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The hydraulic press. (North San Juan, Nev. Co., Cal.) 1858-18??, September 04, 1858, Image 4

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Goodyear’s India Rubber Bat*
cnt.
Commissioner Holt, in the course
of an : “argument which is marked by
more eloquence and broadness of
•opinion than are usually found in offi
cial papers', in favor of extending the
abovkpatent, gives, concerning Good
year’s struggles and inventions, some
particulars of great interest. It ap
pears from these that Goodyear has
devoted about eighteen years of'his
life to the development of the infinite
capabilities of India Rubber, mostly
with a view to the discovery of what
is popularly known as the vulcanizing
process—-that is, the process of hard
ening rubber by means of sulphur and
heat, so that it will not be injuriously
affected ia its manufactured form by
the changes of temperature. The
Commissioner of Patents says :
“Frcm the first moment that the concep
tion entered his mind until his complete suc
cess—embracing a period of from sixteen to
eighteen years—he applied himself unceas
ingly and enthusiastically to its perfection,
and to its introduction into use, in every form
that his fruitful genius could devise. So in
tensely were his faculties concentrated upon
it that he seems to have been incapable of
thought or of action upon any other subject.
He carried continually about his person a
piece of India rubber, and into the ears of all
who would listen be poured incessantly the
story of his experiraehts, and the glowing
language of bis prophecies. He was, accord
ing to the witnesses, completely absorbed by
it, both by day and night, pursuing it with
untiring energy, and with almost superhu
man perseverance. Not only were the pow
ers of his mind and body thus ardently devo
ted to the intention and its introduction into
use, but every dollar he possessed or could
command through the resources of nis ere lit,
or'the influences of friendship, was uncalcu
latingly cast into that seething caldron of ex
periment which was allowed to know no re
pose. The very bed on which his wife slept,
and the linen that covered his table, were
seized and sold to pay his board ; and we see
him, with his stricken household, following
in the funeral of his child on foot, because he
had no means with which to hire a carriage.
His family had to endure privations almost?
surpassing belief, being frequently without
an article of food in their bouse, or fuel in
' the coldest weather; and indeed it is said
’that they could not have lived through the
winter of 1839 but for the kind offices of a
few charitable friends.
They are represented as gathering sticks in
the woods, and on the edges of the highways,
with which to cook their meals and digging
the potatoes of their little garden before they
were half grown, while one of his hungry
•children, in a spirit worthy of bis father, is
heard Expressing his thanks that this much
had been spared to them. We after find him
arrested, and incarcerated in the debtor’s
prison ; but even amid its gloom his vision of
the future never grew dim—his faith in his
-ultimate triumph never faltered.”
Throughout all these severe trials
: and embarrassments, which are par*
alleled by the experience of the
world’s great benefactors in all times,
"Goodyear met with no encouragement
from the public and but little from
his best friends, being regarded, even
by them at times, as visionary if n*t
insane. But he kept right on, with a
bravery that could not be appalled,
-making ono advance after another
'until the discovery of the process
which formed the climax of his inven
tions. This came suddenly, even ac
cidentally, as most results come which
'have long bceifjainfully and earnest
ly sought.
“In one of those animated conversations so
"habitual to him, in reference to his experi
ments, a piece of India rubber combined with
sulphur, which be held in his hand as the
text of alibis discourses, was by a violent
gesture thrown Into a burning stove near
which he was standing. When taken out.af
-ter being subjected to a high degree of heat,
■he saw—what, it may be safely affirmed,
would have escaped the notice of all others—
that a complete transformation had taken
place, and that an entirely new product—
since so felicitously termed ‘clastic metal’—
was the consequence. When subjected to
further tests, the thrilling conviction burst
upon him that success had at length crowned
his efforts, and that the mystery ho had so
long wooed now stood unveiled before him.—
His history in this respect is altogether par
allel with that of the greatest inventors and
discoverers who have preceded him. The
lamp had swung for centuries in the cathe
dral of Pisa,but, of the thronging multitudes
who worshipped there, none had heeded the
lessons which it taught. It was reserved for
the profound and observant intellect of young
Galileo to extract from its oscillations the
true laws of the pendulum, which led to the
creation of an infallible measure of time.—
The theory of universal gravitation loses no
rthing of its grandeur or value because sug
gested by the falling of an apple from the
'tree. In all lands, by teeming millions,this
phenomenon bad been observed, but to none
had it imparted instruction—to none bad it
wpoken of that wonderful secret which lurked
beneath Its simple features. At length its
•still small voice’ fell npon the delicate and
appreciative ear of one whom it startled into
Inquiry. light thus afforded, to whom
-all-had been blind, was indeed dim and twink
ling; but, following its guidance as one who
traces back the dawn, the great Newton soon
plunged into the full-orbed splendors of a
discovery confessedly the most brilliant
which has gilded and ennobled the annals of
science. On all the hearthstones of the civ
ilized world, for thousands of years, the ket
tle had boiled and lifted its lid by the ex
ftasaive power of its steam ; yet for none bad
this seemingly trite and ever-recurring inci
pient been significant~to none had it an
nounced that measureless power of which it
wae the humble but [distinct exponent. At
length the movement caught the eye of a
lonely student of nature, then a prisoner in
Abe tower of London, and in the soil of his
prolific mind it proved the rapidly expanding
germ cf that steam engine whose triumphs
have changed the aooiaT, political and com
mercial aspects of the globe. 80 India rub
ber, in combination with sulphur, may by
accident bare been exposed to the high de
gree of heat often before, without attracting
the attention of any. and it is safe to allege
that it might have been thus exposed a thou
sand times afterwards without the world’s
having been the wiser or wealthier for it.—
The thorough self-culture and training of the
applicant and his unwearied researches, pre
pared him at once to seize upon, to compre
hend, and embody, in a practical form, the
truth he sought, the moment it presented it
self, no matter how dimly to him. This was
bis merit—the same in kind with that of the
most illustrious inventors,who have appeared
in the world, and by that of but few of them
surpassed in degree ”
Singularly enough Goodyear had
previously avoided, as most to be
feared, the very agent, heat, which
he needed, his former combinations of
India rubber and sulphur having meN
ted under it. A greater degree of
heat wasjust what he wanted. Ilis
discovery made, he subsequently per
fected it by the addition of white lead.
The application of his new ‘elastic
metal’ to the thousand useful purpo
ses for' which we now see it employed,
was his next and hardly less laborious
task.' Capitalists and manufacturers
shrunk fearfully from him, and it was
only by proving at immense cost and
many sacrifices the value of his in
ventions that they finally won support
and became a great staple in trade.
But for all this, “at the close of all
his toils and. sacrifices, and of the
humiliations he has been called on to
endure, Ibis public-spirited inventor,
whose life has been worn away in ad
vancing the best interests of mankind,
is found to be still poor, oppressed
with debt, and with the winter of age
creeping upon his shattered constitu
tion.” The receipts from Goodyear’s
various manufactures have of course
been enormous, but so have been bis
expenditures, by reason of the great
cost of establishing an entirely new
branch of industry, and pursuing the
experiments arid making the improve
ments in which he has been constant
ly employed. The patent has been
extedned for seven years frem the
15th June, 1858.
Original Extracts.
The Possible Extinction of
Man. —lt may be, as some one lias
suggested, that'there is not only a
term of life to the individual, but to
the species, and that when the proper
time comes, the prolific energy.’being
exhausted, man is transferred to tho
list of extinct forms. Strange
thought, that the beauteous phenom
ena of personal existence—the
thnll of the lover, tho mother’s smile
on cherub infancy, the brightness of
loving firesides, the aspirations of
generous poets and philosophers, the
thought cast up and beyond the earth
ly, that petard which breaks down
every door—the tears of penitence,
the meekness of the suffering hum-*
ble, the ardor of the strong in good
causes, all that the great and benifi
cient of all ages have felt, all that
each of us now sees, and muses on,
in his home, his people, his age,—-
that all these should be thus resolved;
passing away whole “equinoxes” into
the past, as far as we particular men
are concerned, still passing further
back as respects the larger person
alities called nations, and still further
'inconceivable multiplication with
regard to the species—gone, lost,
hushed in the stillness of a mightier
death than has hitherto been thought
of! But yet tho faith may not be
shaken, that that which has been en
dowed with the power of godlike
thought, and allowed to come into
communion with its Eternal Author,
cannot be truly lost. The vital flame
which proceeded from him at first, re
turning to him in our perfected form at
last, bearing with it all good and love
ly things, and making of all the far
extending Past butone intense Present,
glorious and everlasting.
[Vestiges of Creation.
Morning. - i —Whilst I read the po
ets, I think that nothing new can be
said about morning and evening—
But when I see the day break, fam
not reminded of these Homeric, or
Shakespearian, or Miltonic,or Chauce
rian pictures. No; but I fe6l perhaps
the pain of an alien world: a world not
yet subdued by the thought; or, I am
cheered by the moist, warm, glitter
ing, budding, melodious hour, that
takes down the narrow walls of my
soul,and extends its life and pulsation
to the horizon. That is morning, to
cease for a bright hour to be a priso
ner of this sickly body, and to be
come as large as nature.— Emerson.
Revenge is a kind of wild justice,
which the more man’s nature runs to,
the more ought law to weed it out;
for as for the first wrong, it doth but
offend the law, but the revenge of
that wrong putteth the law out of of
fice. Certainly, in taking revenge, a
man is but even with bis enemy, but
in passing it over, he is superior; for
it is a prince’s part to pardon; and
Solomon, I am sure, saith, “It is the
glory of a man to pass by an offence.”
[Bacon.
Spiritual Independence. —The
sense of spiritual independence is
like the lovely varnish of the dew,'
whereby the old, hard, peaked earth,
and its old self-same productions, are
made new every morning, and shining
with the last touch of the artist’s hand.
A false humility, a complaisance to
reigning s chools, or to the wisdom of
antiquity, must not defraud me of su>
preme possession of this hour. If
any person have less love of liberty,
& less jealousy to guard his integrity,
shall he therefore dictate to you and
me? .Say to such doctors, We are
thankful to you, as we are to history,
to the pyramids, and to the authors;
but now our day .has come; we have
been born out of the eternal silence;
and ndw we will live, —live for Our
selves, —and not as tho i pall-bearers
of a funeral, but as thd upholders and
creators of 6ur age; and neither
Greece nor Rome, nbr the three Kings
of Cologne, nor the college of the
Sorbonne, nor the Edinburgh Review,
is to command any longer. Now
that we are here, we will put our Own
interpretation on things, and our own
things for interpretation. Please
himself with complaisance who will—
for me," things must take my scale,
not I theirs. Twill'say with the war**
like king, “God gave me this crown,
and the whole world shall not take it
away.”—[Emerson.
The Beauty of American Scene-*
RY.— Tho noonday darkness of the
American forest, tho deep, echoing,
aboriginal woods, where the living
columns of the oak and fir tower up
from the ruins of tho trees of the last
millenium; where, from year to year,
tho eagle and tho crow see no intru
der; the pines, bearded with savage
moss, yet touched with grace by the
violets at their feet, the«broad cold
lowland, which forms its coat of vapor
with the stillness of subterranean
crystallization; and where the travel*
ler, amid the repulsive plants that
are all native in the swamp, thinks
with pleasing terror of the distant
town; this beauty,—haggard and des
ert beauty, which the sun and the
moon, the snow and the rain, repaint
and vary, has never been' recorded by
art, yet is not indifferent to any pas
senger. All men are poets, at heart.
Iron Buildings.
Amongst the many inventions
which the present age has produced
for the promotion of human comfort,
one of the most remarkable and ben
eficient is the construction of iron
buildings. This latest triumph of me*
chanical genius owes its ultimate
practical success, though not its ori
gin, to James Bogardus of 'New York,
who undeterred by the ridicule add
chilly indifference which greeted his
first experiments and prbpositions as
they did the inventions of Fulton & Ste
phenson, and no wise discouraged
by the repeated failure of similar ex
periments in England,perfected a plan
for a building of four stories high
which combined perfect strength and
solidity with great architectural beau*
ty. Ten years ago he laid in New
York City the foundation of the first
iron house ever erected in the New
World; and it stands to-day as firm
as ever, a monument of his complete
success, and not 'the only one, for his
native city now contains many to hole
blocks of iron buildings. The pecu
liar advantages of this style Of build
ings are its superior strength, dura
bility beauty and economy.
The most elaborate architectural
designs can be used in the construc
tion of them, and the richest, most
delicate ornaments and carving of
the ancient marble structures, be
faithfully and cheaply reproduced
for their adornment. They can be
rapidly constructed at any season of
the year by workmen of ordinary
capacity, without plumb, square or
level. Every part of the building
being brought to the ground exactly
fitted for its intended position, and
the whole structure Simjdy bolted to
gether, story after story Until it
stands as strong as a solid casting.
It can be taken apart at any time and
re-erected elsewhere Without injury.
Such is the invention Which seems
destined to inaugurate a new era of
iron.
Howling Saloonl
c street, nearly opposite the V. 8. Hoick
MARYSVILLE.
inform* hi* friends on the Ridgo
2fdlnri^h^to re^? WUng Alleyß, °“ ted
best of wines, liquors and cigars.
Marysville, may 28th, 1858. 38tf
HOTELS.
Union Hotel ,
Ml
111 l
Main street, North San Juan
EDWARDS & SWAIN Proprietors.
THE undersigned would respectfully announce to
their friends end the public generally, that they
have fitted up the Union Hotel, and are now prepared tc
accommodate Travelers and Boarders, in a manner that
will not fail to give entire satisfaction.
The traveler may rest assured that he will here fin
Good Rooms and Beds,
and a well supplied
T* A T~n ,T! aiyi BAR,
with such other conveniences as come within the range
of possibility.
THE STABLE
Is large and commodious, and attended by an attentive
Hostler, who will bo in attendance to take charge of
travelers’ animals.
In connection with this House is one qf pie most
commodious Barns in tlie mountains, well provided with
Hay, Barley, Ac.; also designed for Storage.
Stages
Leave this. Hotel Ibply for Sacranunto, MarystOU, For
est City, Vownieville, Ctiernkee, MfUlezuma and Nevada.
ALSO... .
Columbia Hill and Ilura'busr!
UNITED STATES HOTEL.
' Corner C and Tiurd sts.,
MARYSVILLE.
STOKES & SHIELDS, Propt’s.
The Proprietors would respcct
fully inform their friends and the public
* * * * that thev have recently, at great expense
|l»|l|§gg fitted up this new Hotel in a style nnsur-
JBSlSSSl passed by any house in the city, and are
now prepared to accommodate all who may desire good
living, a well vontillated room, or a good bed.
Mr. Stokes is well known as the former proprietor
of “Charley’s Restaurant,” where he was acknowledged
as the best caterer in the city; his reputation is, there
fore, most favorably established. His old friends are
respectfully iuvitea to call at his new house.
TERMS:
Board per Week 00
Board with Lodging......T .'. 10 00
Single Meals 50
Lodging 50
W. C STOK ES.
28 3m A. M. SHIELDS.
National €xd)aug(
No. 34, Broad Street, Nevada.
THE undersigned, late proprietors of the United
States Hotel, having leased Bicknell's Block and
fitted it up throughout, are now prepared to accommo
date permanent and transient Boarders, in a style un
surpassed in the State.
THE TABLE
will at all times be supplied with all the varieties the
market affords.
The Beds and Furniture
are all NEW, and for style and comfort cannot bo ex
celled.
Particular attention will be paid to the accommoda
tion of Ladies and Families.
Having had long experience in the business, we are
confident of being able to make the National one of the
most desirable Hotels in the mountains.
This Block is substantially built of Brick, and
withstood the late disastrous fire—the rooms are airy
and well finished, and from the Balconies you have a
splendid view of the surrounding country.
pg'OPE.XALL
The Bar will be under the supervision of Mr. Thom
as Hbnrt. and will at all times be supplied with the
chu’cest'Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
PEAIhSON A HEALY, Proprietors.
Nevada, April Bth, 1868. 21 3m
‘im .
ORLEANS HOTEL
ORLEANS FLAT.
rpHE Subscribers would re
J. npecffully inform the traveling public that they
still keep that popular Hotel at Orleans Flat, known as
the Orleans Hotel, which they have fitted up in a supe
rior style, and all who may,favor them with a call, may
rest assured that the study nf the Proprietors will be to
make them comfortable while guests in the House.
Their Table
Wili always be furnished with the best that the market
afford g, and ■ -..
The Bar *
will at times he supplied with such articles as will
satisfy the most particular.
4 BUCHANAN & LAWRENCE.
STAB BAKERY.
BY
A. P. LANNE&& PRO.
THE Subscribers Having abandoned the
Boarding department of their establishment, will
hereafter devote their entire attention to the Bakery and
Bar. The patronage of the public is solicited.
The Bar
will be furnished with the choicest Wines and Liquors
in the market.
The Bakery
Is in charge of a competent Baker, and will furnish
fresh Bread, cakes and pies of all kinds every day.
Bails and Parties
” *]* b® burnished at short notice, in a superior manner,
and at low prices.
It is the intebtion of the proprietors to keep a choice
and complete assortment, fresh from the oven, at all
times.
North San Juan, Apr. 23, 1858. 11 my
Lumber , Lumber!
THE undersigned take this opportunity to inform
the public that they have recently purchased of
& Sawyer, their new and splendid steam saw
mill, situated at Central H&nch, near San Juan, where
they are now prepared to furnish on the shortest notice
Sluice and Building Lumber,
and Blocks of all kinds.
All Orders satisfactorily filled and.promptlv delivered
J. F. CLARK,
Henry wonsey,
„ .1. B. JOHNSON.
Central Ranch, April Bth, 1858. 21 tf
•HTTEJVTIOJW
FAMILIES, HOTELS,
Restaurants & Traders
tA&E NOTICE.
J have determined to close out my entire stock of
Crockery and Glassware
Within the hext sixty days, and will se l
AT COST!
It consists In part of
Stone China plates, cups and saucers, dishes;
Bakers, chambers, pitchers, ewers and basins;
Sugars, butters, bowls, Ac., Ac.;
French and china dinner and tea sets;
Platen cups and saucers, dishes, Ac.;
Gold band china tea sets, cups and saucers.
Plates, dishes, bakers, bowls, Ac.;
Mould and jut tumblers, goblets, salts, dishes,
Nappies; bowls on foot, pitchers, decanters,
Bitter bottles, bar sugars, celeries, sugars,
Butters, lamps, etc.:
. . Alsot
A large iuis irtment of Brittania ware, lamps, mirrors,
and every article tisdally found in a well kept crockery
store. ...
HOW 18 THE TIME,
As thestock must be sold, and an opportunity is offered
that is rarely met with, to famish your Tabled hand
somely at Importation cost.
A. P. FLINT,
106 First street, between D and High, next door but
one to Brumagim and co., Marysville. [aug 14 Im]
DRIED REPP of a superior quality just re
ceived by PECK A COLEY.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
San Juan Drug Store!
b. p.Tyery,
Druggist & Apothecary
Main street, nearly opposite the Post Office,
' North San Tuan.
Has on hand a large and ge d stock of Drugs,
Chemicals, Patent Medicines, Perfumery, Toilet
and Fancy Articles.
ALSO
White Lead, Paint Stuffs, Linseed Oil. Lamp. Machine,
Neats foot, Tanner's, Olive and castor Oils,
Turpentine, Varnishes, Alcohol,
Camphtne,
Glue, putty, window glass, brushes of every description.
The particular attention of families is called to my su
perior
Assorted Spices,
Flavoring Extracts, Essences; Tapioca, Vcrmncelli,
Maccafoni, sage, pearl barley, arrowroot, farriua,
Starch, oatmeal, fresh hops,cu)inaiy herbs,
Tamarinds, Paleeratua, pure cream tartar,
Super carbonate soda, washing soda, dye-stuffs,
Indigo, Ihjuid blueing.
Select Wines and Liquors,
for medical use.
Grardon Seeds,
by the pound or small package. Seed peas, beans and
corn; clover, grass, flower and bird seeds; Onion
sets in their season.
The subscriber is always at home, and will give his
personal attention to the preparation of PHYSICIANS’
PRESCRIPTION'S, and Family Medicines.
Nov. 14 th, 1857. [1 3m*]
SAMOS
saparj^
<
Cl
/.IV
S3®
m
S
N^W-YORK^
THE VERY BEST REMEDY
FOR PURIFYING THE BLOOD,
And for the Cure of
SCROFULA,
FEVER SOKES,
SALT RHEUM,
RHEUMATISM,
PIMPLES, BILES,
STUBBORN ULCERS,
LIVER COMPLAINT,
MERCURIAL DISEASES,
CUTANEOUS ERUPTIONS,.
GENERAL DEBILITY, &0.
AS A
A XD
GENERAL TOXIC FOR THE SYSTEM,
IT IS t’NRIVALLED.
It has long been a most Important desideratum In
the practice of medicine, to obtain a remedy similar
to this, and accordingly we find it resorted to almost
universally in oases of Scrofula, Liver Diseases, Salt
Rheum, General Prostration of the Vital Powers, and
all those tormenting diseases of the skin so trying to
the patience and injurious to the health. Although
possessed of powerful healing properties, it is entirely
harmless, aud will not injure the most
DELICATE CONSTITUTION.
When in perfect health, no effect is produced by Us
use, except an increase of appetite; but when disease
Is seated in the frame, and carrying fast Its victim
along the path of life, then Its mysterious influence
is felt and seen; it enkindles new life and vigor, and
brings health and strength to the suffering and dis-
SCROFULOUS SORE EYES.
The following Important testimony is from South
Kingston, R. I. In this case the Sarsaparilla was
recommended by the family Physician.
Messrs. Sands; —Gentlemen, —My little daughter,
when one year old, was attacked with a scrofulous
humor on her face, which soon after extended into
her eyes, causing almost total blindness in one of
them, and disfiguring her whole face. I employed
two physicians to attend her, who exhausted their
utmost skill to give her relief, but it all proved use
less, and finally one of theuvj-ernarked to me that ho
had known of some striking cures effected by Sands’
Sarsaparilla, and advised me to try it, I obtained one
bottle, which she commenced using, and before it was
all used np it had effected an entire cure. It is now
over four years since she was cured, and there has
been no reappearance of the disease, and we are
satisfied that it is a perfect cure.
Respectfully yours,
GEORGE ROBINSON.
Prepared and sold by A. B. «fc D. BANDS,
Wholesale Druggists, 100 Fulton-street corner of
William, New 1 ork.
For sale by DEWITT, KITTLE Jc Co., H. JOHN
SON <t Co..and KLDINGTON & Co., San Francisco;
RICE & COFFIN, Marysville; R. H. McDONALD
& Co. Sacramento; and by Druggists generally.
For sale by IJ. P. Avert.
CHAIRS, Bedsteads, Bedding; &c.,
[1 tf ] For sale by PECK & GOLEV.
o
REGON and CALIFORNIA HAMS
and Bacon, at 26 PECK & COLEYS.
LADIES SHOES.
A CHOICE lot of Ladies gaiters, slippers, and
shoes, for stile by A. SPERLING.
DECLARATION,
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, (
County of Nevada. \ 83 •
I, SARAH A. SMITH, residing at Cherokee
5 1U W? county of Nevada, and State of California,
wife of Thomas G. Smith of Cherokee aforesaid, desirous
of availing myself of the benefits of sn Act entitled ‘An
Act to authorize married women to tarusact business
in their own names as sole traders,” passed April 12th
1852, do hereby declare that I intend to carry on the
business of mining and trading in mining claims,, ran
ching and buying and selling stock.
And from and after the date hereof, I will be indivi
dually responsible in roy own name for all debts con
tracted by me on account of said business and that the
amount invested in the same is less than five thousand
dollars.
Witness my hand this 14th day of August, a. d. 1858.
her
SARAH X A. SMITH.
. mark.
In presence of J. B. Johnson.
State of California, County of Nevada, J ss.
On niis 14th day of Augu-t, A. D. 1868, before me
personally came Sarah A. Smith, to me known to be the
individual described and who executed the within dec
laration, and acknowledged that she executed the some
and being informed of the contents thereof, she ac
knowledged on a private examination by me made
apart from her h usband, that she executed the forego
ing declaration freely and without any fear or compul
sion of him, and that she docs not wish to retract the
same. J. B. JOHNSON, J. P.
North San Juan, Aug. 21, 1858. [1 3t]
Mining Claims for Sale.
OWE undivided third interest in the “LAST
Claims, situated on Manzanita
Hill adjoining the Manzanita and Kentucky Claims; to
gether with Tunnels, sluices, Ac. belonging thereto,
Sweetiand, Aug. 5,1858. 8 T. CURTIS.
Family Sewing Machines
A SIiPPI V Wkh, .....
A SUPPLY of Wheeler A Wilson
superior Sewing Machines kept on hand at t
subscriber s residence in Nevada, at the manufacture
prices and freight.
Machines set up and instructions given in any pa
of the county without extra charge by applying in ™
son or by letter to MILO UOADLEY.
Nevada, August 4.1808. 38
PRINTING, AGENCIES &C.
HYDRAULIC (KISS
BOOK AND JOB
A
OFFICE,
Nortl) San Juan.
The Proprietors of this Establishment
have an excellent assortment of
\
® "'Q \S 'l%
AND ARE PREPARED TO DO
PLAIN
AND
seisms ax
WORK,
such as :
HAjXD-BILLS, B V L. 9 WS.
POSTERS . RECEIPTS .
PR O G EAMMES, CER TIFICA TE S
BILL HEADS, CIRCULARS,
LABELS, IJ\ VJTATIOJVS,
PAMPHLETS, CARDS,
And everything port;lining to the Printing Business in
the very best style, and at the
LOWEST PRICES!
:-0-:
PRINTING
. IN
Gold, Silver and Copper Bronzes
AND
COLORED INKS!
Executed in an elegant style.
We guarantee ,
Entire Satisfaction to All!
I N 15 PAH 11,
Execution jxiicl Prices,
Defy Competitionl
Challenge Comparison.
A 3103 RANDAL H. LASSITKR
, RMD iL & CO.,
General JSews Acre ills,
D HALERS in California -Atlantic ami European
Newspapers and Magazines. Blank Iknjkst Suthyj
erv, latter Sheets and Cheap Publications. 61, 1>
street, MARYSVILLE, Sole Agents in Marysville fot
the San Francisco and Sacramento Daily, Weekly and
Steamer Newsi aj<et<j, Also,
Agent for Aortln San Juan Star,
North Californian, Sierra Citizen, Democrat, Mountain
Messenger, Plumas Argus, Tehama -Advocate, Ac.—
übsoriptic ns and Advertisements taken at uffiee rates.
On the arrival of every steamer from the Ivrst we.aTo
in receipt of a full assortment of the leading Fordtu
and American Newspapers and Magazines, and on life
Departure of each Steamer we have for sale a variety of
the California Steamer Papers, Pictorials and Magazines
'KSU Any article in our lino not to Is? found in this
market will he ordered from San Francisco or New
lork, if desired. RANDAL A CO,
Cl, Dstrcet, opposite the Theater.
i:
L. P. FISHER’S
SDVER.TIZIJVG AGE.Vc'v
SAN FRANCISCO.
O. 171J 2 Washington street, up stairs, nearly op
N!
. _ posite Magnvrc's.Opera House.
L. P. Fisher is the authorized Agent of the
North Sas Juan Star,
Marysville Herald;
Sacramento Union,
San Joaquin Rcpu'ilicnn, Stockton,
I’acific Methodist, Ssocktou,
Sonora Herald,
Nevada Journal,
Grans Valley Telegraph,
Red Bluff Beacon;
Cohim’na Gazette;
Tuolumne Courier;
Mountain Democrat. Placrrville ;
Empire County Argus, “
Sknsta Cjurie.r;
Mariposa Gazette;
I'rrka Weekly Union;
Folsom Di-patch;
Trimly Journal, WearerviHc;
Weekly Ledger, Jackson;
Calaveras Chronicle; Mokelumnc 2fill;
Sonoma County Jonro-U;
California Mining Journal;
Ins Angeles Star;
Santa Barbara Gazette;
Sim Diego Herald;
Alameda County Gazelle; '
Placer Oturier, Yankee Jim't;
Napa County Reporter;
H Sierra Democrat, Downievilh;
Humboldt -Times, Union;
Oregonian. Portland, O. T. • >
‘ Oregon Weekly Times Portland, 0. 1.
Oregon Statesman. Salem, O. T.
Pacific Christian Advocate, Salem; 0. T.
Jacksonville ll eruld, Jackson, O. T.;
Pioneer and Democrat, Olympia. W.
• Washington Republican, Steilacoom, IP. T.
Polynesian, Honolulu, S. I.;
Pacific (hmmercial Advertizer, Honolulu, S. T.;
Mexican Extraordinary, City of Mexico;
Hongkong Register.
Adveitizing in the Atlantic States.,.
L. P. F. has now completed his arrangements for th e
forwarding of advertisements to all the principal larges t
circulating Journals and Newspapers published in the
Atlantic States.
A fine opportunity is hero offered to those who.wieh
to advertize in any part of the Union, of doing so at the
lowest rates, and in a prompt and satisfactory manner
AND PAPER HANGING.
J. Carpenter
IS prepared to receive and promptly exectite all work
in his line, in the best style of the art. Such as
House or Sign Painting,
Graining, Gilding, Glazing, or Lining and Paper Hang
ing. My motto is,
“Live and Let Live ! ”
Work as good as the best! Prices to suit the Times'
Shop on Main st. opposite Thomas' Stable.
North San Juan, Nov. 16, 1837. [1 tf ]
RANCH
And Tavern Stand for Sale.
I|IHE Well known Kentucky Home
K and Farm is hereby offered for sale at a good bar
bbi n. It is situated about one mile oast cf French
Corral, Nevada county, at the junction of tbereads lad
ing from Sacramento to Marysville, to North San Joan.
Camptonville, Forest City and Downieville, with one
leading to Cherokee, Moore’s Flat, Orleans Fiat and Ku
** . ?* z**® farm consists of over 3,000 acres, enclosed
with a fence, and making the best ,
STOCK RANCH
in the country. Thirty acres are in a good state of
cultivation. On the Farm is a good Two-story HOUSE
with a new and substantial stable, 100 feet long by 32
wide; together with numerous outbuildings, and good
water privileges. Any person wishing to purchase the
best mountain Ranch in California, will do well to ex
amine the premises. It will be sold at a fair price,
ror particulars 4c., apply to
EDWARD ALLISON,
Kentucky House.

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