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The hydraulic press. (North San Juan, Nev. Co., Cal.) 1858-18??, October 09, 1858, Image 1

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VOLUME I.
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS,
Is Published every Saturday,
Bv AVERY & WATERS.
& P, AVYEV, „..TH. W. VTATIES.
Worth San Juan, ITevada Co., Cal
Terms.
#/M Ttar...~ •* 00
Hi* Montht...~ t. 3 OO
thru Month* * 00
•Single Copie*
«9>AIl paper* will be stopped at the end of the term
T)ald, unless renewed by tbe subscriber.
Advortising.
One square of twelve lines, one insertion $3 00
Xsch subsequent insertion 1 SO
▲ liberal deduction made to regular monthly and quar
terly advertisers. Advertisements may be changed
'Once a month without extra charge.
49*A1l advertising must be paid for in Advance.
Jol> Printing.
We have in connection with the Newspaper, a Job
O Ace, complete in all its departments, and capable of
executing every description of Job Work with neatness
accuracy ami dispatch, upon the most reasonable terms.
WORK DELIVERED USTIL PAID FOR
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
nSTiTFARQui[arT~
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, BRIDGEPORT
Township. Office, next door to Weiss’ Billiard Sa
loon, Main street, Ban Juan. 1 t!
J. B. JOHNSON,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, OFFICE. IN
Judge stidgcr’u Law Office, Main street, North
San J a am.. Itf
O. P. STIDGER,
Attorney at law. notary public
and Conveyancer. Office on the north side of Main
street, one door west of Seawoll & Son's store, opposite
the Pioneer, NORTH SAX JUAN.
, Nov. 13, 1837. Hm
Win. F. ANDERSON,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
•Orncs...lu Alban’s Brick Building, corner of Broad and
Pine streets, Nevada. 1213rn
■■MKT MEREDITH THOMAS P. HAWLET
MEREDITH & HAWLEY,
Attorneys at Law,
NEVADA CITY, CAL. 15 3m
W. TAUT .DAVID BSLDEX.
* BELDEY & YAYT,
ATTORNEYS AT LA TV,
{Particular attention given to procuring IT. S.Land War
rants for persons by Military service entitled to
the same.
<©»nca...No. 4, second story of Alban's Brick Building,
Corner Broad and Pine streets. NEVADA. 21
atamox kicksir,...._ c. wilso.v hill _
BUCKYCII & HILL,
ffAVIMC associateil themselves togettier in the
B m practice of the Law, will attend promptly to all
business confided to their care in Nevada and adjoining
■Counties.
Ornca —ln Kelsey’s Brick Building, Commercial
street, Nevada.
. April 8, 1858. 213 m
a. a. m'coxxell, a.c. hues.
McCOYXELL & YILES,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law,
Will practice in all the Courts of the 14th Judicial Dis
trict, and in the Supreme Court.
Ornca —Kidd’s Brick Building, up stairs. 21 3m
B. S. OLDS, M. !>.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON—OFFICE,
at Moore's Hotel, Moore’s Flat. 4tf
BUSINESS CARDS.
ATTEYTIOY, EVERYBODY!
barneFleyison
Has Just received from below a choice stock of
Cigars and Tobacco,
Which he ia prepared to dispose of at wholesale or retail
at very low rates.
Pipes, Tobacco and Snuff Boxes,
And FANCY GOODS in an endless variety.
Confectionery, Fruits &c.
Received weekly, and sold cheap for the oro.
CHEAP PUBLICATIONS, 1
Beautiful Pribts, Playing Cards, Stationery, Ac., ic.
CUTLERY.
■ The keenest kind konstantly kept on sale for kash.
Store oaa Main street, next to Post Office
my2l
, f J. W. SULLIVAN’S
GREAT PACIFIC EMPORIUM,
AND
General Agency of Periodical Literature,
AND SOLE AGENT FOE
“THE CALIFORNIA TRUE DELTA”
Boston Journal, Missouri Republican, On
cinnatti Commercial, N. T. Courier ties Etats Unis,
Jfew York Herald, Tribune and Tima.
Ac., Ac., Ac.
Washington stbkt, next to the post office,
San Fr aneit to.
JEWELLERS.
JEWELRY.
ik
MR. VANDBKLOOY,
SH A VINO assumed the proprietorship of the estab
lishment of Mr. Schwartz, respectfully informs
public and his old friends that he is prepared to
Msum Hectare Jewelry,
of all descriptions in the neatest and best possible man
ner, at short notice.
Mr. V. has long had the reputation of being a com
pere nt and faithful Watchmaker, and will give good
satMaction in all kinds of
Watch and Clock Repairing,
and warrants all his work, -
«na warran hfm a trial -®*
streat, opposite C. Scbardin’s. - 29tf
CHARLESW. YOUNG. ~
MAH UP ACT UREA OF
CMifomlA’ J ©welry 5
ik
W A T* C HMAK.ER,
And Dealer in •••
■JTIme Wtteliei) JFewelry, Diamond-
Work, Ac.
Junction of Main and Commercial streets,
YE V AD A.
Vtrada, April 91b, 1816. » *9
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS.
SALOONS & LIQUOR STORES.
BILLIARDS, 25 CTS. A GAME!
San Juan Exchange
C. SCHARDIN & CO.,
HAVING 'purchased the Interest of
John Woods in the above San Juan £xchange,imd
made large additions and improvements, the Saloon
now compares favorably with any in the Mountain!.
Tbrce Billiard Tables,
In first-rate order—two of them new’M arble Beds
and equal to any in the State. The wood bed ia the fa
vorite of the place.
It is the intention of the proprietor to use every exer
tion to make the Exchange the favorite resort of all
seekers of healthy pleasurable exercise.
. THE BAR
will be furnished with the very best
WISES A\D LIQUORS
To be had in the San Francisco Market, and no pains
will be spared to make everything pleasant and attrac
tive. 10
Largest Stock in the Mountains.
Pioneer Liquor Store.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
OPPOSITE FRANK SMITH’S TIN SHOP, MAIN STREET.
THE subscriber having refitted and refurnished
the above store, is now prepared With a large and
complete stock of
Wines, Litfuors, Ale and Porter
of theuest quality, and at as
Low Prices, Wholesale or Retail, as they can he bought
below, both in Quantity and Quality.
All orders promptly attended to, and Goods de
livered free of charge.
CALIFORNIA WINE ,
OREGON CIDER ,
and a variety of choice beverages, always on hand And
for sale by the case, bottle or glass.
The Pioneer Liquor Store is one of the oldest estab
lishments of the kind in this vicinity, and the proprie
tor expects by close attention to business, to create for
it an increased popularity. D. KRAFT.
North San Juan, April 2d, 1858. 20mytf
IFine Old Brandies
C. E. HELFRICH,
Soda Water Manufacturer,
DEALER IN FINE BRANDIES,
rtTjiMines, Ale, Porter Ac.
SoHLI Brandies, of the following brands:
Old Sazerac, Otard, Jules, Robin A Co., United Tine
yards, Martel le, Champaigne, Otard, Ac., Ac.
Philadelphia and Holland Gin,
Old Tom, Santa Cruz and Jamaica Rum, Monongahela,
Bourbon, Irish and Scotch Whiskey:
Ilei.lsick, Schrcider and Morizettc Champaigne;
Port, Sherry, Ginger, Hock, Sauterne Claret Wines.
Assorted Case Liquors,
and SYRUPS.
His extensive stock is now complete in every depart
ment, and will be offered at the most
Reasonable Prices.
San Juan North, Nov. 17, 1857. [1 3m]
C. SCHARDIN & CO.,
Wholesale and detail Dealers in
Wines, Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco.
Also— a general assortment of
FRESH AND DRIED FRUITS,
And Confectionery.
This cool and delicious beverage is kept on hand du
ring the summer montns.
SOUTH SIDE OF MA N STREET.
Xorth San Juan, Xov. 17, 1857. . [1 tf ]
B o oks:
BOOKS FOR THE MILLION.
J. E. HAMLIN,
No. S 3 Broad street, corner Pine,
NEVADA.
Has just received the largest and best as
sorted stock of
Books and Stationery,
Musical Instruments,
CUTLERY. GOLD PENS, FANCY GOODS,TOYS
Ac., *
ever brought to the city of Nevada, which will bo sold at
Wholesale and Retail
Cheaper than the Cheapest!
My stock consists in part of a good assortment of Law
Medical, Historical, Poetical, Miscellaneous, Masonic
Works, Catholic Piety, and School Books of every vari
ety.
Any quantity cf
Christmas Presents, Valentines, Ac., for the Holidays.
New and improved Diaries, and Daily Journals, for
1858. A variety of sizes for the pocket and Counting
Boom.
CHEAP PUBLICATIONS.
A circulating Library of 1,000 volumes, new, and iu
good order, and I am constantly receiving the latest
and most desirable works published, direct from New
York and Philadelphia. Magazines, Periodicals, News
papers, Ac from all parts of the Globe.
Steamer papers and California Weeklies, neatly put
up for mailing—Postage Free.
It is useless for me to try to enumerate the endless
variety of everything. And I will say I have as good
an assortment as can be found this ride of San Francis
co.
Persons wishing anything in my line of business will
save money by calling on me before purchasing else
where.
Our Motto Is We Strive to Please.
21 3m J. E. HAMLIN.
GALVANIZED IRON HOSE.
THE subscriber is now prepared to manufacture
Galvanized Iron Hose, for miners’ use, of superior
quality and manufacture, at,the lowest rates. He has
a quantity of Iron and Bands on hand, and can fill or
ders at short notice. Call, or send orders to the Tin A
Hardware store, Main street. F. SMITH.
North San Juan, March 5, ’5B. 16tf
To Miners.
WE are prepared furnish any articles not usual
ly kept in the stores in this place at T W.O
DATS NOTICE ; such as Anvils, Blocks, Ropes,
Pulleys, Hose, and every article wanted.
PECK A COLEY
JUST RECEIVED—A LARGE LOT OF
POWDER, 3 PECK A COLEY.
V"
AIRS] Bedsteads, Bedding Ac,] .
[1 tf ] For tale by PECK A COLEY.
A MEW LOT nT HARD WARE, Ac.
•/■LToOreceived. l«t , F. SMITH.
Oregon and California hams
and Bacon, at JB PACK A OOUY-s
NORTH SAN JUAN, NEVADA CO., CAL., SATURDAY, OCT. 9. 1858.
The Character of a Happy Life.
How happy is he born and taught,
That serveth not another’s will ;
Whose armour is his honest thought,
And simple truth his utmost sxill!
Whose passions not his masters are,
Whose soul is still prepared for death,
Untied unto the worldly care
Of public fame, or private breath;
Who envies none that chance doth raise,
Or vice; who never understood
How deepest wounds are given by praise;
Nor rules of state, but rules of good.
Who hath his life from rumours freed,
Whose conscience is his strong retreat;
Whose state can neither flatterers feed,
Nor ruin maxe oppressors great;
Who God doth late and early pray,
More of His grace than gifts to lend;
And entertains the harmless day
With a religious booKor friend;
This man is freed from servile bands
Of hope to rise or fear to fall;
Lord of himself, though not of lands;
And having nothing, yet hath all.
Sir Henry Wctton.
[ Original.]
LOG CABIN INKLINGS.
No. VIII.
In August, 1849, we—there were
four of us—left San Francisco Bay
on board oflhe little schooner Empire,
bound for Sacramento and the mines.
We had been idling a little and boat
ing a little about the bay since the
Bth of July, waiting for a report from
one of our party who had gone up
the river as a pioneer to get intelli**
gence for our mutual advantage. We
hardly believed yet that the mines
were not a cheat; we could not real
ize that gold might bs had for the
picking up. Day after day wo had
rambled over the drifting sand hills
of Yerba Buena, wondered at its
tents of trade, and stood amazed in
those hot canvas houses where money
was carelessly exposed in tempting
heaps upon tbe monte tables, - and
men were bartering their integrity—
so soon!—for the gambler’s chance
of fortune. Everywhere wealth was
abundant,.and signs of “Se Compra
Oro aqui,’’ informed the passenger
where he might behold substantial
proofs of the golden discovery whose
mere rumor had brought him so far.
Still there was a toublesomo sense of
uncertainty remaining that we were
anxious to dissipate, no matter how.
The report came at last—favorable;
indeed, glowingly so; and we were
soon on our way to the real Dorado.
What a rich, eloquent sound there
was in those days to the word Sac
ramento ! (albeit some of us who
were vain of a little bad Spanish per
sisted in calling the first town on the
river by the name of Nueva Helvetia.')
It was gloriously promising, foreign,
and golden. Visions of Castillian
steams and antique towns came across
my mind whenever I thought of it.
Gorgeous pictures of tropical scenery,
too, and of golden lands, and roving
companies of those enthusiastic for
tune-seekers whose researches in the
sixteenth century led to the ultimate
discovery not destined to be theirs.
Well, tbe river in those days was
bordered by most luxuriant banks.
Rank under-brush grew beneath tall
oaks and taller sycamores, and pen
dant masses of grape-vine foliage
clung to every tree, making a green
wall on each side of the clear, tranquil
stream. Occasionally this thick mass
of vegetation would open and reveal
glimpses of wide prairie glowing in
all the colors of summer bloom and
bounded by the faint blue outlines of
distant mountains. Closing up again,
a bend in the shore would bide tbe
course of the stream either way, and
seem to enclose us as in a little lake.
Night came upon us in one of these
delicious spots. Can I ever forget
the picture of twilight hues changing
and blending and darkening into star
ry night over that lovely scene ! Oar
little schooner was secured to the
trunk of a lofty sycamore, whose
wide-spread branches thrust them
selves through her rigging, and flung
a leafy shelter over her peopled deck.
The slender hall and graceful spars
of the craft were mirrowed motionless
below us. The stars gazed upon their
own purity in the water as they have
done through countless ages ; and all
the loveliness of earth and heaven
was pictured in tbe liquid element.
All night we lay there, from early
eye till “.breezy morn,” drinking into
the influence of a scene
loveliness few of os had ever
seen equalled. Occasionally the pro
found stillness was broken by the
doloronS\hoot of an owl or the plaint
of some lonely dove; which only made
the succeeding silence more impress
ively felt. What matter if the mos
quitos, in unseen myriads, fell upon
us like an Egyptian plague and forced
us to involuntary vigils ? Who wish
ed to sleep at such a time, in such a
place! A few lay stretched upon
the deck, rolled up in thick smother
ing blankets; but something worse
than the stings of conscience made
their thoughts waking ones. At last,
morn dawned upon us—and such a
morn ! The very reverse of the pro
cess by which the preceding day had
deepened into night; for night seem
ed to grow amorous of the beauty she
had killed, and the magic of her dewy
tears worked a miracle in the east.
Day faintly opened his eyes upon the
sable mourner, commencing, with the
same wan smile which had played over
his dying moments, to live again;
and growing stronger and stronger,
and brighter and brighter, and rising
still further into the embrace of night,
until she fled like a blushing bride
before his lusty approaches. Then
the Memnon strain burst from every
feathered chorister; the trees rustled
their viny trailing robes and clapped
their leafy hands, the Sacramento
rippled musically past our advancing
vessel, and all was joy, and hope, and
inspiration. Just before us, after some
hours, a few dozen naked masts rose
amongst the trees, and white tents
began to gleam as though an army
were there, and the hum of human
life to sound, and—we were fast an
chored to an oak in front of Sacra
mento !
How hot the deep dust in the
streets of the Canvas City!—how
crowded!—how busy ! —how strange!
But we are very tired and sleepy
now : “ Let us go down to that big
sycamore, boys, and pitch our tent —
not so large as yonder round one
with its streamer fluttering—and take
some coffee, and try to sleep before
we look around.” It is all done, but
slumber will not visit my lids, for my
mind is full of last night’s beauty,[my
heart of clinging remembrances ; and
I pencil these lines, which express
little more than my inability to ex
press myself. Will any friend ever
read them ? Shall I ever again meet
a friend ? Much I fear me, that my
feet may pause forever in their pil
grimage, ere they reach the paths
they trod in youth. These selfish
musings and crude thoughts would
then fall into strange bauds. Strange
minds, that lack the key of sympathy,
will fail to reach the secret of my life
—will fail to know me —and impa
tiently consign these rough sketches
to destruction. Well, if they do
there will be nothing lost. The
thoughts will bo as well bestowed as
the thinker.
** *«««***
The dark, bcspang’ed robe of night
Around her form is furled,
And slowly, like a queen, she glides
Towards the western world.
The prophet-star that speaks of day.
Contracts his sphere of light.
And streaks of cloud, that erst were dark,
Are rosy-hued and bright.
Till now, uprising from the wooers,
The red sun darts a gleam
Of early splendor through the sky,
And mirrors in the stream
A lengthened image of his faco
Between the fringed banks,
Which kis* their shadows as they dip
Their long, green, rounding ranks
Into the liquid blue that lies
Deeper than all below,
Adding completion to the view
Revealed by morning’s glow.
Soft from the skies a thousand hues
In dreamy haze descend,
And as they vary or unite
Divine enchantment lend.
Dissolving colors float around,
Delicious odors fill
The tinted air with sweets that wake
A gushing, mellow thrill
Of music exquisite—the voice
Of praise and wild delight—
From every bird that sang the sun
To rest the previous night.
Oh, tranquil mom I oh, heav'nly scene!
What spirit here presides,
That seems attendant on the queen
Of loveliness, and glides—
With such a sweet, sad influence,
Like music’s distant strain—
Into my soul, and speaks of joys
I never may regain!
Strange, that the beauties ye unfold
A tinge of grief should cast
O’er all my thoughts, and mar delight
With mem’ries of the past
The water ripples merrily,
Birds sing, the earth looks glad
And breathes an incense up to heav'n—
While man alone is sad.
Yet still, your melancholy spell
Continue o’er my soul.
And let regret for what is past
My present e’er control;
For l>eauty nevi r wakes a thought
Of sorrow in the mind
That does not leave her spirit there—
Sweet, innocent, refined.
Crashaw, an old English poet,has
the following lines which apply to the
Atlantic Cable quite as appropriately
as any of the so-called scriptural
prophecies:
“Relow tbe bottom of the great abyss,
Thera, where one centre raooneiles ail things,
The world's profound heart pants.”
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS
Improvidence and Tanity of
Genius.
The autobiography of poor Hay
don, the English painter, who termi
nated with his own hand a life of dis
appointment', affords two lessons that
are very often disregarded by men
of genius. One lesson is given in
words by himself;
“ Too proud to do small, modest things
that I might obtain fair means of existence
as I proceeded with my great work, I thought
it no degradation to borrow, to risk the in
sult of a refusal, and to be bated down like
the meanest dealer. * * * To be strictly
correct you should do nothing, however nec
essary, which your income does not warrant
you in doing.”
In another place he says ;
“ Let no man use evil as a means of suc
cess in any scheme however grand.”
If this lesson had been regarded,
how many a bright light, untimely
quenched by poverty, neglect, and
sorrow, had shone on with increased
effulgence through the natural allot
ted term ! The annals of literature
and art would not then have been
saddened by so many melancholy ex-’
hibiti6ns of weakness, criminality,
suffering, and despair. Otway might
have written more tragedies, Gold
smith been as much respected as his
works are admired, Scott not crushed
to earth by the burden of debt, and
Lamartine not now a public suppliant
for pecuniary aid. Hayden himself
would have achieved remunerative
fame, and saved his family the pain
and horror of his tragic suicide.
The sturdy independence, uncom
plaining, persevering industry and
self-denying morality of Dr. Johnson
are worth more to men than even his
writings, and they gave him not only
success, but the excusable triumph of
proudly refusing proffered assistance.
They are more valuable than the
most brilliant reputation when that is
sullied by intemperance and humilia
ting abnegation of manly dignity.
How strange it seems to unaspiring
poverty, to whom a tithe of the pecu
niary reward which often falls to the
lot of genius would be sufficient
wealth, that genius should be dissat
isified, complaining, and indigent.
As we read of the sums received by
a Byron, a Scott, and a Lamartine
for their literary productions, we
wonder that they could ever sacrifice
the substantial delights of indepen
dence for the temporary joy which
springs from munificence and is in
variably followed by pressing want.
The other lesson taught by Hay
don’s life, though not presented by
himself in special words, may be sta
ted thus: We should not place too
high an estimate upon our own abil
ities, for the world generally under
values a man who overvalues himself.
This may be considered a truism that
needs no comments to enforce it, al
though it will bear an illustration.
Hear Southey speak of Madoc :
“ Unquestionably the poem will stand
and flourish. lam perfectly satisfied
with the execution—now eight months
after its publication, in my cool judg
ment. William Taylor has said it is
the best English poem that has left
the press since Paradise Lost; —in-
deed, this is not exagerated praise ,
for unfortunately there is no competi
tion.” (!) Shades of Byron and of
Wordsworth ! Again, hear what he
says of Keham A : “ Every genera
tion will afford me some half dozen
admirers of it; and the everlasting
column of Dante’s fame does not stand
upon a wider base.” He thinks that
there is fair ground of comparison
for himself with Tasso, Virgil, and
Homer! This is Alp upon Alp with
a vengeance ! We do not pretend
to offer an opinion ourselves upon the
subject, since the reading world has
saved us that trouble, —and really it
does not appear to side with either
William Taylor or Robert Southey !
Still, in spite of this glaring in
stance of literary vanity, on the part
of a man, too, who was justly noted
for amiable modesty and ready ac
knowledgment of talent in others,
we do not believe that literary men
are the vainest of mortals. The as
sertion that they are is often made,
bat has not been irrefutably proven.
NUMBER 8.
Vanity and self-conceit are pretty
large ingredients in the composition
of all men, and if they are less con
spicuously displayed by the humble
than by the superior, it is simply be
cause the humble are not such dis
tinguished marks for criticism. A
speck of impurity is visible on the
white down of the swan, when it
might spread all over the ebon plumes
of the scavenger crow without detec
tion. How common it is to see men
vainer of their good looks or their
garments, which are mere accidents
of birth or fortune, than genius is of
a fine poem or painting. Your weal*
thy noodle may make ostentatious
display of his jewelry, of bis houses,
of his horses, and wither rough-clad
poverty out of his way with a frown
of haughtiness, nor meet reproach;
but let a miserable man of brains,
whose ideas and exquisite faculty of
expression are his only possession*,
exult over a beautiful thought felicit
ously worded, and the laughing world
reproaches him with vanity ! True,
be should “ give God thanks and
make no boast of it,” as simple Dog
berry advises ; but then he is too
much like the rest of mankind to
practice such silent humility. Better
would it be if those who warm the
dull clay of humanity with fire from
heaven should shout no praises of
the act, but let the deed, as it will
surely do, alone proclaim itself. Ge
nius, while it subsists upon applause,
should let it descend unsought, as
manna came to the children of Israel;
and like “ the statue which enchants
the world,” perform its mission voice
less of itself, letting its silence fall
“ like music on the heart.”
• Hi as Muck-a-muck. —ln a treaty
between the United States and the
Shah of Persia, which was concluded
last December, and a printed copy of
which we have just read, occur the
following magniloquent titles, which
pertain to his Persian highness :
“ The President of the United States
of North America, and his Majesty,,
as exalted as the planet Saturn; the
Sovereign to whom the sun serves as
a standard ; whose splendor and mag
nificence are equal to that of the
skies; the Sublime Sovereign, the
Mgparch whose armies are as numer
ous as the stars ; [Oh, what a whap
per!] whose greatness calls to mind
that of Jeinshid; whoso magnificence
equals that of Darius; the hen* of
the crown and throne of the Kayan
ians, the Sublime Emperor of all
Persia,” &c., &c. What sublime
fanfarronade ! Only differing in de
gree from the complacent self-lauda
tion of the naked Digger Indian who
slaps himself on the breast, and grunts
forth: “ Big Injin, me—mucha sabe
me—hi yar —welly good !”
Premium for Profligacy. —An
item of rare importance is passing
through the English newspapers,
showing the Queen’s appreciation
and encouragement of modest merit
and unpretending enterprise. The
wife of a Maltese boatman, named
Meilac, of Cospicus, gave birth a
short time since to three children at
one time. The mother and progeny
did well. On the circumstance being
made known to Queen Victoria, her
majesty exercised her usual generdsa
ity on such occasions, by sending the
mother the sum of three pounds, be
ing a sovereign for each of the little
ones.
In this great country every little
one is a sovereign himself, by right
of birth under the stars and striper.
The Chicago Journal calls the mi
nute wonders revealed by the micro
scope, the “ fine-hand writing of
God.” The same paper has the fol
lowing on easy weeping:
“We knew a young woman —she
is older and wiser now—who shed so
many tears over aromatic woes in
pleasant rhymes, that she looked upon
the real sorrows of the world with
dry eyes; she had no ‘tears to shed*
at anybody’s call. Somehow, we sus
pect the nature whose pumps are al
ways manned for ‘a good cry,’ of
keeping its feelings pretty near the
surface, and that you need not go
very deep in the left-breast before
you come to rock.”

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