OCR Interpretation


The hydraulic press. (North San Juan, Nev. Co., Cal.) 1858-18??, November 06, 1858, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93051083/1858-11-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

VOLUME I.
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS,
la Published every Saturday-,
Bv AVERY & WATERS.
B. P. AVERT, TH. W. WATERS.
North San Juan, Nevada Co., Cal
Terms.
■One Tear $5 0®
Sue Months 3 00
Thru Months 8 00
Single Copies *5
gy-All papers will be stopped at the end of the term
•paid, unless renewed by the subscriber.
A.dLvortisins«
Ote square of twelve Hues, one insertion $3 00
ICach subsequent insertion 1 30
X liberal deduction made to regular monthly and quar
terly advertisers. Adv rtisements may be changed
•nee a month without extra charge.
49TAU advertising must be paid for in Advance.
9*013 Printing.
We have in connection with the Newspaper, a Job
Oillce, complete in all its departments, and capable of
■executing every description of Job Work with neatness
accurac y and dispatch, upon the most reasonable terms.
«*.VO WORK DELIVERED UNTIL PAID FOR
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
R. H. FARQTTFIAR,
JUSTICE of the PEACE, BRIEGEPORT
Township. Office, on Flume »t., 2 doors from Main
street, San Juan. 1 ti
O. P. STIDGEB,
Attorney at hw, notary public
and Conveyancer. Office on the north 3ide of Main
street, one door west of Seawell 4 Son’s store, opposite
the Pioneer. NORTH SAN JUAN.
Nov. Vi, 1857. 11m
TS. F. ANDERSON, W«. H. MVRTI.V
ANDERSON & M4RTIN,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office, corner of Commercial and Pine streets,
near the Court House, NEVADA CITY. lOtf
■ BNRT MEREDITH THOMAS T. HAWLEY
MEREDITH & HAWLEY,
*tt«rneys at Law,
NEVADA CITY. CAL. 15 3m
M. W. TAMT DAVID BtLDE.V
BGLftEI & TAIT,
ATTORNEYS At tAW,
Particular attention given to prncuringG. S.T.and War
rants for persons by Military service entitled to
the same.
0m«...N0 4. second story of Alban’s Brick Building,
Corner Broad and Pine streets. NEVADA. 21
hTASTON BUCKNER, C. Wl iJN HILL .
BUCKVE & & HILL,
HAVING associated themselves together in the
practice of the Law, will attend promptly to all
business confided to their care iu Nevada aud adjoining
■counties.
Orncs—ln Kelsey's Brick Building, Commercial
Btreet. Neva IA.
April 8, 1853. 21 3m
y. B. m’CONNCLT., A.C NILES.
IffcCOWELL & NILES,
Attorneys and Counsellors at haw,
Will practice in all the Courts of the 14th Judicial Dis
trict, and in the Supreme Court.
Office —Kidd's Brick Building, up stairs. 21 3ni
HE ARY W. JOHNSTON,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON & ACCOUCHEUR,
HAVING selected North San Juan as a permanent
home for himself and family, would most respect
fully tender his professional services to the citizens of
this village, and the people in general. An experience
of 23 years successful practice—the last 6 years in Cali
fornia —inspire him with full Confidence of being able
to give entire satisfaction to those who may give him
their patronage.
• His office is on Main street, neorly opposite E. V,
Hatfield’s store, San Juan, where he cm be found at
all times when not professionally absent.
Oct. 12, lssB. 9 3m
WM. EICHELKOTH,
German Physician and Accoucheur,
(Drutscijft ftrjt.)
'*3_Rf«idence, corner Flume and San Francisco streets,
105m* North. San du&n.
B. S. OLDS, HI. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON---OFFICE,
at Moore’s Hotel, Moore’s Flat. 4tf
BUSINESS CARDS.
J. IS. FULLER,
Expressman and general agent.
Runs a Daily Express from
Vamptonvllle to Galena Hill, Young's Hill, Indi
an Hill, Indian Valley, and Railroad Hill.
California Dailies and Weeklies, and Atlantic papers
ahd periodicals delivered promptly Agent for the
Kydr unite Press. 49~ColIections made.
GEORGE THEALL,
Expreiiman and General Agent.
Runs a Daily Express from
Torest City to Alleghanytown, Chips*
Flat and Minnesota. v
A»-C*lift>rnia and Atlantic Newspapers and Magazines
• PS hand and delivered to order.“g3h
«-Agent for THE HYDRAULIC PRESS,
J 7W. SULLIVAN’S
great pacific emporium,
AND
General Agency of Periodical Literature ,
AND SOT.E AGENT f >r
•‘THE CALIFORNIA TRUE DELTA”
California Boston Journal. Missouri Republican, Cin
nßßfltti Commercial, N. Y. Courier des Slots Unis,
New York Herald. Tribune and Timet.
Ac., 4c., 4c.
WASBIRdTON BTBKT, NEXT TO THE POST OFFICE,
San Francisco.
CHARLES W. YOUNG.
MANUFACTURER OF
OnliforniA «T owelry ;
watchmaker,
And Dealer in
Pine -Watches, Jewelry, Diamond-
Work, Ac.
Junction of Main and Commercial streets,
NEVADA.
I Nevada, April Bth, 1868. 213 m
PAIR GOLD SCALES, 90 OUNCES
7capacity, for sale cheap at FRANCHERE’S
Book and Variety Store.
FOUND!
„• North San Jnau, a pocket-book, containing son
dry notes drawn In favor of Wm. H. Taylor.
The owner can have the seme by calling at this office
( paying cost of advertising.
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS.
SALOONS & LIQUOR STORES.
BILLIARDS, 25 CTS. A GAME!
San Juan Exchange
C. SCHARDIN & CO.,
HAVING purchased the Intercut of
John Woods in the above San Jnan Exchange,and
made large additions and improvements, the Saloon
now compares favorably with any in the Mountains.
Three Billiard Tables,
In first-rate order—two of them new Marble Beds
and equal to any in the State. The wood bed is the fa
vorite of the place.
It is the intention offhe proprietor to use every exer
tion to make the Exchange the favorite resort of all
seekers of healthy pleasurable exercise.
THE BAR
will be furnished with the very best
WI\ES A\D LIQUORS
To be had in the San Francisco Market, and no pains
will be spared to make everything pleasant and attrac
tive. 10
Largest Stock in the Mountains.
Pioneer Liquor Store.
WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
OPPOSITE frank smith’s tin shop, main street.
THE subscriber having refitted and. refurnished
the above store, is now prepared with a large and
complete stock of
Wines, Liquors, Ale and Porter
of the best quality, and at as
Low Prices, Wholesale or Retail, as they can be bought
l>elo 10. bothin Quantity and Quality.
All orders promptly attended to, and Goods de
livered free of charge.
CALIFORNIA WINE,
OREGON CIDER,
and a variety of choice beverages, always on hand and
for sale by the case, bottle or glass.
The Pioneer Liquor Store is one of the oldest estab
lishments of the kind in this vicinity, and the proprie
tor expects by close attention to business, to create for
it an increased popularity. D. KRAFT.
North Sau Juan, April 2d. 1858. 20mytf
Fine Old Brandies
C. E. HELFRICH,
Soda Water Manufacturer,
DEALER IX FINE BRANDIES,
[Wines, Ale, Porter Ac.
Brandies, of the following brands :
Old Sazerac, Otard, Jules, Robin 4 Co., United Vine
yards, Martel le, Champaigfce, Otard, 4c., At.
Philadelphia and Holland Gin,
Old Tom, Santa Cruz and Jamaica Rum, Monongahela,
Bourbon. Iris£, and Scotch Whiskey:
Ileidsick, Schfeider and Morizette Champaigne;
Fort. Sherry, Ginger, Hock. Sauterne Claret Wines.
Assorted Case Liquors,
and SYRUPS.
His extensive stock is now complete in every depart
ment, And will be offered at the most
Reasonable Prices.
San Jiian North, Nov. IV, 1867.
[1 3m]
C. SCHARDIN & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Wines, Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco.
Also— a general assortment of
FRESH AND DRIED FRUITS,
And Confectionery.
This cool and delicious hevebfege is kept on baud du
ring the suniinc, muuiuo.
SOUTH SIDE OF MA.N STREET.
North San Juan, Nov. 17, 1857. [1 tf ]
n o o u s:
BOOKS FOR THE MILLION.
J. E. UAMLIX,
No. 53 Broad street, corner Pine,
NEVADA.
Has just received the largest and best as
. sorted stock of
Books and Stationery,
Musical Instruments,
cutlery, gold pens, fancy goods,toys
&c.,
ever brought to thecßy of Nevada, which will bo sold at
Wholesale and Retail
Cheaper than the Cheapest!
My stock consists in part of a mod assortment of Law
Medical. Historical, Poetical. Miscellaneous, Masonic
Works, Catholic Piety, and School Books of every vari
ety.
Any quantity cf
Christmas Presents, Valentines, 4c , for the Holidays.
New and improved Diaries, and Daily Journals, for
1858. A variety of sizes for the pocket and Counting
Room.
CHEAP PUBLICATIONS.
A circulating Library of 1,000 volumes, new, and in
good order, ami I am constantly receiving the latest
and most desirable works published, direct from New
York and Philadelphia. Magazines. Periodicals, News
papers. 4c from all parts of the Globe.
Steamer papers anil California Weeklies, neatly put
up for mailing—Postage Free.
It is useless for me to try to enumerate the endless
variety of everything. And I Will say I have as good
an assortment as can be found this side of San Francis
co.
Persons wishing anythingin mv line of business will
save money by calling on me before purchasing else
where.
Onv Motto la We Strive to Please.
21 3m J. E. HAMLIN.
GALVANIZED IRON 116.5 E.
THE subscriber is now prepared to manufacture
Galvanized Iron Hose, for miners' use, of superior
quality and manufacture, at the lowest rates. He has
a quantity of Iron and Bands on hand, and can fill or
ders at short notice. Call, or send orders to the Tin 4
Hardware store. Main street. F. SMITH.
North San Jnan. March 5, ’5B. 16tf
To Miners.
WE are prepared furnish any articles not usual
ly kept in the stores in this place at TWO
DAYS NOTICE ; such as Auvils, Blocks, Ropes,
Pulleys, Hose, and every article wanted.
PECK 4 COLEY
rU'T RE* EIVED—A LARGE LOT OF
POWDER, 3 PECK 4 COLET.
CHAIRS, Bedsteads, Bedding 4c.,
[1 tf j For sale by PECK 4 COLEY.
NEW LOT of HARD WARE, Ac.
.just received. 16t F. SMITH.
OS
EGON and CALIFORNIA HAM*
ad Bseews at 3« PEOK 4 COLBTW
NORTH SAN JUAN, NEVADA CO., CAL., SATURDAY, NOV. 6,185 a
[Original^
OLD LETTERS.
BT PAUL PURL.
Came they from sinner or from saint,
Cast them in, for the Are is faint;
The fire is faint, and the frost is strong.
And these old letters have lived too long.
How welcome once it matters not:
•Their worth away with time has sped,
The love is over, the hope is dead,
And the old friend has forgot.
[Harpers’ Weekly.
“ Cast them in! ” —I will first look o’er
Tbsse dearer pages than classic lore,
And scan the feelings which moved my heart
As I earnestly vowed I ne'er would part
With these letters from friends of yore:
The package is large, I will hasten through,
As one hurried glance at each will do—
“ Then, “old letters,” your time is o’er.
“Cast them In I ” whose are these that I raise?
Ah yes! frefm a friend of my achool-boy days,
Whose laughing black eyes in m'y thoughts I see,
As in school they beamed with mischievous glee
Whet the master’s back was turned.
’Tis long since he wrote Cut a line would be
Sufficient to kindle his love for me
As brightly as ever it burned.
These lines were traced by a father’s hand
To bis wandering son in a distant land,
And I ween his heart whs filled with cars
As he penned—“ Beware of the tempter’s snare!
Stand firm whennhe trial is ‘near! ”
Though I oft have yielded and wantonly strayed,
Yet as often my steps has this talisman stayed
As I turned with a penitent tear.
These few. long hid in a corner lay.
Though I calmly rest, as I read to-day.
Yet memories sad with these sheets entwine »
The heart that inspired them nnee was mine,
And T dreamed such love would last I
But, no matter—’tis past: the dream is o’er :
I have wakened, and now shall dream no mote
This vision of the past.
How sweet these lines from mv sister dear.
Bright gushines of love from a fountain clear,
As she pleads with mo fondly—“ Cease to roam,
For anxious hearts now await thee at homo
In their circle to take thy part;
Bring poverty, sickness, wealth or fame, —
Bring, better than all. a stainless name,
And a loving and trusting heart.”
Be still my heart! ’Tis the spell of years.
And purest love that bringeth these tears.
Dear mother! perhaps thine eyes were dim.
And shook thy hand while writing to him
Thou callest “ My first-born boy 1”
Though blotted the page, all thy wealth of love
Shinesclear in each line asthe stars above,
And it yields me the purest joy.
“Cast them in! ” I have traveled long and far,
And these letters have been my Northern star;
When weary, how oft my head I've p ressed
On these “ old letters,” to seek for rest
And to dream of the “ old time past! ”
And I'll “ cast them in”—when this heart is cold
As the granite cliffs of these mountains old
Wheifithey feel the wintry blast.
Cherokee, Oct. 26th, 115 S.
“Shylock” and the Jews.—
Shakespeare wrote for royalty, nobil
ity and the times. A desire to please
the reignin'! sovereigns induced the
“ O “
perversion of historical characters
which, thus, undeservedly calumnia
ted by the genius of the poet, have
descended to posterity as objects of
aversion. Thus have we been taught
to hate Macbeth. Richard 111, and
“Shylock,” the Jew, as the repre
sentative of his people, notwlthstands
ing profane and sacred writers teach
that “Shylock” is a monatrocity of
implacability, duplicity and attrocious
revenge, and not a fair exponent of
his nationality. True, his people had
been persecuted and driven out from
among nations, like Cain, with the
curse of a stupendous murder upon
them; but in estimating the Jewish
character, we must remember Jona
than, and t)avid, and Isaiah, who,
whatever may be doubted of the in
spiration of the scriptures, are be
lieved to be historical personages.—
We must not forget the more than
brother’s fidelity of the first, the
forbearance of David when he found
his persecutor asleep and spared his
life, nor the Godlike prophecies of the
Hebrew poet Isaiah, than whom no
mortal bas'ever uttered more sublime
sentences of poetic inspiration.
, [ Trinity Journal.
Angels in odr Pathway —Over
on yonder hill-side, where the grey
slope stretches off from the neat white
school-house toward the southern
sun, the happy shouts of twenty or
thirty little children at play, greet the
passer’s ear. They are the violets
and primrose brood of human life,who
catch their youthful impulses from
the brightening skies and gentle
breezes of the spring. Everywhere
they are welcome; in all climes they
wear the same glowing, hopeful, gol
den colors of eye and soul; bat here,
in the vanishing deserts, and still
brooding solitudes of these mountains,
where manhood has so long been sep
arated from the joys of family and
home, they are indeed, angels in our
pathway.—Aw Andrea* Indepen
dent.
Advice of An Aztec Mother to
her Daughter.
The following admirable passage,
which illustrates the antiquity of good
manners, is part of an original trans
lation from Sahagun’s “Historia de
Nueva Espano” which is given in
the Appendix to Prescott’s uCon
quest of Mexico.” As the historian
of Cortez remarks, “It is the product
of the twilight of civilisation,” hav
ing been written upwards of three
centuries ago; but it is no less worthy
the regard of the maidens of 10-day
than of that ancient Mexican girl
who receivedit from her mother when
this continent was to the old one a
land unknown.
The Aztec matron first assures her
‘•beloved daughter,” her “very dear
little dove” of her affection, earnestly
charges her to observe the advice of
her father, and then counsels her as
follows, concluding at much length on
the beauty and necessity of a chaste
and holy life;
Take care that your garments are
such as are decent and proper ; and
observe that you do not adorn your
self with much finery, since this is a
mark of vanity and folly. As little
becoming is it, that your dress should
be very mean, dirty, or ragged; since
rags are a mark of the low, and of
those who are held in contempt. Let
your clothes be becoming and neat,
that you may neither appear fantastic
nor mean. When you speak, do not
hurry your words from uneasiness,hut
speak deliberately and calmly. Do
not raise your voice very high, nor
speak very low, but in a moderate
tone. Neither mince, when you
speak,nor when you salute, nor speak
through your nose: but let your
words be proper, of a good sound,
and your voice gentle. Do not be
nice in the choice of your words. In
walking, my daughter, see that you
behave becomingly, neither going
with haste, nor too slowly; since it is
an evidence of being puffed up, to
walk too slowly, and walking hastily
causes a vicious habit of restlessness
and instability. Therefore neither
walk very fast, nor very slow; yet,
when it shall be necessary to go with
haste, do so, —in this use your dis
cretion. And when you may be ob
liged to jump over a pool of water,
do it with decency, that you may nei
ther appear clumsy nor light. When
you are in the street, do not carry
your head much inclined, or your
body bent> nor as little go with your
head very much raised; since it is a
mark of ill breeding; walk erect, and
with your head slightly inclined. Do
not have your mouth Covered, or
your face, from shame, nor go looking
like a near-sighted person, nor, on
your way, make fantastic movements
with your feet- Walk through the
street quietly, and with propriety.—
Another thing that you must attend
to, my daughter, is, that, when you
are in the street, you do not go look
ing hither and thither, nor turning
your head to look at this and that;
walk neither looking at the skies, nor
on the ground. Do not look upon
those whom you meet with the eyes
of an offended person, nor have the
appearance of being uneasy ; but of
one who looks upon all with a serene
countenance; doing this, you will give
no one occasion of being offended
with you. Show a becoming coun
tenance; that you may neither appear
morose, nor, on the other hand, too
complaisant. See, my daughter,that
you give yourself no concern about
the words you may hear, in going
through the street, nor pay any re
gard to them, let those who come and
go say what they will. Take care
that you neither answer nor speak,
but act as if you neither beard nor
understood them; since, doing in this
manner, no one will be able to say
with truth that you have said any
thing amiss. See, likewise, my
daughter, that you never paint youi
face, or stain it or your lips with col
ors, in order to appear well; since
this is a mark of vile and unchaste
women.
JKg-The world makes us talkers
but solitude makes us thinkers.
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS
Sour Grapes.
The man who seeks wealth with
no definite idea of employing it for
an unselfish purpose, is a slave.
Wealth is the Moloch to which he sac
rifices nearly all that is noble in his
hature. And for what, after all, does
he do this ? Because it will bring
him friends, a home, and the Comforts
which make home pleasant ? Be
cause wealth will prolong the echo of
his name a few days longer than bis
body remains above the ground ? No,
for if be secures these it is by other
means than excessive wealth. It is
the poor man of a kind heart, bis
band gently touching all little heads
as he passes along, after whom all
the dogs and children fondly run,
and adults cast good-natured glances.
It is the doer of useful deeds that is
gratefully remembered after death,
in spite of what, in moods of misan
thropy, or by disappointed men may
be said to the contrary. Many a
little hut by tho roads de now shelters
humble benefactors who will be em
balmed in grateful hearts through
many generations after names now
great “on ’change” are forgotten.
If a man dies old and rich, it is pre
sumptive evidence against him. One
may have the misfortune to die be
fore he was able to expend usefully
the liches which were accumulated
with a laudable motive; and the pos
sihility of this is hi* sufficient de
fence. But to die a wealthy octoge
narian'—what defence does this admit?
borne one observed when John Quin
cy Adams paid the debt of nature,
fiat nothing could be urged to his
disadvantage, except that he died
worth some thousands of So
it is that, at the all-swallowing grave,
the glitter of a man’s riches will ob
scure for a time the milder radiance
of his good deeds ; but those will
blossom for him above the sod, and
attract reverent feet to the spot where
he lies, long after his wealth is forgiv
en him.
“ Or ly the actions of the just
Smell sweet and Mess m in the dust.”
Thus Strides Empire.— The P.
M. General advertises for proposals
for conveying the mails of the United
States over six different routes cen
tering at Salt Lake City in Utah.—
The aggregate length of these routes
is between 700 and 800 miles. They
traverse a country lying midway be
tween the extremes of civilization on
each side of the continent, and a
country which was # unknown to the
world within our own memory.
[email protected]“The Philadelphia Bulletin has
an exchange list of “one thousand
newspapers from every spot where
newspapers are pubilshed.”
Steam vs. Rowdyism. —The Phi
ladelphia folks have discovered that
steam fire engines are the only things
that will kill the “killers” and reform
the fire department. They will have
at least twelve of these powerful ma
chines in less than a year. They
work admirably in Cincinnati.
Where Truth may he found is
thus quaintly told by Charles Lamb
in a “ Curious Fragment,” which ho
wrote in imitation of Robert Burton :
“ If Very Truth be extant indeed
on earth, as some hold she it is which
actuatek men’s deeds, purposes, ye
may in vain look for her in the learn
ed universities, balls, colleges. Truth
is no doctresse, she takes no degrees
at Paris or Oxford, amongst great
clerks, disputants, subtile Aristutles,
men no dosi ingenii , able to take lully
by the chin , but oftentimes to such an
one as myself, an Idiota or common
person, no great things , melancho
lizing in woods where waters are,
quiet places by rivers, fountains;
whereas the silly man expecting no
such matter, thinketh only bow best
to delectate and refresh bis mind con
tinually with Nature , her pleasant
scenes, woods, waterfalls, or Art, her
stately gardens, parks, terraces, Bel
videres, on a sudden the goddess her
self Truth has appeared, with a shi
ning light, and a sparkling counte
nance, so as ye may not be able
lightly to resist her.”
NUMBER 12.
A Pioneer Gone.
Thomas 0. Larkin died on the 27th
ult., at San Francisco. He came to
this country from Boston in 1832,
before Sntter arrived here, married,
it is said, the first American female
who ever settled in California, and
the children born of this marriage
were the first Americans of unmixei
blood born in California.
For about twelve years he engaged
in commercial pursuits at Monterey,
carrying on a considerable export
trade. He was the first and last
American consul in this country, and
occupied other public positions.
When Fremont arrived here in
1846, Larkin took a very prominent
and active part in securing California
to the possession of our government.
Ho subsequently sent east very full
and reliable accounts of the gold
covery, and was one of the formers
of our State Constitution. Recently
he has not been known to the majori
ty of Californias except as a larg*
land holder. The Sacramento Union-,
from which paper these particular*
are gathered, remarks that “ his hon
orable efforts in aid of our flag, and in
planting the first of our institution*
on this coast, will bo remember
ed when his large possessions of land
and his singleness of devotion in later
years to the accumulation of wealth
shall have been forgotten.” But thi*
last sentence is very unjust if we may
believe the editor of the Evening
Telegram, who seems to have known
Mr. Larkin, and pays the following
tribute to his worth:
“ Always prompt and upright in
his dealings with the
kind to the hon
est In good and pure
was Thomas 0. Larkin. His roof,
it is true covered the head of a very
rich man ; yet, beneath it also rested
in peace and comfort, the noble soul.
Indeed, the strange thought has often
occurred to us that Mr. Larkin lived
like one who knew there was some
thing higher and better to labor for
than dollars and cents.”
PbRB Liquors. — A sensible writer
in the Nevada National scouts at the
idea that any kind of alcoholic bever*
age is good for man. He says:
“ Nothing is more common among
people than to talk about pure liquors.
They prate about them, and commend
them, as if they were not only harm
less, but the very elixir of life. Pure
wine, pure brandy, pure whiskey.
“ Oh, drink as much as you please,
it won’t hurt you,”—how often do
you hear it said.
“The truth of it is, there is no sort
of alcoholic drink, whether wine,
brandy, or whiskey, but that deranges
the system, disorders the vital action
to a greater or less degree, induces
disease, abridges happiness, and shor
tens life. “ Pure liquors I” Why*
you had just as well talk about purs
arsenic, or pure hydrocyanic acid.
Liquors, pure as they can be mads
of their different varieties, drank daily
in quantities sufficient to make a de*
cided stimulant impression on the an
imal economy, and even in quantities
much less, we might venture to say
is just as sure to derange the physi-*
cal powers, sap the energies of the
intellect, weaken the body, shorten
the life, and degenerate man and his
species, as a atone thrown in the aii 1
is to fall to the earth again.
• * • • •
“ There is too much tippling in this
country among all classes, and unless
stopped, the species must suffer deg*
radation from it, to a greater ct less
degree.
Good, plain, wholesome diet, active
exercise, a noblo purpose, an honest
heart, a humane disposition, and a
clear conscience, are the principal
conditions of health and happiness on
earth, and go a great way towards
preparing a man for Heaven. The
purest liquors are unnecessary. They
are but an apology for “gentlemanly’*
tippling* Let them alone* Save you*
money, your body uncorrupted, and
discharge your duty, like a man and
a philosopher, to yourself, your spe*
cies, your country and your God.”
J®"Professor Agassiz thinks the
creation of roses was coeval with that
of the first woman —the fairest flow
er and the fairest creature given to
the world at the same moment.

xml | txt