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The hydraulic press. (North San Juan, Nev. Co., Cal.) 1858-18??, November 27, 1858, Image 1

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THE HYDRAULIC PRESS.
By Avery & Waters.
■Professional.
R. IL FARQUHAR,
JUSTICK of the PEACE, BRIEOKPORT
Township. Office, on Fimno st., 2 doors from Main
street, San Juan. 1 tf
0. P. STIDGER,
Attorney at law. notary public
and Conveyancer. Office on the north side of Main
street, one door west of Sea well A Sou's store, opjiosite
the Pioneer, NORTH SAN JUAN.
Nov. 13, 1837. 1 lm
wm. r. ardersor, wm. n. martir-
ANDERSON &. MARTIN,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
££*■ Office, corner of Commercial and Pine streets,
near the Court House, NEVADA CITY. lOtf
DE.VItV MEREDITH THOMAS V. HAWLEY
MEREDITH & HAWLEY,
Attorneys at Law,
NEVADA CITY , CAL. 15 3m
Q SO. W. VAST DAVID UELDEM
DELDEN & TAINT,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Particular attention to procurin';U. S. Ran 1 War
rants for persons by Military service entitled to
the same.
Office... No. 4, second story of Alban’s RnVk Building,
Corner Broad and Pino streets, N KVADA. 21
ErAXTO.V III'OKVER, C. WILSJ.V UILL .
BUCKNER K HILL,
Having associated themselves together in the
practice of the Raw. will attend promptly to all
business confided to their care in Nevada and adjoining
counties.
Office— ln Kelsey's Brick Building, Commercial
Street, Nevada.
April 8, 1858. 213 m
t. R. M'cOMMEtl A.C MILES.
McConnell & niles,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law,
Will practice in all the Courts of the 14th Judicial Dis
trict, ami in the Supreme Court.
Office —Kidd's Brick Building, up stairs. 21 3m
HENRY W. JOHNSTON,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON & ACCOUCHEUR,
HAVINO selected Xortli San Juan as a permanent
home for himself mid family, would most respect
fully tender his professional services to the citizens of
lliis village, ami the people in general. An experience
«f 23 years successful practice—the last 0 years in Cali
fornia—inspire him with full confidence of being aide
to give entire satisfaction to those who may give him
their |wtronagc.
His office is on Main street, neorly opposite E. V.
Hatfield's store, flan Juan, where he can be found at
•II times when not professionally absent.
Oct. 12, IKSB. 9 3m
WM. EICHELROTH,
Germau Physician and Accoucheur,
(iJcutsrijrr Sr)t.)
•A-H esidence, corner Flume and Saa Francisco streets,
105m 11 North San Juan.
W. A. K [TTREDGE, M. D.
Moore's Elat, Nevada Co., Cal.
OFFERS Ins services to the public as a Physician and
Surgeon.
Ajf'Special attention given to all diseases requiring
enrgieal aid. 1211
11. 8. OLDS, 31. !>.,
JMYSICI VN AND SU HG EON—OFFICE,
L at Moore's Hotel, Moore’s Klal. 4tf
gusiurss Cards.
J. E. FULLER,
EXPRESSMAN AND GENERAL AGENT,
Runs a Daily Express from
Cant|itonville to Galtna Hill, Young's Hill, Indi
an Hill, Indian VaJU.y, atul Railroad Hill.
California Dallies and Weeklies, and Atlantic pnp-rs
and iieriodicals delivered promptly. Agent for the
Hydraulic Press. 41 Collections made.
GEORGE THEALL,
Kxpressman and General Agent.
Huns a Daily Kxpress from
Foreit City to Alleghanytown, Chips’
Flat and Minnesota.
43~CaIifornia ami Atlantic Newspapers and Magazines
on hand and delivered to order.'
for TIIK HYDRAULIC PRESS.
J. W. SULLIVAN’S
GREAT PACIFIC EMPORIUM,
AND
General Agency of Periodical Literature,
AND SOUK AGENT FOR
“THE CALIFORNIA TRUE DELTA”
California Huston Journal, Missouri Republican, Cin
cinnati) Commercial, X. II Courier ties Kbits Unis,
Xew York Herald, Tribune and Times.
Ac., Ac., Ac.
■WASHINGTON STKET, NEXT TO THE POST OFFICE,
San Francisco.
J. P. YANDERLOOY,
TCHMAZ
And Manufacturer of
kllfornla Jewelry.
INFORMS his old friends and the public,
that by the addition to bis establishment of
machinery and many tools which are usually
be found in large manufactories, he can give
lie West finish to his work, and still keep bis prices
140 per cent, below those of the generality of
) trade.
4S-BILLIARD BALLS RENEWED.”®*
Fine Gunsand Revolvers Repaired in
*the liest stylo. Brass, Steel and Ivory
Turned.
Surgical Instruments Polished, and
r ino»tly all fine jobs done with neatness
lAd dispatch.
Watch and Clock Repairing!
at the usual rates, and all work warranted.
• Shop on Main street, next door above Weiss'
Billiard Saloon, North San Juan. lOtf
CHARLES W. YOUNG.
MANUFACTURER OP
California J* owolry ;
WATCHMAKER,
And Dealer in ......
Flue Watches, Jewelry, Diamond.
Work, Ac,
Junction of Main and Commercial streets,
NET AD A.
| Nevada, April Bth, 1868. 213 m
1 j"vNE PAIR GOLD SCALES, 90 OUNCES
| vycapacity, for sale cheap at FRANCHERE’B
Book and Variety Store.
FOUND !
wg North San Juan, a pocket-book, containing sun-
J dry notes drawn in favor of Win. 11. Taylor.
The owßcr can have the same by calling at *h:s office
and paying cost of advertising.
BILLIARDS, 25 CTS. A GAME!
San Juan Exchange
C. SCHARDIN & CO.,
HAVING purchased the Interest o <
John Woods in thoabove Sun Juan Exchange.and
made large adilitions and improvements, the Saloon
now compares favorably with any in the Mountains.
' Three Billiard Tables,
In first-rate order—two of them new Marble Beds
and equal to any in the State. The wood bed is the fa
vorite of the place.
It is the intention of the proprietor to use every exer
tion to make the Exchange the favorite resort of *ll
seekers of healthy pleasurable exercise.
THE BAH
will be furnished with the very best
WISES AND LiqrOßS
To be had in the San Francisco Market, and no pains
will bo spared to make everything pleasant and attrac
tive. 10
Pioneejr Saloon>
SPERO ANDERSON,
HAVING RETURNED from Fraser river
ami purchase! the above establishment, ro-
WriSgSjgK-'pectfiilly informs his friends and the public
that lie intends tokcepa tine
Wholesale and Retail Stock
...0F...
Wines and Liquors* Ale, Por
ter, Beer, Cider.
CHAMPAIGN,
SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS,
Pure California 'Wine,
CIGARS AND TOBACCO .
His BAR will be supplied with the choicest kinds of
tile idmve articles, ami he trusts to maintain his old rep
utation as the keeper of a first-rate saloon.
North San Juan, Nov Gth, 1858. 12lf
Fine Old Brandies
C. E. lIELFRICH,
Soda Water Manufacturer,
DEALER IN FINE BRANDIES,
f fl-jVVinos, Ale, I’orter Ac.
Brandies, of the following brands:
Old Sazerac, Otard, Jules, Robin A Co., United Vine
yards, MartellCjClnunpaiguc, Otard, Ac., 4c.
Philadelphia and Holland Gin,
Old Tom, Santa Cruz and Jamaica Rum, Monongaheht,
Bourbon, Irish and Scotch Whiskey:
Heidsji k, Schreider and Mori/.ettc Chainpaigne;
Fort, Sherry, Ginger, Hock, Sautcrnc Claret Wines.
Assorted Case Liquors,
and SYRUPS.
His extensive slock is now complete iu every depart
ment, and will he offered at the most
Reasonable Prices.
San Joan North, Nov. 17, 1857.
[1 3m]
0. SCHARDIN & CO.,
. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
I Wines, Liquors, Cljgnrs aud To*
1 bacco.
Also— a general assortment of
FRESH AND DRIED FRUITS,
And Confectionery.
SOUTH SIDE OF MA JV STREET.
Xorth San Juan, Xov. 17,1857. [1 tf ]
Mleghany Saloon «
BILLIARDS! BILLIARDS!
FORD <& SPENCER
MNFOllfii the lovers of this noble game that they
8 will find at their Saloon in Alleghanytown,
Two Marble Bed Billiard Ta bles,
which are iu excellent condition.
The Bar
Is always stocked with the best Wines, Liquors and
Cigars.
The proprietors will also spread a
Free Lunch Every Night!
AUrghanyUnon, Oct. 23. 1858.
Caution to Purchasers
OF
EUREKA_ WHISKEY!
IT has come to the knowledge of the undersigned,
that various parties are putting up whiskey, in imita
tion packages, made in San Francisco, and branding it
“EUREKA WHISKEY.”
We caution dealers in tlic interior against purchasing
any of those imitations for the genuine imported arti
cle. The genuine
“ Eureka Whiskey 99
Is imported in Barrels and half barrels, and the packa
ges are branded on one bead. “EUREKA WHISKEY,
1841>, WM. NEWELL A CO.” with a copy-right attached
and on the other head, “J. T. D.”
To any one who has purchased the GENUINE EURE
KA WHISKEY this caution is unnecessary, as they
cannot be deceived bv imitations.
WM. NEWELL A CO.,
Sole Agents, 109, Battery street*
San Francisco, Sept. 15, ISSS.
tfP .Tbe GENUINE Eureka Whiskey is for sale by all
the principal Liquor Houses in San Francisco. 14 3m
g eaten.
Lumber, Lumber I
THE undersigned take this opportunity to inform
the public that they have recently purchased of
French A Sawyer, their new and splendid steam saw
mill, situated at Central Ranch, near San Juan, where
they are now prepared to furnish on the shortest notice
Sluice and Building Lumber,
and Blocks of all kinds.
All Orders satisfactorily filled and promptly delivered.
J. F. CLARK,
HENRY WONSEY,
J. B. JOHNSON.
Central Ranch, April Sth, 1858. 21 tf
LUMBER ! LUMBER ! I
THE PROPRIETORS OF THE
North San Juan Saw-Mill take this opportunity to
inform the public that they have recently purchased the
above-named property, which has been refitted at great
expense, and that they ore now prepared to furnish
Sluice and Building Lumber,
And Blocks of all kinds, on short notice.
All orders satisfactorily filled and promptly delivered.
W’m 11. SEARS, Agent.
January Ist, 185<* 7tf
NORTH SAN JUAN, NEVADA CO, SATURDAY, NOV. 27, 1858.
§njtottlw gress.
Indians and Hindoos. —Franklin
tells an amusing and instructive story
about some Susquehanna Indians, who
were assembled by a Swedish minister,
and listened to a sermon from him on
the history and principles of Christian
ity. They harkened With characteristic
attention till the close, and then one of
them arose, expressed his approbation
of what he had heard, and desired to
recount in turn a tradition of his own
people. He said that, in the beginning,
the fathers of the Red Man had only
the flesh of animals to subsist on, until
one day a beautiful young woman from
the spirit-land appeared to two hunters
and, being entertained by them with
venison, promised that they should be
rewarded if they would come to the
same place after thirteen moons. They
did so, and where her right hand had
touched the ground found corn, where
her left had touched it they found kid
ney beans, and where she had sat on it
they found tobacco. The good mis
sionary, (says Franklin,) was disgusted
with this idle tale, and said :
“ What I delivered to you were sa
cred truths; but what you tell me is
mere fable, fiction, and falsehood.”
The Indian, offended, replied —“ My
brother, it seems your friends have not
done you justice in your education;
they have not well instructed you in
the rules of common civility. You saw
that we, who understand and practice
th sc rules, believed all your stories;
why do you refuse to believe ours?”
We were reminded of this very per
tinent inquiry on reading what an En
glish traveler writes upon his return
from India:
“ People in tliis country cannot appreciate the ex
treme improbability, I almost say impossibility,
of the conversion of a high-casto Hindoo. Humanly
speaking, it would bo almost as reasonable to expect
the Archbishop of Canterbury to sacrifice a goat to
Parhutee. As for arguing with a Hindoo of intelli
gence, it is like using a cannon against Hindoo earth
works. He will grant every argument of the Chris
tian, will advance his religion, admit his miracles, and
acknowledge the truth of the Incarnation. At tho
same time he will contend that lie has an older ami
a lietter system, miracles much more astounding, and
numberless avatars, instead of ouo only. Ho is tho
most tolerant man in the world; will allow every re
ligion to be true, and as his own system will not admit
of converts, ho recommends every man to adhere to his
particular creed and allow others to do tho same.”
Hop Growing in California. —
Under this title, the Culturist for No
vember—a superior number, —advan-
ces some convincing arguments in favor
of introducing the culture of hops into
this State, and gives the results of an
experiment made by Mr. Bushnell, of
Bodega. This gentleman raised from
young roots, set out last March, two
hundred pounds of hops, which he sold
for one dollar a pound, and could have
taken the same price for a larger quan
tity. “ His experiment with the crop,”
says the Culturist , “is an entire suc
cess ; he has now three acres only, but
will enlarge bis hop grounds from year
to year. In his opinion, good corn land
will grow hops. He plants in rows eight
feet apart, and the same distance in the
rows; puts two poles to each hiU, incli
ning them outward so that the hops may
not run together and become entangled;
plants his new-grounds with roots from
old hills in March, but thinks it might
be done earlier with advantage; has
used poles of all lengths between twelve
and twenty-five feet, and finds his hops
go to the top of them, but that a sixteen
feet pole is the best height to begin with,
as the hop produces better than on a high
er one; likes to have the vines reach
the end of the pole and then hang off,
as they fruit better; uses redwood poles;
cultivates the ground as he would for
corn, by keeping down the weeds. The
hop ripens about the first of September;
crop is gathered by cutting off the vines
at bottom and lifting the poles out of
the ground. The drying and curing re
quires close, constant attention, but is
not hard labor; yield per acre, one ton
or more—at one dollar a pound, 82,000;
at fifty cents a pound, 81,000; nearly
or quite equal to tea, coffee, or wine
growing per acre.”
Carelessness itself may not be crimi
nal, but its consequences are very often
so.
SIERRA TURNPIKE.
The citizens of Sierra and Yuba coun
ties arc taking active measures for the
construction of a new wagon road, with
a view of connecting their principal
towns directly with Marysville. We
learn from a communication in the Ma
rysville Democrat that the first day of
December is selected as the period for an
organization of a company for the above
purpose, at Goodyear’s Bar, and that
they propose as the best the following
route:—
“ Commencing at DownieTillo, by way of Goodyear’s
Bar ami Camptonville to Garden Valley, with a branch
from the head of Woodruff Creek, about oue mile above
the Mountain House, to Fred’s Ranch, on the main road
between Forest City ami Alleghanytown, touching at
or near Forest City. Fred’s Ranch is the point below
Galloway's, where Scott’s survey .of the emigrant road
leaves that ridge to descend to Forest City. This will
give Marysville a read on the nearest and best route to
all those most important mining localities, and will also
he that much of the great emigrant road completed on
the Holiness pass route.”
The heaviest ascending grade is said
to be oue foot to the rod.
Mr. llicc, the author of the commu
nication above referred to, thinks that if
the stock for the proposed road is prompt
ly subscribed for, the road will be com
pleted by next Juncor July. We hear
tily hope it may, for although this par
ticular vicinity may not be directly ben
efitted by it, any thing that will facilitate
mountain travel, will promote the gene
ral convenience and result advantage
ously to every section. But the most
important consideration connected with
this subject is, that the road will lead the
way to the ultimate opening through this
portion of the mountains of a new emi
grant and mail route, which would cer
tainly benefit every county lying in its
vicinity, and effect at an earlier day
than otherwise the settlement of the
mountain vallics. If what is claimed
for the Holiness pass be true, it offers
greater facilities fur the construction of
a road, and opposes fewer obstacles to
continuous travel through all seasons
than either the Southern or Central
routes. But even if this were not so,
and if the Ilcnncss pass were merely as
good as others, there will soon be a ne
cessity for another road connecting Plu
mas, Sierra, Yuba and Nevada counties
with the great line of overland emigra
tion and with the settlements which
must spring up along its course.
The Gold Discovery. —Amongst
several specimens of California gold ex
hibited not long since before the Royal
Institution, London, was a fine lump of
quartz gold, which was acquired by the
Right Hon. Edward Ellice about thirty
years ago.
It is generally conceded that the ex
istence of gold in California was known
many years before its discovery by Mar
shall at Sutter’s Mill. It is believed
to have been known to the Jesuit mis
sionaries, who concealed the fact out of
policy. Wo recollect that Farnham,
who visited this country in 1842, and
published of his trip, stated
that the luaHpknew of the existence
of gold, butwould not reveal its locality,
because their traditions told them such
a disclosure would eventuate in the ad
vent of a superior race amongst them
and their own annihilation. The tradi
tion has proved to be prophetic, so far,
but doubtless originated with the wily
Jesuits.
A friend who was in the country about
the same time has told us that lumps
and scales of a heavy yellow metal had
frequently been found and thrown away
as valueless. How many a rude hunter
may have thus tossed carelessly from
him a discovery greater than that of
Potosi!
The development of California’s im
mense mineral wealth was reserved for
the energetic and progressive Anglo-
Saxon. The enervated mongrel races
of Mexico would only have exhausted
the surface placers without contributing
aught to the permanent interests of
mankind.
The Nevada Democrat anounccs its in
tention of publishing an extra on the ar
rival of each Overland Mai!,in which
they will give the news at length. We
wish them succes.
Unobtrusive benevolence inspires most
sol f-sa tisfac tion.
ANTS AND CHLOROFORM.
Most people will not think there is
any connection between the little insect
which is so often cruelly trodden under
foot and the beniffeent agent employed
by surgeons to produce insensibility to
pain.
They have no doubt often gazed with
curiosity upon busy colonics of ants, and
wondered what useful purpose was sub
served by their existence, turning away,
at last, their nostrils offended by the pe
culiar odor our little friends emit, and
their minds uninformed by an intelligent
conclusion. Not so have the enquiring
students of nature regarded these intel
ligent insects, but have deemed them
worthy of patient investigation, the re
sults of which are elaborately recorded
for our edification. They found them
to be the most intellectual of insects,
with peculiarities startlingly analogous
to human characteristics, and the analy
sis of the peculiar sour fluid which they
eject led to a discovery which is justly
considered one of the greatest triumphs
of chemistry.
The mere fact of such a liquid would
be considered insignificant by most per
sons, but to the disciple of science noth
ing is insignificant. It was found on
bruising the insects and distilling them,
mixed with water, that a peculiar vola
tile acid passed over, which was named
Formic acid, from the Latin formica, an
ant. This is one of the most powerful
acids known, and forms soluble salts
with metalic bases. Its radical is For
mylc, which docs not exist separately.
Of course, on the discovery of such a
powerful acid, numberless experiments
were made with it, and ultimately it was
found that it could be obtained artifi
cially, that is without recourse to the
red ant which afforded it in the first in
stance.
It reached the climax of its wonderful
history when, combined with chlorine
and other agents, it led to the production
of chloroform, which, in chemical lan
guage, is the pcrchloridc of Formylc. —
Thus the sour liquid which ants eject
when irritated, and the odor of which
every one has observed, is one of the
constituent parts of an agent that has
done more to relieve human suffering
than any other discovery of medical
science. How wonderful is nature in
all her ways, and how wonderful, too,
arc the processes by which man can fath
om her secrets and imitate her silent la
bors.
In the laboratory of the chemist, as in
that of nature, the most minute circum
stance may lead to stupendous conse
quences. Let us then, all observe na
ture with more care and reverence, and
if we cannot be numbered amongst
those patient disciples of hers, who arc
quietly laboring for the welfare of man
kind, we shall at least have the pleasures
which spring from intelligent observa
tion, and from the reflection that no ob
ject is unimportant to the Creator.
Indigenous Apple and Chestnut.
—Mr. A. Bushncll, of Green Valley,
Bodega, Sonoma county, has sent the
editor of the Culturist a half dozen or
more seedling native apple-trees. In
their growth they resemble the native
crab-apple of the Western States, but
with even more of a dwarfish habit.
The same publication asserts that
there is a chestnut indigenous to Cali
fornia, sweet and delicious, growing on
low bushes upon the middle plateaux of
the Sierras.
Sgf* Women are often praised for
clinging to drunken husbands, and call
ed angels, when their angelic devotion is
consigning a whole helpless family to
misery. There is a virtue in being con
stant to the most miserable wretch so
long as there exists hope of reforming
himj but after that time is evidently
past, there is more reason for suspecting
that the wife shares her husband’s degra
dation than that she seeks to lift him
from it by her self-sacrificing faithfulness.
If habitual drunkenness were everywhere
sufficient ground for divorce, women
would not so often give men occasion to
praise them for a virtue that is often
times the creature of necessity.
Volume I Number 15.
[communicated. ]
THE PRESENT AGE.
Nevada county, 1
November 19,1858. )
Ech Hydraulic Press: —Do you think
the age in which we live superior to any
since the dawning of human mind upon
earth ? Docs it contain more wisdom—
more goodness—more talent —more ge
nius? Is man morally, spiritually, and
intellectually greater?
Look not out of your window into the
street before you answer; there is no
field for judgment there. Close the
shutter, and send your spirit to gather
truth and falsehood from the crowding
millions; then, it is very like, you will
answer thus: “If presumption canim
body wisdom, goodness, talent, genius
and greatness, our age is far superior to
any past."
You know what ice have accomplished,
but wc know but little of what has been
thought and done before us. History is
to us but as a faint dream, full of great
and little shadows, acts and actors, suit
ed to the times; and our judgment of
them is like the school-boy’s, who says
to his fellow, “my jack-knife is better
than yours, and I will not trade with
you.”
And he will say too, “my father is a
better man than yours, tho’ he be a cob
bler, and yours a kingt”
There is a pride in every man which
makes him think himself more perfect
than his fellows; but his greatness is
developed by the accidents of to-day or
to-morrow.
The future is a store-house full of
gold, and fame, and toys for every fancy,
to which hope gives ambition the key.
One man justly or falsely praised,
kindles emulation in a thousand; and
to this wc owe the greatness of the
Christian world so boasted of to-day.
To-day, to-day; our all is compassed
in to-day; and what is yesterday to any
man? A time perhaps mis-spenfc; a
time he cannot touch again, or fill again
with hope. If happiness was in it, it
is to-day but as a sweet shadow lingering
on his heart; if it brought him shame
or sorrow, he would forget it, and in to
morrow look with stronger hope for
pleasure and for profit.
So far as it is possible for us to know, .
wc arc in all scientific arts far, far in ad- r
vance of all the ages past combined; but
that wc are morally better, or intellectu
ally greater is a lie—an insult to the God
to whom we say we owe our being.—
When wc take into consideration the fa
cilities which have been afforded man
since the days of type, to communicate
his thoughts and ideas, good or bad, to
the world, great allowance should be
made for the many enlightened genera- .
tions of days gone by.
Since the art of printing the whole
sphere upon which we live has been ex
plored, and re-explored, and made visible
to the quick eye of thought, bringing
light to the mind, words to the tongue,
and subjects to the pen.
Before, man to man was comparatively
unknown; now, they shake hands in
thought from pole to pole, from horizon
to horizon.
Now, the mind is quicker from exer
cise, the tongue more elegant from use.
But they have both grown less pure;
excitement makes the blood run quick
and hot, and passion overruns honesty.
This is a great age truly; but it is not
the greatest. But when it is said that
this is a fast age, the truth is told. But
who shall say that it is the happiest age ?
No man whose thoughts can go beyond
his own door-yard.
When the blood runs cool and calm,
man can be great and happy, and reason
like a God; —then only. But the day
is not now. SITALLWRITE.
is a great country for news
papers. All foreign newspapers must
pass through the hands of a censor, who
cither rejects them wholly or strikes out
whatever objectionable passages he may
find. One frequently sees paragraphs,
or whole columns, either covered with
a coating of black paste or so nicely
erased that uo sign ot printers’ ink is
left.

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