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The hydraulic press. (North San Juan, Nev. Co., Cal.) 1858-18??, May 19, 1860, Image 1

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BY AYERY & WATERS.
llte Padrawlk smnL
Published everysAtuhd ay morning
JK&’OJ)let on Main street, adjoining the Drug Store.’' £&
Terms for the Paper.
One Year, invariable in advance ■. .$5 00
Six Months, u • “ “ ..•. 300
Three “ « “ “ 3 00
Terms for Advertising.
‘6ne Square, (12 line*) first insertion,. $3 00
iiach subsequent insertion, . 1 00
93~ Bn sines* cards not exceeding fonr linos of this
type, will be inserted for $6 00 a quarter.
Saloons & Liquor Stores,
TheFirstand Last Chance Saloon
The public is informed tHAt
ABBEY A CGLLODI have opened a new and
handsome
LIQUOR AND SMOKING SALOON
in the building formerly known as the Pioneer Liqaor
Store. They will keep the purest Wines and Liquors,
Lest Cigars, and most fascinating of Baikeepers.
Everybody who took the first chance in California,
the second at Frazer river, or the last in
W ashoei
arc Invited to give the subscribers a call.
SAM. ABBEY,
North San Jnan, Ap-il 14, ’6O. GEO. CULLODI.
MILLIARDS, 25 CTS. A GAME!
SAN JXTAN^JEXCHANGE.
C. SCHARDIN & CO,,
WOULD respectfully inform "their old friends
and the public generally "that they have recent
ly made many improvements to the above-named pop
ular resort, and are bettor prepared than ever to please
nil tastes.
Three Billiard Tables,
In first-rate ordcr---two of them new Marbie Bed*
and equal to anyfn the State. The wood bed is the fa
vorite of the place.
BOWLING.
Two splendid Ten-Pin Alleys arc attached to the es
tablishment, well supplied with the perquisites of wach
an institution.
It is the intention of the proprietor to use every exer
tion to make the Exchange the favorite resort of all
seekers of healthy pleasurable exercise.
THE BAR
W-Hl he fntnished With the Very best
WINES AND LIQI ORS
To be had in the San Francisco Market, and no pains
Will be spared to make everything pleasant and attrac
tive. 10
C. SCHAIIDIN & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers fn
Wlnti, Liquors, Cigars aud Tobaccos
Also— a general assortment of Fresh and
Dried Fruit and Confectionery*-—south side
of Main street.
iVori/ 1 .San Jwm, .Von. If, IS*?. {1 If ]
Fine Old Brandies
C. E. HELFMCII,
Soda Water Manufacturer.
m
isqu
CNO h
san d s
DEALER IN
Fine Brandies,
Wines, Ale,
Porter Ac.
Brandies, of the fol
lowing brands:
Old Saz.erac. Otard,
Jules. Kobin A Co.,
United Vineyards.
ChAttipaigne,
Martelle, Otard, Ac.,
Philadelphia and
HOLLAND GIN,
•Old Tom, Santa Cruz and Jamaica Rum. Monongahela,
Bourbon, Irish and Scotch Whiskey:
Heidslck, Schreider and Morizette Champaigne;
Fort, Sherry, Giugor, Hock, Sauterne Claret Wines.
Assorted Case Liqaors and Syrups,
His extensive stock Is now complete in every depart
ment, and will be offered at
SACRAMENTO PRICES.
3an Jnan North, Nov. 17, 1857. [1 3m]
SAN JUAN BREWERY.
This well-known establishment, owned by
IStoffler A Koch, is now under the control Of
,the junior (nember, Mr. Koch, and will so
remai-i until the Settlement of the estate ofMr.Stoffler
lately deceased. The business of manufacturing
Tiftgor Beer
will be continued as heretofore, and the old reputation
Of the article fully maintained. jan2l
Variety*
HAVE YOU READ
HAVE YOU READ
HAVE YOU READ
HAVE YOU READ
HAVE YOU READ
HAVE YOU READ
HUTCHINGS’ CALIFORNIA MAGAZINE
HUTCHINGS’ CALIFORNIA MAGAZINE
HUTCHINGS’ CALIFORNIA MAGAZINE
HUTCHINGS’ CALIFORNIA MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED EVERY MONTH ?
PUBLISHED EVERY MONTH ?
S 3 PER ANNUM.
$3 PER ANNUM.
S 3 PER ANNUM.
ALSO,
ALSO,
ALSO,
THE LITTLE PIONEER FOR CHILDREN
THE Llt TLE PIONEER FOR CHILDREN
THE LITTLE PIONEER FOR CHILDREN
THE LITTLE PIONEER FOR CHILDREN
tHE LITTLE PIONEER FOR CHILDREN
01 26 PER ANNUM.
Si 25 PER ANNUM.
ADDRESS,
HUTCHINGS & ROSENFIELD,
San Francisco,
Window sash*, at
RE AMES? S.
KMMWM
AT
REDUCED PRICES!! 1
CASH as CHEAP as the
FRANCUERE ft BUTLER.
Best guax tartar
at FRANCUERE A BUTLER'S.
WE will sell
CHB API
tf
THE HYDRAULIC PRESS.
Business & Professional*
p. H. FARQUHAR,
Justice of the Peace,
Bridgeport Township. Office, in the old Masonic Hall
Main s i rat, San Juan. 1 tt
0. P. STIDGER,
Attorney at Law, Notary Public,
And Conveyancer. Office on the north side of Main
street, one door west of E V. Hatfield's store,
oppOsitethe Pioneer, NORTH SAN JUAN.
Nov. 13, 1867. 1
C. WILSON HILL,
Attorney at LA w,
Wiil attend promptly to all husinessconfidcd to his care
fn Nevada and adjoining counties.
Of fice In Ahbotfs Building, NEVADA. tfl6
JAMES CARPENTER,
House, Sign and Decorative Painter,
AND
PAPER HANGER*
**uSlToP—Foot of Main street, NORTH SAN JUAN.
All work warranted to give satisfaction. jan 28
JOHN A. SEELY,
Agent for
The TUTew Idria Quicksilver,
The Best and Purest Article in the State!
Post Office Building, North San Juan, Nevada ccunty.
SAM. ABBEY,
New* Agent And Expre ssman ,
Runs a Daily Express from
North San Juan to Sebastopol, Sweetland, Birchville
and French Corral. California and Atlantic papers for
sale.
SMITH’S EXPRESS,
Runs Daily from North San .Tuan to Shady Creek,
Cherokee. Little Gross Valley and Columbia Rill.—
Also, Weekly to Arnold's Ranch, Bloomfield and
Urisko.
AJ“California and Atlantic Newspapers for sale. Let
ters and Packages carried, comiuifsions attended to
and collections made. Agent for the Hydraulic Press
J. B. PAINTER,
(Utl O’MEARA k PAINTER,)
Dealer in
TYPE, PRESSES, PRINTING MATERIAL,
Paper , Cards, and Printer's Stock generally,
133 Clay street, near Sattsoi&e,
SAN FRANCISCO.
jan 21 ly
WM. FAULKNER *s> SON,
Sansome street, San Prancisco, Cal.
\ GENTS FOR JAMES CONNER & SON’S U. S.
TYPE FOUNDRY, and dealers in all kinds of
Printing materials..
Printers Will find it to their advantage to tall On ns
before purchasing. apr23 6m
Dentistry*
DR. F. 0. CLARK,
Dentist, * C herokee
HAS flu Office in the 'tftriifey Hotel* on Main
Street, where he is prepared to perform all ope
rations on the TEKTII, on the latest and most im
proved principles. mar24—3m
J. IV. MYERS,
r>ENT I S T ,
Office at the Union Hotel , North San Juan.
All operations performed on the most approved prin
ciples. Particular attention paid to Plate Work,
mar 24tf.
DENTISTRY.
DR. R. W. STERLING,
SURGEON 4MECIIAN
ICAL DENTIST. Resi
dence, Sweetland, Neva
da tonhty, is prepared to
I operate, and frill be hap
py to attend on All thoqe
who nmy favor him with
their patronage. Teeth
filled with pure gold foil
or Crystal Gold. Also, —
with an insoliuble and
incorrosivc Quart* Ce
ment, which Is Well adapted to Filling and Restoring
frail and discolored Teeth to their original siee and
color; it also possesses a peculiar varnish property, and
will remain firm in cavities that Would not retain a
Gold Filling.
Teeth inserted oh heavy Gold plate, from one to an
entire set, according to the latest approved style.
Exposed and aching nerves treated in 5 to 20 min
utes, leaving the teeth in a fit condition for filling!
o*Childron’s teeth properly regulated, which is
not only important for the preservation of the Teeth,
bnt li\C features of the face and expression of the
countenance.
Teeth extracted without pain, by Dr. Francis’
“Electro Magnetic” process.
By request families will be waited on at their resi
dences without extra charge. apr 28 tf
Mr. J.W. GUTHRIE having become
a partner In the Oak Tree Market, bus
iness will hereafter be conducted uu-ler
the name of
J. W. GUTHRIE & CO.
FRESH AND PICKLED MEATS,
Fresh lieef. Pork, Mutton and Veal, killed every Jay.
The Beat Corited Beef.
Also —
Beet Cattle for Sale.
Enquire as |above.
N. B. All persons knowing themselves indebted
to me, will call atethe Oak Tree Market and settle np
immediately. N. F. BROWN.
North San Joan, Feb’y Ist. 1860. fel>4
M ark ets.
Oak Tree Market*
taro
IBS
SAN JUAN MEAT MARKET.
C. E. POWERS
HAVING become sole proprietor of the
£o* market heretofore kept by Crawford i Co.,
iu Peck k Coley's Brick Building, on Main
dimdlA street, informs the public that bo has always
on band,
Fresh Beef. Pork ana Mutton
Killed every day.
Home Cared Hems,
sweet and delicious.
Corned Beef and Pork,
And Fresh Sausages and Sausage Meat.
«-TRT THE NSW MARKET t'£|
North San Juan, February 18,1660. tf
Fresh California Hams!
CURED IN 1860,
AT THE OAK TREE MARKET.
California Hams and Bacon.
"I V7' B have a large quantity of Hams and Bacon'of
VV our own curing, which we wish to close out
cheap for cash
apt 7 tf
J. VT GUTHRIE,
Ohk Tree Market.
CAMPHBNE t For sale by
FRANCHERE A BUTLER,
J 7 Flams street.
IURXITVaE 4b BEDDING) at
MSAMCJTS.
NORTH SAN JUAN, NEVADA CO, SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1860.
Travel.
MARYSVItyI STAGE'7
OPPOSITION LINE!
The opposition stage for Marysville
will leave North San Juan every
MONDAY WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY, at
o’clock in the morning.
Office 1 at the Sierra Nevada Hotel.
RETURN TKIPS Will I>e made every TUESDAY,
THURSDAY and SATURDAY. Marysville ■ office at
the Young America Saloon, N. E. corner High and
Second street.
PARE, $3 00 EACH WAY.
AJfEvcry care and comfort guaranteed.
J. S. McCUE, Proprietor.
North San Juan, May 12,1800. tf
HO FOR WASHOE!
, SMITH & FALL’S
Train of Passenger Mules for
Western Utah, leaves DOWN
.ieville every MONDAY, WED
NESDAY and Friday, going by the Jamison route—
The Beat Route now Open
across the Sierra Nevada—and making the trip in 3
days. The Trail is in excellent condition, and passen
gers are a snred that they can
Ride every Toot of the Distance.
Applications for passage can be made in Downioville
at tire office of the undersigned, and in North San Juan
at the Livery Stable of T. 0. Smith & CA.
AS“Fare Reasonable.
SMITH & FALL.
April 21st, 1860. t'f
LIVERY STABLE.
Uotfttr Main and Reservoir streets
Worth San Juan.
T. (5. Smith, Sarmet CloW
SMITH & CLOW, Prop’s.
jgfi
WOULD respectfully Inform the traveling prntdlc
that they can be accommodated at a mertflent’f
notice, with the best
Saddle and Buggy Horses
In the Mountains.
LADIES, wishing to take a horseback ride, will find
at our stable, easy, gen tie and spirited animals, with
excellent side-saddles, Ac.
Elegant Top Haggles t
And well matched homes for those 'who desire them.
Horses kept by the day or Week—..oil fed and care
fully groomed.
Excha&ges
frith Camptonville, Forest City and Nevada.
Their large, ahd commodious stables enable
them,to accommodate a very large number of Horses,
and the public can depend upon finding every conven
ience and care that can be found in any first-classs es
tablishment of the kind
North San Juan, Dec.lSth, 1858. 17tf
V ariety.
TIN & HARDWARE STORE.
Stoves, Hardware
Cook stoves,
Parlor stoves.
Box stoves,
Shelf Hardware,
Nalls,
lloSe Pipe,
Cutlery,
A general assortm’nt
of T o ware,
Builder'S Hardware,
Carpenter’s Tools,
Batts and screws,
Iron and steel.
Galvanised iron Pipe,
Water Boxes, Ac,
4®*oh hand and made to order.-®(i
fc’BAfrK. SMITH,
Brick Bow, Main street.
North San Jnan, Nov. 17,1857. Iff
CENTRAL RANCH SAW-MILL
CLARK & CO.
~J ’vTRECT the attention of the public to their
J /splendid steam saw mill, which is now turning
out the very best of
YELLOW AND SUGAR PINE LUMBER,
of every kind for bnilding and mining purposes, [and
delivering it promptly wherever ordered.
They have unrivalled facilities for filling orders im
mediately. and always sell the best material at the low
est prices. They also furnish every kind of
SLUICE BLOCKS,
as directed, and can snpply the citizens of North San
Juan with the
Best of Fire Wood
Orders can be left at the mill, or at the office in Sar
Juan, on Main street, under the flame.
J. F. CLARK.
, J. B. JOHNSON.
Nov. 19th, 1859. tf
Wood and Lumber Yard.
CLARK dk CO* have an extensive Wood and
Lumber Yard at the porter of Cherokee and Res
ervoir streets, by the termfhbs of the railway. Kvery
kind of sawed lumber is kept always on hand, and
large or small demands can be instantly supplied.
Fire Wood, either oak, pine or manzanita. green or
dry, for sal. in any quantity, and will be delivered at
short notice.
Orders can be left at the Yard, or at the office on
Main street. J. F. CLARK,
Nov. 19.1559. tf J. B. JOHNSON.
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY!!!
Live Yankee\ Blacksmith
AND
WAGON SHOP.
On Main St., Opposite Reamer’s Store,
NORTH SAN JtAN.
THE Proprietors have every facility for doing as
good Blacksmith and Iron work as can be done
anywhere, at us short notice and as reasonable prices.
Car Wheels, Ox Yokes d: Wheelbarrows,
of our own manufacture, always on hand.
Light anti Heavy Wagons,
made to order, as cheap and as well as they can be
made below.
Repairing Done with dispatch.
SO.AII work waranted.
mar24—tf JOT, WEYMOUTH A CROSS.
COLUMBIA HILL STORE!
W. C. COLEY
HAS opened a Cash Store at Columbia Hill, where
he offers to the public a choice assortment Of
Goods, consisting of
Groceries And Provisions t
Miners’ Implements, Ac., A(q
A share of patronage is respectfully solicited.
jail 28lf W. C. COLEY.
AINTB and OILS, at the
SAN JUAN DRUG STORE.
Window glass,
At tit. SAN JUAN DRUG STORE.
®ne §ajdra«Uc
B. P. AVERY, Editor,
San FranCisco aito Marysville Railroad.
—According to a report of the Directors
lately published in the Appeal , this impor
tant enterprise is progressing finely and is
certain to result successfully. The available
property of tbc company—embracing 60.000
acres of swamp and overflotved land donated
by the State and valued at Only $lO per acre,
together with 1600 acres of land donated by
Capt. Frisbic rtf Vallejo, half a mile of water
front at the latter place, other donations at
Marysville ahd along the line of the route,
and capital stock subscriptions amounting
to $“626,700 —reaches an aggregate of $2,-
376,700. To complete the road $1,000,000
toore Will be necessary, which must be raised
by loan. Four assessments of 10 per cen‘,
each have been levied upon the capital stock
subscribed, t. 191,549 paid in, and 140,896 of
ibis expended 'em the read, leaving upwards
of $50,900 in the treasury. On the 3rd of
August, 1858, a contract was signed between
the Company and D. C. Haskin, Esq., for
constructing, completing and equipping the
entire Hue of road from Marysville to Vallejo,
including the erection of all required depots
and way stations, buildings, Ac., contem
plated in the former report of the Chief En
gineer and the reclamation of all the swamp
and overflowed lands over Vrhich the road
passes. The consideration at which this, to
the stockholders, very favorable contract,
was made, was the payment of three and
one-half millions of dollars to Mr. Raskin,
as fast as the work progressed at the rates
estimated by the Chief Engineer, in the fol
lowing manner: One and one-half millions
in bonds of the Company, secured by mort
gage upon all the property of the road ; one
and one-half millions in full paid stock of
the Company, and one-half million in cash.
The grading will all be completed by July,
and the road in runniageondition to Suisun
City by another summer, bringing Marysville
within five hours of San Francisco, the en
trepot of the Stale. The receipts of this
road are estimated at not less than $2,000
per day.
A PtEASlxts Inxidknt. —While the conven
tion for the organisation of a provisional
government was in session at Tucson, Ari
zona, and just as the members were consid*
ering a proposition to name a portion of the
territory Santa Rita county, they were
startled by the ringing ot bells, and a hun
dred women or more rushing out of the
church, singing and praying and parading
in front Of them, through the streets, their
patron saint San Augustine. No one in the
Convention knew the cause of this sudden
outbreak of prayer and rejoicing, and every
one knew it was not one of the Mexican
Saint days. The enigma was soon solved ;
a runner had come into town with the joy
ful tidings that Capt. Ewell was coming with
the beautiful little Mexican girl, who had
been carried into captivity about sixteen
days previous by the Apaches. The con
vention resumed business and immediately
conferred upon Santa Rita county the name
of Ewell. The Stockton Republican ob
serves that many a beautiful poem or ex
quisite tale has owed its suggesting influ
ences to a less romantic foundation than that
which gave its present name to Ewell coun
ty, Arizona.
Sierra Items. —We condense from tbe
Democrat that the Sierra Turnpike is a pay
ing work, in more than one respect. The
receipts for toll during the month of April
amounted to upwards of SBOO. Four quartz
mining companies cleaned up an aggregate
of 1214 ounces, worth not less, probably,
than $i21,000. People continue to go to
Washoe. Generally they keep business up
here, where they know it is good, and take
their chance in Silverland. A little girl won
the prize of horses and buggy at Gifford and
Luther’s raffle. Forbes sublimates a story
about a “dorg” who dragged off through the
snow his kennel and a thirty-pound dumb
bell. His drunken master came looking for
him at early morn, ’'sat down on the door
step and watched the fading stars, and the
electric flashes shooting up into the
and the rosy bank through which the god of
day was about cleaving bis way.” We came
away then.
New Idea tn Gkapi Ccltchb.— The Stand
ard has an interesting article describing an
experiment in grape culture made by John
Wolfskill, on Putah creek, which went to
prove that vine stocks raised from the seed
and grafted the second year Vdl! yield fruit
the third year and thrive much better than
any other class of vines* The Standard sug
gests that stocks of a hardy and strong
growth, adapted to local peculiarities of soil
and climate, may be insnred by selecting the
seeds of indigenous varieties. It would be
well, also> to experimeut more in the culti
vation of indigenous grapes without graft
ing. They can fee Vasily improved, and fine
varieties multiplied from them. It was by
cultivation of the native grape on the Ohio
that Longwortb made a fortune and
gave Catawba wine world-wide fame. Mfej.
Bidwell, of Butte county, has produced fine
wine from our river grapes, ani we believe
experiments with native growths have been
successfully made ia other
ITEItS OF 3?B.t)aRESS.
The factthatour mountain soil is valuable
for tillage is fast winning general apprecia
tion. la numerous localities Where the hand
of cultivation never was busy before, it is at
work this spring-, winning nature from her
wildness and smoothing the ruggedness of
these elevated regions til! they smile like the
gardens of liie favored East. Every mining
center is now a focus of agricultural effort,
and the highways are fast being converted
into lanes. Between North San Juan and
French Corrall, a distance of eight miles
along the lofty ridge dividing the South and
Middle Yu baß, very little tillable land
remains unoccupied and unfenced; and for
ten miles above the former town, up nearly
to the deep snow line, where the soil is
deeper and richer, thousands of acres along
the roads have been either enclosed or partly
so, both for tillage and the preservation of
the timber, which is becoming immensely
valuable. From the Upper portion of the
ridge will soon come our chief supplies Of
lumber and firewood, and as the dense for
ests are leveled the ground they have fertil
ized for ages will he ploughed and planted.
Mining operations will occasionally ruin
some choice spot-, but they will justify the
making of many another. But for the mines
these saVage altitudes would not have been
the home of civilized communities for many
years. They constitute the propulsive ele
ment hete, as throughout the whole State.
Those Who work them are themselves be
coming cultivators and home-builders. At
French Corral, an exclusively mining village
ever since 1849, a large number Of fruit
trees and vines have been planted and small
gardens made, surrounding tasteful cottages.
No place in Nevada county evinces tnore ac
tivity in this respect. Bitchville is a mere
hamlet, but is doing its proportion in.the
same good work. At Buckeye Hill, a few
miles further, Orlando Evans has 2,000
rooted grape vines, many of which will bear
this year, and 2,000 cuttings, besides a pro
ductive garden spot. His cottage, surrounded
by a verandah and looking down a sunny
southeih slope, is a model of simple taste
and adaptability to the climate. His rich
mining claims and vineyard are on opposite
sides of the same elevation, while his resi
dence is between. This is an apt illustra
tion of the harmony which is gradually
growing up between the two great interests
of our S’tUe. At Sweetland, signs of im
provement and increasing content are visi
ble in the greater attention shown to orna
mentation of residences and enclosures.—
Robert Crawford has one of the quaintest,
most picturesque little home nests imagin
able. It looks like the happy thought of an
artist. At Sebastopol—which better de*
serves to be knoWn as Spring Vale, than by
Such h warlike name—are three charming
homes tenanted by obr friends McKeeby,
McCoy and Hartman. The last has increased
the number of his vines to four or five thou
sand, is planting a nursery—the first one in
Northern Nevada—and will do his own bud
ding and grafting. He raises splendid po
tatoes, and thinks when planted in a dry
soil they do much better if mulcbed with
saw dust, the heat of which draws up the
subsoil moisture. The next town, our own,
we heed haVdly mention in this connection,
except to say that it can boast of about forty
private gardens, every one of which has its
pretty cottage. The hill sides about the
place art all fenced and partly under culti
vation. Two years hence there will not be
a lovelier village in the State. At Cherokee,
the next town above Sun Juan, may be seen
the handsomest farm in this part of the
county, belonging to Ackley & Collins. Its
fields of bright green grain glitter amid the
sombre pines with most enchanting effect.
At Columbia Hill, Nichols & Decker have
700 rooted vines and 500 fruit trees. Mr.
Lissou has had a very productive small farm
on New York ravine for several years. Keyes’
orchard and garden on Emory’s road we have
before described. They contain several thou
sand vines and trees aid yield a good in
come. At Lake City, Mr. Arnold has a fine
garden and several hundred apple, peach,
plum and pomegranate trees. He has
brought good spring water to the village,
through wooden pipes, a distance of 4,000
feet. At North Bloomfield an Italian named
Antoine has 360 grape vines—some of them
five years old. They have been trozen every
year in the first leaf, and have not borne
fruit. This point is near the line of deep
snow and extreme cold, and probably indi
cates the limit of grape culture, though ap
ples and vegetables do well. The snow last
winter was 30 inches deep ; this winter but
18 inches.
On the 4th of June the citizens of Auburn
are to determine by vote whether they will
authorize the town trustees to subscribe for
$50,000 of the stock of the Sacramento,
Placer and Nevada Railroad.
The great comet that Charles V. was ego
tistical enough to believe had ominous ref
erence to himself, is expected td be visible
next August. Cherokee, prepare for another
celebration.
An exchange, giving an account of a child
that had been burnt to death by hot water,
erroneously said that it was s*>ld*d to death.
VOL. 2. KO. 39
A Lesson* for the Spani'su Chiss.—Th6
following lines are an extract froto an
published volume, in which the adventures
of a probably fictitious character, by name
Aleck Grenville, are set forth. They will
make a good exercise for the Spanish class
in this town. Aleck has started to Califor
nia, and after many startling scenes and in
cidents, arrives at a small town in Mexico,
where he picks up the language, and speaks
it fluently as a native, as may be seen from
his appeal to a beautiful Senorita with whom
he became desperately enamored. It will bo
observed that the style is that of Longfel
low’s “Hiawatha.” All the productions of
the “Poet Larriet” speak for themselves ;
Aleck Grenville readied the house—house in which
his charmer lived,
Lived and smoked her dgarita—dgatita made oT
paper.'
He (ohm) her sitting on the Boor, puffing at her d
gurita—
Looking very interesting-interesting aSan angel.
Aleck Grenville dotted his coon ikin—skin he used to
wear to meeting
In the State of Cotton Planters.
Then he kicked one foot behind him, bobbed his head
down to the floor;
Floor that was so very dirty—dirty but he didn't see
“ Wanot dutti. Serwrita! I hope oosta are mucho 'ivaiitr;
Wano as yon are bonetet, for oosta Are mucho dulcy —
Sweeter than molasSfes candy, candy that my dad did
fetch me
When I was a fdcaninny, about so high or somewhat
higher.
Scnoreto, I am going all the way to California,
Where I'm told thev’s mucho tiro—oro mucho ! wano
enrol
Cary oosta vamos With Me 7 —l will haul yon in my caro
Caro drawn by r/uatro vacot —big he vacoswano vacos I
For oosta I cary mucho, poco-mas than I can tell yon;
And if yon will vamos with me, I will yen make you
mwchn reco.
What 1 oosta no cary vamos; Por-ka you will not va
mos v.ith me?
You shall have a yrandy casta—cassa worth ten thou
sand patoes!
The Tehuantepec Route.— A friend, writ
ing to ns from on board the Golden Gate, off
Panama, under date of April 18th, relates
a conversation which he had with a gentle
man who has been surveying the Mexican
coast from Costa Rica to Acapulco, and who
claims to know something about the designs
of Commodore Vanderbilt. He says that
Vanderbilt’s son in-law is about to opeh the
Tehuantepec route. He has riVeir steamers
built and coaches ready, and has contracted
for a new ocean steamer. Vanderbilt has
seventeen steamers on the Atlantic side and
of course must do something with them.—
Next year he will put down ahorse railroad.
The ascent can be made to the summit of
the hills on this side in two hours, over an
easy road. The gentleman above-mentioned
says he is nearly certain that a ship canal
can be cut through the isthmus at Cbiriqui,
at a comparatively small cost. The moun
tains flatten out completelyj the highest
land from ocean to ocean being only twenty
eight feet above flood tide.
EcfelPSE. —The astronomers have made an
appointment for the sun to be eclipsed on
the 18th of duly, llis invisibility—strange
that there should be live eyes in invisibility!
—ftill be Visible On the Pacific.
hying the eclipse Will be the appearance, in
the vicinity of thCsutt, of the planets Venus-,
Mercury, Jupiter and Saturn—an event
which will not, according to astronomical
calculations, occur again for millions of
years-, so impatient people had better not
miss it.
.«.
The Sacramento Bee says the Pony Ex
press was started solely to convince Congress
of the superiority of the Central route and
to secure mail contracts over the same for a
number of years-. The parties who com
menced the enterprise are now themselves
half inclined to think that it will ultimately
pay, although they had no each anticipations
at the beginning.
Parties who lately visited Yo Semite Val
ley found beautiful weather, thousands of
fat pigeons, and the falls booming with
their spring flood. The grass in the valley
was from five to six inches high and thickly
studded with blooming strawberry vines.
It Still Lives. — We made a mistake in
quoting from an exchange tWt) Weeks ago
that the S. F. Telegram had suspended pub
lication. It still lives, and we hope it may
continue to flourish for years. It is & good
paper despite its anger at a joke.
There are several splendid macadamised
roads in Australia-, built mainly by Ameri
can enterprise. This fact is almost as cred
itable to our country as the superior prowess
of Hcenan 1
Spelling with Ease. —The way some of
the papers spell "pOn-e-y express*”— Sien'd
Democrat.
Glad we didn’t say that, as we intended-.
A man named Swilling killed & drunken
Mexican in self-defence last week. It is hot
the first time that swilling has killed a man*
Yellow fever is carrying off the inhabi
tants of Acapulco at the rate of about thir
teen per day, and steamer passengers are not
allowed to go on shore.
The Climate at Los Angeles. —The Lbs
Angeles Star says that the market there
abounds with cucumbers; that it is supplied
the year round with new potatoes; that
strawberries are raised etery month in the
year; that green peas are in constant sup
ply, and that tomatoes may be bad every
month—one garden having some vines three?
years old, whioh are constantly bearing.

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