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Roseburg review. [volume] (Roseburg, Or.) 1885-1920, August 14, 1885, Image 1

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ROSEBURG REVIEW
IS ISSUED
FRIDAY MOUXINGS y
BY
J. R. N BELL, - Propriqtor.
Oo Year - - - - - - - $2 50
Bix Months - - - - - - - - 1 25
Three Mouths - - ----- -1 1 00
roseburg Review
HAS THE, .. ..
FIIIEST JOB 0FFIG3
IN DOUGLAS COUNTY
CARDS, BILL HEADS, LEGAL BLAHKS
And other Printing, Iucludirg ,
Large and Heavy Posters and Showy
Neatly and Expeditiously executed -
AT PORTLAND PRICES.
The se aro the term of thoae paving In advance.
Tbe Kcviev offers flue inducement!! to advertisers.
Terms reasonable. " '
VOL. X.
ROSEBURG, OREGON FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 1885.
NO. 19.
Roseilrg
RevieWo
JJ I KEG I OH Y
1 1 r H K
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS
OF THE
TJiiitetl StateH,
State of Orcon
v AND
G rover Cleveland. . ....... .. .President.
Thomas A. Hkndricks. . . .Vice President.
Taos. F. Bayard. . . ; . . .Secretary of State
Dasikl T. MANNiNO.Secretary of Treasury.
L. Q. 0. Lamar. .Secretary of the Interior.
V"m. C. Esdicott .Secretary of War
W. C. W hitkey .Secretary of Navy.
w . i . v iLA3 rose Piaster uenerai .
A. H. Garland. ........ Attorney General.
Uobcisox It. Waits. .... . . . .Chief Justice.
U. S. Senators for Ore.
Joseph N. Dolpii ......... Portland.
Nok Est. ' .'' - '
Member of Congress for Ore.
lion. Binger IIkuMAnn. . . .Roseburg.
M. P. Deady . Portland.
V. S. district Attorney.
James F. Watson ...Portland.
U. S. Collector of Internal
He venue:
Joky Whitt a k er Lane county.
' StatejOfficers
Govern or-
Z. F. Moody Salem.
Secretary of State.
St. P Earhart . . .Salem.
State IVe.Hiirer.
Edward U iksh. Salem.
Superintendent of Public In
- htrtictiou.
E. B. McElroy Salem.
State Printer:
W. II. Byaps. , Salem.
District Judge 2nd Judicial Dis-
. tret
R. S. Be ax Eugene.
District Attoriiey.2ud Judicial
JDistrictj
James Hamilton. . . . .
'. Roseburg,
StHfeSenntorw.
J. II. SiLPE and John Emmett.
IIcnry Kogeks,
GEORGE W. RlDDLE.
t ",: . Wm. Manning.
.'. i w.r
County Officers:
County Judge.
J. S. Fitzhi'gh .......... . Roseburg
C J M - .'
t;ouniy voiiinnssioHcrs.
ClfAKLES A. McLiKE. ..... .Oakland
1 II . . . A f . I I 1.
tfUUA X1AL1 DIU UB V.I ITK
Mieritn "
0." A. Taylor Itosebur.
Clerk.
G. W. Kimball Tiosf burg.
County Treasurer.
tT . juuunr. ............ iiuacumj.
County Surveyor.
Wm. Thiel. .............. Oakland.
CiiUty Assessor.
E. C Sacry. . . . . . ..... . . .Oaklaiid.
Coroner.
City Officers:
-'.'yTriiKtfos:
J. C. FrLLERTOX, ' J. J. Caulfield,
L. C WftEELER, Thomas Grxsdale,
(V L WfLLIS.
Ito corrtor. ... . . . . ..T- Fokd.
J4aiMUull.i . . .GeOROE I.ANGKXBERG
atimiAil BOWES BROS.
FOUNDRY,
Machine Shop,
Wagon Shop,
Blacksmith Shop.
MN ilAKE CASTINGS FROM ONE
j oou'e to tliree toiitt weight. Small Cu
jh1a for Btnall castings. Aloney refunded if
work is uot Ralinfac-tory. rortland prices !
2vr telegrams and expresae.
jf OHN ANDERSON,
., ' PROPRIETOR OF THE
BIG HORSE SHOE
CIGAR STORE.
Jackson street, lioseburg Oregon.
TKALER IX CANDIES, NUTS, CIGARS, TOBAC
U co pipe, notion., cutlery, stationery, eitjiir
mci, nd everytinhg usually found iu a tirst-class
variety store. -t.
Meentchaum Goods a specially.
My good are the best and guaranteed as repre
sented. Prices low, as 1 do not propose to be un
dersold. .IOUX ANDERSON.
JPUMAIIUIIEPALAGF,
. UNCLE JOHN GILDERSLEEVE
Has the fluest stock of furniture south of Portland
j . ' which he sells as cheap as it can be bought
in the State. The new fangled
DOUBLE BED LOUNGE.
AXD
PATENT CORNICES.
Also has on hind a full assortment of beds and bed
ding, chairs, tables,
BUKKAUS AND COMMODES,
And all kinds of Cbildrens Chairs, etc.
J. GILDERSLEEVE.
PORTLAND AD VERTISERS-
C. W. KNOWLES, v L. D. BliOWN.
ST. CHARLES HOTEL,
(EUROPEAN PLAN )
BROWN L KNOWLES, Proprietors.
FIRST CLASS IN EVERY RESPECT.
Good Restaurant Connected With -The House
Fire-proof Brick Building
ISO Rooms.
In the Center of the City
COR. FR0XT ASD MORRISOX STS., PORTLAND
. EUROPEAX PLAX.
ESMOND HOTEL,
" First Class In Every Particular,
Corker Front and Morrison Sts
PORTLAXD,
OREGOX
Thomas Giiseas, Proprietor.
ESMOND I5ESTAUHANT,
If. Mlllek, Proprietor,
Comer Front and Morrison Streets,
PORTLAND, OREGOX.
Special Arrangements for Wedding and Dinner
Parties and Banquets.
milE ST. CHARLES RESTAURANT.
T
Charles Heilmax, Proprietor.
The very best in the Market is set
before you. !
THE
INTERNATIONAL
HOTEL,
Cor. Third and E Streets,
Portland, Oregon.
rui-uced rates, prices to suit the times
phis large and well-ap pointed house
X offers sujxsrior ajcouuxUtioiis at. pjnlar prices.
Meal j6o, H;oiiis i5e. and Mc. Only tliree blocks
I miii all Depots and Steamer landiiis, tree Buss
I .o ami from the lintel No ( hinese ervauts. No
overcliaruos r deviation from regular ra.un ol
I er ba .
zuartf-U Jti. JLtiW X iiV. rrpr.
Louis Eppinger, Manager.
EUROPEAN PLAN.
Sample Rooms for Co i : T.'avcUh
PORTLAND, OR
THE
NEW YORK COFFEE HOUE
RESTAURANT AND
Oyster Saloon-
THE LEADIXO CHECK RESTAURANT IN CITY
SIFERD & HACKNEY. PROP S.
Open Day and Night. Private Rooms for Ladies.
132 First Street Portland Oregon.
Established 1852.
-A. ROBERTS,
Corner First and Alder Street Portland, Or.
THE LEADJ&G
AND
OF OREGON.
"THE PLACE TO BUY.
J B CONGLE
Manufacturer, Wholesale and Retail Dealer In
SADDLES, HARNESS,
C3. Leather asd Saddlery Habdwarf.
103 and 110 Front Street PORTLAND OREGON
MOOIIE'S RESTAURANT.
(Principaal Business Street.)
Roscburg, Oregon
MEALS 25 CENTS, LODGING 25 CENTS
r"We Keep the Best the Market Affords.
MRS. NELLIL M0UF
ISAAC MATHEWS,
I-3s Just Opened
NEW MEAT 3XVltlT!
Opposite Carlon's Stable.
Juloy Beef, Moderate Trices
Tennyson's Latest Poem-
Two sftm3 of love make day of human life, V
Which el, with oil its pains and griefs and deaths;
Were utter darkness; one the sun of dawn ,
That brightens through the mother's tender eyes,
And warms the child's awakening world; and one
The latter rising1 sun of spousal love,
Which from her household orbit draws the child
To move in other spheres.' The mother weeps
At that white funeral oi the single life?
Her maiden daughter's marriage; and her tears -Arehalf
of pleasure, half of pain. The child
Is happj ever in leaving her. But thou,
True daughter, whose all faitWu I filial cyi
Hare seen the lonlinessof earthly thrones, .;
Wilt 'leither quit the wdo wod crown, nor let -This
latter light of love hate risen in vain.: .
But, m oving: through the mother's home, between
The twv that lo?e thee, lead a suuimsr life.
Swayed by each love, and swaying to each love
Like some conjectured placet in mid heaven,
Between two suns, and drawing down from both j
The lixht and genial warmth of couble day.
."But God forbid-that' I should lory save in 'Jth
cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.
This snblime resolution of Paul not
to glory in anything save the cross of
Jesus Christ, made him the hero of the
ages. Apart from Him who suffered
on it, there certainly lias been no be
liever in the cross, comparable to that
npostle who made it his solitary glory.
He who glories in the cross is glorified
by it. As, of old, one knelt to become
a knight, and kneeling was smitten by
the sword that knighted him, so that
while he knelt a soldier, he arose a
knight, so Paul arose by the cross the
world called ignominious, unto the
highest order of Immortality. The sin
ner, and a-lo the saint is the creature
of his shrine, whatever be its origin.
"They that make them are like unto
them," said the psalmist, speaking of
the gods f the heathen. Tlify are like
th?m, for, though they make them they
are in time made by them, as the foun
tain and its source rise or sink to the
same level. The stream of humanity
rises to the unspeakable glories of the
heavens, when it can ascend
through
the cr ss as its fountain
co-niinalinii
wiw tne current mat issues mere.
"When Nero ruled the Eternal City
and lived in a golden palace, and ruled
in the luxurious splendors of the court
and rolled in unlimited wealth, th
crossbeam languished in his prison;
anon, be passes the lofty wnlls of Rome
and treads wiih trembling steps the
Appian Way to t lie place of decapita
tion. Wl ose p'acu would ou chose,
oh, brother! Paul has nb-oady chosen,
and wriiten his r sjiution in i.iltlible
lettei-s, ,4God forbid tbafc 1 should glo
rv save in the cross of the Lord Jesus
Christ'
Time Ins indicated the wisdom ef his
decision. The. glory of Home has van
ished, theehurvh grows young with the
flight of increasing age. ;
.Paul sits crowntd among the shiiin
and gloriiied, and God shield us from
knowing the doom of the sovil of Nero.
Nero wore for a time the diadem of
the Cresars, Paul wears foreterniry the
crown cf righteousness which fadeth
not away through oncoming myriads
of ages.
Th3 r.ame of Nero is the synonym for
everything mean and vile, the name of
Paul loads all the trains of earth's no
bility. The choice of Paul "raised a
mortal to the skies," that of Nero
"brought au augel down."
By the cross men rise to the zenith;
by the throne of pride, they fall to the
nadir, a-id like Lucifer, never to rise
a'zam. it seems to me tiiat in making
the choice for Christ and the cross, we
must ut ourselves in imagination, in
the times of the apostles, and decide
as between a Paul and a Nero; between
a Man of Sorrows and a Pontius Pilate.
Did we all do this would there be
Christians now? Yes, men chose the
cross then; they would to-day under
similar circumstances.
But tbe circumstances are similar,
yea, identical; not in their outward
form, but iu their essential character.
The impulses, the motives, the incli
nations of men are the same to-day as
they were when. Paul went on his mis
sionary journeys; or when Jesus dis
coursed to the multitudes on the shoies
of Galilee. As then, we confess Jesus
determined if necessary to die with
him; or we are ashamed of him and of
his words before a sinful and an adul
terous generation. Still, we fall on
the stone and are broken; or it falls on
us and we are ground to powder.
There is the same power iu the cross
to-day as there was when Paul, by bear
ing it, and glorying in it, was transfig
ured by it into the likeness of Him who
is the effulgence of Jehovah's g'ory.
How abject and mean seem all other
objects of glorying when compared to
the cross of Jesus Christ. The heathen
abroad, glory in hideous idols,
jrrim
images of debasing and imaginary pow
er, and the heathen at home worship at
snrines as vne. j nere are many things
in which men glory. Such is human
nature that each individual selects
sonw object of worship to which big
sonl lows in homage; Christianity
does not destroy, but regulates human
nature.
It cleans the corroded wheels of our
A - 1 1 11 1 ,
meiuat ana niorai ciocK-woric that we
keep truer time; it restores the soul's
lost harmonies that the music of life is
sweeter; out of the manifol J roicas of
earth, it enables the ear to select the
voice of truth and beauty. The value
oi sucu a coTecuve as- uiiratianuv is
the moie apparent when we perceive
the false object of glorying and their
soul-killing tendencies; false, because
while they are good in themselves they
are turned aside from their legitimate
use and exalted into objects of woi-ship,
borne sriory in me beasts that were
created for the U3e of man; theatten
tiou, the interest and the affections be
ing lavished on horses, dogs and fowls.
With others, the ruling pa ssion -is for
the accumulation of wealth, or tfie ac
quisition of titles of office, of-rankan 1
of power, prefairing to rule on earth
and suffer in hell rather than to , serve
on earth and reign in heaven,: How
unenviable the place in history of the
Bacons, the Tweeds and the Dorseys. -
Others glory in their race, their color
and their nationality, having little or
no regard for .their 'fellow-men when
they belong to another clan, forgetting
that "of one blood God created" all the
nations of men to dwell on all the, face
of the earth." It is the cross thagoes
in advance of the implements of a Chris-,
tian civilization, and reconciles to each
d'her irien'of hostile races and restores
to earth herfost traltiesT w:
In times of political' excitement it
would seem thai to glory in party i$ the
chief end of man. Then each party
imagines itself the especial guardian of
the govf.mn.ent, the constitution, the
institutions and the liberties of the
country; and the opposition is regarded
as bent upon the utter destruction of
a'l. The effects of this party-woi-ship
are destruction of confidence and friend-
shin between the sections, intoxication
of the mental and moral faculties, so
that-. wo can not see our fellow-men as
they really are, and the growth of big
otry aad alienatioa and hate.
This pariy-worship freezes the genial
currents of the soul, and leaves . in the
eart a parched and an id desert. Such
is party servitude in politics; how much
he more ruirous in rebgion, where it
disfigures the body of Christ, and often
destroys them for whom Canst died.
It subverts the christian religion, wdiose
essence is love; it makes a Babylon of
the New Jerusal m, and converts the
cress into an instrument of torture, as it
was before Christ; by dyinjf on ir, chang
ed it into a shrine of unfeeling beauty.
As poor, frail, ignorant and sectarian
men are prone to glory in party rather
than the cr ss. so are they prone to
w A.
b rn incensed party leaders rather than
to Christ. . Men, who can not bow to
the man Christ Jesus, are soli to men.
Because they are in bo:idie to me n
hey wear "their names, as tokens of
lebjnous fealty, and i ronoinee them
ss their shilboleths. and parade them
a
h. mehold gods. The cross, on the
contrary, .frees us from all bondage to
men, and tcsach ;s us to honor all men,
and to love all men, but to worship
oulv God. It reco.niized no master of
the soul, but the soul's Creator an 1
Redeemer. A man in the church may
be eminent and great, but oulyas th.j
first among equals, for all aro brethren
taare. Nor should w) glory in doc
trine, even though it be "our pi a."
It may b3 that many a one who d.3-
nouncfs glorying in "doctrine, when it
is that of Calin or Wesley, is an un
conscious rcctariaii iu h'.s zeal for
Christian Union, glorying in his own
"feasible basis," instead of the cross of
Jesus Christ by wliich al :ie the child
ren of men are reconciled to Go 1 and
to one another. And what is it to glory
in the cross of Christ ? '
It is. to glory in Christ cruciGed; it is
to choose as Lord him whom the world
derided and put to an ignominious
death; even death on a cross; him who,
in bringing many pons to g'ory, was
perfected in suffering; him who for the
joy that was set before him the joy in
ving men from sin and death en
dured the cross anl despised the shame.
Such is the meaning of Paul's synec
doche. To glory in such a cross is to accept
as one's own the life of the crucified
with all that it involves of responsibil
ity, of self-abnegation and sacrifice, and
of glorious destiny. Such glorying re
produces the Christ in the life of the
Christian, in whom Christ's glory glis
tens, as the light of the sun in the
bloom and m the ripened fruit of the
kapple and the peach.
The Christian s earth-life is made
glorious by the glory that excelleth; his
life is sweetened and enriched, and
made hopeful and glad and beautiful;
but most in death does his soul tri
umph. For him death is not death at
all, but the vestibule to a house not
made with hands, eternal in the heav
ens.
For him death has no sting, the grave
no terrors; for him hope hath a star and
the rustle of angel's wings; for him the
Jordan opens, and the land of promise
extends without limit; for him immor
tality pours ont its riches from rivers
inexhaustable. It is said that thera is
joy in heaven over one sinner that re
pents: how much more over a saint
that triumphs, that falls in battle on
i '
his shield, that dying looks still upon
the standard of the cross and "smiles
to see its splendors fly in tiiumph o'er
his closing eye."
Then he- enters his glorified body,
shines in the light of tbe Great White
Throne, and "knows no more the sor
rows that bend us here."
Oh, let us glory in the cross only,
till we "enter the green tent whose cur
tains never outward turn," till we enter
the rest prepared for the people of God.
J. P. Davis.
The Difference-
They had been married six weeks,
and she said: "Now don't oo stay out
late, but come oma. soon to oor ,little
wifey tifey!'" They had been married
six years, and she said: "If you go
out to-night, Smith, I'm going to lock
up the house and go oyer and sleep at
mothers.
Aii Excerpt From Dr. Newman'3 Address
at the Death of General Grant
; Dr. Newman then deliverf d the ser
mon, the family sittign, in the mean
time, abovtt the remains in the parlor.
He spoke very feelingly in his address,
which consumed one hour and a half in
its dejivery. lie took as his text the
twenty-first verse - of the twenty-fifth
chapter of Matthew: "Well done, thou
good and faithful servant; enter thou
into the joy of thy Lord."
"Such, my brethren," said the speak
er, "is the eulogy that God shall pro
nouiice upon human goodness and fidel
ity wherever found among the.sons of
men.";. c. , ' ; . ..
"Some comrade in arms will speak
of the splendor of the martial genius of
the dead, some statesman will review
the" majesty of hia civil administration,
historians will place him on the" pedes
tal of his renown, but let me," said the
speaker, "as a minister of religion, dwell
upon that great character which will
ever be his crown of glory and the im
perishable heritage of the country he
loved so wc 11." V
The minister then dwelt upon the
honors which wens bestowed upon him,
and the l)omage which was done his
memory, and declared that "the secret
of his power over the thoughts of the
world and the love of mankind was his
loftiness of chaiacter and grandeur of
intellect, and the fact that he was none
other than himself. He was one of the
Few men in history who exceeded ex-
ectation, by doing what all others had
failed to do. He had no hatred in his
heart. His holy evangel to the nation
was 'Let us have peace.' and in his
lying chamber he had grasped the hand
of him whose sword was the first he.
lad won. As illustrative of this broad
spirit, the sorrow at his death is nation
al to-dav in its broadest sense. Duty
to his conscience, his country and hs
God, was his standard of successful
manhood. He was the humblest of
men and a lover of the most lowly.
His love of wife, children and home
was supreme."
Speaking of the deep and tender af
fection he bore his wife, the speaker
said: "And thai such was the tender!
ness of his love and solicitude for her
and hers appears by a letter found af
ter his death. He had written it
secretin and carried the sacred missive
lay after day during fourteen days,
knowing she would find it at las."
He quoted from the letter as fodows:
Look after our dear children and di
rt cfc them in paths of rectitude. It
would distress me far more to think
that one of them would depart from an
honorable, upright and virtuous life
than it would to know they were pros
trated cm a bed uf sickness from which
they were never to arise alive. Thy
have never given us any cause for alarm
on their account, and I earnestly pray
thev never will. With these few in
unctions and the knowledge I have of
your love and allection and ot the duti
ful affection of our children, I bid you
a final farewell until we meet in anoth
er and I trust a better world. You
will find this on my person after my
demise." '
This was cf.ited Mt. McGregor, July
9, 1885.
Dr. Newman continuing said: "The
principles oi Lhtistianity were deeply
igrafted upon the spirit of General
Grant. On the 18th of April last he
said: 'I believe in the holy scriptures,
and who so lives by them will be beni-
fited. Men may differ as to interpreta
tion, but the seriptures are man's best
guide.' He held broad religious views,
and believed in the kinship of all man
kind."
The closing portion of the address
was devoted to a discription of the last
hours of the General's life,his calm for
titude, unwavering patience and clear
brain; knowing that death was near and
praying for its coming.
At the conclusion of the discourse
the hymn, "Nearer my God to Ther,"
was rendered impressively by the con-
egatiou. The services ended With
the benediction.
A Story of Gen. Bragg.
I have heard a story in the old army
very characteristic ot Bragg. Un one
occasion, when stationed at a post of
several companies, commanded by a
field officer, he was himself command
ing one of the companies and at the
same time acting post quarter-master
and commissary, He was a first lieu
tenant at the time, but his captain was
detached on other duty. As command
er of the company he made a requisi
tion upon the quartermaster himself
for something he wanted. As quarter
master he declined to till the reouisi-
x
tion, and indorsed upon the back of it
his reason for so doing. As company
' a.
commander he responded to this, ursr-
ing that his requisition called for not!.-
nig out what he was entitled to, and
that it was the duty of the quarter
master to fill it. The quartermaster
still persisted that he was right.
In this condition of affairs Bragg refer
red the whole matter to the command
ing officer. The latter, when he saw
the natare-of the matter referred, ex
claimed: "Mv God, Mr. Bragg, you
have quarreled with every officer iu ti e
army, and now you are quarreling with
yourself." Gen. Grant's Book.
Complaint is made that vegetables
shipped north are overripe when they
reach the market A good many eggs
shipped toutli seem to have the same
failing. Savannr h, (Ga.) News,
OAKLAND ADVERTISERS
JgJ 1IEARTS0CK,
Oakland, Oregon.
Wagonmaker
and
Undertaker,
KEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND A
line assortment of i Coffins and Burial
Caskets, which he will sell at reasonable
prices. Also keeps a large stock of all ma
terials necessars for repairing and making
Wagons, Buggies, Plows and Machinery of
au Kinaa.
Q A. SEHLBREDE, j
ATIORXEYAT LAW,
OAKLAND, OREGOX.
Notary Public- . , - ' -
BAILEY'S
HOTEL.
Oakland, Oregon.
Board $1 per Day; Single Meals, 25 cents,
.-.)-
fSTThis house has lately changed hands and is
thoroughly renovated and refurnished. The travel
in? public will find the beat of accommodations.
IVo Cliiuameii j Employed.
! SMITH BIXLZI
MRS. S. A. MBTCHIXSOS,
MILLINERY STORE!
Oaltaliitl,
Orcffoni
LAOIES WILL V.SD MT; STOCK LARGE AND
Complete. Price moderate.
rji-x- M 111. Mns. S. A. Hctchissoh..
" . t
Onklnnd, j Oregon
I 1 f JUST RETURNED FROM
iSiiu Missouri, where he purchased
Seventeen Head of Fine Pedigreed
Short Horn Durham Cattle!
And has established ;a Stock Farm at
the Red Hills, Eighi miles north of
Oakland. The next season ho will
have CALVES FOR SALE and in
vites the attention of the citizens of
Douglas county to this new enterprise.
A Cut of the Sire of jtwo of his Calves
can be seen at this office.
i
This Bull Weighs'2500 Pounds!
Thin in flesh, and isj st beaut. .. Mr.
Kerley can be seen at Oakland and
would dispose of two
Season.
These Stock were
Yourg Bulls this
nirchased of the
Celebrated Independence Stock Raisers
Chiles, Knox, Davis Bros., and Hughes
fc Son, and are catalogued.
There are two Sucjking Calves born
since the purchase, ahi five more will
come this Season.
DEPOT HOTEL,
OAKLAND, OREGON.
I?ieliarcl Tlidmas, Prop.
This Hotel has been; established for a
number of years, land lias become
very popular with the travel
' ing public.
First Class
SLEEPING ACCOMODATIONS.
AND THE,
Table supplied with the B?st the Market affords
Hotel at the Depot of the Railroad.
CIVIL BEND STORE
V. I. ARRIIIGTON,
i
DEALER IN
I Dry Goois Grbcsios eto
All Kinds of Produce Taken in Exchange
CIVIL BEND, DOU0. CO., OREGON.
The Portland Business College, Portland, Ore-
tmn ftfTfrs Riinerior orivate and class instruction
to the young and middle-aged of both sexes who
desire VO ODUUU B uiiw:iutucviuuavtui mm.
AAia(ctant with trvnrnncrh work, una At the
least expense. Day and evening sessions througn
ontthe year. Students admitted anytime. Cata
logue on application, a. r. abstbo2u, rnucipui.
SUBSCRIBE?.
RErIEW and
PJFES SIONAL.
OSEB URG, ORE. ;
L F. LANE, j JOHN LANS
JANE & LAKE, 1
- Attorneys at Law.
Main street, opposite Cosmopolitan IIoteL
J C. FULLERTON,
Attorney at Law.
Office in Marks' brick, up stairs.
N. MOO EE, . .
General Insurance Agent.
. Office at Court House, lloaeburg.,-
G. SCR0GCJS, JR., r
I, Real Estate Aent, ,
Office with Lane & Lane, near Court House
ALL KINDS OF REAL ESTATE AND CITT
Property Bought, Sold or Leased on CommU
aion. Exchanges ot Real Esta.e effected. taxrtU U
M IS GELLANEO US.
BELFILS,
Watchmaker.
HAVING HAD 28 YEARS EXPERIENCE-AS
Watchmaker in Oregon. I feel cottfliieot tJ
giving satisfaction iu all work entrusted to ma
1 have the County patent riirht for sale of Concrete
Cement Pipe for convey injr water to any place de-wreU-
L. BKLTltS.
T JASKULEK,
V . -Practical
Watchmaker, Jeweler and Optician.
ALL WORK WARRANTED.
Dealer in Watches, Clock?, Jewelry,
Spectacles and Eyeglasses.
A FULL. LINK OP
CIGARS, TOBACCO & FANCY GOODS.
THE ONLY RELUBLE OPTOMER IN TOWN
for the proper ad juatmont of Spectacles. Depot
of the Genuine Bnvr.il ian Pebble Sectaeles and Eye
glasses. Offlce in Hamilton's Brick Block.
H PARRY, ;
Merchant Tailor.
First right-hand room, up stairs, orefr
Marks' Store.
Repairs and Alterations neatly done.
ABSOLUTELY ( j FIRST CLASS
DC! McCL ALLEN, I
.1 Proprietor of the "
McCLALLEN HOUSE.
Large Sample Rooms for Commercial
Travelers. :
Free Coach to and from the bouse
Bagsajje delivered free of charge.
T A SMITH.
v. - Proprietor of the
CITY BAKERY AND
CANDY FACTORY
KEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND A FULL
Stock of Bread, Cakes, Pics, Plain and Fancy
Crackers, etc. Also a fine selection of French aad
American Candies ana Chocolate Goods.
JOHN NEVILLE,
V Proprietor of the
IiOSEBURG SODA WORKS
MANUFACTURES A SUPERIOR QUALITY Or
Soda Water. Sarsanarilla and Uimrer Ale. Or.
ders front abroad filled wiih promptness and at
reasonable rates. 1
RS. HOOVER,
Dealer in
FINE MILLINERY
AND FANCY GOODS,
Ladies will find my Stoct Large and
Complete. Prices Moderate.'
Mrs. H..E. Boo vsr.
JII. O'M ALLEY, i
. Propiietor of the
ROSEBURG MARBLE WORKS.
V And Dealer in "
Toombstones, Tablets, Etc.
Shop Rear of Hogan'a Store.
THE PEOPLES
GROCERY STORE. ..
: O. II. FLOOK
. . . ,
HAS JUST OPENED A NEW AND NICE STOCK
of Family Groceries in tbe Belfils nuildlnr,
where he will be glad to see all wanting Goods In hi
line. Country produce taken in exchange. Orders
from the country will receive careful attention.
fJIHE CENTRAL HOTEL. ,
Having as;ain assura d the managcK
ment of this well-known House, r of
which we are the owners, w take
this method of Informing th public
that it will be . .
I First-Class in Every Pa.rticulak5;
Meals and Lodjfiuif per day...... ....91 09'
Meals. : .. . .... .
Lodipng.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. " '
S. T. k E. GARRISON.

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