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The Dalles times-mountaineer. [volume] (The Dalles, Or.) 1882-1904, August 31, 1889, Image 1

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9ffilT!VTAIXEEJt. ' Volame XXX
THE DALLES, OREGON, SATURDAY, AUGUST 31, 1889,
NUMBER 3
CONSOLIDATED 18S2.
TiJifcs-aioi'aiTAisEEn, - vm
PKINTED EVERY f.VrUKDAY
BY
John Pi'ichell, Edjok Aho Proprietcr
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
Single copy, one year. ...
Single copy six months
4aTeru strictly in ad van re
..2.0
.. 1.00
Entered at the I'mtngtce at The Dalle, Or., as Second
ClaetMaiter for traluitutigLon liirjuun me mih.
LIST OF STATE AND CO'JHTY OFFICIALS.
Governor S. Pennovcr
Sesrctary of .State W. VicBndc
Treasurer--. eo. W. U ebb
SuperiiftuuJent of tublic instruction.. K. P. iicEIroy
Senators
Congressman
State 1'rintur. ......
t J. II. Mitcneli
li. liermaiin
Frank iiaker
COlTl.
Sheriff
Clerk
Geo. Herbert
..O. li. Thompson
Geo. Much
Treasurer
Commissioners
Assessor
Surveyor r. . .
Suferintenuent of Public fachcol
Coroner
I Geonre A. Young
H. A. Leavcus
H. Gourlay
E. r . Huarp
.... A. C. Connelly
...William llicneii
Professional Cards.
pvR. J. O. BOYD.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
ibe Dalles, Oregon.
Office Rooms 5 and 8. over Moody & licLeod's
store, comer 2.1 and Washing ton S(.
Residence North side Fourth St, near Lincoln.
Calls iu city or couutry answered at all hours.
J. B. coitnof.
QONDON fc CONDON,
Attorneys
v . co.ndc.n.
La v.
Offlce On Court street, opposite the OM Court
House, The Li'ille?, Or.
Jl U. THOMPSON,
'Attorney and Counselor at Law,
Oftick Kpit door to U. S. Land Office.
Will practice in all Courts, and in the U. S. Land
Office. Collections promptly attended to.
D
SlDDALL D. D. 8.
Nitrous Oiide or
Laughing Gas Giver
For Painless extraction of Teeth. Rooms, sign of
the Golden Tooth, Second Street.
I)
K. H. LOGAN.
Office :
Rooms 2 and a in Land Olucn Building.
C. UOLLISTEK,
O
Plivsieinn nntl Surspnn,
Rooms oi-er Dalles National Bank.
Office hours lfc A.M. to 13 M.. and from 2 to 4 P.M.
Residence West end of Third street.
o
D. DOANE, Jf. D.,
Pliysician and Surgeon,
The Dalles, Oregon
Office Over French & Co.'b Bank.
Rksidsscb Over lIcFarland & French's.
J-R. S. B. WALTER.
Physician and Surgeon.
Diseases of Children a speciality. Erekinsville
Bberman Co., Oregon.
DR. J. F. DICKSON, GRADUATE OF TOR
onto University. Canada. Office room, 4 oyer
Moody's store. Office hours 8 to 10:31 A. M.; 2 to 4
P. M. Country calls promptly attended.
f r HATS 8 HUNTINGTON
JJJ-AYS HUKTINGTON,
Attorneys at Law,
Office In French's Buildirur, Second St, between
Washington and Federal.
R.
F. HOKE, ATTORSEVAT LAW.
over Postotlice, The Dalles.
Room 5,
ap8dw
E. ATWATER,
Dalles, Oresen.
ATTORNEY AT LAW, TIIE
apr 16-wtf
B. b. dittos.
GEO. WATKIX3.
D
UFUR 4s WATKLKS,
Attorneys-at-Law.
NOTARY PUBLIC.
Rooms over Moody & McLeod's store, next door to
Fish liardon's, Washington Sfc " ?v
.JEMNETT ft WILSON. . -
v Attorneys at !LaW,
- . : y '
Office In Schanno'S building, Bp-stairs. i
- The Dalles - - Oregon.
t. fc. STOBT.
W. k BBASSIUW.
S"
TORY BRADSIIAW,
Attorneys at Law.
The Dalles, Oregon.
MCCOY & MoCOY, BARBERS, Second Street,
next door to MaiEarchcru & MacLeod's. The
cleanest shave, the nobbies hair-cut and most health
ful baths. apSdsw
A.
A. BONNY.
Central Market.
Corner Court and Third streets. The Dal es
Crrc-on. We always keep the best. Cash paid or
tit stock.
1 tf
, KOONTZ,
lie nl Estate,
Insurance and
LoanA sent.
Aocnts for the Scottish Union and National In-
' iraraiiee company of Edinburgh, Scotland,
Capital
43.000,000.
Valuable Farni3 near the City
to sell on easy
Ottlce over Post Office. The Dalles, Or.
GEO.
ANDERSON,
BaALBB
ALL KINDS OF GOHS,
KevolTens. Am monition.
Fishin; Tackle, Pocket Cutlery, Razors, etc, etc.
Repairing and New Work done to Order.
Bccond Street THE DALLES OREGON
ladies, Attention!
A Sew Invention for Dress dittins.
A. Self-Instructor
That can be used by a man or woman, and which
gives a perfect fit. Price of scale, including
a key of full instructions. Sit SO.
Can be had by calling on or addressing
BU3-S9 MRS C. L. PniLLIPS The Dalles, Or,
OREGON-:- BAKERY,
A. KELLER, Prop'r,
Washington street, next door telow Geo. Ruch's.
Dalles, Oregon.
Having the Bakery formerly owned by Geo. Ruch,
I am prepared to furnish families, hotels and res
taurants with the choicest Bread. Cakes and Pics.
Denny, Eice & Co.
Wool & Commission Merchants
610 Atlantic Ave, Boston.
Cash advances made on consignment.
T FAGAN
MERCHANT TAILOR
Saltings of ail kinds, imported and domestic on
liana
FIT WARRANTED.
None but the best of labor employed and satis
ction guaranteed
Jerome Lauer,
Proprietor of the
Will alwsys keep on sale
Puget Sound Fisb,
Chickens, Turkeys,
Also, Provisions, Candies, Tobacco
and Cimrs.
Leave your orders, as they will receive prompt
. attention.
; - JEROME LAUER.
Efiscellaneous.
WANTED!
My old friends and tlic pub'ic, one and ell to come
ana see me in the
ON
UNION AND RAILROAD STS
Where one can ectall the comforts of Home. Sfs
rooms are furnished tVith Spring Beth, and tiie
Tables second to none in the city. Price same a
before. 3I:a.ls 25 centa-; Lodging 25 cents.
T- T. NICKOI.A5, Jf ropr,
NEPTUNE
hm Mm d U Bonis,
110 Front Street,
THE DALLES, - - - OREGON.
CHAS. PRAZCS., I'EOP E
S3" Xoue but the most Rkillful artists em
Hot and Cold and Shower Hat lis for the comfoi t of
utroii3.
At the old stand of II. Lusher.
L EOHDEN & CO.,
DEALERS IN
Grockery& Glassware
LAMPS CHANDELIERS AND FIXTUnES
Rogers Bros'. Platedware,
IIL Poozet Cutlery.
J. Russell & Cos Table Cutlory,
Keen Kutter Shears and Scissors,
gSFEvery One Warranted.g$
CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
SMOKERS' ARTICLES,
Fancy Goods atirl Notions,
Iron Wheel Wajrons; Bieycles; Bird Cases: Agents for
i-he ricw Home, Lite ai:U Koyal M..lolin ew
ing Machines, Neclies :uij Attachments
for every Mschiuc. Picture Frauics
iu stock or made to order.
Lara & Mkmh
A
AT THE
EAST EI STOCK Y
WILI. PAY THE
HisfliestCasli Price for
Hay and Grain.
THEY HAVE
AMPLE FACILITIES
FOR STORAGE.
The Dalles Lumbering
COMPANY,
Successors to TDOS. JOHNS & CO.
MINT BUILDING GROUND.
ThkDalles, - - Oregon.
SKAUtRS IS AIX KINDS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
Lumber and Builder's Materia!.
' AL3S
Shingles, Fence Posts
Lime and Hair.
MANOITACTUBERS OF
DOORS.
WIND OWS,
13LIISI3S.
Orders from abroad receive prompt attention.
Trees! Trees! Trees!
FRUIT TREES!
Ornamental Trees,
Shade Trees and
Timber Culture Trees
Ornamental Shrnb'bery,
Rosses! ltosce!
Creenhonse Plants.
We hive on hand at this date a few hundred Italian
and Pit te Pruuea, which we olfcr at reasonable
prices by toe hundred.
THE CELEBRATED NEW PLUM,
IMI 12 X 3SE
V e oner 25 cents each.
Don't be humbugged by parinpr f 1 for them, for we
warrant ours to be genuine M AU1AMA.
Also, CABDAGE and TOMATO PLANTS in large
supply. Send lor Catalogue and prices.
Aadress,
THE JEWETT NURSERIES
10se White Salmon, VI'. T.
Real Estatejnsnrance
0 Collection Agency.
.o. 113 XUirdStla Kcsonic BaildiDS.
Agent for the
Northwest Fire;
Best Home Company on the Coast.
Also Apront for
Aetna Life and Pacific Snrcty, Accident
Insurance Companies.
Having been appointed correspondent lor be
Lombard Investment Co.
I am prepared to make Loans on (rood Pea
Estate
also in
Security in Wasco and Gilliam
Counties,
Washington Territory.
If you
WANT MONEY
Call on or address C. E. BAYARD,
The Dalles, Oga.
Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds for Wash
mrton Territory.
J. P. JOHNSON,
Successor to Seufort Bros.,
Proprietor of
SECOND STREET.
And dealer in
Fish, Fruits, Vegetables, Provisions, Etc
43rHighest Price paid for Country Produce.
TOR ICE CREAM
AND
ICE GOLD SODA WATER,
-GO TO-
It
story
it
104 Second Street.
Cram & Corson, Props.
New OfliiiniDia Hoi
WW rf-.J
we r nan e kb
CanayFac
French& Co., Bankers.
THE DALLES. OREGON.
Transact
General Banking Business,
Collections Made at all Points
on Favorable Terms.
Letters or Credit imsiiort, available In
all parts efthe United States.
XSTSfeht Exchange and Teleiaphie Transfers sold
on New York, Chicii-ro, M. Louis, han rrancist-o,
Portland, Seattle and Walla Walla, . T., and va-
rious points in Oiejroii and Washini;ton Territory.
D. P,
THOMPSON,
President.
J. S.SCHEXCK,
Vice-President
II. M. UEALL, Cashier.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK.
(Successor to)
SCIIEXK & CEALL, BANKERS,
TRANSACTS A REGULAR BANKING BUSINESS,
BUY AND SELL EXCHANGE.
COLLECTIONS OA REFT7LLY MADE AND
PKOiiPTLY ACCOUNTED Full.
DRAW ON NEW YORK, SAN FP-iNCISCO AND
rOUTLA-M).
Directors!
D P TnoMPsosi, T W Spares,
J S Sciikxck, Czorok A LlEBR,
li SI Bkall.
feblStf
Miscellaneous
E. BECK,
Clio Lcadins
MATCHMAKER
AND m
'ELER
Xext to 1st Nat. Bank. .
Always on hand the latent styles of jewelry.
clocks, watches, etc. , at the lowest prices. If you
want something lasling and hand some, ive bock
toe leweier a can. men 2
J. FREIMAN,
THE 1I31EI2,
IN THE
Boot - and - Shoe
Trade.
SOLE AGENT FOR
LAIRD, SCHOBER & MITCHELL,
KANAN & SON,
EDWARD C. BURT,
and tie IV. L. DOUGLASS Celebrated
S3. 00 Shoe.
VV.LUUUULAb
OTTOt
i3Coods sold Cheaper than ever.
Call and
XAiniue the fine sfeick on hand.
J. Freiman,
Kehanno'H Brick, ttecond Ntrt-et
We Are Here
And to
tay
AT OUR
HEADQUARTERS
With a Large Sfock of
IMS,
it etc.. etc.
-ALS0-
Tiiiioiliy, Wheat and Wild Hay
OATS, BARLEY,
Bran, Rolled Barley, etc.
OUR STOCK IS A 1 IN OUALITY AND
quantity, which we are pleased to offer you at
very low prices for cash or country produce.
Call and see for . ourselves, We mean what we say
and you will not be sorry.
spr 8 wtf
SNIPES & K1NERSLY-
street, The Dulles, Oresen. (-
Leaclinz Drujr
''(,'ists. 12S Secotd
BLAKELEY & CLARK,
THE I.EADINO
Prescription Druggists.
175 Second Street, The Dalles.
Countrv and Mall Orders will re
ceive Prompt Attention.
Stapl
BROOKS & BEERS
TELEGRAPHIC.
DEATH ON THE RAIL.
Tendleion. Or. Ansr. 23.--A uisas
trous wreck occurred Yesterday after
noon on the mountain division of the
Short Liue. near Meuclium station, close
to the summit of the Blue mountains,
No. 8, an east-going freight, was late,
and with a double -header attached, was
toilitiir un the-mountain at the rate
of
fifteen miles an hour. Shortly afrer
leading eosrine had passed throusrh
the
the
tUDiiel a short distance this tide
Meacham station Engineer Birnhart
rliinct-d out of the cat) window and saw
the entrine No. 19, the west bound freight
coining at about a ten mile gait abou
fifty vurda away. He exclaimed, "3Iy
God!" and his fireman, Frank McConnell
evidently misunderstanding him. glanced
up inquiiingiy while in the act ot seooi
ing up a shovelful cf coal, just as the
two tD"ineS struck. iMcLonnell was
caught between the engines aud instant
ly killed.
in the collision Hie two opposing
engines were weogcJ closely to
gether, while the second engine on No
8
crowed forward and pushed the tender
in front to one side and reared square on
ton of the boiler of the leading engine
Iu the icaction it rolled to one side, aud
thus freed Barnhart, who had been
caught in Ida cab like a mouse in a trap
by the crash, and narrowly escaped his
fireman's fate. There was scarcely loom
to jump, the accident occuinng m a rock
cut. and the engineers and Bremen on
the remaining locomotives stayed with
their engines.
Engineer McMain was badly scalded
on his hands, and bis fireman was injur
ed on the head.
The head brakemnn of No. 19, whose
name could not be learned, jumped from
the train into a pile of rocks and got oil'
with a sprained leg and a lew bruises
Conductor O'mstead, who baa charge
of the wtst bound freight, and the con
ductor of the east-bound truin, both es
caped uninjured.
Alter the collision searcn was made lor
McConnell, and his dead body wna found
tld nnd crushed between the two
engines ana scaiaca uy tne escaping
steam. Efforts to release the con se ot
the unfortunate fireman were made, but
without avail at first. It wa 8:30
Vlock in the evening before his remains
were hneliv extricated irom the wrecK,
badly brusied, burned and mutilated'.
THE MAYBEICK CASE.
Nf.w Top.a, Aug. 28 Thomas Stanzel,
ho was an important witness in the
May brick ca.e, arrived from England
es'.arday and was interviewed here to
day. lie says the .hnglisri people
generally opposed the veidii-t. Concern
ing the murits of the cie, Sfanzul says
he does not believe she poisoned him.
was Mr. Maybrick's body servant for
ur years before bis marriage at Norfolk,
Ve. While I lived with him Maybrick
often complained that he did not feel well,
nd time and time again sent me to the
rug store to get him arsenic. lie bought
half a dollar's worth at u time. .1 made
beet tea, aud he would put the areenic in
nd drink it. Mavbrick continued the
use of arsenic, and toward the last of my
service the doses of arsenic grew larger,
and he wanted more rubbing. For nine
years he used arsenic."
PASSENGER TRAINS COLLIDE.
Petroleum, W. Va., Aug. 23. A col
lision occurred this morning on the Bal
timore & Ohio, between Petroleum and
Silverrun tunnel, about twenty-three
miles east of Pirkersburg, in which three
men were instantly killed and fifteen or
twenty wounded.
DETUTY MARSHAL BEAGLE'S CASE.
San Francisco, Ang. 23. Sheriff Cun
ningham, of San Joaquin county, entered
a demurrer in the United States court this
afternoon, in which he took exceptions to
the traverse made by Deputy Marshal
Neagle in liis petition for a habeas cor
pus. The sheriff asks that Neagle be re-
mrned to his custody, to be tried accord-
it g to the laws of the state of California
for the killing or Juage lerry.
THE CHARGE AGAINST JUSTICE FIELD.
Stockton, Aug. 23. It is expected
that the district attorney will, to morrow,
dismiss the charge against Justice Field
when Neagle's case is called.
WANTS AN EXAMINATION.
Omaha, Aug. 23. Senator Mandcrson
has forwarded to Washington to Commis
sioner Tanner a fetter in which he da
mands an examination by medical experts
to determine whether he is entitled to the
re-tated peusion recently ' granted him.
The letter is quite lengthy. In the course
of it he eays the commissioners will bear
him out in the statement that his pension
was wholly without his seeking, and
granted without his knowledge, although
he would have nad a perfect right to ap
ply for it under the -laws.
INDIAN AFFAIRS.
Washington, Aug. 23. The Indian
bureau has received, through Indian
Agent Cole, at Colville, W. T., agency, a
reply from Special Agent Welton to the
letter of inquiry relative to the arrest of
certain Indian murderers on the Colville
reservation.
FOUR MEN HANGED.
New York, Aug. 23. The four mur
derers of women, Patrick Packenbam,
Jack Lewis, James Nolan and Eerd Car-
rolin, were hanged in the yard of the
Tombs prison this morning.
There were two scaffolds and two men
were hanged on each. Packenbam and
Nolan were first executed on the scaffold
which was erected on the Franklin street
side of the prison. The drop fell at 6:55
o'clock. Eight minutes later Lewis and
Corrolin were hanging from the scaffold
on the Leonard street side.
the behring sea ' seizures.
Ottawa, Aug. 23. It is now admitted
in political circles hire that Lord Stanley
has made urgent representations regard
ing the recent seizures in Behring sea.
A leading official of the fisheries de
partment says that he feels certain 'that
an international commission will be ap
pointed, alter the expiration of the Alas
ka Commercial Company's contract, to
settle the Atlantic and Behring sea ques
tions. He feels confident that compen
sation lor the late seizures will be paid
the Canadian vessel owners.
Hon. A. Mackenzie Bonell, minister of
custom?, has telegraphed to Victoria for
information regarding the recent seizures
in Behring sea. He expressed himself as
pleased with the attitude assumed by the
London Times on this question.
ENGLAND READY TO NEGOTIATE.
London, Aug. 23. The press associa
tion says: The English government has
intimated to the United States govern
ment its willingness to negotiate a set
tlement of the Behring sea matter, and
now awaits the American government's
reply.
A BRAVE POLICE CAPTAIN DEAD.
New York. Aug. 23. PolLe Captain
Sunders is dead. He rescued seven
persons from drowning, for which con
gress voted him a medal. He had great
renntn for braverv. He hid been a
policeman for twenty-three years.
a through, car service.
Milwaukee. Aug. 23. The Wisconsin
rvmral and Northern Pacific traffic
agreement takes form to morrow, in the
shnni, of the through car service from
Chicago to Tacoma, W. T., and Portland,
Or oneiwntr ten nrst nnoroKen counec-
-nn from LaktTvM.icb.igan across the
continent to the Pacific Northwest.
PBEPAKING for the- ENCAMTMENT.
The first Grand , A rzsy tvg ition to
nnivc in the city came to night from
Southern California, forty lour strong
Notice lias been received of the arrival
ti-morrow of about 10,000 veteran
The citv is handsomely decorated. The
business'sections ara almost a continuou
mass of bunting and garlands ot green
PORTLAND AND POUT TOWNSEND,
Port Townsend, W. T., Aug. 24. The
steimer Olympian brought to this place
to day a rnilroad construction outfit, with
winch the Lmon i"acinc will begin hulo
ing the road from here to Portland
corns of engineers and Captain Hill
superintendent of the Oregon Improve
merit 'Company, arrived with the outfit
The whart wus crowded with spectators
upon the arrival of the steamer, a'l anx
ious to satisfy themselves that the out
fit had arrived. Work will begin early
next week. Tl)3 Transcontinental people
are fullv avvure af .he importance o
biginniog work at an early date. The
bonds require that twenty-five miles of
road shall be com pi -.ted by January 1
1889, or the bonus will be forfeited.
ACROSS TOE COLORADO DESERT.
San Francisco, Aug. 24. William E
Graves, of New York, president of the
Los Angeles, San Diego it l uma railroad,
who is now in this citv, received a dis
patch to day from New York, stating
that bonds of the company to the extent
of $5,000,000 had been sold. From San
Piego eastward the line will run through
National Citv, tl.ence across the Colorado
desert to Yumn, making a connection
with the Southern Pacific. Graves to
day let contracts in this citv for the first
lorty miles ot the road, lhirtv miles ot
the road have already been built from
San Diego to Del Mar, and, it is stated.
t will be continued to Los Angeles and
hrough the town of Orange.
THERE WAS AN UNDERSTANDING.
Ottawa, Aug. 24- A meeting of the
cabinet has been called lor the 15th of
September, and a;l members have been
urged to be on hand at that lime. It is
learned on reliable authority that in ac
cordance with an understanding informal
ly arrived at between the authorities at
Loudon and at Washington, of which the
Dominion government hitherto appears
to have been unaware the United States
cruisers Wire only to go through the
formula or seizing Cauaoian vessels
caught in Bi hi ing sea in contravention
to
the proscribed regulations ot the
niteil Slates government, without car
rjing the seizure into actural effect, and
int on'v in the m isl 11 1" rant, cases,
hen these vosels were caught sealing
or
with teals on board, were cargoes to
be seized or confiscated. A prominei.t
official in reteiring to this new phase
t the Uehiing sea dispute anil the light
that bud been thrown upon it by recent
corrtsi.omlence from the British govern
ment, said that while the Loitcd btutes
government would by this course still
untain tlx-ir contention to the txclu-
ve right of the seal fisheries of Behring
sea they would Lot make themselves"
liable lor nearly so large an amount of
omages it these coure were tollowtd as
they went indiscriminately to work
seizing vessels aud cargoes as they did
in 1880 and 1887, should it ultimately
be decided that the claim they had set is
illegal.
FIRE IN A COLLIERY.
Victoria, B. C, Aug. 24. A Nanai
mo special says: "This afternoon about
4:30 o'clock fire was discovered at the
foot of No. 1 shaft of the East Welling
ton colliery. The men below ground
were immediately notified of the pending
danger and brought to the surface np the
No. 2 shaft. They were enabled to use
this means of escape as the underground
workings of the two shafts connect. Most
foitunately the men were all saved with
out accident. At one time it was feared
all the mules underground would be suf
focated, but have since been saved. -
WAIVES EXTRADITION.
Miles City, Mont., Aug. 24. Word
has been received here from William
Cathay, a cowboy, that the deputy sheriff
who caught Alfred Brazier, the murderer
of Brown, who is now in Regina, North
west territory, with him, that Brazier has
consented to come back without being
extradited, and be will start with him at
once for this place. It is understood
that Biazicr is Lackel by the cowboy
element, and that they aided his escape
at the time of the murdtr.
A RAILROAD TO LINKYILLE.
Port Townsend, Ang. 24. A railroad
is to be built from a point near Ashland,
on the Southern Pacific railroad, to Link
ville. Or. Major Brooks, of this place,
has gien one-halt of his hot spring ranch
at Linkville to secure the construction of
the road.
THE CONGO RAILROAD.
New York, Aug. 24 It is said that
O. P. Huntington's trip to Europe is for
the purpose of consulting with the king
of Belgium relative to the Congo railroad
enterprise. It is estimated that the road
will cost trom $40,000,000 to $j0,000,0U0
to build and equip, ot which $0,400,000
has been subscribed under the auspices
of a Belgium stock company, which is
the great trading concern of the Congo
free state. It is the connection ot this
Lower Congo region with the Upper Con
go country for which a railroad is sought.
The Upper Congo country has a large
population, and a vast trado can be
opened up there, of which the Belgians
wish to reap the benefit.
THE GERMAN SITUATION.
Berlin, Aug. 24. Compared with the
visit of the late Emperor William to Al
sace Lorraine, in 1870, the present em
peror's visit was a phenominal success,
and indicates remarkable progress made
in Germanizing the provinces during the
past decade.
Copenhagen telegrams announce that
the czar and czariua boarded the imper
ial yactb at Peterhof yesterday and were
expected in Copenhagen Tuesday, but at
the momeut the sailing was postponed.
The belief now is that the czar will dis
embark at Stettm,cn route to Copenhagen,
and have a brief, quiet meeting with the
emperor at Hounsdam.
An inspired article in the Cologne
Qasette on the result of the emperors
visit to Osborne says the relations be
tween England and Germany are more
friendly. Owing, however, to the oppos
tion of a radical parliament the English
government is compelled to proceed
cautiously toward disapproaebmeut with
Germany. The Gazette adds: "Whether
the czar comes or not there is small hope
that the relations between Russia and
Germany will improve."
DEATH OF A PHILANTHROPIST.
St. Louis, Aug. 25. Henry Sbaw, the
venerable philanthropist, died this morn
ing, aged 80.
PENSION OFFICE RULIXG.
Washington, Ang. 20. One of the
most important rulings made by the com
missioner of pensions in laic years, in
that it affects the masses of tiie soldiers
of the conntry, is that issued to-day by
Commissioner Tanner to the chiefs of
divisions in the pension bureau. What
it does is to extend the limitations in
regard to competent witnesses to such an
extent that this great and constantly
growing bar to the granting of pensions
Ts almost obliterated. As the years roll
on, and so many of the soldiers of the
late war have died, it becomes difficult
for applicants for pensions to furnish
proof in regard to origin ot disability.
Under the rules of the pension office; in
the past the evidence of one commission
ed officer or one orderly sergeant was re
quired. In the event of inability to
famish this evidence the testimony of
two private soldiers was required. The
order of the commissioner to day extends
this latter stipulation to "the claimant
and one private soldier," or, in tlia-ords
of the commissioner, "the origin shall be
held to be proven on the evidence of the
claimant and one private, provided
always, that said claimant and said privat
be men of reputable character,
THROUGH THE WHIRLPOOL RAPIDS.
Niagara Falls, N. Y., Aug. 25 Car
lisle I). Graham made a successful trip
througn Whirlpool rapids this afternoon
in a -barrel-shaped boat.
At first the boat traveled easily, but
soon was in the grasp of a more raiii
current, that hastened its journey. It
rode beautifully on the trip through "the
npid$, and frequently disappeared from
sight, and at one time it was out of sight
so long that muny believed it to be lost
The course it took was down the center
of the river.
At 5 o'clock it entered the whirlpool.
and the thousands of people who had
gathered there to witness Graham's
friends recover the barrel were doomed
to be disappointed, for, instead of lu in
caught in the main current and carried
across the pool, as is usually the case, it
hugged the American side and was car
lied into the quiet water in front of the
outlet, and was forced slowly over nearly
to the Canadian side. For a minute it
was a question whether it was to go
around the pool or down the river, but
the outward bound current was too
strong, and at 4:54 P. M. Graham passed
out of the pool and down through the
fearful water opposite Foster's Flats,
which is the spot most feared by all the
rapids' navigators.
All ot these dangers Graham to day
passed in safety, and at 5;05 P. J'.
Seymour, Fleming and John Lonsdale, of
Lewiston, picked him up nearthe old
Liewiston budge.
TnE RESERVOIR BROKE.
Providence, R. I., Aug. 25. Spring
ke reservoir, near xiskeville, which
supplies a whole row null village
along the r'awtucket river, burst tins
afternoon.
Down the valley Mrs Greene aged 60;
Mrs. Hawkins aged 90, and Mrs.Tcw's
son, 7 jtars old were walking through a
strip of wood and were overtaken by the
flood and drowned. The bodies were
found in the wood, through which the
water quickly ran until it emptied into
the Pawtucket river.
pension commissioner tanner.
Cuautaqua, Aug. 25. Yesterday was
Grand Aimy day here. Corporal Tanner
addressed a large audience. In the
course of his remarks he said : ''You and
were paid for being so'.diers, and we
got 42 cents a day to stand up and be-
not at Jlenry atterson, of Louis
ville, who was a rebel without the heart
fight, has said in his paper, and it is
only one of the many lies he lifts told
hat the size of the pension conimissinn-
s grant depend on Irs condition. If,
he is sober, he gives 12 a month; if
runk, as he usually is, he gives them
24 a month. The only tinre I ever saw
Watterson was in Washington, and he
was drunk then.
Why thev say wc are bankrupting the
treasury, yet Windom comes out with a
report showing nn increased surplus.
Every taxpayer ought to be in fa for of
pens:ons,bccuuse the money is distributed
u every city, villnge aud hamlet. I he
papers have been howling considerable
because the commissioner has made a lot
of cases special. They said there were
10,000 special cases, but they found 900.
wish I had toe power, I would settle
these cases within forty-eight hours.
here are 400,000 others waiting. Tbey
are within the clearest defined limits of
law and the commissioner must regard
his oath as sacred as the prayer bis
mother taught hiin. On the other hand.
I will say that the commissioner will sit
up nights, as be has done for six months,
to do justice to veterans,"
A TRAIN ROBBER CAUGnT.
Lancaster, Pa., Aug. 25. Charles
D. Chambers just released from an East
ern penitentiary came to this city last
evening, and when the Pacific Express on
the Panama railroad polled out of the
station at 1 :25 this morning, boarded the
Pullman car and endavoced to rob the
passengers. Charley Murk, the porter,
of Jersey City, struggled with him and
was shot twice. Chambers sats he was
stealing a ride and the porter began fir
ing at him, he grasped the pistol and it
went off. The porter says Chambers was
in a berth, and, when descovered, drew
a revolver and commenced firing,
senator mandersons' pension. .
Omaha, Neb., Aug. 25. Senator Man
dorson has forwarded to Commissioner
of Pensions Tanner a letter, iu w hich he
demands an examination by medical
experts, to determine whether ho is en
titled to the rerated pension recfutly
granted him. In the course of it he says
that the commissioner will bear him out
in ihe statement that the pension was
wholly without his seeking and granted
without bis knowledge, although he
would have had a oerfect right to apply
for it under the law.
FIRE AT KANSAS CITY.
Kansas City, Aug. 25. The smoke
house aud rendering works of Swift &
Co.'s packing establishment were de
stroy (l by fire to-day. involving a loss of
$150,000, with $120,000 insurance. The
firemen labored uudcr serious disadvat
age owing to inadequate water pressure
and bad The wind not shifted fortunately,
the whole works would have been de
stroyed, involving a loss of not leS3 than
$500,000.
Drowned in Hie Xatctieer-
Yakima Herald. 9
On Sunday last Alma, daughter of A. C.
Eugdahl, aged 16 years, was drowned in the
Nateheez. Mr. Eugdahl lives about eigh
teen miles up the valley and the reports re
ceived of the sad affair are of a very meagre
nature. The Herald's informant states that
after dinner on Sunday Mrs. Engdahl asked
her daughter to wash the dishes, remarking
that she would get the snpper. The dishes
washed Miss Engdahl left the house and
walked toward the river. Supper time ar
rived and the girl not returning the family
became alarmed, and Mr. Engdahl and bod
found and followed her tracks leading to
ward the river. The river reached the
searchers separated, one going np and the
other down stream. About half a mile
down stream the body of the girt was found
lodged on a ritlle. Life was extinct. The
deceased was a sister of County Superin
tendent Hilda A. Engdahl.
Deatn or an OU Pioneer.
Mr. Jos. Shields, who died in this city
yesterday, was an old pioneer of this coun
ty, having worked for the company since
I860. He was born in Ireland in 1S25, and
immigrated to America while young. For
many years he worked in the shipyards in
New York, and followed that vocation un
til bis last illness. For the past two years,
he has been sick, and nnder the doctor's
care. Mr. Shields was well known to all
our old residents, and enjoyed the reputa
tion of being an honest and industrious
citizen. During the past thirty-five years
he has been atnliated with the Masonic
fraternity, and will be buried from the hall
in this city under the auspices of the order,
the funeral taking place to-morrow morn
ing at 10 o'clock.
Warm Sprixu.s, Aug 23. 1889.
Editor Turea-MouitTAisEEE:
Permit n.i through the columns of your
valued paper to acknowledge tho kindness
of Mr. W. M. McCorkle, of the Tygh Val
ley Flouring Mills, in the gift of a box of
beautiful peaches and of Mr. and Mrs. Geo.
P. Morgan and Mr. Leslie Butler, of your
city, in the gift of boxes of apples, plums,
peaches, pears and prunes.
Thank you, kind friends, we shall ever
remember you with glad hearts.
Gratefully yours,
R, W. and K. W, McBbidk.
ITKMS I . It KIEF.
From Saturday Daily.
Mr. W. G. Kerns is in Fortlaud.
Mrs. A. A. Urquhart, of Rufus, is in the
eity.
Mr. W. Lord returned from the ccast this
morning.
J. C. Egbert, of lower Fifteen Mile, is in
the city.
Mr. G. W. Hunt passed through on this
morning's train.
A ti l' phone plant will be erected at
iNortii lakuna.
Mr. G. W. Miller left this morning on
visit to Goldendale.
htreet cars will commence running in
.Albany on iVlcmlay.
A new fire-plug will be placed in position
near the Umatilla House.
Mre. Geo. Johnston, of Dufur nee Eeed
visited the city to-day.
Tudce Tliornbury and party returned last
evening trom Collins Landing.
Mr. I. C. Richards, of Centerville,
, 1., was in town to-day.
Mr. Chas. Mc-Kenzie, one of the leading
citizens ot ros.-u, was in the city to-uay,
The many friends of Hon. T. W. Shisher
will be pleased to hear that ho is conval
escent.
Mrs. limma Ward and the Misses Mc-
Guire arc on a yisit to their parents at He
aiiunvnle.
air. A. li. Mote, is running his new
thresher to-day out at Mr. Sharp's place, on
iiiree Aiile.
Mr. J. B. Crosscn sold at auction to-dav
a new Lyon & Healy piano, to Mr. Wheal-
don tor SliOO.
Prof. Smith, who lias been spending his
vacation in Salem and Yaquina, returned
last evening.
The weather is delightfully cool just at
present and the campers are returning home
in great numbers.
Mr. Elijah Koontz will teach the Eight
Mle school this fall, commonly kuown as
the Mcfialcy school.
Mr. D. M. French and family returned
this morning from North Beach where thiy
lave been spending the summer.
The steamer Vaaco which was taken over
the Cascades a couple of months ago, is to
be sold at public auction Sept. 10.
Reports from Hartland say the farmers
will average from sixteen to twenty bushels
to the acre, aud the grain is plump.
Mr. Dee; hake, the man who w is ran
over by his wagou some time ago, returned
eater-Jay to his home in I'nnevuie.
The Mountain Queen, known to stiam-
hoatmcn on the middle river, is being re
modeled into a bide-wuecier at Astoria.
Rcy. and Mrs W. C. Curtis returned
this morning from Astoria, where Mr. Curtis
ne spent the Kuiniucr iu the hope of bene
fiting his health.
Tiie Dalles at present is enjoying a build-
ng boom Many row houses are uoing up
in different parts of the city and wo hear of
more to follow soon.
What's the use of working at home to
morrow when you can go to llaisjlit's and
get such a nice dinner cheaper than ycu can
get at home and a inueh better variety.
We understand that some of the streams
this vicinity, which aboun-led in fish
loi merly, by reasou of the drouth this sea-
gop, will be almost denuded ot their inhabi
tants.
The west-bound passenqrr train that was
due here yesterday at 2:40 1. M. did not
arrive until 10 o'clock last night. It was
delayed by the recent collision cn the Blue
mountains.
Mr. C. L. Phillips is excavating for a
building on his lot of ground on Third
street, iu the postofiice block. - The build
ing, when completed, will be nsed for his
soda works.
The primaries are being held to-day at
Rockland, Washington, to elect delegates
to the county convention, which will name
the representatives to the state convention
at Walla Walla
D. C. Litter, late of The Dalles now a
resident of Washington county, Iowa, wrote
back to parties here, under date of Aug. IS,
to have a car load of ponies or small borses
shipped to him iu Iowa.
Articles of incorporation were filed yes
terday in the secretary of state's office at
Salem by the Fossil (later Co. The object
is to furnish water, good and pure, to the
town. Good for Fossil.
Mr. F. E. McKnight, of McKnight Bros.,
of Bakeoycn, gave us a pleasant call this
morning. He has sold his farm to Messrs.
Whitcomb & Neustadter, who will engage
largely in sheep and cattle.
The vigilauce committee organized at
Walla Walla has made the discovery that
a lot of boys from 13 to 15 are the ones
who haye started the tires in that city.
No arrests have yet been made.
The weather during the past day or so
cannot be excelled anywhere. The air is
clear and invigorating. To breathe the
pnre ozone on our altitudes is equal to Dr.
Brown-Sequard's elixir of life.
Mr. J. F. Root, on Pleasant ridge, a few
day3 since, iu looking into a well fell down,
a distance of forty feet. He escaped with
only a fractured limb. At last accounts, he
was recovering from his injuries.
An unconscionable man eavs that the fish
at Badger lake are so voracious that they
jump at the hook when held near the water.
This may not be gospel truth, but this is
not equal to many stories told by our in
formant. Mr. Geo. Patterson accompanied by Mr.
Drake, of Eight Mile, returned yesterday
from a three weeks' outing in the vicinity of
Mt. Hootl. They succeeded in getting a
fine lot of berries, and Mr. Patterson killed
a fine black bear.
We have received the seventh annual
catalogue of the state normal school at Mc
Minnville. This is a good institution, and
those intending to follow the profession of
teaching would be benefitted by a course of
training at this school.
Mr. J. II. Hadley, a prominent farmer re
siding near Dufur, returned last evening
from a two weeks' visit in the vicinity of
Mt. Adams. Mr. Hadley is well pleased
with the vicinity as a stock range, aud con
templates starting a dairy there.
Mr. Frank M. Splawn. of Hartland, lost
a very valuable horse last Tuesday by being
cut by barbed wire. The horse was being
driveu in a team, and becoming scared ran
into a fence and cut the muscle of the right
leg. Inflammation took place, aud the
horse died in a few days.
A fine Smith & Wesson revolver that was
advertised a few days ago in our columns as
lost, was found this morning near the en
gine house by Mr. F. G. Connelly and re
turned as per our ad. to Mr. A. Keller.
An ail. in cur columns is sure to reach the
proper party, and it always pays to adver
tise, sy
Mr. Frank Beezlcy, who resided in this
county during his boyhood but of late years
in Giiliam county, has been in the city for
eeyeral days, visiting his father Mr. Jos.
Beezley. - Frank has recently sold out his
interest here and in a few days w ill remove
all his effects to the Bi Bend country.
The new state of Washington gams a good
citizen and may success attend him.
Mr. Urban Spencer, who was injured by
a fall from the railroad bridge near Biggs,
and brought to the Umatilla House in this
city, nearly two weeks ago, died last night.
Rev. Mr. Simpson ordered the body taken
to the undertaking rooms of Mr. Wm.
Michell, where the body was prepared for
burial. The funeral services were conducted
by Revs. E. D. Sutcliffe and W. G. Simp
son at 4 P. M. to-day. Ou Monday Mr.
Simpson will wait upon oar people to raise
by subscription the amount of 80, the ex
pense of nursing and burying the unfortu
nate man.
The fire at Rufus Wednesday destroyed
five buildings. Mr. Urquhart 's store and
goods were totally destroyed. The dwelling
house caught after the store was in flames,
and while Mrs. Urquhart was attempting
to save goods from the store, her husband
and Mr. Jones the partners in the business
being both absent from tbo city. An at
tempt was aiso made to burn the warehouse
of the O. ii. & N. Co., but it wai put out
before any damage was done. This con
flagration was undoubtedly the work of an
incendiary, but fortunately the flames on
the west side were blown south by a wind
in that direction.
From Monday's Da ly.
Any quantity of fir wood ou the beach
Miss Maggie Linder returned Saturday
irom a sojourn at llwaco.
Mr. A. J. Dufur, jr., of Dufur, gave us a
pleasant call this mormug.
Another burned bridge and a consequent
delay in tiie arrival ot trains.
.Mr. ii . v., oarretson leic this morning
lor a trip to tne eastern states.
Mr. Jos. Shields, an old resident in this
vicinity, died in this city to-day,
Messrs. O. Kincrsly and H. Herbriue
leic on Saturday s train tor the Last.
Mrs. H. F. Turner returned Saturday
irom a visit to ner parents at McAlinnville.
Notwithstanding the lateuess of the sea
son new buildings are still in course of erec
tion.
School commenced at thf Sister's this
moruinn and the academy will open next
Monday.
Mrs. Lettie Kccney, of Arlington, is vis
iting her sister, Mrs. W. E. Theodore, of
ine Dalles.
The public school of Dufur, on the graded
system, will begin . next Monday, Mr. A.
rrazer principal.
Four engines have been demolished on
the Blue Mountain division within the short
space of a week.
Mr. Joseph Southwell, of Lower Fifteen
Mile, is in the city. His crops are not
abundant this year.
A party of immigrants from Kansas
passed through Burns a few days ago, who
uau been on the journey since April.
1, r i, r , ...
iur. j. jriaruy, our artist, is painting a
picture of the Celilo fishery from a photo-
grapu laKea uelore the lt ot August.
Col. and Mrs. C. E. Morgau and Cant.
and Mrs. T. A. Houghton returned on the
boat this morning from a vacation at the
coast.
Mr. G. F. Beers, of the firm of Brooks &
Beers, was taketi sick to-dav. The nature
of tiie disease we have not heard deter
mined. A paper called the WeUrn licnorter has
been started in the intercuts of tne colored
population of Pjrtlaui, Taeoina, Seattle
and Spokane Falls.
A pair of pebble spectacles was dropped
on Second street Saturday cvenimr. ' The
finder will be thankiully rewarded by leav
ing them at this office.
From Mr. A. J. Dufur, jr.. we loam that
the harvest on Fifteen Miio is mucti better
than expected, and the people are not as
discouraged as they were.
Hillsboro Independent: The Dalles
Mountaineer, the leading paper of Eastern
regon. enters en its tlnnitt l year of cub-
lication. Success attend it.
Mr. E. Beck is receiving a large and var
ied stock of watche. jewelry, etc. His
prices will be the lou est. Call nd exam
ine his goo, Is if you wiih anything in liis
1:LC.
Wc understand that salmon are so plenti
ful at Celdo that a man can dip them up
with his hands. There never was a more
bountiful ruu of fish than during the present
season.
We are assured by a prominent citizen of
The Dalles that in another year two rail
roads will leave The Dalies one for Gold
endale and another for Crook and Grant
counties.
Tho town of Dufur has grown consider
ably during the past year. Several new
buildings have been erected, and a larce
number of people have made permanent
homes tin re.
We learn from the Prineville Review that
five horscthieves passed through tho north
ern part of Crook county. John Bocys, an
ex-convict and two of the Breeding boys
arc said to be in the party.
That terrible disease, diphtheria is still
raging iu the John Day country. Mr. John
Luce aud daughter both died from the dis
ease last week, and children in tho family
are not expected to recover.
Baker City Blade: The water has already
commenced to increase in volume in the
numerous small streams throughout the
yalley, notwithstanding the fact that no
rain has fallen for a number of weeks.
Lexington Budget: With its issue of the
17th instant The Dalles Moostainkkr be
gan the thirtieth ycir of its existence. It
is a complete newspaper, fully up with the
demands ot the community, and deserved
prosperity attends it.
SuuJay Mercury: The Times-Mountaineer
published at The Dalles, is thirty years
of age, and is a smiling and hearty old
fellow. The paper has always been a friend
of Oregon, a good neighbor and a news
paper everybody likes.
Baker City Blade: The Dalles Times
Mountainef.r has entered upon its thirtieth
year of publication. That paper is one of
the best edited papers of Oregon, and it
will -doubtless coutinue in its successful
course for many years to come.
The transfering of the passengers to tho
boat this morning reminded one of old times
when all the traffic between here aud Port
land was done by boats. All the old time
activity and bustle was there and for awhile
it seemed like ante-railroad days.
The members of tho Young Women's
Christian Tempera lice Union of this city
will hold a fair before the commencement of
the holiday season. Preparations have
been begun for this event, and the young
ladies will have many of the noyelties of
the coming season.
Mr. Beezley presented us a few specimens
of fruit which grew from seedlings, which
he denominates a mixture of peach and
almond. He has almond trees in bis garden
in close pioximity to peach trees, and this,
he claims, is an act of mescegenation of
these two varieties.
The Catholic citizens of the town are con
templating the erection of a new brick
church. The edifice will stand on the site
of the present building which will be torn
down to accommodate the new one. It is
to cost, according to present estimates,
$15,000, of which about $1000 has already
been pledged.
Au osculation was performed by a couple
near the crossing of Fifth street yesterday
in broad daylight. This is not contrary to
the "statute in such cases made and pio
vided;" but the young people would enjoy
it much more if it was 'neath the shade of
some tree, with no prying eyes around them,
aud none to witness except the chasto stars
or moon above.
It was reported yesterday that a bridge
was burning between Hood River and Wy
eth and this morning the report was that
four bridges were afire. At any rate the
tire was quite a large one and will necessi
tate the transferring of all freights and
passengers by boat for days. Tho boats left
last night a'onut 9:30, going to the Cascades
and returned this morning and immediate
ly left dowu the river again.
The last few days have been full of mis
fortunes for the O. R. 4 N. Co. Two acci
dents on the Blue mountains, resulting iu
tho death of a fireman, the injury of two
engineers, and the wreck of large hog
engines, baye delayed the train for several
days past, and yesterday a bridge between
Wyeth and V lento was burned, necessitat
ing the transfer by boat of passengers aud
mail between this city and Portland.
The Butte (Mont.) murderer, whose re
spite reached him last Friday just as he
was being led from his cell to the gallows,
will hang next Friday sure. The governor
granted the respite because of a petition
from tho condemned muu's spiritual advis
er, stating that inside of another week be
would have the pri-oner converted aud
ready to meet his God, and the governor
would be responsible if he allowed one
week's time to send a man to sheol.
The Second Eastern Oregon District Ag
ricultural Society has joined the National
Trotting Association, aud both organizations
will be in conjunction hereafter. The rules
of the National Association will be in force
at the meeting of the society, and any per
son ruled out at The Dalles will also be
ruled out in any meeting under the control
of the association. This is a guarantee of
fairness in all contests of speed on the race
course iu this city.
All efforts so far to find George Nuttine,
stock inspector for Crook coanty, baye
proved futile. The Prineville ifewt has
the following to say regarding him: "Scarce
ly a hope is now entertained by the people
of this community that the body of George
Nutting will be found. If he Was mur
der -d, his body has been so carefully hidden
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castorla;
or so deeply buried that finding it will be
out of the question. However the search
has not been given up. Another effort will
lie made next week to find tho remains. If
the remaius are nowhere on the surface, wo
may conclude w ith a degree of certainty
that he waj murdered, his body deeply bur
ied aud eyery trace of the grave obliter
ated. Astoria rione.tr: One of the most profit
able fish wheels on the Columbia is said to
be down at the Cascades in tho Columbia
about half way between the Upper and
Lower Cascades. There is a pit just at ihe
side of the wheel to catch and hold the fish
when they are dumped out of tho wheel.
The pit is about 12 feet square by 20 feet
deep, and Mr. L. W. Curtis informs ns that
he has seen that pit half full of writhing,
squirming salmon. Several tons are fre
quently caught there in one day.
A new swindle is reported. A timid
looking couple rides up to a farm-house and
desire to be married amidst its classic sur
roundings. They would pay liberally for
the privilege. A third party who accom
panies the couple performs the ceremony.
The ricn and romantic bridegroom hands
the farmer $10 and asks him to sign the
marriage "certificate" as a witness. In
time the farmer finds he has signed a note
for $400. The note is attached to the cer
tificate and turns up in the hands of an
innocent purchaser. The granger must pay
it. Salem Journal: A recent arrival in Ore
gon from Michigan, brought tents, firearms,
and provisions, prepared to rough it in the
wild wilderness, which he expected to find.
He brought two sacks of flour in order to
hare something to eat. besides the fish he
expected to snare and the wild meat cap
tured in the wilderness. He must have
been surprised to find a civilization eaual or
superior to that which he left. His case
fairly illustrates an opinion entertained bv
thousands in the east, that Oregon is a place
inhabited by nomadio tribes of the "Biiflklo
Bill" style.
Benton Leader: Some of our democratic;
brethcrn of the press are exercised because
the Oreaonian has said iu substance that tha
fate J udge Terry stood for the methods and
purposes of the democratic party. But
they might well have possessed their souls
in patience upon the certainty that the
Oretjonian would itself shortly refute the
truth of thft statement. And it has done
so. It nobly praises the methods and rjar-
poses of the head and representative of the
democratic party in Oregon, Governor Pen
noyer, and likens his opponent, Mr. Taffe,
to Judge Terry. And it is not iinnrnhahlo
that tho governor will down the recalcitrant
fisherman of Celilo, lust as Naulo downed
the bully of California.
A curious incident haonened to John K1.
Icy at the Walla Walla hospital a few days
since, says an exchange. A robber tube
had been placed in his side to remove the
pus formed by pleurisy. The incision in
healing had reached the ltchinc staue. and.
human like, he began to scratch the injured
part. While doing this be loosened tha
pin that held the tube in place, and upon
taking the next breath the tube was drawn
inside the body. It happened to be in each
a spot that it went clear around the spine.
Drs. Shaw and Blalock operated upon the
man, having to make a long incision in tha
back to find the tube, which was finally re
moved. The O. R. 4 N. Co. have brought suit in"
the circuit court of Morrow county against
the bondsmen who agreed to furnish the
right of way and depot grounds of the Wil
low creek branch road. The railrond
company claimed to haye advanced $24,933.
72 for the right ot way and depot grounds
and the bondsmen have paid them only
15,000. Tiiere are about 00 bondsmen,
defendants, who are sued for the balance of
9,933.72. The Heppner Gazette aays: It
will result in the bondsmen having to put
up that amount, less about $3000 in notes
which is still due and collectible. The Oa-z-'tle
is "in for it" with the remainder of
the bondsmen, and knows no other way Out
of the difficulty but to pay up its propor
tion of the arrears.
Twenty-ninth tnnual exhibition at
Salem, Oregon,
Commencing Jlonday, September IP,
Continuing one week, under the man
agement of the Oresron State
Board ot Ag-rciulttire.
OYER $15000 IN CASH
PREMIUMS
Offered for agricultural, stock, dairj, and mechn.
Icil exhibit, for works of art and fancy work, and
for trials of speed. 1
Running and Ti'otUcg Races
EACH DAY.
Important improremcbts made fn the premium
list.
Red need ratva for fare nod ftehrhts on all tr&ns
portation lines to aud from the fair.
PRICES OF ADMISSION.
lien's day ticket
Women's day ticket
Men's seasiin ticket
.Women's season ticket. ,
SOa
26c
$2.60
$1.00
Send to tbe secretary at Salem tor a premium list.
1. T. APPERSON, President.
J. T. GREGG, Secretary.
MacEacton & MacLeod
Have Just Received a
LARGE STOCK
OP-
FURNISHING GOODS, "
HHTS, SH06S, 6TO
Direct From Manufacturers.
g2rCaIl and see them at
12 Second Street.-Si
-tf
GEO. P. MORGAN,
ROOM O.
Land Office B nil dine
la agent for
California Insnrance Ca, of San Fran siteo.
aarillan. of London.
l.)'vn, oj London. ,
ftiAHVELOUS
DISCOVERY.
Inly riennlne Sratem af Memory TnUatBa'.
l our ISsnk Learned In ane reodlna.
lttind wondrrlno- cared. ,
Eri-rr child mni adult really benefitted.
iiraat ludacezutfDta to Correvpoodenoa Classes,
Pnwnoetus, with opinion of f)r. lVm. A. Ilitnt
mi! 1, t .8 wirid-fam-d Bnaclalrat In Wind Dlseawa,
t Jrcnli;if Thompson, tiie areat furolioU
Tit, J. 3i. U-ickley, l).i.,aditorof ilia Cfiritia
.1 ti, X. J'., Kic hurd Hrortor, the 8c;n0s.
ili v. XV. A-tr, JndaP;ibon, Jndab. J?.
li -!l iniin, am mii-iT, wmi wm i u,
Vci i. A. '.LOrjliTTI 8U7 l ifta A
i Are., It, T.
Oregon State Fair
f ........ 1 v ;
o

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