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The Trinity journal. [volume] (Weaverville, Trinity County, Cal.) 1856-1857, June 14, 1856, Image 3

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Arrival of the Sierra Nevada.
Murder at Washington City by a
Californian.
AFFAIRS GENERALLY.
The Washington Star of May 8th, gives
the following acconnt of the murder commit
ted by Mr. P. T. Herbert:
To-day, shortly after 11 a. m., P. T. Her
bert, a California hicmber of the House of
Representatives of the United States, went
over to breakfast at Willard’s Hotel, where
lie takes his meals, and sent a boy from the
breakfast room for his breakfast. In four
or five minutes after a portion of his break
fast was set before him, and the boy then
told him that at that hour it would be ne
cessary for him (the boy,) to get an order
'from the office to have a breakfast sent up
from the kitchen.
Herbert told the boy to “Clear out, you
Irish son of a b .” He turned around
ito another waiter, Thomas Keating, who
was standing near by, and exclaimed, “And
5 on, you damned Irish son of a b , clear
•out, too.” The answer of Thomas Keating
was not comprehended by our informant (an
•eye witness.)
Herbert, on being answered by Thomas,
irose and struck him on the neck behind, with
iliis list. Thomas Keating seized a plate and
threw it at Herbert. Herbert seized a chair
and threw it across the round table at Tlios.
Keating, striking him with it.
They then clinched and fought. Another
Californian, whose name we have not heard,
came in at the door and ran to 1 lerbert’s
assistance, and also struck Thomas Keating
with a chair.
Patrick Keating, the brother of Thomas
(and the steward of the house,) at that time
coming into the room, ran to his brother’s
assistance, and seized Herbert, who imme
diately drew a revolver. The other Cali
fornian at that time was striking both the
Keatings with a chair.
As Herbert drew bis revolver, Patrick
Keating seized it by the barrel, and they
struggled over it for some moments, until
the French cook of the house came in and
separated Herbert and P. Keating, who let
go his hold of the pistol barrel.
Thomas Keating and the other Californi
an were mingled in that particular part of
the fray between Herbert and Patrick. Af
ter Patrick let go the barrel of the revolver,
Herbert seized Thomas (who had clinched
him and was struggling for the pistol,) by
the collar, and, putting the pistol to bis
breast, shot him through the lungs, killing
him in five minutes.
After the shot, one of the other servants
threw a piece of chinaware at Herbert, but
none of the others interfered.
Herbert and his Californian companion
left the room and house immediately, by the
Fourteenth street door, where Herbert took
n hack and drove away. Subsequently lie
delivered himself up at the office of Justice
Daniel Smith, on Eighth street.
His examination for killing Thomas Keat
ing, aged about 34 or 3d years, (who leaves
a wife and two children,) will take place at
the guard-house at 4 r. m.
The two Keatings were civil men, and
were favorites with the boarders in the
house.
This account of the affray we take from
the lips of one of the servant's, an aged man,
who saw all of it.
A telegraphic dispatch to New York on
the Oth, at 10 o’clock, t\ m., states that t lie
examination of Mr. Herbert, on charge of
shooting Thomas Keating, at Willard’s Ho
tel, was resumed that evening. The court
room was densely crowded.
District Attorney Key asked for a post
ponement of the case, stating that at his in
stance, Secretary Marcy had solicited Mr.
Dubois, the Netlierlaiui Minister, who saw
the occurrence, to attend as a witness, but
Mr. Dubois declined doing so at present,
wishing first to consult with oilier members
of the Diplomatic Corps. Mr. Key remarked
that foreign ministers being exempt from
process in such cases, Mr- Dubois must at
tend voluntarily, if at all, and there was no
probability of his attendance until to-morrow.
The counsel for defence opposing a post
ponement, the sitting justices ordered the
examination to proceed.
Arnold Harris, John E. Reynolds, Major
Graham and William A. Gardiner were ex
amined for the defence. Mr. Gardiner is
the Californian who was in company with
II erbert when the difficulty occurred, and
with whose pistol Herbert shot Keating.—
Mr. G ardiner and Mr. Herbert lodged to
gether, and the latter, as Mr. G. states,
took the pistol from the mantel-piece of their
room on the evening preceding the occur
rence. Mr. Gardiner gave a graphic de
scription of the light, in which lie was a
prominent actor.
Messrs. Bradley, Weller, Percy, Walker
and Phillips addressed the court in favor of
the discharge of the prisener. District At
torney Key replied on the part of the prose
cution, the question of bail entering largely
into his argument. After a session of live
hours, the prisoner was remanded to the cus
tody of the United States Marshal, the
Court stating that they would render their
decision to-morrow.
Congress. ona l ai *d other matters of a gov
ernmental cliara " tc r U1 'c ns they were.—
There is every probability that the Wulker-
Bivas government was recognized gome days
before this. Both Houses of Congress have
passed a bill granting the State of Iowa
1,£4)0,000 acres of luud for railroad pur
poses.
Political intelligence is extensively mixed.
The New Jersey State Democratic Conven
tion chose delegates to the National Con
vention favorable to Mr. Buchanan, while
those from South Carolina were instructed
to vote for Pierce, The Philadelphia City
election resulten in the choice of Richard
Vuux, the Democratic candidate for Mayor.
The ultra free soil portions of the New Jer
sey, Massachusetts and New Hampshire
Know Nothing State Councils have formal
ly repudiated the nomination of Fillmore
and Donelson, and have agreep to join the
“Republican” Convention ol June.
On the 6th of May a great trotting match,
for a stake of $10,000, mile heats in harness,
came off at the Union Course, Long Island,
the horses “Bo i" and ‘ k a S^ni"
The latter won the race, makiug the last
mile in 2:37
Tee ship Adriana, from New York, bound
to San Francisco, was abandoned in a sink
ing condition on the 5th of May off Nan
tucket Shoals. Her crew were saved, and
they returned to Boston. The Adriana
cleared on the 12th ult, with a cargo of
1,455 tons of coal. There is an insurance
of $102,000 on the ship and cargo.
Meetings are being held in the large cities
to express substantial sympathy tor the
starving inhabitants of the Cape De \ erdes.
Large amounts were collected.
The value of foreign goods imported at
the port of Boston during the week ending
2d ult., amounted to $1,253,306.
The boiler of the steamboat J. D. Fierce
exploded at St. Johns, New Brunswick, on
the 8th May, killing four persons and se
riously wounding several others.
A locomotive on the Catawissa railroad,
Pennsylvania, exploded on the 1th, killing
three persons and wounding more.
,1. (». Percival, the poet and State Geolo
gist of Iowa, died recently at Chicago.
Mr. Smith, the proprietor of the New
York Sunday Courier, was cowhided by
Win. Systcr, a returned Nicaraguan; and
Maj. Heiss, late government bearer of gov
ernment dispatches to Nicaragua, had a
light with the editor of the Washington
Star —how belligerent Nicaragua makes
people!
The legislature of Connecticut, in joint
meeting, have re-elected Mr. Minor Gover
nor of the State. The State Council of the
American party in Illinois has endorsed the
nomination of Fillmore and Donelson. The
Wilmington, Delaware, municipal election
resulted in guing the American party four,
and the Democrats one of their candidates.
The schooner Daniel Parker, of Orleans,
from Bangor to Now York, was wrecked on
the 9th May. The master, mate and cook
were drowned. Kent’s cotton mill at Paw
tucket, Rhode Island, was burned lately.—
The loss was heavy, and there was $18,600
insurance. The office of the Belvidere and
Trenton, N. .1. railroad was robbed on the
night of May 8th, of $5000.
SEVEN DAYS LATER FROM EUROPE.
Further Ratification of the Peace Treaty.
SPANISH INTERFERENCE WITH CENTRAL
AMERICAN AFFAIRS.
On the 1th May, the Canadian steamship
North America arrived at Quebec, bringing
Liverpool dates to the 23d April. On the
Stli, the Royal Mail steamer America arrived
at Halifax, with dates to the 2tHh of April.
The Turkish and Prussian Governments
hud ratified the Treaty of Peace. Dis
patches from the Crimea state that portions
of the English army had left, soon to be fol
lowed by the entire Allied army, K inborn
and Kupatoria being the first places evacua
ted. The Russian militia was ordered to
disband, and the Admirality had issued in
structions for placing buoys in the Gulfs of
Finland and Bothnia, and to light the light
houses there and on the Baltic and White
Sens.
A letter from Vienna says that tlie com
mission to organize the Principalities will
commence its labors very shortly.
Omar Pasha’s army will be formed into
moveable columns, for the purpose of enforc
ing the execution of the new laws.
The Paris correspondent of a leading
Brussels journal states that a dispatch had
been received, which announced that the
Danish Government had consented to the
arrangements which had been offered by
foreign governments, for the regulation of
the Sound Dues.
Central American affairs appear to have
alarmed the Spanish Government, so much
so that it was reported in Paris, on the au
thority of a privrtc letter from Madrid, that
the Government was desirous of making an
expedition, combined with France and En
gland, against Nicaragua, in order to pre
vent the fillibusters from passing to Cuba,
when they finish their work under Walker.
But Spain has no sympathy in her appre
hensions from France and England ; though
they are said to be advising her to keep
clear from any interference with the United
States.
The Czar Alexander and his principal
officers laid visited Moscow, where they
were received by the authorities and nobility
with enthusiasm and display. The Emperor
delivered an address on the peace question,
in which he explains his motives for accept
ing the treaty, lie said :
‘‘Many of you, I am aware, regret that I should
have so readily accepted the propositions made
to me. 11 was my duty as a man, and as the head
of a great empire, either to rejector accept them
frankly. I have honorably and conscientiously
fulfilled that duty. J am sure that allowances
will he made for the difficult position in which I
w us placed, and that shortly every devoted friend
of Hu.-sia will render justice to my views and in
tentions for the welfare of the country.
‘‘Supposing the fate of arms should have re
mained constantly favorable to ns, us it has been
in Asia, the empire would have exhausted its re
sources in keeping up large armies on different
points, the soldiers of which would, in a great
measure, be taken away from agriculture and
labor. In the government of Moscow itself many
manufactories have been compelled to close. I
prefer the real prosperity of the arts of peace to
the vain glory of combats.
•'I have thrown open the ports of Russia to the
commerce of the world ; the frontiers to the free
circulation of foreign produce. I wish, hence
forth, that the greatest facility shall he afforded
in our markets for the exchange of wares of every
origin, and of the raw materials and manufac
tures of our soils. Various projects will shortly
be communicated to you. the object of which will
l e to give an impulse to home industry, and in
which, l trust, every nobleman will takea share.’’
Rumors were current, arid obtained some
credence, that the British government was
inclined to give way in the position it had
assumed in the controversy with the United
States Government upon Central American
affairs, but the belief was that Mr. Cramp
ton would not be recalled. To this we may
add the remarks of the London Morning
Star, an organ of a portion of the ministry :
‘•We are told that at a meeting of the cabinet
on Tuesday, the 22d, at which Lord Clarendon
was present, for the first time since his return
from Paris, the answer to the United States was
agreed upon. On some of the points connected
with the Central American question the British
government are prepared to give way, but they
are prepared to communicate to the United States
that they are unanimous in their determination
to continue him in his present position as British
Minisser at Washington.”
An imperial eftcree bad appeared in
commanding a further reduction in the army.
It was rumored that Lord Cowley will be
British Minister to St. Petersburg, and that
Lord Stanhope will succeed him at Paris.
The Persian difficulty with England is on
the way of settlement. Accounts from Te
heran say that the Armenians arc endeavor
ing to procure a treaty of commerce with
the United States.
Prince Gortchakoff, from Vienna, suc
ceeds Count Nesselrode as Minister. Cron
stradt is expected to be free from ice by the
13th to the 20th May, and Riga by the 25th
of April at the latest.
A grand Naval review took place at
Spithead, England, on the 23d of April, in
honor of the restoration of peace. Over
100,000 spectators were present, on sea and
land. The fleet numbered over 240 ships of
war, big and little, all steamers, with the
exception of two ; comprised 34,000 horse
hower ; carried 3,000 guns and 33,000 men;
included sixteen gunboats and three floating
batteries, and extended twelve miles along
the water, east and west, across Spithead.
The fleet formed four squadrons, and per
formed a number of naval maneuvers for
j the edification of the Queen. Afterwards
the fleet made a sham attack on Portsmouth
Castle, and the performances were concluded
by illuminating all the ships with colored
lights.
Letter from General Walker.
The following letter, written by Walker
to Senator Weller, is taken from the New
York Times. In a debate in the Senate,
recently, Senators Weller and Douglass de
fended the course pursued by Walker in his
fillibustering movements :
Granada, April 15.
My Dear Sir :—By the last papers front
New York, I learn that when I was de
nounced in the Senate for the conduct Nic
aragua has pursued towards the Transit
Company, you were so generous as to under
take to defend me from the nspersons of men
utterly ignorant of my character. In con
sequence of this, 1 take the liberty of writing
some facts in relation to a Hairs here, and
these facts will, 1 think, prove not unimport
ant to the Government of the United States.
You have doubtless learned from the
newspapers how pacific was the policy Nic
aragua proposed to pursue toward the other
States of Central America. Notwithstand
ing all overtures of peace, the neighboring
governments showed themselves, it not posi
tively, at least negatively, hostile to the ac
tual administration of Nicaragua. It was
constantly asserted, not oidy here, but
throughout Central America, that the States
were stimulated to this conduct by English
and French agents But it was not until
the correspondence oT the Consul General of
Costa lliea in London was intercepted by
me, a few weeks ago, that positive evidence
was afforded of the active sympathy the
British Government manifest for those who
oppose the Americans in Nicaragua.
The correspondence shows that England
is furnishing arms and ammunition to our
enemies, and at the same time the whole
llritish West India Squadron is sent to
San .Juan del Norte, in order that the moral
weight of the English Government may be
thrown into the scale against our Republic.
I do not know how these facts may appear
to people of the United States, but to me
they seem directly at variance with Ameri
can principles and American interests.
These facts are potent to all, and their
significance is apparent to the most superfi
cial observer. There are other circumstan
ces connected with the present war, waging
in this State and in Costa lliea, which may
require interpretation in order to make their
importance felt.
The Government of Costa lliea has never
yet declared war against the Government of
Nicaragua ; yet it has invaded our territo
ries, has murdered American citizens, who
have never forfeited the protection of the
United States Government. This has been
done under cover of a decree, issued by the
President of Costa lliea, declaring war
against the American forces in the service
of Nicaragua. To declare war against the
forces, in the service of Nicaragua, and not
against Nicaragua herself is to deny, in the
most positive and offensive manner, the
right of Americans to engage in the service
of a foreign State. Not only has this dec
laration of war been made in this oppressive
and unheard-of manner, but another decree
has been published, ordering all American
prisoners of war taken by the Costa lliea
forces to be shot. This is to deny to Amer
icans engaged in a foreign service the com
mon rights to which soldiers are entitled by
the laws of war.
Such decrees as those I have mentioned
not only throw Costa Rica, as I conceive,
beyond the pale of civilized nations, but
they also directly affect the honor and dig
nity of the United States. They attempt
to control the American people, and keep
them within u limit which the American
government has never prescribed. Costa
lliea says Americans shall not emigrate to
Nicaragua and take arms in her service.—
It remains to be seen whether she can sus
tain herself in so singular a position.
In such a war as they are now waging
against us, there can be but one result.
They may destroy my whole force—a cir
cumstance I deem almost impossible. They
may kill every American nowin Nicaragua,
but the seed is sown and not all the force of
Spanish America can prevent the fruit from
coining to maturity. The more suvage the
nature of the war they wage against us, the
more certain the result, the more terrible
the consequences. 1 may not live to see
the end, but I feel that my countrymen will
not permit the result to be doubtful. 1
know that the honor and interests of the
great country which, despite the foreign
service 1 am engaged in, I still love to cull
my own, are involved in the present strug
gles, That honor must be preserved invio
lute, and those interests must be jealously
maintained.
I begin, however, to leave facts, and
therefore w ill coueludc.
I remain, with high regard, your obedieut
servant. Wm, Walker.
Hon John B. Weller, U. S. Senate.
Conceit and confidence are both of them
cbealed, the first alwas imposes upon itself,
the second frequently deceives others too.
DIKD.
At Ridgeville, on Saturday, the 7th in8t.,from
wounds received four hours previous hy the rav
ing of a bank, Henry Shoemaker, formerly of
Athensville, Green Co. 111.
NEW ADVERTISEM’TS.
S'" EVER A L very desirable apartments in
Heinrich’s new building, Main street,
Weaverville. The rooms are nicely papered,
and otter superior inducements to gentlemen who
prefer a quiet retreat free from the annoyances ot
a hotel. Kent moderate. Apply to
nl2-3t HEINRICH.
Weaverville
DANCING ACADEMY.
Miss Lizzik Bcrbank. - - Principal.
Mr. E. P. Wilson, ... Assistant.
riMlE ladies and gentlemen of Weaverville and
I vicinity are respectfully informed that the first
Assembly of the above Academy will be given at
the Trinity Theater, on Friday evening. June 6th.
when those wishing to become members cun have
an opportunity of doing so.
Evenings OK Ti ition :—Wednesday—School lor
ladies and gentlemen,—Friday, invariably dovo
pd to Social Assemblies. Private lessons for la
dies and children any afternoon during the week,
(Sundays excepted.)
All the new and fashionable fancy Dances taught
without extra charge, via : Galop a la Sevastopol,
Trinity Scholtisehe, Highland Polka, Ma/.ourku.
Waltz, Spanish Dance. Polka Waltz, La Esmeral
da. Ac. Assembly Tickets can be procured at the
St. Charles Hotel, or at the door of the Theater
on Friday evening. Subscribers will please leave
their names at the St. Charles Hotel.
Terms—$20 per Quarter, payable invariably
in advance. The patronage ot the public is re
spectfully solicited.
Weaver, June 7, 1850. 20-lw.
„ BLUE WING.”
r rMIK undersigned desires to inform his friends
1 in Weaverville, and the public generally, that
he has opened a
S A 1. O O X
of the above name, on Muiustrcet, where he hopes
to give general satisfaction to his patrons.
The best of Liquors and Cigars will be furnish
ed at the liar, and no pains will be spared to make
his place agreeable and popular.
JAMES LYNCH.
Weaver, June 7, 1856. 20-tf.
Notice.
I take this early opportunity to inform my own
customers and friends that 1 have sold mv old
and favorite stand, the “St. Charles Hotel, ’ and
desire to settle up my accounts at the earliest
practicable period. AH persons indebted to me
will please call and settle immediately, in order
to enable me to pay off mv debts.
S. S. nOVKY.
Weaver, June 7, 1856. 2t)-ef.
Notice.
riv H E undersigned having purchased the St.
I Charles Hotel, and all the appurtenances, w ill
close the same this evening, for the purpose of en
larging and refitting the house, which will be re
opened in a superior style and capacity for ac
commodation, on the 10th inst., by I!. W. Wilson,
Esq. W. 8. FROST.
Weaver. June 7, 1856. 20-tf.
County Warrant*.
TRKASLRKB’h OkKICK, [
Trinity County, June 1. 1856. |
r [' II E following County Warrants will be re-
I deemed at my ottlce on Monday. June 9th :
Nos. I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7. 10. 11, i2, ill, 15, regis
tered May 11th and 15th, 1855.
C. F. LYNN, Treasurer.
Weaver, June 4, 1856. 20-lw.
Sluiitr’s Sale.
BY virtue of two executions, one issued out ol
the Hon. District Court of the 15th Judicial
District, cm a Judgment rendered therein, on the
Hd day of June, A. 1>. 1856, in favor of S. A V.
Chamberlin, and against M. Fisher, for tile slim
of eight hundred dollars, principal, and twenty
seven 86-100 dollars, interest, and six hundred
and ninety .seven 65-100 dollars, costs of suit, a
mounting to the sum of fifteen hundred and twen
ty-live 51-100 dollars, (1525 51,) ami the other by
confession entered, and Judgment Roll filed in
the Clerk’s office of the aforesaid Court, on the
2nd day of June, 1856, against William Thomas,
and in favor of John I’. Iioss, E. il. Darker, ami
Mills A Van tine, for the sum of thirteen hundred
and twenty-seven I,! 100 dollars, uud ten dollurs
costs, amounting to the sum of thirteen hundred
ami thirty seven dollars and forty-three cents,
(1557 43,) 1 will expose for" sale to the highest
bidder, for cash, on Sullll'tlttU tlie "ZHtli
cliiy of .llliir, A. i). 1856, at the Court House
door, in the town of Weaverville, between the
hours of 10 a. m- and 5 p. m. the House known as
Thomas’ Trading Dost, situuted on Trinity river,
where the Flume of Feliley A Co. crosses the riv
er, with the Corrull, and all the improvements
thereunto belonging, to satisfy said Judgments
and accruing costs. This 4th day of June, 1856.
E. N Ell LETT, Sheriff.
By I. G. Messed, Under Sheriff. 20-5w.
A Dedication Ball
UJl L L be given at Dr. II. M. Chauneey’s new
Hotel, at Chauncey villc, on Weaver Creek,
on the ith of July next.
MANAGERS:
Weaverville J. 8. McCain, I. G. Messec, J. C.
Burch, E. Neblelt, A. Stetson, 11, Maine.
Oregon Gulch Frank Harris, A. J. FoRcr, R.
Bugbee.
Ridgevillc—F. Bales, J. F. Chellis, M. Grifllin.
Canon City J. Day, J. Logan, Win. Simpson.
Illg Flat D. 11. Murphy, J. May, A. McQuillan.
Cox’s Bar O. Simmons, Win. McCollum.
North Fork F. D. Ketchum, D. D. Hamilton,
C. Lee, S. L. Moore.
Lewiston Frank Wood.
Steiner's Ranch D. W. R. Bliss, - Hancock.
Fr.oou Managers.- J. C. Burch, W. M. Lowe.
Weaver, May, ill, 1856. 19-tf.
Administrator’s Sale.
N’OTICE is hereby given (list all the personal
property belonging to the estate of Thomas
Collins, dec. will he exposed for sale at public auc
tion, at t 'altini City. Trinity Co. on Saturday, Juno
1 Ith. By Order of lTobate Court.
J. M. FISHER, Adinr.
May 31, 1856. l*.3w.
OHEOKB
A TPAB ’ on
Garrison, Morgau, FrHz & ItaMon,
HAN FRANCISCO.
SIGHT DRAFTS at current rates, in sums to
suit, on
Manhattan Bank .New York.
Charles Morgan A Co New York.
Darby A Barksdale St. Louis, Mo.
price paid for Gold Dust.
RHODES A, WHITNEY,
Jxo. Axueuson, Agt.
Weaverville, May 17, 1856. 20-tf.
('opart nr i>liip Notice.
rplIE undersigned, having formed a Copartner
1 ship for the purpose of transacting the lluild
ing and Contracting business, desire to assure the
public, in soliciting their patronage, thut all bus
iness entrusted to them shall lie executed in the
beat manner and upon liberal terms. They have
taken the stand formerly occupied by Harris A
Johnson, on the North side of Court street, in the
town of Weaverville, and will be ready at all
times to accommodate persons wishing to contract
for the building of Bridges, Brick or frame Hou
“• *«* *To% 4 BRAY.
Wesvcr, Ajprll 1* ( 165®.
E X PRESSES.
F. W. BLAKE & CO.’S
EXPRESS* BANKING OFFICE
connecting with
HELLS, FARGO & Co.
COLLECTIONS made, and a general Express
business attended to. SIGHT DRAFTS at
par on
SIIASTA.
MARYSVILLE.
SACRAMENTO, and
SAN FRANCISCO.
V I.f.I..-', FARGO A CO.'S Exchange for sale
a all the principal Cities in the Atlantic States.
Special and General Deposits Received.
G O Is I> I> IT ST
HOI WIT AT TUB llKlHKST MAUKKT RATES.
Office in Davison A Harris’ Fire Proof Building,
Main street, Weaver.
F. W. BLAKE * CO.
Weaver, Mar 10, 1856. 16 tf.
A. E. RAYNES & Co’S.
F. X 1* U ESS,
F O K
Union and Humboldt Hay.
CON VEI‘TIN'11 WITH
ROWE A CO.’S EXPRESS. WEAVER,
AMI THE PACIFIC EXPRESS CO.. SHASTA.
UHLL run a weekly Express to Month Canon
Creek. North Fork. Trinity, Big Flat. Big
Bar, Cox’s Bar, Canadian liar, Burnt Ranch,
South Fork, Trinity, New River, Iloopa Valiev,
and I’nion,
Through the Pacific Express Co. to all parts of
California and Oregon, and semi-monthly to the
Atlantic States and Europe. Treasure received
for shipment, Collections made, and all business
attended to with promptness and dispatch.
A. E. RAYNES A CO.
Weavervllle. March 15. 1856. 8-tf
E. G. JOSLIN’S
HIIKIEV 11,1 A) KXPltESS!
connecting with the
PACIFIC’ EXPRESS ( ».
to all parts of the atlantic States and Europe, by
every Steamer. Mr. .losliii leaves Weavervllle ev
ery Tl'ESDAY and SATl RDAY utoruiug, for
LEWISTON, (Trinity River.)
BATES’ RANCH,
CllKl.LlS’ MILLS,
MINERS! II,LE,
DIGGER CREEK.
MI LE CREEK, and
RIDC.EVILLE,
and will give particular attention to the carrying
and delivery of LETTERS, P ACK At iES.TKKAS
I RE, Ac. DRAFTS purchased upon any Bank
iug House in tiio State.
Collections made, and all inialuesH in the Ex
press line carefully attended to.
MTGold Dust bought. E. G. JOSLIN.
Weaver, Muroli 1, 1856.
RAVELEY’S EXPRESS.
CONNECTING WITH
Tin* I'm ilir Express <’oni|>un)',
To all parts of the Northern and Southern Mines,
and to the Atlantic States and Europe
WEEKLY.
Will run a Tegular ami reliable Express from
WEAVERVILLE
TO
Oil KG ON GUKCII,
P K N N 8 V I, V A N I A B A H,
CANON CITY, or
.1 A (’ K A S S It A U
Collections made, orders received, and pucka
ges I'orwaided a ilh
l > i<iiii|itu«‘MH mill l)is|ialcli.
AlwaVs on hand,
' LATEST STATES PAPERS.
Highest price paid for
GOLD DUST.
augll tf S. W. RAVELEY, Agt.
MASONIC NOTICE.
Trinity Loiliie, No. M7, F. A. M.,
MOLD their regular communications at their
Hull, in Weuyel'ville, on the last Monday of
each month.
JAH' Hour of meeting, 6 o’clock, P, M,
J. S. P1TJCER, W. M.
Joit.v C. Biticii, Sec’y.
TRINITY DIVISION No. 105
Sons of Temperance,
Meet at their Hall every FRIDAY
EVENING, at 7J o’clock.
Officers for present term :
J. M. Estes, W. |*. B. w. Winston, W. A.
Geo. W. Ward, R. S. ,1. W. Klldey, A. R. S.
C. F. Lynn, F. S. It. S. Guptiil, T.
.1. A. Watson, C. James Downey, A. 0.
M. Murphy, I. S. J. Geggis, (). S.
R. Johnson, Chaplain, II. .1. Seaman, P. W. P.
Dissolution of Co-Partnership.
XTOTICE is hereby given that the partnership
i x heretofore existing between D. M. Filer and
P. M. Filer, ih this day dissolved by mutual con
sent. P. M. Eder is hereby authorized to collect
ull debts duo to the linn.
f>. M. EDEIl.
P. M. EDER.
Weavervllle, May 2, 1856.
fTMIE undersigned having purchased the interest
I of P. M. Eder, the business will ho continued
under the name us heretofore.
15. I>. M. EDER A Co.
11 A It I) VV A It K,
Iron and Stool,
n . W. TI.N NIN 8. Co.,
WKKT HtOK MaiK st. nk.xt noon to minkr’h hotel.
U; E are uow receiving and will keep alw ays on
hand, a general assortment of Hardware, of
the best quality, consisting of
err, wrouuht ash horse kmos,
SHOVELS, SUC DUES, ACC CHS,
V LAKES
HV ITS,
.IKES,
HELLS,
CHISELS,
LOCKS,
LATCHES,
FILES,
Sq CARES,
LOU I 'HA IKS,
HALTER “
TRACE “
IIAI LI KO WIRE,
11 WHETS,
SCREWS,
HEIR HEMPS,
ORA W KKICKS
U RINDS TOKES,
cross err sa ws,
whip
hash
SI. VICE FORKS,
HA Y EOHKS.
HO RAX, q VICKS II, VER, W/KDOW CLASS,
PETTY. PAINTS, OILS, CARMSHES, Re.,
HLACKKSlITlrS furnished with the best arti
cle of iron and .Steel of every size, for cash only.
W. W. TINN1N A Co.
Weaver, April 12, 1856. 12-tf.
CEO. J. IIKOOKN A Co.
paper warehouse,
123 S ANSI I ME ST., - - SAN FRANGTJCO.
i v)H HA LE 10,000 ltt‘HHiH Fine
I’ Printing Puper, 22x32, 24x34, 24x30, 28x42,
32x46.
200» Reams Fine Book Paper, 24x38, 40, 44,
and 48 lbs.
10,000 Reams Mantlla Paper all sizes in small
bales of 10 reams each.
8000 Reems Palm, Straw, Crown and Double
Crown.
200 Gross Hart’s Playing Cards.
Blank Cards, Cup and Letter Paper, and Light
body’s celebrated News Ink, together with n large
stock of New and Fancy Job Type from Conner
& Sous foundry. Also, Hue and Buggies’ Prin
ting and Job Pre.ssea.
tan Franeieco, January list. o3-3»
DAVISON & HARRIS,
MAIN ST. WEAVERVH-LE.
AH I HID MTU I DM:
Dealers in Drugs, Patent Medicines, Sta
tionery, Wines, Liquors, Tobacco,
Segars, &.C.
BEING now permanently settled in our NEW,.
FIRE-PROOF BUILDING,
and thankful for the very liberal patronage ws
hare received for the past THREE YEARS, now
otter our old customers and all new ones, a large
and well-selected stock of pure DRUGS, and
GENUINE PATENT MEDICINES,
of which we are the authorlied agent*. Also,,
the largest and most complete assortment of
Perfumery, Fancy and Toilet Articles.
We would ulso call their attention to our stock of
■ K « » « » Ms Me
consisting of Novels, Histories. School-books, the 1
prose and I'ovtical works of the incst eminent Au
thors,
CUTLERY &. WRITING MATERIAL
: of every description. In addition to the abort,
we have on hand a Hue assortment of GenvikI
BRANDIES, WHISKEY,
and Foreign Wines. Also,
TOBACCO AND CIGARS,
together with a very large stock of American
Ploying Card*, all of which w ill be sold at great
ly reduced prices, for the reason that we have set
tled here permanently, and ran afford to sell for
less profit than those who arc more anxious
“TO MAKE THEIR PILE,”
in a short time. Our motto is,
f re dit u lien «o can Cash when w e cannot.
Jan. 2t>, 1858. nl-tf.
Millinery and Dress-Making.
■ <*«» .<•** m. arm w mr
WOULD respectfully announce to the ladies of
» A Weaverville and vicinity, that she is now
permanently located in this place, and is prepar
ed to receive orders for
DRESS MAKINO, MILLINERY AND NEEDLE WORK
of every description. Rooms at the house of Mr.
Levi Reynolds, opposite Kreuchtown.
Weaver, March 15, 185(1. 8-3ra.
TO T1IE LADIES
OF WEAVERVILLEI
IT KING now in (lie receipt of our Spring stock
) of Ladies’ Goods, we now offer the most com
plete assortment ever lor sale In this pluct,coa
sisting in part, of
PARASOLS, BONNETS,
SILK VIZITKS, LAWNS.
FRENCH CALICOS, DOTTED MUSLINS,
BRILLIANTS, PLAIN A FIG’RD. I1AUAGES,
FLOUNCED DltKSSKS.CIIEM 1 EM 1SETTES,
SLEEVES A COLLARS,
LADIES’ SHOES AND SLIPPERS,
FRENCH I’ERKUMEKV. Ac. Ac.
D. M. EDER A Co. Main St.
Weaverville, May 3, 185(1. 13-tf.
INDEPENDENCE HOTEL.
MAIN ST., WEAVERVILLE.
BATCHELOR &. DAVIS, Proprietor*.
'PIIIS NEW him! SPLENDID*^
I Hist class Hotel, unsurpassed ill its llnH
appointments by any house in Northern JaUB,
California, is now before the public for a share of
patronage. Furnished with every requisite for
tlie comfort and convenience of guests entirely
new throughout it offers superior inducement*
to both permanent boulders and transient visitors.
Among the advantages presented by this House
are —
tut. A Table furnished in the best *tyle, under
the supervision of an experienced caterer.
2d. Large, well ventilated sleeping apartment*
titled w ith cleun beds, ami kept ill perfect order.
3rd Elegantly furnished apartments and par
lor KXCLUSI\ ELY FOR LADIES.
The whole establishment Is under the immedi
ate management of M KS. D A VIS, a lady whose
experience in this business euaurcs satisfvctlou to
a;i.
.1 A. BATCHELOR.
1. DAVIS.
Weaverville, Fvb. 9th, 1850, n3 tf
Mountain Market.
On Court St. at the head o!' Main.
This Market is constantly sup
plied with i very tiling in this GHk
-avTUstoliiie of business, suell us IIEEK, ' 11 *
PORK. CORNED BEEF PICKLED PORK,SAU
SAGE. SMOKED AND I RESII, TRIPE. HEAD
CHEESE, Hl.ool) PUDDINGS, LIVERWoKST,
Ac, Corned beef and pickled Pork, ulwuys on
hand anil for sulo In KEGS, mid in quantity or
quality our assortment of
BACON A ND HAMS,
cannot be surpassed. They are cured by us for
this market, uml are warranted to lie sweet and
good. Those w isliing anything in our line will do
well to give us u c all before purchasing elsewhere.
Loomis, iiuscuofT a Co.
Weaver, May 3, 1850, 13-tf.
ST. CHARLES HOTEL.
MAIN ST. WF.AVERVILhH.
S. S. I tOVKY, Proprietor,
Tirol l.D announce to his friend* ami
VV the public generally, that this well- j| Hff!
known establishment, recently destroyed
by tire, has been rebuilt upon a new and improved
plan, uml is now open. Acenmiiioduilmis superi
or to any heretofore known in this plane, ami «-
qual to any north of Sacramento, lie is roulhh-iit
In' can furnish, on terms reasonable and satisfac
tory to those who are hardest 1,1 please.
His TABLE will be supplii d at ull times with
tint best the market affords, and CLEAN HEIM,
uml rooms fitted up In tho most convenient and
utlraetive style, are always ready fbr those who
limy favor him with their patronage.
With every coldidenoe in his capacity to satisfy
all reasonable demands, he again solicits from
the public a continuance of their former support,
S. S. HOVfcY.
Weaver, Feb. 23, 185(1. 20-tf.
SPRING STOCK.
Groceries* Liquors, Sega fa, Ac.
Tin: call the attention of our htttnefous friend*
V V and tile public to our extensive Spring stock
which we have received and ure daily receiving,
making it the largest and most varied assort meal
North of San Frauciaco, consisting In part of
G ROGER IKS,
LIQUORS,
SEGARS,
MINER’S IMPLEMENTS,
CltOGKER V.
SADDLERY,
HARDWARE.
CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES, Ac.
Those desirous of purchasing at Wholesale, wn
invite their attention to our establishment, being
satisfied that we are utile to suit them in any and
alt Goods, ut prices much lower than any other
House in Weaverville. D. M, EDER 4 Co.
Eire Proof Building, Maiu street.
Weaverville, May 3, 1850. 15-tf.
County Scrip Wanted.
81 M|E highest price will be paid for Five ’Ftiqi>
J. -and Dollar* in Trinity County Sosip.
Warrants of any and ull issues. fix* onv *•-
mount bought. Apply to JOUN. C- BURCH.
Weaver, April 26, 1856, 14-tf.
Notice ! Notioe J Notice !
AS I ain to leave Weaverville on the 15th lost
for the States, thoae indebted to- the firm of
D. M. Eder A. Co. will please to calf at the stora
and make immediate settlement to avoid expense
p M Wi&u
Weaverville, M»v 16}$,

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