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Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1900-1903, November 17, 1900, Image 6

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WATERBURY EVENING DEMOCRAT,- SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 17, 1900.
;
In. Theatrical Q,hatter
f
?
: a
:
BY BRANDON.
,
iiHHS
' May Irwin has begun another week
at the Bijou theater with the Belle of
Bridgeport. Miss Irwin's business nas
been steady. It has not been great,
but it is good.
John W. Kansome in his Richard
Croker make-up read the returns at
Koster & Bial's last election night.
Mr Kansome had haVd work to make
his make-up fit the republican re
4
turns.
The Kansas City courts have given
Alice Nielsen the right to use her stage
name as her real one. She is Alice
Jfentwig no longer. She was divorced
from Professor Nentwig, an organist,
some time ago.
!!
James O'Neill's stupendous produc
tion of Monte Cristo is testing the ca
pacity of the Academy of Music every
night. Such business has not been
known at this theater since the early
days of the Old Homestead.
James Heme is approaching the
end of his long stay at the Theater
Republic, where be celebrated his fif
tieth performance of Sag Harbor the
other night. Early in December Mr
Heme will start on his road tour.
"The Two Orphans" is to be revived
next week at the American theater,
Kew York, by the stock company
there. New and elaborate scenery has
been prepared, Miss Terese Dragle.
an actress well known in the west and
daughter of George Dragle, the oldest
living American manager, has been
specially engaged to play Marianne.
::
'A funny story is told about an illus
trated song act that was engaged for
one of the club concerts of a Jewish
club in Brooklyn. They were sent to
fill the place of another act and did
not know the nature of the club where
they were working. They made a
preat hit until they introduced the
Piece de Resistance. The Holy City,
and then they suddenly found out in
a hurry that it wasn't quite the selec
tion for a Jewish club. , .
:: ' - , - -
Peter F. Dailey in "Hodge, Podge &
Co," will make a long run at the Mad
ison Square theater. The house is
packed at every performance. The
audiences greatly enjoy his curtain
speeches. When he first opened his
run in New York he used to tell the
audience to go out between the acts
and surprise him by buying him a dia
mond ring. Last weok he came be
fore the curtain antf ended his re
marks with his usual lines about the
ring. Just as he saiCi this, a uf.ckage
waa thrown on the itage. He picked
5t up, but did not open it until he
reached his dressing room. It con
tained not one. but four diamond rings.
Tailey, since then has not said a word
nbout diamond rings before the cur
tain. They came too fast for him.
::
'A native tenor is such a rarity that
most managers despair of finding one,
and In many of the later comic opera
productions no tenor parts are writ
ten. This season the Bostonians are
more fortunate than any of their com
petitors in the lyric field. They have
secured a phenomenally voiced tenor.
Albert Parr, who has created great in
terest by bis artistic singing and intel
ligent acting in the operas of their
repertoire. In "The Viceroy" Mr Parr
appears to unusual advantage, singing
the ballad. "Just cfor a Day," with ad
mirable diction, reaching C in Alt.
With authority and vigor.
Alberta Gallatin's Nell Gwyn play
is to be callfed "Under the liestora
tion." It was written by Cator Hev
erin, of Philadelphia. It is said to be
written concerning historical incidents
involving the "Merry Monarch,"
Charles IL. and the fascinating act
ress. The play is in four acts and an
pniloime. Edwin O.- Child is to star
Miss Gallatin is to star Miss Gallatin.
He promises a production scenically
lavish and correct as to atmosphere.
The supporting company will include
Margaret Dale Owen, Clara Bainford,
Marie Thill. Cecilia Griffith, Alexan
der Kearney, M. J. Jordan, Allan Dav
enport, W. G. Smith, Arthur McNally,
8. D. Allen and Fred G. Ross.
... . . -u-
"She is without a peer," wrote the
bard working, conscientious press
agent of the "Kockabye Baby" Opera
company..- And the next day he was
confronted by Miss Evelina Velvet
voice, who, with a dangerous glitter
la her eye and emotion in her voice,
snapped: "Without a peer", indeed!
WelL are there any peers in this
country? But I want you to under
stand that when I was in England I
had some of the bluest blood in the
English peerage dancing attendance
on me! Now, Mr Smart, the next time
yon get out. your hammer for me, just
chase np the facts," and she swept
haughtily out of the room. The poor
precis agent Is in doubt whether to send
" Evelina a vest pocket dictionary or
resign.
Theodore Burt Sayre yesterday can-
pleted the last act of "Thomas Moore,
the Dlav which Andrew Mack is to
present later in the season. Mr Sayre
wrote the play to order for Rich &
Harris, and the managers nave ex
pressed themselves as satisfied with
the manuscript It Is a romantic com
edy of the period of 1805, part histori
cal In its plot. Among the characters
Introduced are Sheridan. Beau Brum
rael, Lord Byron, the Prince of Wales
cad Lord Mona.. Mr Mack will ap--ar
in the title role, depicting Thom
J 8 Moore from the time of his earliest
i draggles in his attic room to his later
-""jmphs in London society. Mr
XX Will Introduce six songs, two of
ovrn composition. The others will
"t of some of Moore's most fam-
-nns set to music. The piece Is
for a Broadway theater next jduction was fairly acceptable to the j
- " ' jlarge audience, r- -
, 4
A rf.
4.
J
Belle Fremont, a dainty young lyric
soprano, who has attracted consider
able attention with the Bostonians, in
"The Viceroy," is a niece of Jessie
Bartlett Davis.
BRANDON.
LAST CHANCE FOR WHEELS.
The Sawtelle Dramatic company
closes its engagement at the Jacques
this evening, and the eleventh bicycle
will be given away free at this per
formance. At the matinee yesterday
Percy Norvey, 52 South Leonard street,
was given a wheel, and in the evening
Al Houlihan, 133 Bishop street. ,
phViw w; n ,?, i
cnance to get a wheel for nothing, and
uieie ougnt to Do an overflowing house
at the Jacques. "Chattanooga in '(Jl"
will be the bill.
GRAND OPERA.
Many purchasers were on hand this
morning when seats went on sale for
tlie International Grand Operatic com
pany presentation of grand opera, un
d:r the auspices of the Kimball school
of music, on Monday evening at Poll's.
Considerable interest lias been mani
fested by music lovers in tin's enter
tainment, and as a line rendering of
grand opera is assured these will" un
doubtedly be out in large numbers.
Cavailena Rusti
leaua and "Martha."
I of which mine sm are : , h play?" Manager "You are to
both tuneful operas, and they will be T)ers0nate the villain " Amateur 4c
put on with particular attention to cos- ' Persnjte the Milam. Amateur Ac
turning and scenerv. Madame Vicini i to How do 1 make up? JIanaSer
Kathryn E. Teunien, William Ste- ' "You don't have to; that's why
pliens, Arthur Randolph" Seaton, i 5"ou were chosen for the part." Kich
ChJrles Fontaiu Lorraine and Sitrnnr ! mond Dispatch.
Gnarro are known in all musicalc-en-
ters as grand opera artists of world
wide reputation, and Madame Charles
Fontain Lorraine, who appears be
tween the parts of the program in ar
tistic impersonations, enjoys also a
very favorable reputation. ' Prices are
2-j. 50, 7 cents, $1 and $1.50. and
grand opera at these prices ought to
attract every lover of music in Wa
terbury. "THROUGH THE BREAKERS."
Owen Davis's beautiful melodrama.
"Through the Breakers," will make a
very attractive performance at the
Jacques Monday, Tuesday and Wed
nesday, and if it repeats its previous
experience here it will undoubtedly
nack tlie house at every performance.
The play, it will be remembered, made
a tremendous success when presented
here two seasons ago by Maude
Banl-s. and show-goers are' not done
talk' jg yet of the splendid sea effect
protfaced as a climax of one of the
acts. As then, the play will now be
presented under the personal direction
of Mr Davis himself, and it will un
doubtedly be as fine a performance as
it was before. Seats went on sale this
morninsr. and there is already a large
demand for them.
"THE CADET GIRL."
The announcement that we are to
have "The Cadet Girl" at Poli's on
Wednesday evening, with the full
strength of Mr Chamberlyn's company
and the production complete as it was
given in New York and Boston, has
aroused the liveliest anticipation
among local lovers of fun. Ordinarily
these big musical comedy organizations
are very largely cut down when sent
to the one and two night stands, and
Manager Chamberlyn would undoubt
edly do so with "The Cadet Girl" were
it to stay on the road for more than
a week or two. As it is, however, it
will be seen for less than a week at a
time in only a few of the cities in the
immediate vicinity of Boston," and it
would not be good policy to do' so
where the fact would become so quick
ly known as here. The result is that
the entire orcanization of eightv-flve
persons will be seen in its production I
here. 1 he same great cast of princi- ;
pals which the New Y'ork Herald de- j
clared was enough to carry any two
musical comedies to success, and head-
ed by the .inimitable Dan Daly, and j
the same superlative production that
requires three cars for transportation,
will be brought here. It will without i
any question be the biggest and best J
production of musical comedy in Wa- !
terbury this season. Sale of seats i
Tuesday. i
LULU GLASER.
Pretty Lulu Glaser in "Sweet Anna
Page" Thursday evening at Poli's.
"THE COUNTY FAIR."
If one can opine from the roars of
laughter which greeted the production
once more in this city of that old-time
success, "The County Fair," at Poli's
theater last evening, the play was
highly pleasing to the audience pres
ent, which was one of the largest and
most representative of the season.
There is nothing intricate in the plot
of the play, if it has any plot, the
story being only a simple story of
rural life, depicting in a wonderful
manner the quaint and curious, the
simple and warmhearted characters,
so typical of rustic life.
Neil Burgess, who has been seen
here several times before, and who has
a warm place in the affections of the
theater-going' people of Waterbury,
portrayed as Abigail Prue, the char
acter of a warm-hearted -, New Eng
land spinster whose eccentricity Is
productive of many amusing and
laughter-producing situations. He
was -at once humorous and pathetic,
witty and sorrowful, resolute and tin
determined, warm-hearted and indif
ferent, in a word he played and acted
the role in such a manner that one,
who was not cognizant of the person
playing the role, could not detect the
least sign of masculinity about it. The
character of Otis Tucker, the ac
knowledged wooer of Miss Abby, who
would like to, but hadn't the courage
to propose to her, was ably portrayed
by Edward S. Metcalf. Miss C. Blanche
Rice as Taggs, a rather, mischievous
and a little deceitful though faithful
youngster, was a favorite with the
audience, while Eddie Jackson, her
friend and companion,, did the little
he had to. do in a fair manner.
During the third act the County
Fair quartette rendered several pleas
ing selections and the entire company
danced the Virginia reel. The scenery
throughout' was beautiful, especially
the scene at the Rock Bottom farm in
the second act. As a whole, the Dro-
Tlie Dreamer' Discovery.
"Somewhere," he sighed, "there Is a land
"Where gentle breezes sweetly blow.
Where sparkling- wavelets kiss the strand.
Where lovers wander hand In hand
A land I dreamed of long: ago.
"Here men contend in brutal ways, ' i
And, weary of the rush and roar, ' i
I labor through the cheerless days, -t
Lost in the soulless city's maze.
And dream the sweet, old dreams no
more!" ' '
Yet he that mourned the long ago
Found, where the never-ceasing streams
Of traffic roar and surge and flow,
One whom ho loved who smiled and lo!
There was the country of his dreams!
S. E. Kiser, in Chicago Times-Herald. ,
HUMOROUS.
A Husband's Regret. Herr Grimper
fwhose wife has just boxed his ears)
"And I, like a donkey., once begged
for that hand." Lustige Blaetter.
Chance for a Hero. "When I marry,
It will be a brave hero, who fears
nothing." May "Yes, dear; I am
sure you will never wed any other
kind of a man.?' Philadelphia Bulle
tin. Written Examination. "That Bos
ton school teacher wanted me to
propose by letter." "What for?" "She
said many a man who was all right
on grammar was terribly shaky on
spelling. " Indianarjolis Journal
'
How He Got Out. Custodian "So
you changed your mind about taking
that flat as soon as you went inside?"
Portly "Change nothing! Wasn't
room in there even to charge my
mind; I just backed' out." Denver
Kews.
The Deeper Disguise. Sergeant
"Shall I detail an officer in citizen's
clothes?" Captain "It won't do to
have his identity suspected. Better
detail an officer with citizen's man
ners, to make assurance doubly sure."
-Detroit Journal.
TTe Looked His 'Character. Amateur
! Antm- "Whnt. clnraftnr fim T r t.il.-B
The Mendicant. "Beg pardon, sir;
but x haven't nad anything to eat for
a week." The Philanthropist "Let
me congratulate you upon your suc
cess in so interesting an experiment.
7t must be a great saving to you, and
I'm sure you're looking well." Bos
on Transcript.
A Seeker of Peace. The intoxicated
ETentleman made his way unsteadily
into Wun Lung's laundry, and deliv
ered a huge bundle of linen with the
remark: "Zhere ol' man! Un'stan'
you killin' mishnaries. All ri'. Come
'roun' my houshe. My muzzer-in-law
use' be mishnary." Baltimore Amer
ican. P. ED ROCK CLINGS TO NAME.
Efory of How Town Came by It and
Its Sturdy Resolve Xot to
Change It.
' "Up in Columbia county," said a man
who spent the summer up the Hudson,
to a New Y'ork Sun reporter, "is Red
Jtock, a small hamlet, 26 miles from
'il'oany and near East Chatham and
Creechy Lake. Now. Red Rock isn't
much of a place, but there is something
interesting about it that I fancy all
the world doesn't know. The pres
ent name is not the one it has alvvaj's
borne, and what its other name was
I don't know. Whatever it was the
people did not like it, and concluded
they would change it. There was no
particular reason why they should call
it Red Rock, but that was determined
upon, and so Red Rock it became.
Then in the course of time strangers
of an inquiring turn of mind began
to ask why the place had such a name, ;
and as no reason could be given, new- .
comers to the neighborhood began to
want a name that meant something.
This insistence grew so strong that the
old residents began to look around for ;
a reason for the name of their place, '
and at last they found a huge bowlder
near by which they said was what had
suggested the name. But the bowlder
was gray instead ot red and the pro
gressionists insisted that that would
not do. At last, the' old-timers hit
upon a new plan, and procuring a bar
rel of red paint, they painted the big
rock red. Red Rock, indeed, it waa
Bow, and not only was all opposition
to the name overcome, but the painting
ot the rock every spring has become
on annual festival, and the people cele
brate it. with a big picnic and general
celebration. It was a new idea-to me,
and if there is any other town anv-
where on earth that is christened every
spring with red paint or any other
color, ! don't know where it is."
HEROIC AMID DANGERS.
V.BulIh Women in South Africa Have
- In Many Instances Proved
Their Mettle.
During the progress of the war in
South Africa many stories of individ
ual heroism have been told. A French
man writing from Bloemfontein, testi
fies that the English women there are
remarkable for the cheerful stoicism
with which they endured the anxiety
and discomforts of recent conditions.
He indulg-es, also, in other comments
that are interesting.
"One "may obs-erve among English
women," he says, "the same thing in
the matter of gracefulness that one
notices among the men in jthe mat
ter of politeness. There is no mean.
Either the English woman is extreme
ly graceful, pretty, elegant and even,
recherche, or else she is quite Tidicu-,
lous, ill dressed, sharp-featured and
plain the sort of woman for whom
there is no word in the French lan
guage. The great poet . Heine- wrote
once that a man who could see . and
understand : no woman was plain. I
always believed him. Alas! I had not
seen certain English women,-. and
Heine could never have seen them
either.
"An, English woman who is pretty
and clever possesses abundant charm,
but I have seen French women by no
means pretty who have made them-
se.ves so pleasing that they were to be
preferred to classic beauties. In Eng
land, ' however, when a woman misses
being good-looking the case is hope
less. She knows not how to walk, talk.
please or narrate, and is compelled to
take refuge in heroic endurance of her
plainness," v
MEAN PRACTICAL JOKE.
Bridal Pair Arrive In Cblcaeo with
- Luffgrase That Amaied Porter
and Bellboys.
According- to the Chicago Inter
Ocean two true hearts that beat as
one came into the Victoria hotel the
other day. They were in the bosoms
of Mr. and Mrs. Dwi-ht B. Louis,
who were married in Milwaukee the
night before..
Two false hearts ,that beat as two
wer brought into the hotel a few
minutes later. They belonged to the
bridal trunk of Mr. and Mrs. Dwjght
B. Louis, were made of iron, were
painted red, weighed ten pounds each,
THE BRIDAL TRUNK.
and were fastened to the tt-unk by a
heavy chain. On one side of each of
the hearts was the instription:
"Dwightie, I'm so happy!"
On the other was:
"Ella, same here."
Friends of tlie bridal couple in Mil
waukee had had fun with the baggage
before it was checked at Milwaukee.
When the trunks arrived the guests
of the hotel looked at them curiously,
and when the baggage went up to
the bridal chamber a laugh was heard
in the corridors.
Soon the bell rang. A bellboy ran
upstairs with a file. Half an hour
later there was a clatter in the street.
Two iron hearts reposed on the pave
ment. The two real, hearts kept ihe
seclusion of their rooms during the
clay. They feared the vividness of their
blushes would cause tlames to break
out in the lie tel.
KISS ANTTiONY'S ARGUMENT.
it
Fell l,ilie . Comb In tlie Slldst of
ller Male Antagonists nntl
Settled Tlieiii.
Miss Susan B. Anthony, the veteran
woman suffragist, has always had a
livelv wit, and there is more than one
example in her recent life, by Mrs. Ida
llusted Harper, of her nimble use of it
in the behalf of her sex, says Youth's
Companion.
During her experience as a school
teacher Miss Anthony got her first
practical insight into society's injus
tice to woman as a worker: Repeated
ly she would take a school, which a
male teacher had been obliged to give
up because of inefficiency, and, al
though she made a thorough success,
would receive only one-fourth of his
salary.
Her first opportunity of calling at-tention-to
the injury done the teach
ing profession by slighting its women
members came during the state con
vention in 1S53. Two-thirds of the
teachers in attendance were womenl
but not one of them spoke, nor was
their presence recognized in any way
by the men.
Toward the close of the second day
tho question under discussion was:
"Why the profession of teacher was
not as much respected as that of doc
tor, lawyer or minister?"
Miss Anthony, having listened for
some time, rose, but only succeeded in
gaining a hearing after half an hour's
heated debate as to whether she
should be permitted to address the
meeting. She had remained standing,
fearing to lose her chance, with her
heart beating a tattoo, and permis
sion being granted, she said: j
"It seems to me you fail to compre-
hend the cause of the disrespect of .
which you complain. Bo you not see
that so long as society says that wom
an has not brains enough to be a doc
tor, lawyer or minister, but has plen
ty to be a teacher, every man of you
who condescends to teach tacitly ad
mits before Israel and the sun that
he has no more brains than a wom
an ?"
As may be imagined, this little
bomb was disconcerting to men and
women alike.
HELEN KELLER IS A MARVEL.
Deaf, Dumb and Blind, Yet She Gains
a Thorough Education Her
Student Life.
Helen Keller, the deaf, dumb and
blind girl, has overcome tremendous
obstacles and is now progressing well
as a student at Badcliffe, says an ex
change. The bulk of her preparation for
college was accomplished under Ar
thur' Gilman's instruction, aided by
Miss Sullivan, for several years her
teacher. By the employment of sev
eral ingenious instruments she mas
tered geometry and algebra, while
with raised letter books she has se
cured a grasp on English, Latin and
Greek. Her examination papers were
in the Braille raised point system and
the answers she wrote on a type
writer, in the "use of which she is an
expert. Besides passing in all the
required subjects. Miss Keller has
entered Badcliffe with freshman Eng
lish and advanced Frenci to the rood.
At the lectures Helen is invariably
accompanied by" Miss Sullivan, who
sits close beside her and gives her, in
the manual language, whatever the
instructor may be saying. The fine
ness of her soul and the exquisite na
ture of her thoughts are evidenced
by the essays written during her
preparation. "
For all Helen Keller's remarkable
intellectuality she is in the main, just
pleasant, normal girl. She rides a
tandem,, sews, crochets, embroiders,
and, most marvelous of all, plays a
capital game of chess. Sha is with
out doubt the most wonderful college
girl the world has yet seen. - .
JJj
I lit?
49-33
t JUS T WHAT YOU WANT FOR THESE SHARP NIGHTS. . '
69c, 89c, 98c, $1.S5, 1.50. $8.00 up to 7.50 the
finest.
LARGE SIZE HEAVY AND WARM. .
Our Coats, Capes and
Jackets
Are remarkable for style, quality and
reasonableness in price. Never in the
history of the Garment trade have
such stylish wear been offered AT
SUCH LOW rRICES.
Tailor made hi every detail at about
the price of material alone.
Over BOO NEW THIS EAR'S "UP-TO-DATE"
GARMENTS for von to
chose from. NOT ONE OLD ONE IN
THE LOT.
A SPLENDID KERSEY COAT,
WELL LINED. STITCHED WITH
SILK. BEST CUT AND MAKE: A
!! GARMENT l'OR $4.!)S. COLORS.
TANS. CASTOR, BLACK, GARNET
AND ROYAL.
HANDSOME DOUBLE FACED
GOLF CAPE. MADE OF FINE HEA
VY ALL WOOL STOCK. WITH Oil
WITHOUT HANDSOME FRINGE:
STORM COLLAR; A $10 GARMENT
AT ,?5.9S.
r - f
MEETINGS TO-NIGHT.
Nosahogan lodge school meeting.
Waterbury association, N. A. S. E.
Friendly league, home evening;
drawing, hand sewing and instruction
on sewing machine.
MEETINGS TO-MORROW.
Melchisedeck lodge, I. O. B. B.
Prince Hereditary of Savoy society.
Brooklyn Athletic club.
Maude Adams's business at the
Knickerbocker theater has been be
yond nil expectations. 'ine receipts
have been phenomenal, and L'Aiglon
has drawn larger audiences than was
ever' anticipated, and the outlook is
magnificent for the next four weeks,
as the advance sale indicated.
::
M. T. Burleigh, a young colored man,
has been added to the choir of-exclusive
St George's church. New York.
He is the possessor of an excellent bar
itone voice, which has been carefully
trained at a conservatory or music in
Nov,' York. Burleigh comes from Erie,
Penn. and was employed there as a
bank messenger. His splendid voice
awakened interest in him. and he was
sent to New York. lie Avon his posi-
0on nffainst. a arRO mlmber
of
coin
witii petitors. The salary connected
the place is $S00 per annum.
Toby Claude, the dainty little Irish
fairy, born on the "ould sod," educat
ed in a convent in France, taught mu
sic in Germany and singing in Italy,
and speaking the languages of all the
countries of Europe perfectly, is now
an American, both by choice and
marriage. She will be remembered as
the "candy" girl in tho "The Belle of
love so prettily to stalwart W. Pro
pert Carleton, her husband in real life.
They are referred to by their famil
iars as ti 4 auu 4 1 , which in
terpreted in feet and inches, indi
cates their respective statures. Both
are members of "The Cadet GiiT'Com
pany. in which all are supposed to be
French excepting little Toby, and she
is, by the demands of the author, an
American girl. The role suits her to
perfection, and in it she has added
vastly to her list of aelmirers. She is
one of the few women of the stace
who are genuinely funny. An artist
to the tips of her diminutive little
tinsel's, she. has the opportunity in
"The Cadet Girl" to do something be
sides looking pretty enough to eat
and little enough to pet. and it' is said
that she has improved the opportunity
in such a manner as to make her pres
ence on the stno-e at all times con
temporarreous with hearty laughter.
COMING EVENTS.
Jacques, November 12 and entire
week Sawtelle Dramatic company.
City hall, November 9-19 St Thom
as's church fair.
COpcordia hall. November 14-17
-Fair by Concordia Singing society.
St Michael's hall, Waterville, No
vember 17 St Michael's church fair.
Poli's, Monday and Tuesday. No
vember 19 aud 2Q International Grand
Opera company.
At Jacques, Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday, November 19 to 21
"Through the Breakers." , .
Leavenworth ball, November 21
Lecture by Bliss Perry, "Thackeray."
Poli's. Wednesday,' November 21
Marie Dressier.
At Toli's, Thursday, November 22
Lulu Glaseu. .
Jacques, Thursday, "Friday and Sat
urday. November 22-24 "Boston After
Dark" " ' i
' was obtained for me by
I 'iS MONROE'S
lS1x- BUSINESS COLLEGE
vnjea. T K if - ?j- th.B.
9- 1"4
'(
f"',ri7!IilWfimp
"7
Send
ibiill.
urn
South iVtairi Street.
EXTRA VALUES IN CATES AND
COATS FOR OLD LADIES AND
STOUT TERSONS.
Great Raton Sale Continued Saturday
"1.000 yards No 40 ALL PURE SILK
TAFFETA RIBBONS, usually sold
at ."c. For one day oiilv, 10 cents a
yard.
SEE SPECIAL DISPLAY IN
SOUTH WINDOW.
1.000 HANDSOME IRISH POINT
PILLOW SHAMS. BUREAU
SCARFS. TIDIES. ETC. WORTH a.lc
TO T.V, FOR ONLY .'x- EACH.
SEE DISPLAY IX SOUTH WIN
DO W.
THE LAST DAY ON OUR
GREAT HALF PRICE SALE
OF FIXE FURS. MANUFACTURER
SAYS. HE CAN'T STAND THE
LOSS.
SCARFS. COLLARETTES AND
BOAS OF MINK. OTTER. BEAVER,
OPOSSUM. ELECTRIC SEAL.
STONE MARTEN, RUSSIAN SABLE.
ETC.
More situations just filled with
Holmes. Booth & Haydens Co, C.
M. Cottle. Waterbury Clock
Company.
We Giva Careful individual In
struction; and New Pupils
Enter Any Tima.
glW.
's Free.
JDOLl'S THEATER.
MONDAY EVENING, NOV 19.
Special subscription, engagement of the
IIMMiOHL mum SO,
of New York, and London,
under the auspices of the
Kigali School of Music.
PRIMA DONNA VICINI
Will Sing in Each Opera.
Trices: i2.", 50. 75 cents, $1. $1.50.
On sale to subscribers ifriday, Novem
ber 3l. To tlie general public Satur
day, November 17.
JACQUES OPERA HOUSE.
MONDAY. TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY
NOVEMBER 1!, 20, 21.
Matinees Tuesday and Wednesday.
Oweu Davis's Superb Melodrama,
tai fi tta Breakers
Presented by a splendid company and
with scenic embellishments of a
surprising nature.
Trices 15, 25, 35, 50 cents. Matinees
10 and 20 cents. Sale of seats Satur
day, November 17.
pOLl'S THEAl hR.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOV 21.
First Production in Waterbury of
The Cadet Girl:
Under the Sole Direction of A. H.
Chamberlyn.
Exactly the same as played for seven
weeks in New York, three weeks
iu Philadelphia, and six weeks in
Boston.
DAN DALY, as Premier Comedian.
Prices: 25c. 50c, 75c, $1, $1.50. Sale
of seats Tuesday, November 20.
ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH FAIR
WATERVILLE.
Opens Saturday Evening, November
' - 17, 1900. at St Michael's Hall.
Entertainment and Dancing Each
' ' Evening. Admission 10 Cents.
COOOOOOOOOCGOOOOCOOO oooco
o The Whole Story
8 in one letter about
(rERET DAVIS'.)
8 From Capt. F. Ifije, Police Station No. 8
S? 5, Montreal : "We frequently use Peebt 9
O Davis' Pain-Kilixi: tor pains in the atom-Q
O ach, rheumatismt stiffness, frost bites, chil- O
btains, cramps, and all afflictions , which q
befall men in onr position. . 1 have no heei- O
i tation in saying that Pain-Kilxeb is the Q
best remedy to have near at hand." q
Used Internally ,nnd Externally. Q
S Two Sizes, 55c. and 5ffc. bottles. - 8
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOO
Co
MANUFACTURER HAS WITH
DRAWN" HIS OFFER TO SELL AT
ONE-HALF, AND WE CLOSE OUR
OFFER TO-NIGHT, SO IF YOU
WISH TO SECURE YOUR FURS AT
HALF PRICE, DO IT NOT LATER
THAN TO-NIGHT.
YOU GET ONE-HALF, MANU
FACTURER THE OTHER.
The Grandest Values in Men's Win
ter Underwear ever shown in this citv.
OYER TEX STYLES AT HO CTS.
Double R-.vasted and back, double
seated Drawers. Camel's Hair. Scotch
Wool, Fleecy Lined cr Plain. Fancy.
Blue. Cream and NaturaT Shades. Di
rect from Manufacturer TO YOU. NO
MIDDLE MAN'S PROFIT. 20 differ
ent finer and better qualities, from 7't
cents to $2. 00.
Ladies and Children are not forgot
ten Fine Lamb's Wool. Australian
Wool. Camel's Hair. Fleecy Lined, etc.
!." cents to' $2: ample stock to choose
from to suit every purse. -
GAS TO BURN
FOR ALL TURTOSES.
GAS ENGINES, any desired power.
GAS STOVES, for cooking or heat
ing. GAS BURNERS, all approved kinds.
All most cheerfully shown, and all
information and estimates cheerfully
imparted to all who will call.
The United Gas fmprovsmsnt Go
150 Grand Street.
Home Work
Is considered the best sort of laundry
work, but add to the care your laundry
work would get at home our improved
facilities that you can never hope to
possess, and you will know how we
can turn out perfect work at a merely
nominal cost. .
Davis' Steam Laundry
17 CANAL STREET.
Branch Office, C7 Grand St.
BLUE FISH
10 Cants lb.
BLUE FISH, 10c a pound
SEA TROUT. So a pound
Long Island Clams and Scallops and
a Large Variety of Other
Kinds of Fish.
Corner of South Main and Union Sts.
City Fish Market.
Cor. North Main and North Eini Sts,
On Waterville street, a beautiful res
idence embracing all the artistic and
modern improvements which suggest
ease and comfort, aud that place on
Ridgewood street with its tasty and .
highly embellished front facing the
warming smiles of the southern sun,
will bring happiness to its possessor.
E. II- TISRSTEY,
Real Estate. Fire and Plate Glass
Insurance, and Bonds and Surety
given; 107 Bank street.
ea i nos
of two to five days' duration,
are offered by the
lifiion
me
TO
, Norfolk, Va.
Old Point Comfort, Va.
Kieiimontl, Va,
Was&ington, D.C
Steamers sail uaiiy except Sunday
from Tier 2(J, North liiver, foot of
Beach street. New York.
Tickets, including meals and statej
room accommodations, $13.00 and up
wards. For full information apply to
OLD DOMINION S. S. COHPANV
SI Beach Street, New York, N. Y.
II. B. Walker. Traf. Mgr. .
J. J. Brown. G. P. Aj
anything yon invent or improve ; also eet !
i CAVEA1.TR ADS-MARK, COPYRIGHT or DESIGN J
! PROTECTION. Mend modri. ukoti-h.arnhot!- !
for free examination and advice,.
Rn0 fiM DATtuTQ ee, NoAttys
i w-h
uuun wsi t uikuiu leeneiorep&teat.;
to
j Patent Lawyers. WAS H ! N GTO N , D . C
Short

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