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Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1900-1903, November 21, 1900, Image 6

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WATERBURY EVENING DEMOCRAT, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21,190a
- 3
ineatrical
Fraternal
THE CADET GIRL.1
Local show goers who visit Poli's
this evening are pretty sure 10 see n
"The Cadet Girl"- the most splendid
presentation of musical comedy ever
given on the local stage. Man
ager A. H. Cliamberlyn, who directs
the performance, is the manager of
the Columbia theater, Boston, and he
has pledged' himself to give the pro
duction with all the completeness that
marked the original runs in New
York, Philadelphia and Boston. This
means that eighty-five people will be
on the stage at Poli's this evening, and
that, in addition to everything being
the same as in the original production,
everything will be the same also as in
the run that is to begin in London iu
about six weeks. In order to make
the production additionally strong tlu
bouse orchestra will be increased to
ten pieces. Dan Daly, generally re
garded as the greatest living eccentric
comedian, is the premier comedian of
the organization, and local show goers
have read so much of him that the
desire to see him is widespread. In
addition to him others in the cast, such
as William Cameron, W. P. Carleton,
George A. Schiller, Adele Kitchie.
Toby Claude and Alice Judsou. are
known the world over. In everything
that goes to make a production truly
metropolitan nothing is lacking, and
those who see '-The Cadet Girl" this
evening wiil enjoy a genuine treat.
Prices are 25, 50, 75 cents, 1 and
$1.50.
- "THROUGHTHE BREAKERS."
, Owen Davis's beautiful melodrama,
"Through the Breakers." will be given
its final presentation at the Jacques this
evening. It is one of the most attrac
tive melodramas produced iu this city
and is always exceptionally entertain
ing. It deserves a large audience.
LULU GLASER.
Pretty Lulu Glaser will undoubtedly
prove a popular attraction when she
appears to-morrow evening at Poli's in
her new. opera, "Sweet Aime rage."
Miss Glaser has been a great popular
favorite here since she first played
with Francis Wilson on the night that
Toli's ' theater was first opened three
years ago, and on three subsequent oc
casions that she played here with Mr
Wilson she made innumerable new ad-
fLULU G CASES'
mirers. She is undoubtedly the most
magnetic of all the operatic commedi
ennes, having that indispensable qual
ity -of drawing an audience into close
harmony with herself that-, is one of
the most desirable gifts of a theatrical
artist. She hag had splendid success'
since she began starring for herself in
"Sweet Anne Page," and the opera is
already accepted as profitable metro
politan timber. Miss Glaser will cer
tainly give-a splendid performance to
morrow evening, and her admirers will
probably be out in force. Seats are
now on sale, at 25, 50, 75 cents, $1 and
$1.50.
- "TUB BOW Ell X AJJXEll UAKlv."
' The attractive melodrama, "The
Bowery After Dark," will be the at-
TnftirTl at 1lA JapmlPS fill TltllTSllflV.
Friday and Saturday. The play deals
rwith life in the great metropolis in a
way to enchant the audience, dealing
in incidents Jtad scenes that keep the
spectators worked up -to the pitch of
excitement at all times. Some noted I
hannts on the Bowery are shown, no
tably Suicide HalL and hero, and hero
ine are taken through a series of ad
adventures at once startling and sen
sational. It should prove a most in
teresting performance and will no
doubt be a very, popular attraction.
; 'THE CRACKER JACKS.
Bobby Manchester's noted Cracker
Jacks will be at Poli's Friday and Sat
urday, giving a special matinee on
Saturday. The company is one of the
best known of its kind and offers a
performance that teems with novel
ties. One of the principal ones is the
leaping and vaulting of. Brown and
Marsh, the world's champions, who
come direct from the Paris exposition,
where they made a genuine sensation.
They have a standing challenge of $1.
000 to meet all ompetitors in their line
and would be pleased to have any one
in Waterbury compete with them. An
other novelty is the historical mechan
ical dissolving statuary from the Paris
exposition. Sale of seats to-morrow.
MEETINGS TO-NIGHT. : "-
Winona-lodge, D. of R. -
i Eureka chapter, R. A. M. i.
Toantik tribe, I-O. R. M. "
Court Fruitful Tine, F. of A.
Mattatuck lodge; N. E. O. P.
. Court Fruitful Vine, A. O. F.
Excelsior council, O. U. A. M.
. Court Richard Wagner, F. of A.
Waterbury Company, No 20, U. R.'
a. p. y .
Friendly league, cooking, embroid
Ty, glee club. - , v
' COMING EVENTS.
"St Michael's hall, .Waterville, No
"ber 17 St Michael's church fair.
At Lenvenworth hall, Wednesday,
v 21 Women's club lecture course,
is Perry, "Thackeray."
Poli's, Thursday, November 22
'aser. .
s, Thursday, Friday and Sat
jveinbef 22-24 "Boston After
" - t rwembly ball, .Monday
r 28 Concert of the
1 c fjub, benefit of
i
M
I THE STURGIS WAGER
$ . A DETECTIVE STORY. Sj
i " ?J
3 By EDGAR MORETTR
$j Copyright, 1899, by Frederick A. Stokes Co. JjJ
"I beg to suggest," remarked Dunlap,
"that the shots heard by the policeman
and his prisoner were not fired from
the inside of the bank."
"That appears auite likely," admitted
Murdock; "but they must at any rate
have been fired' in close proximity to
the bank, since the witnesses agree
that they appeared to come from in
side. In that case, whence were they
fired? By whom? And why? On the
whole, my little puzzle doe. not seeia
co 12.3 to in ctosEn. unat is your own
opinion, Mr. Sturgis?"
"'I quite agTee with you that the
problem is probably not so simple as it
seemed at first blus'h to Sprague.
"Very well. Then doubtless you are
willing to undertake the task of supply
ing whatever data may be required to
complete the chain, of evidence against
Quinlan?"
"By no means," replied Sturgis, de
cidedly. "Indeed? Ah! -wvell, of course, if Mr.
Sturgis wishes to withdraw his bet "
"I do not wish to withdraw my bet,"
said Sturgis; "I will agree to solve your
problem within 30 days or to forfeit
my stakes; but I cannot undertake to
prove the truth or falsity of any a
priori theory. I have no personal
knowledge of the matter as yet, and
therefore no theory."
"Quite so," observed Murdock, iron
ically. "I had forgotten your scientific
methods. Of course, it may turn out
that it was the policeman who stole the
satchel from Shorty Dull."
"Perhaps," answered Sturgis, imper
turbably. Murdock smiled.
"Well, gentlemen," said he, "I ac
cept Mr. Sturgis' conditions. If you
are willing," he continued, turning- to
the reporter, "our host will hold the
stakes and decide the wager."
"I. for one, agree with Sprague," said
Dr. Thurston. "I am disappointed in
the problem. I have seen Sturgis un
ravel some extremely puzzling tangles
in my da3"; and each case would not
be hard to find. Why, no longer ago
than this evening, on our way here,
we stumbled upon a most peculiar case
eh oh! er please pass the cognac,
Sprague. I wish I had some like it in
my cellar; it is worth its weight in.
Id."
Dr. Thurston had met Sturgis' steady
gaze and had understood that, for some
reason, or other, the reporter did not
wish him to relate their adventure of
the afternoon.
Only one person appeared to notice
the abrupt termination of his story.
This was Murdock, who had looked up
at the speaker with mild curiosity, and
who had also intercepted the reporter's
warning glance at his friend. He ob
served Dr. Thurston narrowly for a
full minute, appeared to enjoy his
clumsy effort to cover his retreat, and
then quietly siDped his coffee.
CHAPTER IV.
THE BANK PRESIDENT.
Sprague's dinner party was over,
and among the first to take their
leave, shortly after midnight, were
Dunlap, Sturgis and Dr. Thurston.
The reporter did not often spend
an evening in worldly dissipation. He
was a man of action, a hard worker
and an enthusiastic student. Almost
ill of the time which was not actually
Spent in the pursuit of his profession,
was devoted to study in many widely
diCerent fields of art and science.
For Sturgis' ideal of his profession
was high; he held that almost every
form of knowledge was essential to
success in his line of work. It was
seldom, therefore, that he allowed
himself to spend a precious evening
in social intercourse, unless as a more
or less direct means to some end. He
had made an exception in favor of
Sprague's dinner, and his meeting
with Dunlap, whom he had not pre
viously known, had been entirely ac
cidental. Dunlap was, however, a man whom
Sturgis needed to see in the course
of his study of the Knickerbocker
bank mystery, and he had not lost
the opportunity which chance had
placed in his way. After obtaining an
introduction to the bank president,
the reporter had sought an occasion
to speak with him in private; and, as
this did not present itself during the
course of the evening, he had timed
his departure so that it should coin
cide with that of Dunlap. Dr. Thurs
ton had followed his friend's lead,
"Are -you going down to . the bank,
this .evening, Mr. Dunlap?" asked
Eturgis, as the trio faced the bleak
wind. . . '
"I? No. Why should I?" inquired
the banker, in apparent surprise.
"I see no particular reason why
you should," replied the reporter. "If
to-day were a banking day, there
would be no time to lose. But since
it is New Year's day, there is little,
if any, chance of the trail being dis
turbed; and it will be much easier
to find it in broad daylight- than by
gaslight. Our friends of the central
office are tisually pretty clever in dis
covering' at least the more - evident
. clews in a case of this sort, even when
,tbey have, not the ability to correct
ly interpret them. ' And ' since they;
have completely failed in their search,
to-night, we must anticipate a more
than ordinarily difficult puzzle."
"Why, Mr. Sturgis," said Dunlap,
somewhat anxiously. "You talk as
though you really believed that some
mysterious crime- has been committed
at the bank." ' : ; ; ' ; . "
"I do. not know enough about the
case as yet to advance any positive
belief in - the matter," said Sturgis;
"but if we assume as correct the cir
cumstances related in r the article
which Dr. Murdock read to us this
evening, - they certainly present ' an
extraordinary . aspect."
Dunlap reflected for an instant.
'. "Still, the fact that our cashier
found everything in good order at the
bank is in itself completely reassur
ing." he said, musingly.- "
.("Very -likely," assented Sturgis. "It
is quite possible that from a banker's
oint of view the problem is wholly
devoid of interest; but from a de
tective's standpoint it appears to be
full of promising , features. rThefe
,2 3. vbctber cc ast y.ou intend to
look farther into the matter yourseir,
I beg you will at least authorize me
to make a survey of the field by day
light in the morning." .'- ' - ' - .-.
Dunlap looked anything but pleased
as the "reporter spoke these words.
He thought before replying. .
"Frankly, Mri Sturgis," he said, at
length, with studied courtesy, "I will
not conceal the fact that what you
aslc places me in a rather awkward
position. You are a friend of ,my
friend Sprague, and my personal in
tercourse with you this evening has
been pleasant enough' to. make me
hope that, in the future, I may be
so fortunate as to include you in my
own circle of acquaintances. There
fore, on personal grounds, it would
give me great pleasure to grant your
request. But, on the other hand, you
are a journalist and I am a. banker;
and it is with banks as with nations
happy that which has no hietory.
Capital is proverbially timid, you
know."
"I see," said Sturgis; "you fear that
the reputation of the Knickerbocker
bank may suffer if the mystery of
the pistol shots is solved."
"No, no, my dear sir; not at all,
not at all. You quite misunderstood
me," replied the banker, with just a
shade of warmth. "It is not a ques
tion of the bank's credit exactly,
since there has been neither robbery
nor defalcation; but depositors do not
like to see the name of their bank
mentioned in the newspapers; . they
take fright at once, j Depositors are
most unreasonable beings, Mr. Stur
gis; they -are linble to become panic
stricken cn the most insignificant prov
ocation; and then they run amuck
like mad sheep. The Knickerbocker
bank does not fear any run that
might ever be made upon it. Its
credit stands on too secure a founda
tion for that. But nevertheless a run
on a bank is expensive, Mr. Sturgis,
very expensive."
"The bank's affairs being in so sat
isfactory a condition," observed the
reporter, "it seems to me that what
ever harm publicity is likely to do
has already been done. The imagina
tions of your depositors are now at
work sapping the foundation of the
Knickerbocker bank. If the truth
cannot injure its credit, it can only
strengthen it; and to withhold the
truth under the circumstances is to
invite suspicion."
Dunlap did not appear to like the
turn the conversation was taking.
He walked along in silence for a few
minutes, irresolute. At length lie
eeemed to make up his mind.
"Perhaps you are right after all,
Mr. Sturgis. At any rate we have
nothing to conceal from the public.
If you will be at the bank to-morrow
morning at nine o'clock, I shall be
pleased to meet you there."
Sturgis nodded his acquiescence.
"Well, gentlemen, here is my
street," continued the banker. "Good
evening, good evening."
And he was off.
"Whither are you bound now,
Thurston?" asked the reporter, as the
friends resumed their walk.
"Home and to bed like a sensible
fellow," replied the physician.
"Don't you do anything of the sort.
Come along with me to my rooms. I
must arrange the data so far col
lected in the two interesting cases
that I have taken up to-day; and in the
cab Hosiery, at least, you can prob
ably be of assistance to me, if you
will."
"Very well, eld man ; lead cn. I am
curious to know what theories you
have adopted in these two cases."
"Theories!" replied Sturgis; "I never
adopt theories. I simply ascertain
facts and arrange them in their proper
sequence, as far as possible. When
this arrangement is successfully ac
complished, the history of the crime is
practically completed. Detection of
crime is an exact science. Here, as in
all other sciences, the imagination
has an important paat to play, but that
part consists in coordinating and in
terpreting facts. The solid foundation
of facts must invariably come first."
CHAPTER V.
A FOUNDATION OP FACTS.
When the two men were comfortably
settled in the reporter's study, Sturgis
produced pipes, tobacco and writing
materials.
"There, now," said he, as he prepared
to write, "I begin with what I shall
call the Cab Mystery. The data in this
case are already plentiful and curious.
I shall read as I write, and you can
iterrupt for suggestions and criti
cisms, as the points occur to you. In
the first place, the dead man is about
fifty years old, and was employed in
Eome commercial house or financial in
1 stitution, probably bookkeeper, at a
f airly good salary." : ; .
s "Hold on there, Sturgis," laughed
Thurston. "I thought you were going
"HOLD ON THERE, - STURGIS.
to build up a solid foundation of facts
before you allowed your imagination
to run'riotl" ; v
. "Well?" inquired the reporter, in ap
parent surprise. , . .
'."Well, the only fact you have men
tioned; is the. approximate age of the
dead man. The rest is pure assump-'
tion. How can you know anything
certain about ,his occupation and- the
amount of his salary?" . -f
"True; I forgot you had not followed
the steps in the process of induction.
Here they are; the dead man's sleeves,
on" the under side below the elbow,
were worn shiny." This shows that
his occupation is at a desk of some
kind."
"Or behind a counter,', suggested
Thurston
"No. Your hypotfiesis is untenable.
A clerk behind a counter occasionally,
it is,true, leans upon his forearms.' But
incessant contact with the counter
leaves across the front of his trousers
an unmistakable line of wear, at a
level varying according to the Height
of the individual: "This line was not
present in the case of the man in the
cab. On the other hand', his waistcoat
is frayed at the level of the fourth but
ton from the top.. Therefore I main
tain that he was in the habit of work
ing at a desk. Now the trousers, al
though not new- are not baggy at the
knees, though free from the seams
which would suggest the effect of press
ing or of a trouser stretcher. Conclu
sion, the desk is a high one; for the
man stood at his work. Most men who
work standing at high desks are book
keepers of one kind or another. There
fore, as I said before, this man - was
probably a bookkeeper. Now, as to his
salary; I do not pretend'to know the
exact, amount of it, of course. But
when a man, who was evidently not a
dude, has his clothes made to order,
of imported material, and' when his
linen, his hat and' his shoes are of good
quality, it is fair to infer that the man's
income was comfortable.
"I proceed with the arrangement of
my data:
"Secondly: the man in the cab died
of a wound caused by a bullet fired at
very close quarters. Indeed, the weap
on must have been held either against
the victim's body, or, at any rate, very
near to it; for the coat is badly burned
by the powder." '
"On these points at least," assented
Dr. Thurston, "I can agree with you.
The bullet probably penetrated the
upper lobe of the left lung."
"Yes," added Sturgis, "and it passed
out at the back, far below where it
went in." .
"What makes you think it passed
out? The wound in the back may
have been caused by another bullet
fired from the rear."
"That hypothesis might be tenable
were it not for this."
With these words the reporter pulled
out his watch, opened the case, and
with the blade of a penknife took from
the surface of the crystal a minute ob
ject, which he handed to the physician.
"Look at it," said he, pushing ovei
a magnifying glass.
Dr. Thurston examined the object
carefully.
"A EpUn ter of bone," he said, al iast,
"Yes. 1 found it 03 the surfacs oi
the wound in the back. How did it get
there?"
"You are right," admitted the physi
cian; "it must have come from "with
in, chipped from a rib and carried out
by the bullet which entered from the
front." . ,
"I think there can be no doubt as to
that. Now, the bullet does not seem
to have been deflected in its course by
its contact with the rib, for, as far as I
have been able to judge by probing
the two wounds with my pencil, their
direction is the same. This is impor
tant and brings me to point three,
which is illustrated by these diagrams,
drawn to scale from the measurements
I took this afternoon."
As he said these words, the reporter
handed to his friend a sheet 'of paper
upon which he had drawn some ge
ometrical figures.
"The first of these diagrams shows
the angle which the course of the bul
let made with a horizontal plane; the
second represents the inclination from
right to left. The former of these an
gles is nearly and the latter not far
from forty-five degrees. The inclina
tion from right to left shows that the
shot was fired from the right side of
the dead man. Now then, one of two
things: Either it was fired by the man
himself, the weapon being held in his
right hand; or else it was fired by an
assassin who stood close to the vic
tim's right side. The first of these hy
potheses, considered by itself..is ad
missible; but it involves the assump
tion of an extremely awkward and un
usual position of the suicide's hand
while firing. On the other hand, the
dead man is tall six feet one inch
and to fire down, at an angle of sixty
degrees, upon a man of his height, his
assailant would have to be a colossus,
or else to stand upon, a chair or in some
equally elevated position, unless the
victim happened, to be seated when the
shot was fired."
"Happened to be seated!" exclaimed
Thurston, astounded, "why, of course
he was seated, since he was in the
cab."
"That brings np point four, which
is not the least puzzling of this in
teresting case," said Sturgis, impress
ively; "the shooting was not done in
the cab." x
"Not done in the cab!"
"No; otherwise the bullet would'have
remained in the cushions; and it was
not there."
"It might have fallen out into the
street at the time of the collision," sug
gested, Thurston.
"No; I searched every inch of space
in which it might have fallen. If it
had been there I should have found
it, for the spot was brilliantly lighted
by an electric light, as you remem
ber.", - The physician pond'ered in silence for'
a few minutes.
"With all due respect for the accu
racy of your observations, and for the
rigorous logic of your inductions,
Sturgis," he asserted at last with de
cision,. "I am positive that the man
died seated, for his limbs stiffened in
that position." 1 - ' '
"Yes," asserted Sturgis, "and for that
matter, I grant you that he breathed
his last in the cab; for in his death,
struggles he clutched in "his left hand
the cushion of the cab window, a piece
of which remained' in his dying grasp.
I merely said that he was not shot in
the cab." ( :
"Then how did he get there?" asked
the physician. -
"Your question is premature, my
dear fellow," replied Sturgis, smiling;
"it must remain' unanswered for the
present. All we have established as
yet is that he did get there. And that
being the case, be must have been as
sisted ; for, wounded as he was, he
could not, I take it, have climbed into
tie cab by himself." - c
' "Ctrtainlip not" asreed Thurston. -''
(To bo Continued.)
Bean the
Signature
of
The Kind You Haw Always Bought
ie
Dress
A
OF IT :
3,000 Yards of new, fine goods at one-third to one-half what tho
goods cost or are worth.
... A GRAND OPPORTUNITY TO PU It CHASE
Waists 'Patterns Skirt Patterns, Dress Patterns.
ALSO QUANTITIES SUITABLE FOE CHILDREN'S WEAR AT HALF WHAT YOU USUALLY PAY.
Don't wait until they are all gone, but come in or send your friend,
It is the greatest money saving opportunity of the year.
- Electric Seal Jackets,
To Order For $30
BECAUSE OUR FURRIERS ARE NOT ON STRIKE, BUT EVER
READY TO MAKE YOUK OLD FUR GARMENTS INTO THE LATEST
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CALL AND INVESTIGATE OUR LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
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PLACE.
118 South
OPPOSITE- SCOVILL STREET.
ina and the
, At Friendly League Hall,
THURSDAY EVENING, NOV 22,
Under the auspices of the Waterbury
Scientific Society.
PROF ALEX. WILDER of Newark,
N. .1., will lecture on China and the'
Chinese, giving their Origin. History.
Religion, Habit, Customs, etc.
ADMISSION 50 CENTS.
Tickets may be obtained at Ells's
Book Haunt, Adt's Art Gallery, Zig-latzki-Marks
Co, and of members.
11-19-4
Gettysburg,
CITY HALL, NOV 2C-27, 1900.
300 beautiful Stereopticon Views,
many of them taken during the battle
or soon thereafter by government pho
tographers. Gettysburg is pictured as
it was in 1SG3 and as it is to-day, after
an expenditure of over four millions
of dollars by the states and by the na
tional government. The battle will be
described by the renowned guide and
lecturer, L. W. Minnigh, who has made
that great struggle his life's study and
who as a battlefield guide and lecturer
is unequaled. Admission 23c, gallery
3oc. Tickets at Cone's drug store.
11-19-S
Thanksgiving Foot Ball Game
All Y. M. C. A. Team vs
Storrs Agricultural College.
ATHLETIC FIELD.
' Game Called at 2:30 p. m. Sharp.
early. A limited number of pupils
nnn nnw ontfi- tlie stHctlv beciniiers'
dancing class, to be opened by Prof.
Bailey at his Acaaemy nan, iuo uaut.
street, next Thursday evening, 8
o'clock. -. This is the original academy
and your success is a certainty. JJon t
waste time and money with amateurs.
Twenty members already entered for
this class. 12 lessons: ladies $o,
Gentlemen $6. ,
ESHOER
FOR THE
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It ABSOLUTELY prevents sllppiusr.
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norao and driver.
Shod with tho Kevcrsllp' your horse's
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Shoes for Pliarpaninc. .
The CALKS are REHOVABLE,
Steel-Centered and SELF-SHARPEN
ING and ROUND or SQUARE BASE
s preferred.
.i Catalogue on 'Application. (
L. L ENSWORTH & SON,
- Blacksmith -Supplies, .
HHRTAFOD " . CONNECTICUT.
Regfs ter
t AbKYQURHORS
S w 4Shof. for
i tirnoti
49-53 South IVaoin street.
Our Great HalfPrice Sale of
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PHENOMENAL SUCCESS, "
Perfect Fit Guaranteed....
Main Street,
WATERBURY, CONN.
ACQUES OPERA HOUSE.
MONDAY, TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY
NOVEMBER 19, 20, 21.
Matinees Tuesday and Wednesday.
Owen Davis's Superb Melodrama,
alters
Presented by a splendid company and
with scenic embellishments of a.
surprising nature.
Prices 15, 25, 35, 50 cents. Matinees
10 and 20 cents. Sale of seats Satur
day, November 17.
pOLPS THEATER.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOV 21.
First Production in Waterbury of
The Cadet Girl
Under the Sole Direction of A. H.
Cliamberlyn.
Exactly the same as played for seven
weeks in New. York, three weeks
in Philadelphia, and six .weeks in
Boston.
DAN DALY, as Premier Comedian.
Prices: 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, $1.50. Sale
of seats Tuesday, November 20.
pOLl'S THEATER.
THURSDAY EVENING, NOV 22.
LULU GLASER
OPEItA COMPANY.
Management of Frank W. Martineau in
j . the New Comic Opera,
Book' by' Louis De Lange and Edgar
Smith, Music by W. H. Neidlinger.
75 PEOPLE
Prices 25, 50, 75c, $1. $1.50. Sale of
seats Wednesday, Nov 21.
JACQUES OPERA HOUSE
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATUR
DAY, NOV 22, 23, 24.
MATINEES FRIDAY AND SATUR-
, DAY. .
The Big Sensational Melodrama,
A stupendous spectacular production.
Prices, 15, 25, 35, 50 cents. Mati
nees, 10 and 20 cents. Sale of seats
Wednesday, November 21.
Glo-MitDrium
Wednesday, Nov 2i,
NEW HAVEN vs WATERBURY.
Friday," Nov 24, . .;
MERIDEN vs WATERBURY.
ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH FAIR
t ' WATERVILLE. ,
Open Saturday Evening, November
17. 1900. at St Michael's Hall.
(Entertainment 1 ana Dancing Each
Evening. Admission 10 Cents, .
Through tts ire
Sweet Anne Page
TheBowery AfterDark
O
emnants
GAS TO BURN
FOR ALL PURPOSES. .
GAS ENGINES, any desired power.
GAS STOVES, for cooking or heat
ing. v
GAS BURNERS, all approved kinds.
All most cheerfully shown, and all
information and estimates cheerfully
imparted to all vjho will call.
The United Gas Improvement Go
150 Grand Street.
If this sort of thing
Is what you want you know -where to
get it. But if you want cleanliness,
carefulness and correctness, turn
your laundry over to us. There's no
better wo-:-k done in the country than
we do. Let us prove it to you.
Branch office, 07 Grand street.
Davis Steam Laundry
17 CANAL STREET.
Branch Office, 07 Grand St
BLUE FISH
10 Cents lb.
BLUE FISH, 10c & pound
SEA TROUT, 8c a pound
Long Island Clams and Scallops and
a Large Variety of Other
Kinds of Fish.
Corner of South Main and Union Sts.
City Fish Market,
Cor. North Main and North Elm Sts.
On Waterville street, a beautiful res
idence embracing all the artistic and
modern improvements which suggest
ease and comfort, and that place on
Ridgewood street with its tasty and
highly embellished front facing the
warming smiles of the southern sun,
will bring happiness to its possessor.
D. II- TIERITEY,
Real Estate, Fire and Plate Glass
Insurance, and Bonds and Surety
given; 167 Bank street.
Short
Sea Trips
of two to five days' duration,
are offered by the
Line
TO
Norfolk, Va.
Old Point Comfort, Va.
"Washington, ;
Steamers sail daily except . Sunday,
from Pier 20, .Noith River foot of
Beach street. New York.
Tickets, including meals and state
room accommodations, $13.00 and up
wards. . v " ':
For full Information apply to
OLD DOMINION S- S. COflPANY
SI Beach Street, New York, N. Y.
H. B. Walker. Traf. Mgr.
. . . x J. J. Brown, G. P. Aj
' anything yon invent or improve ; also pet
' CAVEM.TRAD.fRK, COPTRIGHTarDtSIGW
; nuifcu;iUN. Bend model, aketca. or pnoio.
for free examination and advice; "-
BOOK OH PATENTS KoS
to. wiHaimw
Patent Lawyers. WASHINGTON, D.O.
K
V
I

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