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Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1900-1903, December 31, 1900, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93053725/1900-12-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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WATER B OK Y JK V idiM "1 2i li JDiiUOU liAx 1
-rhe irrms Dp YOthJCflOW
Dry Goods Co.
ommencms;
tyz.dnesdtiy,
anuary
With the Annual Sale
-i of
AND
and
Keri table
20th Century
A Sale.
I
, ' Nec anow win'
f -i- - - - . -
cows for lUndsrweaf
4 U play and half'page
ao:c 3 of this
t i a ps
- . 3-- v &
r - Linens
I
if ir.ms ft: w
'-:-r...iHoon Morrow.
a.'iat v,e are selling Ladies Garments
equal to tailor made at the price of
ready made, and WE GIVE CREDIT.
Will satify us. Our stock of Suits,
Jackets and Skirts is large and varied
and calculated to suit the most ex
acting taste.
The fact that tvo have been obliged
to lease an additional store on Phoenix
avomie is proof postive that we have
pained the ronUdenco of the ladies.
Come and see us. Courteous attend
ants will be on hand to meet you,
and if yon decide to buy you will not
need a long purse, ner be required to
pay
cash.
Guarantee Credit Clothing Co.
33 East riain Street.
13 TIIOEMX -LVEXUE.
A. IR. COWLES
KL'KI'ltlSINU 15AKGA1.NS IN
FtiLT HAT.ir.
We have secured the choicest styles
of Felt Huts from one of New York's
largest houses in this line, ami will
sell i hem way under regular prices
elsewhere.
This lot of Hats includes- all the pop
rlar shapes and colors for Ladies',
Misses' anil Children.
One let of Hats .T.lc: worth 7."c.
(! e hit f Ha:s .l ie; wt rtli 1 lo .fl.2.".
One lot of liats 7-"c; worth Sl.."i0 to .$2
Most of these Hats are fresh from
the factory.
53-t.j CENTER STREET.
K. Dougherty
WE HAVE A FEW
LADIES SHIRT
left, which we will sell at very. low
prices:
Our regular 91.73 Waist at ?1.25.
Some very good $1.40 Waists at 1.
All our OSe and 75c Waists at 30c.
143 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
t Big Reduction $
ttt ; ttt
111 Holiday I
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V J
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in ii. i ;
" -a .j.
Slippers, il
i J
Conn. Boot
and Siioe Co.
2S East Main Street.
R. E. COLBY, Mgr.
JAPANESE FERN BALLS.
Wo have just received our lirst ship
ment of this year's Japanese Kirn
Halls and have placed them on sale
at ONE DOEEAU EACH. They can
lie suspended from the ceiling or a
chandelier and make a beautiful ap
pearance. DALTOM c CO,
199 Bank Street.
HEADQUARTERS
Prichard Building. Corner Grand St.
Herculuie Malt
INSURE HEALTH.
APPETITE, GOOD
DIGESTION,
STRENGTHENS THE
NERVOUS SYSTEM.
, lEe Ectils, SI.75 a Dozen.
WATEBBUBY GROCERY CD
ODD FELLOWS' BLOCK.
' X ' Kest Door to P, O. :
Get Your Xmas
TURKEYS,
CELERY,
CRANBERRIES,
CITRON, ORANGE AND LEMON
PEEL, EYAPOKATED APPLES,
TEARS, PEACHES, 'APRICOTS,
RAISINS, ijIXED CANDY
MIXED NETS. X'MAS CAN.
DLES AT THFA .
? v v
1
I v
greater H.Y.Gocefy;
A Ne w Extension
of Floor Space.
A LARGE SPACE HERETPFORE
USED FOR STORAGE PURPOSES
WILL BE TURNED INTO SALES
ROOMS. GROUND FLOORS ARE
WHAT THE PEOPLE WANT.
A
CLEARANCE
SALE
WILL BE STARTED NEXT WED
NESDAY AND A NEW UP-TO-DATE
STOCK uK HOUSE FURNISHINGS
WILL BE SOLD AND
Profits Will Not
Be Considered.
THERE WILL BE SIXTY-FIVE
PARLOR SUITS IX THE LOT AND
THEY ARE CHOICE .-,XD SELECT
ED. THE PRICES WILL BE A
SURPRISE. WE INVITE EVERY
BODY TO VISIT US AND SATISFY
THEMSELVES.
WATERBORY FURNITURE CO
HOUSE FURNISHERS
and UNDERTAKERS
Eroadway, Next Poll's Theater.
139 East Main St
S 5nhnn! anrf flffino fviinnlips
Our Specialties.
Stationery of Every Descrip
tion, Magazines, Sunday and
Daily Papers. AVe do
First Class Engrav
ing, at the
Waterbury Stationery Store,
201 EAST MAIN STREET.
Henry A. Hayden, Manager.
C
I
Si
0
1
Dentistry
Comfort in teeth is what you get
when you have your artificial plates
or bridge work made by our skilled
ami perfect methods. Every plate is
made to lit and gives perfect satisfac
tion. Cold Fillings, $1 and up.
Silver and Cement, 50 cents.
Cold White Alloy. 75c and np.
My new and painless method of ex
tracting teeth.
OFS. WALTERS,
141 BANK STREET.
Dr. E. R. Patzold,
SURGEON DENTIST.
Fine Gold and Silver Fillings. Geld
Crown and Bridge Work A SPECIAL
TY. Trices very moderate. Satisfac
tion guaranteed. Consultation in Eng
lish or German.
00 BANK STREET,
Waterbury, Ct
HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO ALL THE PATRONS OF THE
Commence the "New Century
4.-, .1,1. ..it tiio "fash Method" of
t, iiv!it.-o vnn more prosperous
1 .
the same cost as now
or the same
try It 7
FRESn TURKEYS FOR SATURDAY. GEESE AND DUCKS.
HOME DRESSED. COME TO XliU "UitiAJ. tisii jua.ius.jii. g
TELEPHONE 110. 1C1-103 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
aSJS SB iK 55 Si 85 &S!5
Shoe Distributors,
D, J Lucy E, P Fitzgerald
HOLIDAY
SLIPPERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
this week. r
If You Want a Pair Do Not Miss This
. Chance.
Lucy dc
1 1 6 State Street,
- New London.
I . - WM I t f JO. A I !.!...,. f ,,r: ...I l-.r-... tr (
i
A
HAPPY and
PROSPEROUS
CENTURY,
Store Will Be Closed
Day January I;
All
The Ziglatzki-Marks Co
80 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
MAN I
Who has to bp outside in tills
weatlier ought to wear a pair
of our
Heavy Buckle Arctics, at $1.50.
These Aretics are one bueUle,
made heavy and of a good qual
ity. -We've sold so many of
tliein that We know they'll give
perfect satisfaction. Buy a pair
and keep your feet warm.
Mens Felt Boois with heavy
overs at $2.00
Holiday Slippers at cut prices.
ll J, G. J1CKLE & SOUS I
To-75 Bank St, Waterbury.
Millinery Reduction
All our Trimmed Hats, Bonnets and
Millinery Goods will be sold at half
price, lie sure and make no mistake
as ours is the only BARGAIN MILLI
NERY in the city. We manufacture
all our hats personally and none of
the millinery stores can give you such
bargains as you can get of FREED
MAN'S Freedman's Bargain Millinery
55 BANK STREET.
Hats trimmed while you wait.
Open evenings.
Mine De Garlcm,
CELEBRATED SCIEHTIFIC PALMIST
And Astrologer. Advice given on all
affairs of life, domestic troubles,
courtship, love, marriage, business,
speculation, law suits; gives dates of
things. Disease a specialty. Don't
fail to consult her; S. Leavenworth
street, Waterbury, Conn.
' aright. One advantage to. you is
doing your home buying. We Avill
You can have a bttter living for
,. - ..t l.r ,..r.- Will Trill
living ai a n--aei mou i
a aK sftr-sfc -Sfc as ah ss ft'
Fitzgerald,
: . . v v 8 Bank Street, ?
Waterbury.
-"
oooo
T - M
I 1
anv S
.1 "!
:". ' ... ..' I
.The b.rif' or. t-Tsv -k eiit-unr Avill
fi J 'I iiwadK''.' 'J - r'io.at.T la ; evi
dence, in wauS Lumfs! about tuwu,
where its presence brought sunshine
and mirth for the Christmastide. A
woman who Is endeavoring to main
tain a large family out of the earnings
of a shiftless man tells a rather inter
esting story about one of the rooster's
pranks on the day before Christmas.
She was taking the last baking of
flour out of the barrel she had and
wondering where the nest would come
from when she heard a rap at the back
door, and on opening it she found a
man on the outside who wanted to
know where she want 'd to have him
put that barrel of flour. "What bar
rel of tiourV inquired the good house
wife, fully satisfied that the clerk was
at the wrong place. "We didn't order
any yet." The man said he knew
nothing about' that, but that he was
sent out from Kelly's with instruc
tions to leave the Hour there and with
out further quibbling he rolled a bar
rel of Pillsbury's int i the kitchen and
then went his way. When the woman
recovered from the shock she com
menced to inspect the newcomer and
noticed an envelope tacked onto the
head of the barrel. Of course she
opened it, and why not? Who had a
better rightV It was addressed to her
husband and contained a card on
which was written: "A Merry Christ
mas, from Kelly's Rooster." When
the head of the house came home from
the factory the woman showed him
the note, "and after reading it. she
states that the only comment he made
about it was that Kelly must have
made a mistake else he would have
asked her to give his man an empty
barrel. It is things likC t-liis which
leak out once in a while about Kelly
that save him from being mobbed
when he goes about talking for Mc
Kinlev and the trusts and combines.
BANK COMMISSIONERS' REPORT.
Savings Banks of the State on Secure
Financial Footing.
Hartford,' Dec 31. The bank com
missioners' report for the year ending
December "1. I'.MH is published to
day. The report shows a remarkably
secure financial footing for the sav
ing banks of the state, with which
the document has -mostly to do.
The number of savings banks has
been increased to S'.J by the addition of
the Xew Hartford savings bank, whi'.'h
commenced business May V2. limb, un
der a charter granted by the general
assembly of ISbtt.
The following statement give an ab
stract of the assets and liabilities as
compared with those of October 1,
lS'.Jil: Loans on real estate, .?(i".7 .".
4ii2.7(: loans on collateral security,
$u,014.8:0.(i: loans on personal se
curifv oulv. !?;;.477..j.47; invested in
United States bonds, .fl.2(W,aio: in
vested in state, town, city, school dis
trict, and corporation bonds and ohli
gatons, !f4.'?,74r),rii.S.41 ; invested iiv rail
road stocks and bonds, $."2.8;Mi.."i:i.".:'.i:
invested in bank stocks, ."S7.04.S.212.24;
real estate owned, including banking
houses, $3.2!0.iiVi.fi4; miscellaneous
asset?. .fl,.'Jtl8.'.t7:?. ."(; cash on hand and
in banks. .t;.2;8..i:i..SS; total assets,
$104.:!24.227.37: increase. !,.S43..".2!).!4.
Liabilities Deposits, $183,781 .!42.21 ;
surplus, .$ti,!r4.;."2.!b; interest and
profit and loss. $3.."r7.'.24..'!."; other lia
bilities, $2!i.707.N2; total liabilities,
ifl!)4"!24,227.:?7; increase. $!1,843.:2!).r,4.
Each class of assets has increased,
with the. exception of the amounts in
vested in United States bonds and mu
nicipal bonds, which together have de
creased $1.722.00! U4. The increase in
the amount of railroad bonds is very
nearly the same as that for the year
ending with October 1. 18!)'.). The in
crease in deposits is $!.ti4. 747.54. be
ing $l.(Hir.H4S.t')1 less than the previous
year, but much larger than in any year
before that one.
By the United States census of 1!im)
the amount of deposits per capita is
$202.22.
The years 1S00 and 1000 show an in
crease "in the number of depositors of
.'4.r:!2. and a total increase of deposits
for the' two years of $20.2!l!t,443.(MJ--a
wonderful showing for the state of
Connecticut.
The rate per cent of dividends paid
the past vear is shown in the following
table:
Tlie amount of capital of the state
banks remains the same, but the capi
tal of the Trust companies is Increased
$457,200 by the amount of the capital
of the Colonial Trust company of Wa
terbury. which commenced business
November 1. 1801), and further install
ments paid in on the stock of the Home
Trust company of Derby and the New
Haven Trust company.
COM 10 AND SEE OUll
Parlor Rockers
mi
Several hundred to choose from.
Prices $3 Upwards.
We promise you an exhibition of
Furniture that' cannot be seen in any
other store in Connecticut.
Over 100 Couches
Special sale of some line Couches,
from S10 to $20. Make It a point to
come Jo this store for your next Fur
niture. - - - -1 .'
Waterbury's Best Furniture Store.
THE
Hampsan-Sellew Furniture tip
KIDNAPI'ERS ARE ACTIVE.
A Demand for Five Hundred Dollars
- ' Made on a Minister.
New York, Dec 30. Taking advan
tage of the interest generally aroused
by the Cudahy kidnapping case, iier
sons not yet apprehended have, ac;
cording to the police, attempted by
threats to extort $500' from the Rev
Dr John P. Peters, pastor of St Mi
chael's Protestant Episcopal church.
Full details of. the plot have not
been made known. Captain Schmitt
berger, of the 100th street police sta
tion, refuses to discuss the affair, be
cause he still hopes to accomplish the
arrest of those who have threatened
Dr Peters. The latter last night re
fused to talk, beyond making the state
ment that he was not in a position to
say anything until the police gave him
permission.
It is understood that several letters,
all of a threatening nature, were re
ceived dining the last fortnight by
the Rev Dr Peters, who was tinitlly
Informed that the Cudahy affair would
be repeated with his daughter as a
victim unless he complied with the de
mand for ifrX).
NEW YORK BANKS.
Scperlnteudcmt Killiarn Proteitl
Against Taxins Savings Banks.
AI.RAXY, Dec. ol. A strong protest
against the taxing of savings banks' de
posits by the state is an important fea
ture of the annual report to the legisla
ture of State Superintendent of Buukiug
Fiederiik Kilbmn. He says:
"If the legislature is to consider tins
question of taxing the deposits in The
savings banks, it should approach it with
the amplest and most reliable informa
tion obtainable and particularly in re
gard to the mistaken assumption that
the moneys held by these institution:'
consist largely of deposits by people of
means. A more searching examination
and analysis of accounts than has ever
been attempted or than is practicable
would be required to ascertain with pre
cision the percentage of deposits which
belongs properly in that class, but from
my knowledge of the policy which gov
erns the management of most savings
banks and from such inspection as 1 have
made of individual accounts, which al
most uniformly show deposits in small
sums only, indicating that they are actu
ally savings and not investment funds, I
am entirely satisfied that it is inconsid
erable. "For every concession or immunity that
is granted to the savings banks they re
turn benefits manifold. They inculcate
thrift and diminish poverty. The fact of
a wage earner being a depositor in them
tends to interest him in public ques
tions and to enroll him in the ranks of
those who stand for honest money and
for preservation of the public faith in
violate. It contributes to make him in
dependent and self respecting and there
fore a better citizen. As to the system
as a whole, who will venture to deny
that it has a part in diminishing tax bur
dens, even though it does not actually
pay taxes'? j3ut for the savings banks it
may well be questioned if the state or
any of its subdivisions could float their
bonds at the rates of interest at which
they are now eagerly absorbed."
Mr. Killmrn again proclaims against
the method employed by the so called na
tional building and loan associations and
asks for the passage of a bill giving him
direct supervision over them. He alleges
as some of the existing abuses "the pay
ment of free withdrawals and excessive
salaries, the employment of high priced
agents, the renting of luxuriously ap
pointed offices, speculating in real estate,
that system of administration which prac
tically ignores the mutual feature which
is supposed to uuderlie all building and
loan associations, the second mortgage
plan of investment and, in shoit, in
genious schemes of all sorts which the
framers of the law could never have con
templated and which have grown up with
or out of the so called national syst-'in."
He then gives a startling list of 13 com
panies that have assigned or g .ne into
receivers' hands in this state in the past
few years.
Mr. Kiihurn says that the financial in
stitutions of the state have been remarka
bly prosperous, having gained in resources
the last four years more than STuO.tHKI.
000. "Nearly .$1,300.00) of tins gain has
been made by the safe deposit companies,
about Sl'i.OOO.OUO by the builiiing and
loan associations, nearly .1 00,01 lO.tMXJ by
the discount banks, $2:iUiO0.K:t by the
savings banks and ,4Uo.uuo.irhi by uio
trust companies. The record for the last
al year, ended Sept. o0. though not
quite in proportion with that tor the re
mainder of the period in question, lias at
east corresponded to it in that as a whole
it shows betterment and progress.
Slicsirinixh Memorial Service.
NEW YORK. Dec. :tl. Memorial
services in Honor 01 ine mie i nonius u.
Shearman of Brooklyn took the place of
the regular service at Ply mouth church
in that borough last evening. Mr. Shear-
nau was long a trustee of the church and
uperintendent of, its Sabbath school. He
participated in the legal defense of Hen
ry Ward Bcjeher in the Tilton trial. As
a single tax advocate he had an interna
tional reputation and always had a vuice
in public questions of the day. Included
in the list of speakers were William
Ll'ovd Carrison of Boston. Henry tieorgV,
Jr.. son of the late Henry George; John
S. Crosby and Edward M. Sliopard. I lie
Rev. Dr. Lindsay Parker of St. Peters
I. E. church, Brooklyn borough, pre
sided. Another l'lnirree Pardon,
LANSING, Mich.. Dec. 31. Governor
Pingiee has pardoned Charles R. Mains,
a Battle Creek lawyer. About two years
ago Mains used language derogatory to
Judg" Cienient Smith, whom he accused
of a conspiracy to ruin him. He was
given a hearing in the supreme court on
a charge of contempt and was disbarred.
Governor Pingree in granting the pardon
says that Mains was not given an oppor
tunity to prove the truth of his charges
and that he has suffered great loss hi be
ing deprived of the right to prat.tic; bis
profession. This is the first time in the
history of the state that a pardon has
been issued to an attorney disbarred from
practicing law. and the courts may not
recognize its validity.
Colombian Rebels Active.
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Dee. 31 The
British steamer Orinoco, which has ar
rived here from Colon,' Colombia, re
ports considerable rebel activity in near
ly all the provinces. The Colombia rail
way and the Magdalena river services
are disorganized,- and business is at a
standstill in every section except Colon.
The Colombian government, according to
the same advices, has been making un
successful attempts to corner the rebel
ban. . .
CASTOR I A
. For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears the
7? ,T
giQiature of
BKOOELTIT BE1EFS
Mrs Mollie English, of Brooklyn,
N. Y., who has been visiting Mrs
Richard O'Connor, of South Leonard
street, has returned home.
Dr Russell has increased his oflico
apartments by the addition of several
handsoint furnished rooms, so that
now he nas one ,of the handsomest and
best equipped suite of rooms in the
city.
Alderman Mahaney, Superintend
of Water Works John O'Brien, Rob
ert Madden and Bill Mahaney returned
from their fishing tour Late Saturday
afternoon. They bad no long fish
yarns to state but quickly and meekly
said that the lish did not bite very
last; their luck was not of the best
but ytt they bad a nice little strina:
of lish.
As the church bells are slowly toll
ing the midnight hour to-night, the '
nineteenth century will meet the fate
of Its predecessors, and, old and hag
gard, pale and careworn, weary and
borne down ivith the weight of years,
after a hundred years of the most
marked and wonderful advancement
and progress in science, invention and
every other thing, will withdraw from
the scene of combat in favor of the
youthful and gay spirited, strong and
robust: twentieth, century. As one
looks back he can hardly helieve that
ume count My ,o quickly, but it has.
It was only yesterday that we made
our New Year resolutions, so it seems.
But let us not soliloquize like that.
Let us look at. the future, see what
it has in store for us. Forget the past
with trials and tribulations, and think
of the future with its joys and pleas
ures. Everyone has his or her faults,
and therefore let us again make new
resolutions. Do not be so conceited as
the person who said that bis only re
gret that the new-year had come" was
because he need make no new resolu
tions, as lie had no fatdis to correct.
As to your humble servant, he wishes
that Brooklyn's representatives in the
alilermanie chamber will see to it that
this section gits its share of the im
provements during the coming vear.
aud that they will continue their "good
work of the past year, that . the
third ward will become democratic
some day, that fishermen will
be a little more conscientious with,
their fish stories, that the St Thomas
Cadets will continue to achieve success
in athletic affairs, that the Brooklyn
Athletic club -will continue to uphold
their fine reputation as entertainers,
that the rivalry between the young
sters' polo teams will be less intense,
that the people will be as law-abiding
as in the past, that those who are fond
of giving fake stories to reporters will
be tin victims themselves some day,
that tin public will treat the Brooklyn
correspondents of the daily papers in,
the s.une kind spirit as during the past
year, ami that all who have been made
the victims of unintentional knocks at
the hands of the Democrat reporter
will forgive him, as he does anyone
who has knocked him in the past:
finally, he wishes each and every one
a happy Xfw Year and many cf them.
But we are drifting from our path. The
new jear and new century will re
ceive : welcome and a greeting far ex
ceeding those accorded to their prede
cessors. Social gatherings and mid
night watches will greet its approach.
At St Patrick's church and also at
St Joseph's, midnight masses will be
celebrated. The services at the for
mer will be unusually impressive, a
solemn high mass will lie celebrated
an I there will be a special musical pro
giam. MRS WHITTEMORE'S TALK.
Interested a Large Number of Men and
Boys at Jacques Yesterday.
It Mas a rare treat for the four hun
dred or more men and boys who were
present at the meeting at Jacques
opera bouse yesterday afternoon, to
listen to the interesting and instruc
tive address of Mrs E. M. Whiltemore,
president of the Door of Hope mission
for fallen women in New York city.
Mrs Whittomore's talk was based on
a selection l mm Scripture in the sec
one chapter of Luke. "The Glad Mes
sage of Peace on Eart'h." Mrs Whilte
more, as examples of how the mes
sage of peace may be brought to some
people, quoted several instances which
she encountered during her vast ex
perience in the missionary Held. The
story of the withdrawal of Lydia, a
degraded woman, from a path of
shame and vice and entering so zeal
ously into missionary work so that
at the present time her reputation as
a missionary worker is widespread,
was a touching and interesting story.
It was manifested by Mrs Wlfitte
more's remarks throughout that she
Is a woman of talent and character,
one who is deeply interested in the
work, in whicli she engaged. Her ad
dress made a deep impression with
those present as was clearly shown by
the applause which greeted the con
clusion of her remarks.
The Y. M. C. A. orchestra rendererl
several selections while the singing
was conducted by L. XV. Sweet and
prayer was read by Mr Hale. The
mandolin solos of Signer Giovanni
Tallarioa of the Kimball school were
exquisite and were much enjoyed by
the audience. Mrs Kimball, acted as
accompanist. T. R. Hyde. Jr, made
an excellent presiding officer. Next
Sunday afternoon Major George A.
Hilton of New York will deliver an
address, taking as his subject "Soul
Poison."
TIIE MILLER BENEFIT.
A Big Crowd Assembled in City nail
Last Night A Financial Success.
The many friends of the late Thom
as B. Miller were out in forje lat
night to attend the sacred concert
whicji was gntn in City hall for the
benefit o.' hia family. When this ben
efit was first started it was for the
benefit of Mr Miller himself, who was
at that time sick with consumption.
On the Sunday that the concert was
to be given he died, and it was" then
decided to postpone ' it for a couple
of weeks and let the benefit go toward
the family of the deceased. Thomas
B. Miller was a former registrar of
voters and while holding that office
he made many friends. .- Several cf
those friends arranged the program,
and it was can-led out veryvsuccess
fully last night. It was not""?, long
program, but it was interesting"froiu
the first number to the last. "Eery
number on the program was grea'.V
appreciated and all did well. All tTe
talent present had given their service
free of charge, and there was not one
item of expense connected with the
whole entertainment. As a conse
quence the widow and young child of
tbe deceased will be banded within a
day or two a very nice sum of money.
It Impossible to say just now bow
mucli. was realized, but orobablj; In
' 1 i. '
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