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Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1900-1903, January 17, 1901, Image 2

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''Clearance Sale 1
. ' ' ; :
'-y.. Not of Ihe old shop.,:
- " worn goods, but new, anil -".
' y the latest styles.
S- Into this sale we have ""
Just added three of the
' latest, prettiest conceits
of Divans or Tetes for
parlor use. One is solid s
mahogany, hand carved,
with inlaid panels, seat 4
. ' upholstered In silk dam- -
ask. Price was $25. You sg
can save $5 by buying it jt
- ' now. ' - ,
Another has a niahog
any back, inlaid, seat in
pretty striped goods; price
was $18. $14.50 will buy 2
,: it.
J. H. Burrall & Co, I
60 BANK STREET. jjs
UNDERTAKING
2- TTNTJKRTAKrNG Nisrht call jt
SI . answered by C. XL Sevmour. 184 3j
2j Maple St. phone; D. M. Ste- 4?
2 wart, 101 FranKlio St. phone.
as
LISTEN TO THIS
RTe carry the largest and best stock of
PIANOS, ORGANS and MUSICAL
MERCHANDISE
In Waterbury. If you don't believe it
, CALL AND BE CONVINCED.
THE DRIGCS & SMITil G9
124-128 BANK STREET.
Established 1852.
Bargains In Second-Hani Pianos.
1 Marshall Piano $100.
. 1 Bradford Piano $05.
1 Vose & Son Piano $G0.
. 1 Dunham Piano $23.
These are instruments we have tak
en in exchange, and must be disposed
of to make room for our new stock.
"We also have several good Organs,
ranging from $15 up.
M. Sonnenberg Piano Co.,
A. W. SKINNER, M'gr.
175 Bank St, Waterbury. Ct.
Try One
Of our three pound boxes of Cameo
Cod, 25c.
Escallops 20c.
A full Jine of fresh Fish. Trices tlie
Same.
CITY FISH MARKET
Cor Union and South Main.
Raw
, Of all kinds wanted. Highest
market prices paid,
Lr. Trwdell
r
Practical Furrier,
103 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
J. H. Mulville.
Undertaker, funeral
director and embalmer.
Besldenca. S97 East Main street.
Store, St Patrick's Block, 110 Broad
ray.
' Telephone at store and residence.
ICE.
SPRING LAKE ICE CO.
THOS. H. HAYES, Proprietor.
B7-89 BROOK STREET.
Telepbono 603-2.
"The only real Sprlna Water Ice In
the City-
, Special attention to family trade.
f
e Haie Reduced the Prices
On oar large stock of Monuments and
Headstones and if you intend to pur
chase anything in this line, now is the
time.- Granite Monuments from' $85
up. Marble Headstones from $15 up.
A large stock of Hard Wood Mantels
from $12.50 up. Grates, Andirons,
Fire Screens and Tiles of all kinds for
neartns, racings and floors. Open
Tery evening.
CHARLES JACKSON St SON,
121 BANK STREET.
. Tci .a Three Family Houses
Six Booms on a Floor.
- North Willow Street.
h - Small Pflvmpnta
Cfcs Seeley & Upham Co..
48 SOUTH WILLOW ST.
"'r Bvohns at 64 Center Street.
".ISt tbe Best Work at the Low
.'ata consistent with the very best
Sf EJITES, TUXIIS, EET1L
rrSciSII-LI3SM
1,
v ,
Evening Democrat
- ISSUED BT
THE DEMOCRAT PUBLISHING COMPANY
C. Maloset, Editor.
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
One Year 15.00 One Month 42o
Delivered by Carrier.
ADVERTISING RATES.
From One Cent a Word to $1.00 an Inch.
Beading Notices 15c to 25o a Line. ,
THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1001.
It is nothing new in Waterbury for
newsboys to receive tickets to the polo
games. For several years the Demo
crat has provided its newsboys with,
tickets to at least one game each year.
Hartford and New Haven are just
giving their paper carriers a chance
to see a game.
The Washington Post, which loses
no opportunity to have a little fun
with Teddy, expresses fear lest he
should be lost in the mountains of Col
orado and not be on hand to make the
inauguration show a success. Be
easy, Mr Post, Teddy has shown him
self to be a hard man to lose.
The Connecticut republicans do not
hesitate at making a $2,500 office when
there is a faithful son to be provided
for. Eddy and Scott, faithful work
ers, competent clerks and good fellows,
had to be provided for, and only one
office being in sight, another one was
created. And the poor taxpayer pays
the freight.
Shakespeare held up for the sus
picion of all future ages the man who
protests- too much and too often. Just
now Senator Hunna is that man. He
is once more protesting rnat the ship
subsidy bill will put no money in his
pocket, and that storks of his being
interested in steamship lines that will
profit by the measure, if it can be
jammed through, are wicked calum
nies. It has leaked out that it was a
quarrel between Mrs Conger, wife of
the minister, and Mrs Squires, wife
or the first secretary of the American
legation, during the siege of l'ekin,
that led to Captain Hall, of the mar
ines, an officer with a splendid record,
being charged with cowardice, and
that it was because of official fear of
Ihe scandal that would be- caused by
uncovering the quarrel that Captain
Hall was denied the court of inquiry
he promptly asked for.
The city council of Amsterdam has
voted the sum of six million guilders,
or $2,412,000, for an electric plant
which is to furnish power for street
cars, lighting, etc, for that city. The
establishment of this plant will mark
an epoch in Amsterdam's progress.
Hartford Times.
It is almost Impossible to-get the
lawmakers of some Connecticut cities
to talk about the matter of municipal
ownership, much less appropriate
large sums of money to carry out the
work. It is coming, slowly, perhaps,
but bound to get there.
As we look back through the last
third of the last century, says a mag
azine writer, glancing at those indus
tries which have made most rapid
strides in progress, many conspicuous
Instances of the practice of scrapping
expensive machinery are noticeable.
Of jfll the many enterprises, those
which have been associated witli and
closely related to the iron and steel
industry have had the most phenome
nal growth. The Bethlehem Iron
company. South Bethlehem, Penn, in
1890 erected the largest steam ham
mer ever built, having a capacity of
123 tens falling weight. This was op
erated successfully for three years in
the manufacture of armor plate, but
when, in 1803, a new type of this pro
duct was invented by H. A. Harvey,
it was found that the nydraulic press
was better adapted for its manufac
ture, and this enormous tool, which,
with all its accessories, cost in round
figures a quarter' of a million dollars,
was immediately set aside, to be re
placed at a similar cost by a hydrau
lic press, which' to-day still remains
th largest in tbe world. This is prob
ably the most notable instance- on rec
ord, on' account of the great expense
involved. " the substitution of a more
efficient tool or another, the normal
life of which ha? only just begun.
HEARD IN MASSING
AH the robbing in Washington is
not being done by congress; the town
is passing through an epicemic of. bur
glary. The daily reports of Mr McKlnley'S
bad cold leave not the slightest doubt
of the firm grip his doctor has on his
job, even if Mr McKlnley'S grip was
Imaginary. :
Fred Grant reports that his district
of the Island of Luzon is pacified and
ready for civil -government. Why not
make Fred "civil -governor of the Dis
trict for life, rand. 'keep, him over
there? ; ' ' ' .
There M; nothing surprising In the
participation of the railroads in the
Nebraska senatorial contest. There
hasn't beep, a republican senator from
the state tal rrsrwho did not owe
his election ,t the railroads. -'
. Why did General Wood make A. E.
Frye, who has resigned the superin
tevdeney of the public schools of Cuba
tmeapsa be could hot without loss of
aetfrsspeet submit to certain exac
tions, promise not to talk for. pnbll
ttas -attest his reslsjHrt1n7 Is Gener
al. Wood, afraid of the effect of the
ptetS n eoagraas?
A ONE HAN TORPEDO BOAT.
If a certain board of naval officers,
now in session in Washington, reports
favorably .on the invention of a New
port man, the government will have
exclusive right to one of the most pow
erful implements of modern naval war
farea one-man torpedo' boat, whose
speed will, it is estimated, be about
forty-five knots, says the Newport, R.
I., correspondent of the Boston Her
ald. For motive power it is understood
that both electricity and compressed
air will be utilized.
The vessel is to be built to run under
the surface, with the operator's head
only above the surface, or, if neces
sary, the movements of the vessel may
be directed wholly from beneath the
surface. Just what method is to be
used to submerge the craft cannot be
learned, although it is said that the
principal used will be wholly different
from that used in the case of the tor
pedo boat Holland. One who is com
petent to talk upon the subject goes so
far as to say that when the plans are
made public they will create a world
wide sensation.
The inventor of the boat is Thomas
J. Moriarty, for years one of the lead
ing machinists and instrument makers
at the government torpedo station at
Goat Island, Newport harbor, and now
president and manager of the Newport
Manufacturing Co. several previous
inventions of Mr Moriarty have been
adapted by the government, notably
his torpedo finder. It is understood
that this new one-man torpedo boat
has been patented in thirteen coun
tries, and undoubtedly the United
States government will want to retain
such a powerful instrument as a pro
tection to itself if for no other rea
son. UNWARRANTED ARROGANCE.
There is a strain of arrogant de
fiance running through the testimony
of certain AVest Point cadets before
the congressional investigating - com
mittee that would seem, to indicate
prompting from some unseen source.
These young men who are eating the
people's food and wearing the peo
ple's cloths and having the people's
money furnished for the purpose of
giving them first class educations, ap
pear to regard Ihe members of the
examining committee in much the
same light as they do the plebes whom
it is their delight to cover with con
tempt and insult. There is a tendency
on the part of these lads to regard
themselves as beings quite apart from
the superior to the civilian who sup
ports them and this in spite of the
fact that in very many cases they at
tend the academy with Ihe precon
ceived plan of leaving ttie service at
the earliest possible moment and
utilizing the expensive education
given them by the people for their
own personal advantage. Which
really places them in an unenviable
position, regarded from the viewpoint
of strictly honorable men. The uppish
and actually impudent manner of sev
eral of these cadet witnesses is in
keeping with this spirit; but further
than that their conduct evidences a
certainty of their position that could
only have come from encouragement
by persons whom they regard as su
perior to their inquisitors. That this
support comes from army officers is
more than probable. It has been
pretty clearly demonstrated, since the
beginning of the Booz inquiry, that
a great many officers are in sympathy
with hazing at the academy. The
half-hearted perfunctory investigation
of the war department's committee
showed that. And on Tuesday, when
a cadet palpably lied before the con
gressional committee and was accused
by a member of the committee of
possessing a "convenient memory,",
the congressman was hissed bv a.
number of army officers among the
spectators. To these gentlemen it
was outrageous that a cadet should
be accused of lying, but not at all
outrageous, apparently, that he should
lie. That he did lie there is not the
slightest doubt, and in several rela
tions; one of them being when he
said that he ha:ed Cadet Boos "just
to make him reel good." The army
man is prone to bracket the words
"officer" and "gentleman." The pub
lic has always been inclined to accept
the synonym; but developments of late
lead us to the belief that in some in
stances "officer" and "cad" may stand
for the same individual. Bridgeport
Union.
SINGING OUT OF TUNE.
Singing out of tune is caused by a
defective voice just as often as by a
defective ear, writes Mrs Walter
Creyke in the Nineteenth . Century.
People who habitually sing in perfect
tune will occasionally sing false with
out detecting it. If tired they will
sing flat. If tlie wind is in the east,
or if they have been dancing all night,
or at the beginning of a sore throat,
the voice may have a tendency to
sharpness. Thus it must be the voice
and not the ear which is at fault. I
have noticed in many 'singers that one
note in the whole voice will be slight
ly'' false; this again must be a defect
in the voice and not in the ear. The
more a singer habitually sings in tune
without effort the less likely will she
be to discover when her voice is off
pitch. When a singer Is beginning to
lose her voice her singing may be com
pletely out of tune without her being
aware of it, but when she does know
it she will be able to avoid singing
false by the cultivation of her ear. The
more defective the voice becomes the
more will the ear require cultivation.
-,It is easy, enough for any one with
a good ear to detect false singing In
another person, but by no means so
easy to detect it in herself, and many
people who do not pretend to- sing a
note in tune themselves will detect the
faintest shade of falseness when an
other person is singing. People who
are able to accompany themselves
when' practicing have a great advan
tage over those who are always obliged
to employ an accompanist. In accom
panying one's self the slightest false
ness can be easily detected, for If the
note struck on the piano can be heard
through the note sung the voice and
the plauo cannot be In perfect tune.
In singing a scale the upper strings
of the piano should vibrate to; the
voice without the notes of the piano
having to be struck at all, if the voice
is in tune with the piano. But these
Instances can scarcely be detected when
standing up and singing to an accom
panist. .
Genese Pure Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y.:
Gentlemen: Our family realize so
much from the use of GRAIN-O that I
feel I must say a word to Induce
others to use It If people are inter
ested In their health and the welfare
Of their children they will use no other
beverage. I have used them all. bat
GRAIN-O I have 'found superior to
any. for tbe reason that; it Is solid
grain. -Tour
for health.
UVi MJEXERS.
CANADIAN TRIBUTE TO DE WET
Sergeant Dixon, one of the Canadian
oniefcrs returned from South ..Africa,
bears testimony to the lively impres
sion General De Wet made on his op
ponents. The following Is a clipping
from the Toronto World of November
17:
Sergeant Dixon was called on to
speak, and he replied by reciting a
poem or his own composition, which
was lustily applauded. It is entitled
The Chase of De Wet,
There's a gentleman named Christian
De Wet
Who Travels with a mixed but wily
set;
Wte have tried to catch him often,
We've the contract for his coffin,
But he does not seem to soften
Not as yet not quite yet.
Now, he's an easy sort of fellow to get
round,
And he doesn't give a d if we sur
round; But when, he's had his little rest, '
He just shakes his downy nest,
And we follow to our best
Cursing loud blooming loud.
He's got the latest trekking wrinkles
nas jje wet:
And can do his fifty miles without a
sweat;
Does not stop to change his clothes,
As across the veldt he goes
With his fingers to his nose
At our net Lord, that net!
Now, we think an awful lot of Chris
ue w et,
A more entertaining gent we never
met.
For he's shown us round the land
With his blooming German band
But we'd like to dump the sand
On De Wet De Wet.
Now, it may be in far-off Canada,
AVhen we're old and the hair turns
gray,
There's a bairn on either knee per
haps, And the sun of our years is nigh set.
Why then then we may read in the
paper
That someone has captured De Wet.
OWL RINGS BURGLAR ALARM.
If the priests of St Gabriel's Roman
Catholic church of New Rochelle can
find the pet owl that frequents their
churchyard they will wring his neck.
On Monday night this owl caused a
disturbance which not only aroused
the priests, but called out' the entire
city police force. A complete system
of burglar alarms litis just been placed
in the church to protect- the costly
gifts given to the parish by the Isellh
family. These gifts consist of gold
communion plates and chalices, .dia
mond studded sanctus bells, gold vest
ments. and statues, and -relics from
Rome and the Holy Land. These gifts
are kept in the tabernacles and reposi
tories of the high altars, and no can
approach them without setting off the
alarms, which are conected with the
priest's house.
Late on Monday night the alarm
went off suddenly with a clatter.
Father Kellner; thi pastor c-f the
church, rushed to the telephone and
called up tlie police.
"1 guess we've got a burglar at
last," said he to Chief'Timmons. "The
alarm would not go off unless some
one is in the church, and no one has
the keys except the janitor and my
self." Chief Timmons and several police
men hurried to the church, and were
Joined by the priests, who had already
slipped pistols into the pockets of their
cassocks and were guarding tlie doors.
The policemen, -alter flooding the
church with light, advanced cautious
ly down the aisles to the chancel,. fully
expecting to encounter the burglars.
They were surprised when they found
that nobody was in the church and
that nothing had been disturbed. The
clergymen and policemen were forced
to tlie conclusion that the alarm must
have been set oft" by accident, and the
burglar hunt broke up.
Just as the police were leaving the
church there was a flutter of wings
and a derisive hoot from overhead.
Then the owl, which had been sitting
on tlie burglar alarm wire, flew away.
New York Tribune.
NEW HAVEN NEGLECTED.
Tlie democratic members of the
house of representatives from New
Haven county appear to have been
strangely overlooked in the make-up
of the committees as announced yes
terday by Speaker Light. The city of
New Haven, with one-eigth of the
population of tlie state, and one-tenth
of the taxable property, has fared
even worse. Neither Mr Donovan or
Mr Housel, both of whom are law
yers, was appointed to the very Im
portant committee on the judiciary.
Speaker Light, in another column of
the Union to-day, makes explanation
of his failure to appoint a democrat
to this committee, that is very plausi
ble from a republican standpoint.
However, whether Mr Light's reasons
were partisan or otherwise. New Ha
ven people, irrespective of party, have
reason to be dissatisfied with his ap
pointments. Granting that the speak
er's selections for the judiciary com
mittee appeared to him the best possible
to be made, it must be admitted that
Mr Donovan's ability and experience
ought to have commanded for him a
place either upon the committee on in
corporations or that on appropriations.
As it is, Mr Donovan and Mr Housel
must waste their activities upon the
same -committee, and each has an ap
pointment upon another, and minor
committeee. New Haven people, while
regretting the circumstances are not
disposed to admit that it is a reflec
tion upon the ability of their repre
sentatives. New Haven Union.
People's Market
Spying Lamb, Chicken, Veal, Mut-
ton, Chicago Dressed Beef nd Na-
tlve Beef. r The finest quality of
Vegetable. Always fresh. -
"THE OLD RELIABLE." '
is the largest In the city And keeps
the largest stock to select from, -
v ' . : " - ' '..
S, BOHL, Proprietor
j 4 SOUTH UAIM 8T.
refepholf ON!9 Ingt Atuadsq.
KIMBALL
School Music
Instruction In Piano, Singing, Organ,
Violin, Harmony. Musical Kindergar
ten, Mandolin, Banjo, Guitar, Cornet,
and Sight Reading. School of Danc
ing and Deportment. Taught by a
Faculty unsurpassed for its excellence.
Ensemble playing free.
, Free admission to Recitals, Concerts
and Lectures.
January 21st a new class in dancing
will be started.
January 29 new classes in Musical
Kindergarten.
. Register now for all departments.
Students received daily.
Special
Sale
OP
Umbrellas.
Trunks, Bags
and. Dress
&nit Cases.
To be sold at 50c on the dollar. We
manufacture all our own goods. We
have the largest and best stock for the
lowest prices in this city. Every arti
cle fully guaranteed. Umbrellas Re
covered and Repaired with the best
Gloria Silk, from C5c up.
Factory,. 7S Grand street.
WATERBURY UMBRELLA MFG; CO
Lookina Out
That is what you ought to be
doing- looking out for our new -serial
. . . . . .
THE WORLD AGAINST HIM
BY WILL N. MARCCN.
It is a copyrighted story, pub
lished in this paper by special
arrangement, and we congratu
late our readers upon being able
to offer it to them. It is a story
of life in our Southern States,
and is well written and thorough
ly interesting.
. WILL APPEAR SOON
IN THIS PAPER.
Commission Men
And dealers in perishable
goods generally.
The subscribers are prepar
ed to accept proposals for
space in their
Cold storage Warehouse
To be completed in early
spring.
THE
Hellmann Brewing Co.,
Waterbury, Conn.
TELEPHONE 310.
Board of Relief,
The Board of Relief of the Town of
Waterbury will meet in Assessors'
room. City hall, January 10, 11, 14,
17, 18, 21 and 24, from 2 to 5 and 7 to
9 p. m.; Saturday, January 20, from
9 to 12 a. in., 2 to 5 and 1 to-9. p. m.,
for the purpose of hearing appeals
rrom the doings of the Assessors and
attending to duties of said office.
JOHN. J. SIEFEN,
JOHN F. GARREN,
I. A. SPENCER,
Board of Relief.
Waterbury, January 7, 1901.
1-7-1S
Exchange Place Cafe.
SCHAEFER'S WEINER BEER
Bottled for Family Use.
vJ. W. HODSON,
20 EXCHANGE PLACE.
$1,000 - Challenge - $1,000
HARVARD BEER, UNION MADE,
on draught.
EMERSON & SONS' WINE
by the bottle.
JAMES E. WATTS, South Main Street
BEADLESTON & WOERZ,
Imported Lager Beer on Draught at
T. . GUEST'S. 95 South Main St.
. 'Phone 230-3.
JVlfs VI. A. Ogden,
Psychic Palmist and Trance Business
Medium.
Do not fail to consult Mrs Ogden,
and be convinced of her PHENOM
ENAL OCCULT POWERS, which has
mystified the greatest scientists. 327
North Main street, second floor.
i 'Om family ' house of eight;.' tooms;
With large lot, on Burton street; 22.
If you want a weH'.tfrtlled.'or.your
old one has gone dry and yoa want It
deepened, we can do It for you. and do
It light.
1 - - V - iM BASK at. ' : '
Overcoats and Ulsters
Are necessities which no one can be without, particularly,durlng. .
the months of January, February and March. These three bluster-.
ing, stormiest and "coldest months" in tlie' year are yet to be passed, -t
Are you prepared for tliem? If not, why not? If you are a man l .
waiting to buy an Overcoat when it is cheaper, now . is the time .
for it - We offer you all our $10 Overcoats for $7. All of our $12 ".
uvercoats ani Ulsters for $9.50.
give you
Weekly Terms To Pay.
If you are a woman we offer you all that we have left in Capes
and Jackets, made of heavy kerseys and meltons in the latest style
at less than the actual cost of manufacture and give you weekly ,
terms to pay. " If you have boys see our line of little reefer suits
and overcoats small in price, but big in value. If you" want the '
entire outfit from head to foot including hats and shoes, don't wait
for the cash, as you are just as much entitled to credit as the rich
man with his big bank account.
j Credit Clothing Co, ;
62 BANK STREET.
SDR R. C. JONES,
- v. s.
Residence, 25 Johnson Street, Water
bury Conn. Office City Lumber
& Coal Co. 93 Bank St. Telephone.
Departure and Arrival of Trains.
NAUGATUCK DIVISION.
Trains leave Bank Street Station for
New York, Bridgeport, New Haven
and other places at 6:35; 8:12; 10:50
a. in., 1:23; 2:4S; 4:45; 5:05; 0:0S and
7:00 p. m. The 7 p. m. is a mixed
train.
Trains -arrive at - Bank Street Sta
tion from New York. Bridgeport, New
Haven and way stations at 8:30; 9:12;
11:12 a. in.; 1:11; 3:50; 0:25; 0:58; 9:00
p. m.; 1:28 a. m.
Trains leave Bank Street Station for
Winsted and way stations at S:3S;
11:14 a. m.; 3:5S and 7:00 p. m.
Trains arrive at Bank Street Sta
tion from Winsted and way stations
at 8:12; 10:50 a. m.; 2:4S; 0:08 p. m.
Trains leave Bank Street Station
for Watertown and wav stations at
0:45: 8:41; 11:17 a. m.; 1:30; 4:01; 5:00;
0:12; 7:03; 9:05 and 11:20 p. m.
Trains arrive at Bank Street Station
from Watertown and wav stations at
6:25; .8:00: 10:40 a. m.; 1:02: 2:35; 4:40;
5:52; G:47; 7:54; 11:1S p. m.
Sunday Trains.
Leave Bank Street Station for New
York, Bridgeport and New Haven at
7:10 a. m. and 5:25 p. m.
Arrive at Bank Street Station from
New York.- Bridgeport and New Ha
ven at 9:38 a. m. and 7:55 p. m.
Leave Bank Street Station for Wa
tertovn and way stations at 9:43 a. m.
and S:00 p. m.
Arrive at Bank Street Station from
Watertown and way stations at C:5S
a. m. and 5:12 p. m.
HIGHLAND DIVISION.
Trains leave Meadow Street Station
for Boston. Hartford and way stations
at 7:00 and 8:3S a. m.; 12:38; 4:05;
8:07 i). in.
Trains arrive at Meadow Street Sta
tion from Boston, Hartford and way
stations at 8:05; 11:40 a. m.; 1:50; 5:13
and 7:45 p. m.
Trains leave Meadow Street Station
for New York, Flshklll Landing, Dan
bury and way stations at S:13 a. m.
and 1:50 and 5:18 p. m.
Trains arrive at Meadow Street Sta
tion from New York, Fishkill Landing.
Danbury and way stations at S:3ti
a. m.; 12:34 and S:04 p. m.
Sunday Trains.
Leave Meadow - Street Station at
8:30; 11:30 a. m.; 5:30 p. m.
Arrive at Meadow Street Station at
10:20 a. m.; 2:18 and 7:20 p. m.
MERIDEN. BRANCH.
Trains leave Dublin Street Station
for Middletown and way stations at
8:50 a. m. and 6:15 p. in.
Trains arrive at Dublin Street Sta
tion from Middjetown and way sta
tions at 7:50 a. m. nnd 4:00 p. m.
ELECTRIC CARS.
Leave Exchange Place daily at 5:37
a. m. and every 15 minutes thereafter
until 1137 p, m.
WATERBURY FIRE ALARM.
4- Cor South Main ana arand sts.
5 Scovill Manufacturing Co. (P;,
C Cor Bridge and Magill sts.
7 Exchange Place.
12 Rogers & Bro. (P).
13 Cor East Main and Niagara sts.
14 Cor East Main and Wolcott rd.
15 Cor High and Walnut sts.
16 Cor East Main and Cherry sts.
17 Cor East Main and Cole sts.
21 Cor North Elm and Kingsbury sts
23 Burton Street engine house.
24 Waterbury Manufacturing Co. (P)
25 Cor North Main and North sts.
26 Cor Buckingham and Cooke sts.
07-Cor Grove & Prospct Sts.
2S Cor Hillside avenue and Pine st.
29 N. Willow bet. Ridgewood and
Hillside avenue. .
31 Cor Bank and Grand sts.
32 Cor Riverside and Bank sts.
34 Cor West Main and Watertown rd
35 Conn. Light's & Pow. Co, car
house, (P).
S6 Waterbury Brass Co. (P).
37 Cor Cedar and Meadow sts.
38 Cor Grand and Field sts:
42 Cor South Main and Clay sts.
43 New England Watch Co. (P).
45 Benedict & Burnham Mfg Co. (P)
46 Waterbury Buckle Co. (P).
47 Cor S. Main and Washinton sts.
51 Cor Baldwin and River sts.
52 Cor Franklin and Union sts. .-
53 Wat'b'y Clock Co, case fact'y (P).
54 Cor Clay and Mill sts.
56 Cor Liberty and River sts. '
57 No 5 Hose House.
58 Cor Baldwin and Stone sts.
62 Cor Doolittle alley and Dublin st
72 Cor West Main and .Villow sts.
74Cor Johnson and Watervllle sts.
212 The PlattyBros & Co. (P). -
213 Hammond Buckie Co. (P).
214 Wat'b'y Clock t3o, mvt fact'y (P).
216 Cor North Main and Grove sts.
251 Cor Round Hill and Ward sts.
261 Junction Cooke and N. Main sts.
272 Grove, bet. Central & Holmes avs.
811 S. N. E. Telephone Co bld'g. (P).
312 Cor Bank and Meadow sts. ,
313 Randolph & Clowes, (p) . . :
314 Plume and Atwood (P). , "
315 American Ring Co (P). .
316 Electric Light Station (P).
318 Holmes. Booth & Hardens (P).
821 No 4 Hose House, -
823 Cor Wash'g'n ave and Porter sts.
324 Cor Charles and Porter sts.
825 Cor Simons st and Wash'g'n ave.
371 City Lumber and Coal Co (P).
412 Tracy Bros (P), , . '
451 Steele & Johnson Mfg Co (P). ;
582 Cor Baldwin and By stt
5
All of our $15 Overcoats for $12, and
We Have the
LATEST FALL
STYLES.
In Soft and Stiff
Hats
And HATS Purchased Here
Cleaned Free of Charge.
Tickets For St. Joseph's T.
A. B. Fair October 31
Given With every
Hat.
Waterbury Hat Store,
35 E. MAIN ST.
Wall Paper
Sale
Begins Wednesday,
Spring Goods At Cost.
We Must Have Money.
WE HANG IT
IPor S 1-2 c
Per Roll.
The F. W. DAINS Co,
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS,
288 North Main St.
. AGENTS CHILTON. PAINTS
Telephone 12L
HORSE SHOEING...
AfiD GEIERAL
WAGON REPAIRING
DONE IN FIRST CLASS SHAPB, i
' AT '
R, N. BLAKESLEE'S,
SCO MEADOW. ST.
Of all descriptions at short notice
Thorough workmanship and reasonable
prices.
Ed Ockels, Sign flaker
OFFICE, 7 BROWN STREET.
PENMANSHIP.
PROFESSOR HOLLEY
Teaches every pupil to wrlre fln
rapid, business hand, in a course of 14
private lessons and no failures. All
Kinds of pen work; executed in taa
highest degree or art.
167 BANK STREET.
OAKV1LLE CO
MAKERS O-
Wire and Metal: Good.
I. O. Freight L4 Express. iMNM
Oabvilio, Conn. , holograph Am "e1
Waterbury, Cona. Jgaw xark
48 Howard Stnafc - T7
A.'
5 1 i -
i V- -

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