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Waterbury Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1900-1903, February 16, 1901, Image 4

Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93053725/1901-02-16/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Curran
' - i. . ,
j
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Dry Goods Co.
ft;; f Specials for Tcv
r ; night and
Monday,
Big Savings In Little' Prices.
Special Sale of Muslin Under
wear and New, Dress
Ginghams.
See show windows.
SMALL WARES. ETC:
Ladies- Gilt Belts, gilt buckles, 21e
Ladies Satin Belt Hose Suminrr-
ers, 12c.
, Leather Pocketbook Purses, I'Jc.
Velvet Belts, with long ends and
spikes, 48c.
.Dress Shields, light weight, per
pair, 9e.
Roll White Tape, 24-vd piece, 8e.
5-ounee bottle Vaseline, 4c.
All bristle Hair Brushes, 19c.
Shell Side Combs, per pair, 8e.
HANDKERCHIEFS:
Scolloped, embroidered, lace edge
Handkerchiefs, value 19e, to-night
and Monday 9c.
JEWELRY:
Assortment of Hat Pins, Brooch
Pins, Sleeve Buttons and Hair
Biaretz, value 25c, to-night and
Monday 10c.
I.ACE COLLARS:
Renaissance Lace Collars, value
$2.75, to-night and Monday $1.98.
SKIRTS:
.. Ladies' all silk (black only) accor
y dion pleated fiounee, to-night and
Monday $4.US.
Ladies' fine mercerized Sateen
Skirts, with flounce and ruffles,
value fl.25, to-night and Monday
98c.
LADIES' UNDERWEAR AND HOS
IERY: Ladies' gray wool Pants and
Vests, value U9e, to-night and Mon
day S5e.
Ladies' fine lisle thread Stockings,
value 50c, to-night and Monday
.'?."e.
Ladies' fine quality, full regular
make; value 25c, to-night and Mon
day lUc.
MEN'S FURNISHINGS:
Odd lot of Men's Natural and
Camel's Hair Shirts, value 3Se, to
night and Monday 19c.
Meu's Natural Wool Shirt3 and
Drawers, value 75c, to-night and
Monday 5de.
Men's Scarlet all wool Shirts and
Drawers, value $1.25, to-night and
Monday Sr.c.
Men's Blue Flannel Shirts, single
or double breasted, value $1.25 to
night and Monday 79c.
Boys' Sweaters, sizes 4 to 8 years
value ?1. to-night and Monday 75c!
Boys' all wool Pants, plain or
checked, to-night and Monday 43c.
DORSET COVERS:
Muslin Corset Covers, high neck,
good shape, all sizes, to-night and
Monday 10c.
Corset Covers. V-shape neck of
pretty Hamburg, perfect fitting
to-night ana Monday 15c.
XIOHT GOWNS:
Women's Night Gowns, Empire
Style, revers and yoke of allover
embroidery, to-night and Monday
49c.
Cambric Night Gowns in Empire
surplice and high neck, trimmed
with Hamburg. Val and Torchon
luces, to-night and Monday 75e
WHITE SKIRTS:
vt omens unite Skirts, umbrella
style, deep cambric flounce edged
, wiui torcnon lace, cambric dust
rutne, to-night and Monday 50c.
DRAWERS:
Umbrella Drawers, made of Fruit
or tlie Loom Muslin, cambric ruf
fle, tucked, and hemstitched, to
night and Monday 25c.
FLANNELETTE NIGHT GOWNS:
women's Flannelette Night
i.owns, lull length and width
pretty stripes, to-night and Mon
day 75c,
SPECIAL SHOE VALUES:
-Men s .?LOU. black calf Shoes, in
Jace and congress. 'nil stvle toes
special to-night and Monday .$1.19.
Men s black calfskin Shoes,
handsewed, most all plain toes,
special tp-night nnd Monday $1.98.
Women's $1.39 Shoes in button and
lace, made of the best selected
Dongola stock, diamond or straight
patent tips, special to-night and
: Monday $1.20.
Boys' and Youths' $1.50 School
Shoes, made of firm black satin
- . -calf stock, double soles, with back
ways, special to-night and Mon-
- day $1.19. . .
. . Misses' and Children's School
Shoes in box calf and black- kid,
light and heavy soles, special to-
, night and Monday 98c.
infants' soft sole Shoes, all colors,
sizes O to 4, special to-night and
Monday 23c.
IX THE CLOAK DEPARTMENT:
-' .. We offer splendid chances for the
, purchase of Winter Garments at
prices that do not represent even
the cost of materials, to say noth
. lng of making. lining or trimming.
- Tailor Made Jackets of best qual
. Ity Melton Cloth, double breasted.
lined throughout, worth $0.50, atj
- only $2.98. ,
. Fine all ..wool Jackets, lined!
throughout with satin, double
breasted front, with 6 fancy but-2
; tons, colors blue, gray, red, brown,
castor and black, worth $10.56, at
" only $4.98. - , ' '
. Flnrih Capes, high stornr -collar,'
-with and without .'applique- and
fur. worth $7.75, at only $3.50.
AH wool Flannel Waists, lined
.throughout, assorted colors ana;
rfefc worth $1.25, at only G9c. , :
treale House WrDDer la lndieo
5.
hM. red, RTay and black . and
au suw, worth wc, at only
Do You Know
That we are selling Ladies' Garments
equal to tailor made at the price of
ready made, and WE GIVE CREDIT.'
$1.00 a Week
Will satify us. Our stock of Suits.
Jackets and Skirts is largo and varied
and calculated to suit the most ex
acting taste.
The fact that we have been obliged
to lease an additional store on Phoenix
avenue is proof postive that we have
gained the confidence of the ladies.
Come and see us. ' Courteous attend
ants will be on hand to meet you.
and if you decide to buy you will cot
need a long purSe, nor be required to
pay cash.
Guarantee Credit Clothing Co.
33 East flain Street.
15 PHOENIX VENTJE5.
A.. F?. COWLES
Febuary Cold Weather Prices.
Are what you have been waiting for.
Another big cut in Trimmed Hats
for Ladies Misses and Children, bee
our windows for prices and styles.
Another big cut in Children's inter
Hoods, Worsted Toques, Tarn O Shan
ters and Boys' Caps. See our win
dows for goods aud prices, then come
in aud select from a large stoc-K anu
save money to buy coal.
53 -C3 CENTER STREET.
K. Dougherty
..
Special for Sat
urday and
Monday.
Ladies' Leather Belts, wide and nar
row, regular 25c quality, now 10c.
Ladies' Fancy I'ins, for fastening the
back of the hair, regular 25c quality,
now 10c.
Fancy Hat Pins, set with colored
stones, value 19c, now 5c and 10c.
K. Dougherty
145 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
THE BEST SHOES ON EARTH.
There is a way of being absolutely
sure that the Shoes you buy are worth
t least as much as you pay for them.
You may not be able to tell good
leather from bad; you may not know
the difference between a high grade
shoe and an article of rougher make,
aud yet it is your own fault if you are
imposed upon. You cannot be expect
ed to detect those differences, but you
can at least take the precaution of
making your purchases where misrep
resentations are never for a moment
tolerated. You will be more than
pleased with our $1.1)8 Shoes.
CONN BOOT SHOE CO.,
, 2S EAST MAIN STREET.
WE CAN FURNISH
Floral Designs
; of any description for
Funeral, Wedding or House Purposes
on short notice and at very reasonable
prices.
Roses Carnations, Narcissus, Lilies,
nvacinths.
DALTON 6c CO,
199 Bank Street.
PRICHARD BUILDING,
Telephone 201-3.
Herculine Malt
INSURE HEALTH, .
APPETITE, GOOD
DIGESTION.
STRENGTHENS THE
NERVOUS SYSTEM.
, lc Ecttle, 'J 1.7 5 a Dozen.
CO
ODD FELLOWS BLOCK.
: Kext Door to P. O.
One family house of eight rooms,
With large lot, on Burton street, VIZ.
If you want a well drilled, or your
'old one has gone dry and you want It
deepened, we can do it lor you, ana do
K right. -.i;-: . ..
I'. - 104 BANK ST. . -
Ockles
13 i a .n s
The lUnited
States Fast Be
coming a
Paradise
We want to make the people feel
happy, and here are the latest figures
to show what is being done in their
interest. In round numbers, this coun
try spent $300,000,000 for hospitals, or
phanages, new churches, etc, etc, in
1900. The Catholics head the list with
$31,000,000, Methodists $26,000,000
Presbyterians $20,000,000 Episcopali
ians $14,000,000, Baptists $12,000,000,
Salvation Army $750,000 nnd so on
down the line. In 1800 we had 2,340
churches and to-day we- have 187.4S1
churches in the United States alone.
This is a marvelous showing a pretty
good world to live in. The next best
thing to do to make the world better
is for the great Trusts 'and Combina
tions who control prices to show their
honesty to the people by paying GOOD
LIVING WAGES. The habit of pay
ing sttiall wages is a bad habit.
What is the world to anyone who
has not got a comfortable home, with
comfortable surroundings? Good char
acter aud good homes must go togeth
er, and watch the good old mother,
when she is in our store; how quickly
she recognizes this fact. She says to
her husband: "JOHN, IF WE WANT
THE JiOlS AND GIRLS TO STAY
IN SIGHTS, WE MUST GIVE THEM
AN ATTRACTIVE HOME!" The
greatest philosopher could not speak
a greater truth. This is what we have
been doing for the past month away
in the markets buying goods the lat
est styles and the lowest prices in
America.
MORIARTY'S
WATERBURY FURNITURE CO
HOUSE FURNISHERS
and UNDERTAKERS
Eroadway, Next Poli's Theater.
Lakeview
Pure Spring Water,
W. N. & T. B. MORAN, Prop.
Prompt and Efficient Service.
North Cooke Street
T. W. M'GARRY & CO
A new store will be opened
at ii? Bank Street, in
the store formerly
occupied by J.
Buckner.
Watch this space for later
particulars.
T. 1. McGarry & Co.
a s:.'$-&'m:
PURE BUTTER
Is the only kind that we carry in
Good Creamery. .
22clb S lbs for- $100.
BEST COOKING BUTTER, 18c.
COFFEE!
We are selling finest of
MOCHA and JAVA 28c lb, 4 lbs for $1.00. - ,
, Served free Wednesday and Saturday. 1
Public
TELEPHONE 110.
- iS - SK - TK - ag - m - as - - : - : - .
141 , THE WHITE STORE
j Lucy& Fitzgerald,
11 Shoe Distributors
D J Lucy
LAST CALL
This is the last week of our Annual Sale. If you are
looking for the best BARGAIN ever offered in
FINE SHOES
do not fail to visit our store this week.
Boys' Shoes, 69c, regular $i value.
Ladies' Oxfords, 59c, regular $3 value.
: Men's Walking Shoes, $148, regular $2 value.
I!
Lucy Fitzgerald,
116 STATE STREET, ' 88 BANK STREET,
;NEW LONDON, CONN. WATBBBUBY, OONN.
We Have a Stock
' ; t vl. f .
of '
150,000 roils
OF '
WALL
PAPER
-AXD
75,000 ft.
OF-.
Room
Moulding
TO SELECT FROM v
The Ziglatzki-Marks Co
80 SOUTH MAIN ST BEET.
STILL COMING
A number of entire new beginning
pupils are still joining the four large
evening classes. You can also, by tak
ing a few private lessons to commence
with, or take a course of six strictly
private lessons where the fashionable
Glide AValtz Is taught. Any hour
daily. Two-step and other fancy
dances. Learn now what you must
in the near future aud lose your "wall
flower" title.
PROF. BAILEY. 108 Bank Street.
I This "Biz I
I Shoe
I Sale"
of the E. H. Towle stock is cer-"
talnly a money saving event for
the public. a
Good Shoes are being sold at
cost and even less. If we hadn't T
bought this stock cheap you ?
couldn't buy Shoes at these J
prices:
Men's 53.50 Patent Leather
Shoes, all styles, $2.98 g
Men's $3.50 Box Calf and
Vici Kid Shoes, with
heavy soles, , $2.48.
Meu's $2.50 Box Calf Shoes,
heavy soles, $1.89
Boys' and Youths' School
Shoes, that were ?1.25 at 98c
. See our Bargain Table, lots of
sample Shoes a'nd Slippers at
half price.
I J. G. JACKLE & SflHS
73-75 Bank Street.
WATERBURY. '
E $ t "S'fr'i"i''H', 't
!p
our new
Butter. Department.
COFFEE!
Market
161-1G3 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
- - - : - : - - SE - se - m - - 5s - -
E, J Fitzgerald
Si
-O 1
STRUCK BY "A TRAIN.
Driver Trown In the Air and r Cart
, Dragged Several Hundred Feet
I There -was a big sensation in South
Brooklyn -this morning when the 8:W5
tram collided with a cart belonging to
Edward McManus, throwing . the
driver, Frank Napoleon, several feet
into. the air and tearing the cart off
the. horse and dragging it several hun
dred feet. It was a close call, and
while it Is thought that the driver was
more scared than hurt, still it is hard
to tell about that, for he got a bad
fall. McManus has men at work
drawing sand from the bank at the
west side of the track and while driv
ing over the rails this morning the
train came upon -the cart in charge
of Frank Nicholas Napoleon before he
had a chance to get out of the way.
A freight that was standing on a sid
ing shut out the view down the road
and on this account the engine was
but -a short distance from the spot
when the man got onto the track.
When he realized his perilous position
he gave a yell and a roa' and struck
the horse with the reins. The animal
made a bound towards the bank, thus
getting his own heels out of the way
on time to save them from being
ground off.?The train came to a stand
still and tlie conductor and engineer
got down and looked over the ground.
All the tacts were reported to Superin
tendent Beach.
A SECOND EXPLOSION.
Victoria. B. C, Feb 16. A second ex
plosion occurred in No 5 shaft at -Union
colliery last night, but it had been
expected and all the men had left. the
workings. This explosion prevents
any further attempts being made to
rescue the entombed miners,, through
No 5 shaft. A partial list of the en
tombed tninters includes eighteen
names.
Great Special Sale
OF-
Parlor
Our Show Window is full of them, at
prices that would startle the manufac
turers themselves.
This is one of the most important
of our February sales.
THE
Hampson-Sellew Furniture Co
Waterbury's Best Furniture Store.
154-15C GRAND STREET.
Dr. E. R. Patzold
SURGEON DENTIST.
Fine Gold and Silver Fillings. Geld
Crown and Bridge Work A SPECIAL
TY. Prices very moderate. Satisfac
tion guaranteed. Consultation in Eng
lish or German.
90 BANK STREET,
Waterbury, Ct.
If you have any trouble with your
fillings como to us. as wo give a
WRITTEN GUARANTEE that they
will stay.
DENTISTRY.
DR. S. W. CHIPMATT,
51 CENTER ST.
Wherever you go, don't go to Dr
Chipman.
Use KOWKURE aiid
save your cows,
WE HAVE- A VERY NICE
GROUND FOOD PUT UP BY "THE
H. O. CO." TO BE WET FOR YOUR
HENS' BREAKFAST; ALSO
SCRATCHING FEED FOR THEIR
NOON MEAL- - CORN, , CRACK
CORN AND WHEAT ALWAYS ON
HAND AT
41 "vx
ff-DE
ga)
Tho Piatt Kill Co.
30 Benedict Street.
. 1 Phone. v
PAID LARGE DPVfDENDS..
The Year 1900 a Prosperous One for
Vaterbury Manufacturer's.
The manufacturing concerns of ''Water-bury
were, never in, a more prosper
ous condition. While all of them de
clared -annual dividends at their last'
meetings of the .year in December,
many of them were little less than
monstrous. All of the big concerns,
furthermore, built large additions last
year, which have been paid for to the
last Cent. It is noticeable, also, that
not one of them increased the pay of
the workmeu, but, ou the contrary,
never before had there been so many
labor disturbances in this city over
wages. The effects oi the strike in
the adjusting department at tlie clock
factory are still felt among the work
men, at all events, and the same might
be said of the situation at the casting
department at the Waterbury Manu
facturing company's giant plant. One
of Hie big silverware factories has been
closed by the silver trust and hundreds-
of men thrown out of work,
while a great many of them have lost
their equity in houses they had built
near the factory whose wheels are
now silent, and which before it became
a mere atom in the assets of the trust
was one of the big concerns in this
city.
Following is the dividend declared
by each concern in fair round ligures:
The New England Watch company. S
per. cent: Scovill Monufacrurlng com
pany, between 30 and 40 per cent;
Waterbury Clock company. 47 per
cent; Waterbury Manufacturing com
pany, about 25 per cent, certainly not
less than that amount: Plume & At
wood company and the American Ring
company. 2U per cent each; the Farrell
Foundry and Machine company. -10 per
cent: this is about the same ligurc
that this concern has been paying for
years: Holmes. Booth & Havdens', C
per cent; American Pin company, 5
per cent. This concern is paying for
a large tract of land and new build
ings. The VaterburyHrass company
and the Benedict & Kiirnham company,
which are now owned by the American
Brass company. 0 por cent each. The
stockholders in these firms, while they
do not draw as high a dividend as they
did before they sold to the American
Brass company, draw as much as be
fore, having more slock this being one
of the conditions of the sale.
HEALTH OF THE STATE.
January Deaths Numbered 1,430
Vaccination and Smallpox.
Tlie state board of health has issued
its report for the last month. There
were 1.4;!) deaths during January.
This was :SH more than iu December,
72 more than in January -of last year,
and 713 more than the. average num
ber of deaths in January for the live
years preceding. The death rate was
18.5 for the large towns, 120.4 for the
small towns and Ul.O for the whole
state. The deaths reported from in
fectious diseases were '-37), being Hi.4
per cent, of the total mortality. Deaths
occurred in the state from diseases as
follows: Measles. 3; scarlet fever, f:
rip. 1.12; cerebro-spmal fever, S:
diphtheria and croup. 41; whooping
cough, 5: erysipelas, (; typhoid fever.
14; malarial fever, 2; puerperal fever,
3: diarrhoea, 12; consumption. 1":1:
pneumonia, 22!: bronchitis, 7:5; dis
eases of nervous system, 14:5; heart
disease, 119: accidents and violence.
i2: all other diseases. 42,". Thee mor
tality in public institutions of the
state was: Bridgeport. '.: Hartford.
20: Middletown, 14; New Haven, 22.
Sixteen towns report as having no
deaths in January. They are: An
dover, Beacon Falls. Bozrah. Canter
bury, Canton, Chaplin. Columbia. Dur
ham. East Cranby, Easton. Killing
worth. Middlebury. Middletield. Sa
lem. Sterling and Trumbull. The reg
istrars of Canaan and Wlllington did
not report for last month. In regard
to smallpox the report says:
The recent outbreak of smallpox
in New York city naturally excited
an apprehension that it would invade
Connecticut. It has moderately, but
far less than was feared. There have
been six cases in Bridgeport, one in
Derby and three in Torrington; none
fatal as yet. The remarkable exemp
tion from this dread pestilence, which
Connecticut has enjoyed, while it has
been prevailing to the number of
thousands of cases in other states, can
only be attributed to the general prac
tice of vaccination in Connecticut.
Vaccination has been ou trial now for
more than a hundred years, and has
been tested in every civilized country
in the world, and everywhere proved
itself a sure nnd safe means of pro
tection, when properly performed. It
is true there are a few mentally dis-
torted persons who deny its protective
.... - .1 .
nower. luev represent a ciass 01 oi-
jectors in the human family that al
ways exists. They are like the famous
colored preacher of Virginia who
claimed that the earth was the center
of the solar system, and with illogical
obstinacy Insisted "dat de sun do
move round it."
I
LETTER CARRIERS' BALL.
The Sixth Annual Was a Brilliant
Success.
City hall was again the scene of
merry festivities last evening, when
the sixth annual concert and sociable
of the letter carriers of Waterbury
was held. The handsome and natty
manner in which the hall was deco
rated at once attracted the eye nnd
won the admiration of tlie exceedingly
large audience iu attendance. The
balls of the letter carriers iu the past
have been grand affairs, but the sixth
annual surpassed them In every de
tail. Here and here upon the stage
were handsomely displayed numerous
potted plants, from behind which ..the
sweet and inspiring strains of dulcet
melody emanated. The American
band furnished music for the dancing
and also rendered an interesting con
cert program as a prelude to the danc
ing. The program of the concert was
as follows:
Overture O. Nicolrl
Merry Wives of Windsor. .A. Czibulka
Woodland Whispers ....C. F. Brlegel
Love's Frolics William Loraine
Salomes-Intermezzo. .
The Limit medley ...... G. Michiels
Czardas.'
, Shortly after the conclusion of the
concert,, which was of l'are merit, the
grand march commenced. Postmaster
J. H. Guernsey and Prof Leo Herr led
with the twenty letter carriers immedi
ately after them. About 150 couples
participated In it. Dancing followed,
the program consisting of eighteen
numbers, for which the American band
orchestra furnished music and Prof
Herr prompted.
Tne gallery and the body of the hall
was filled. All enjoyed a most pleas
ant evening, both those who, sat in
the gallery and looked on and those
wno joined, in tne merry wuirv s
BBOOKLYtf E&1EFS ' - V -
Tynela- 'a 23 rear
fl.ed at her home. No 1 .lameg piai e
fist evening. Besides her husband she
leaves one child. The funeral w.U
take place' Sunday afternoon at 2 p, m.
vvith interment in Calvary.
-Joha Ryan of North Leonard
stieet, who was struck down by a
team about a week ago and seriously
injured, was removed to the hospital ,
jesterday afternoon in Lunnys am- "
biUance. - His condition ls still criU-
There is to be a Lithuanian wed
mg iu Brooklyn Monday morning.
The bride is a well known lady of that '
nationality and the groom is Joe Pit,
who presides over the lunch counter
at a well known cafe.
It was a jolly party that enjoyed
a straw ride to Beacon Falls last even
ing. A more merry crowd could not
be gathered together. After reaching
Beacon Falls all partook of a splendid
1 epast. Both on the way to and fro ' -mere
were songs and recitations
galore.. Officer William Goegins'and
ilioiuas Finuegan were voted the best
directors that ever existed.
A surprise party was given in
honor of Miss Alfred a Whitley at her
home on Bank street last eveuln-
large number of her friends "were
present and the evening was pleasant
ly spent 111 games and amusements. .
iongs were rendered bv Tlioui-s Me- '
Donald. Edward Dehanev, Patrick
lehan and the Misses Margaret De
laney and Rose Raffertv, while Roger
Dawson, Thomas McDonald and .Miss
Rose De Liqnori contributed several
piano selections to the evening's en
tertainment. Danciug was one of the
features of the evening. Refresh
ments were served.
A private, sociable aud dance was
given in l'.eaulae's hall on Charie.-s
street last evening y a number of
young people in ihis section. The
grand march, in which about twenty
couples were participants, was led by
Patrick OT.ti.n and Miss .Hooker.
..Mcnaei irtnnan prompted for tlie
dancing, which was followed until an
early hour. Refreshments were
served. All present had a most de
lightful time aiid it was their unani
mous desire that a similar affair would
be given in the near future. The com
mittee of arrangements was as fol
lows: Michael Biennau. chairman;
Patrick O'Brien. John Malone, John
Cunningham. Michael Cavanaugh. Pat
rick Clark and Michael Mack.
The twelfth anniversary of the
Brooklyn Athletic club was celebrated
in a right royal manner by the mem
bers of this ever increasing iu popular
ity organization and their many
friends. The decorations of the club's
rooms at once fascinated the eye and
many were the compliments which the
decorator's work received last evening.
As on former occasions, the boys gal
lantly upheld their reputation as en
tertainers of the first rank. Every
thing was done by the members to
make' the affair the most enjoyable in
the history of the club, and that they
succeeded was well manifested by th-
manner iu which everyone appeared
to be enjoying him or herself. After
the conclusion of the grand march,
which was led by President Daniel
McCarthy and Miss Mollie McCarthy,
followed by about 1"0 couples, danc
ing followed until a late hour. Music
for the dancing was furnished by the
Excelsior orchestra aud Prof Harper
did tlie prompting. During the inter-'
mission lu-tween the dauceg a light
collation was served. During ihe even
ills' remarks were made by tlie presi
dent, Daniel McCarthy, Steve O'Brien,
ex-president, Thomas ' Mitchell. J.
Kiely. E. J. Donahue and M. Mulca
hey." President McCarthy made rather
a neat speech in which he related the
story of the organization of the dub,
told of the most important events in
its history and dilated on its rapid
growth and its present prosperity.
Manv out of town guests were pres
ent, 'including the following: J. Bu
chanan and P. Ladiance. Bridgeport;
Homer Marchaud. South Norwalk: F.
she, Vnsonia and the Misses Alice
Kielv. New Haven. Smith. Derby;
Stevens. Sevmour, and Jones. Torring
ton The c ommittee of arrangements
consisted of J. O'Brien. J. Duuphv. D.
McCarthy. Michael Madden. Larry
Robinson and Charles Schmidt.
KENNEDY TRIAL ADJOURNED.
Ruling Out of Handwriting Causes
Much Discussion Among Lawyers.
New York, Feb 16. There was a
sudden adjournment of the Kennedy
case yesterday until Monday morning.
Mr Cantwell said the ruling of Justice
1 Fursman barring out the testimony of
l , n snt-nnsft
handwriting experts was a surprise
aud the defense was not prepared to
proceed with the case.
Speaking of Justice Fursman's rul
ing on the testimony of handwriting
experts, Assistant District Attorney
Osborne said yesterday:
"If 'Justice Fursman's ruling is good
law. then to my knowledge at least six
men have been illegally executed. Not
only this. but. hundreds of others, iu
cases, not capital, hn.ve suffered im
prisonment. "In the case of Dr Buchanan the
court of appeal's sustained the decision
of the lower court. Dr Buchanan's
conviction was brought about princi
pally by the testimony of Professor
Ames, the handwriting expert. Take
the case of Molineux. Weeks and
Battle went before Justice Pardon C.
Williams and asked that the indict
ment be dismissed on the ground that
the testimony of the handwriting ex
perts was not sufficient to find an in
dictment on. Justice. Williams decid
ed to the contrary, in a most decided
manner.
"In the case of William TT. Schooley,
convicted of receiving stolen goods by
means of a false signature to a power
of attorney, and whose conviction was
brought about, by a comparison of
handwriting and sustained by the court
of appeals, that tribunal made use of
the following: -' W e know or 110 prin
ciple or rule in law which would jus
tify the court in rejecting this evi
dence.' ,
A parallel case to that of Dr Kenne
dy which resulted in the birth of this
decision is that of the case of the peo
ple vs kray. Coray was indicted in
Madison county for the murder of an
Indian, and was convicted by compari
son of handwriting exhibits consisting
of a signature iu a Bible and a letter
to his sweetheart, in which he stated
his intcut to kill the Indian. The
court of appeals decided flat-footed la
favor of the admission of such testi
mony, although the letter was not set
forth in the indictment," .: ,
- Roller skating at the auditorium Sat
urday matinee! Monday evening ; .
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