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Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1903-1917, April 02, 1903, Image 4

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WATERBURY EVENING DEMOCRAT, THURSDAY, APRIL 2 1903.
Co
FR1DA Y,
As usual, is
Housekeepers'
The list we publish every
Friday is the means of much
saving to the housekeepers of
Waterbury. . .
I The new lines of Easter
Dress Goods, Silks, Shoes.
Kid Gloves, Suits and Cos
tumes are now complete.
Basement Floor.
' 8 to 10 a. m.
6 cakes U. S. Mall Soap,
25c
Cedar Water Pail, with three hoops,
. best, duality, 19c-
Curran Dry
Hoods
Day
J Towel Boiler, hard wood, strongly
made, nicely varnished, 9c
3ouble covered Roasting Pan, full
size, regular- 50c, at 29c
Patent tin Flour Sifter, with crank,' 9c
Clothes Basket, made of the best
willow, large size, 49c
, . Patent Mop Stick, with large cot
ton Mop, complete, , , 15c
Iron Board, 5 feet long, extra wide,
special 48c
Tin Saucepan, stamped In one piece,
holding two quarts, at 9c
Petermau. Roach Food, 9c
Enameled handle Rolling Pins, hard
wood, ' , c
wToilet Paper, best quality, 3c
CJIINA AND GLASSWARE FOR
FRIDAY.
2 to 4 p. m. '
Table Tumblers, fancy pattern, first
quality, special 6 for9c
' Crystal glass Syrup ; Can, "with. -spring'
cover, 9c
iGlass Table Lamp on high stand, .
complete, with large burner and -
chimney,' 45c
.Toilet Pitcher and Basin, large Ize, 59c
Carlsbad China Cuspadores, nicely'
" decorated, special . 39c
White stone chtnaBreakfast Plates, .
. first quality, 4c each
Chamber Seta, 9 pieces', large size,
new shape, decorated, in assort
ed colors, $1.85
91.12 piece Dinner and Tea Set, Eng.
lis;h china, nicely -decorated, spe
; cial $6-95
HOUSEKEEPERS' , DAY THIRD
, ' FLOOR.
'A FEW MORE EXTRA SPECIALS
- FROM THE. NEW CARPETS.
$1.25 Wilton velvet Carpets, a beau-
, tlful furnishing and one of the
, best for hard wear, $1.10
Made, laid and lined free. '
COc best 10-wire Tapestry Brussels
Carpets, noted for its hard wear
ing qualities; . 87c
And made, laid and lined free.
jG9c heavy hard wearing Brussels ' .
" - Carpets, small or .parlor designs, 59c
And made, laid and lined free.
5c velvet Kidderminster Carpets,
, made to take the place of the old
3-ply carpets, '79c
' Made, laid and lined free.
Best extra, super all wool Ingrain
Carpets,1 in small or large de- '
signs, regular 75c grade, Friday 72c
And made, laid nnd lined free.
39c heavy Ingrain Carpets, 25c
'9x12 Brussels Rugs for carpets, reg-"
ular $16.50, Friday ' , $13.50
',15c Floor Oilcloths, f 21c
X'c Floor Oilcloth, ' 30c
5e-c4rk Unseed Linoleums, 45c
J5c Japanese linen warp carpet pat
terns in Mattings. : 25c
: 50c . fringed . opaque Window
Shades, mounted on spring roll
'ers, , . 35c
89c ruffle muslin Curtains', v 69c
98c ruffle muslin Curtains, five tucks
with hemstitched edge, 75c
FURNITURE DEPARTMENT. -Just
read these values. Here is
where cash works wonders.
. - We. have the largest and best assort-
ment of Iron Beds in the city, at prices
which cannot be equaled.
$4.50 2JE2SS- trimmed Beds ; $2.50
$5 brass trimmed Beds, with ex
tension foot. ' $3.00
'$7.50 Beds with brass rod and
foot. $4.50
$10, Beds with brass scrolls ,and
heavy fillings . $7.00
$12 colored Beds, with brass trlm-
- mlngs, $9.00
$15 continuous post Beds, in col
ors, $11.00
$12.50 celebrated felt Mattress. $7.50
$6 combination Mattress, with
, quality ticking, $4.50
$5 Spiral Book spring, $3.50
v $4 double woven wire Spring, with
supports underneath, $2.50
$1.50 Cot Beds, 98c
$30 quartered oak Suit, large mir-
ror, , - $25.00
$35 royal oak Suit, with large roll
footboard, $27.50
$40 Suit, with large empire shape
mirror, . $30.00
-f.'.-5 golden oak Suit. $32.00
$60 massive quartered oak Suits. $50.00
$100 roll top Suits, piano polish,
swell front and a massive mlr-
ror. . $75.00
$7 Dining Tables, six feet long. $4.98
- $9 Tables, large top and carved
. Rtretcher. $7.00
$10 claw foot Tables, craved base.
'$8.50
$18 oak Sideboards, with large mir
v . ror. ' $12.00
$22 Sideboard, swell front, and
shaped mirror, v $18.00
$30 quartered -onk Sideboards, $25.00
$15 Couches, upholstered In vel-
mir. - $10.00
v $7,50 Turkish Couches, full spring
edge, - ' $12.50
$22 double end adjustable Couches.
$17.50
$25 Divans. Indestruotable sprinss
. nnd double end, $20 00
Sft Chiffoniers, five large drawers, $4.fi0
510 Ghlffonlpcs, with mirror.. . $7.50
We've CUT LOOSE From Winter
From Now ott THi is a '
SP
'RING
Those, who know us best, will be quickest to note the
change in our stocks and our styles. We are nothing
if not progressive, prices will seem lower because
qualities are better, varieties are greater, demanded ' by a
larger business Our growth is easily explained. We've
earned the peoples' confidence by faithful service.
The Finnegan
Good Clothes
Store
.Cor. Bank and
A. F COWLES.
Millinery Opening
Wednesday, Thursday and. Friday,
April I. 2 and 3 .
Ladies of Waterbury. and
vicinity cordially invjted.
53 AND 55 CENTER ST.
K. Dougherty
Men's Working Shirts
AT 39c
(Men's Black and White ' Striped
Working Shirts,' double breasted . and
made with all seams double stitched,
value 50c, on sale at 39c.
AT 25c
J Boys' , Negligee Shirts in all sizes,
regular 39c quality, on sale at 25c.
We give Red Star Trading 'Stamps.
K Dougherty,
I4T South Main st.
A GOOD HORSE
attached to an up-to-date carriage, and
your wife, who needs an outing, besld
you, will i-:ake you feel good and mav
save doctor's bills. If not married taka
somebody's daughter whom you know
you wocua use ror a wire. Go to
LOUCKS' STABLES.
46 Spuing street ' tphonesd-j
S30 bUUTH MAIN STREET.
Herbert H.Avery, Proprietor.
The best nlace in the cltv to set a trond ten 11 a a
meal at the lowest prices. Best dinner In the
city for 20o; 6 dinners for $1.' We giveaflrst
classmeal cooked to order for 15o, 30a Our fie.
ivu writers a specialty. 1 t ,
GIVE US A TRIAL.
public ncEtr
READ OUR GENEROUS
$1.00 STAMP LIST.
Bag Niagara . Flour ............. G5c
($1 worth stamps.)
Bag "Cataract Best" Flour . . . . . . 60c
($1 worth stamps.)
3 packages "Mother's Oats" ..... 30c
($1. worth stamps.)
Butter' 22c, 25c, 2Sc
($1 worth stamps with every pound.)
Large bag Salt ................. .10c
($1 worth stamps.)
Full Book of Stamps Willi
161-163 South Main
We A1 Fly.
TO THE EAGLE SHOE STORE FOR OUR
SHOES. GREAT SPRING OPENING SALE.
We Qive Green
THE EAGLE
388 North Main St Qpopsite Sanderson Meat Market.
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COUCHES
CASH OR
BENSON FURNITURE CO.
JM80 South Main St. I " 2 ENTRANCES 1 38-40 Grand Stre it
!i;H!li!E!IS!IB!!IE!!t!
SlillOliliiSlOlSJtllOlBIiBillllKliCIiBlilllS
STORE
- PhiIips
Co.
Grand Streets. :
xtracf.
flakes the Weak Stron
18c Bottle.
3 for 50 Cents.
THE-
Woodruff Grocery Co.
Don't get- it Into youjr, head that a
Gas Range is simply for use during
hot weather. It is intended to meet
every requirement of your kitchen Of
course, it is pleasant in summer, be
cause it keeps the kitchen cool,, but so
far as usefulness Is concerned', every
day in the year is the day for a Gas
Range. You can do anything on it
that you can do on any stove.
The United Gas improvement Co,
GEO. A. UPHAM,
43 SOUTH WILLOW STREET.
Shop 413-2. House 251-3.
STAMP GIVING CONTINUES.
Peruna ...... . v . . 95c bot
, . ($0 worth stamps.)
Blood-'Wine 50c
($3 wcrth stamps.)
Pearl Baking Powder ......... 45c lb
($4 worth stamps.)
10 lbs Tub Lard 95c
($2 worth stamps.): .
18 lbs fine Sugar for $1.00
($2 worth stamps.)
Cream. Java Coffee ............ 35c lb
($5 wortn stami s.)'
With a $6.75 order. Ask for it.
a $6.75 Order-Ask for It.
st.
Tel 110.
Trading Stamps.
SHOE STORE
. II
1
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P
I
Have Arrived
All the latest coverings, Just
drop in and examine them.
Prices lowest in city, .
CREDIT.
11
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"S3
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Matt E
Fori! Kinds
of leather
SMITH GIIILS PIQUE FACULTY.
Antics Begin With a Parody Whicfh is
Undignified and Irreverent.
Northampton. Mass, April 2. Smith
college Is in a fever of excitement be
cause of lack of harmony between the
faculty and : the leading girls in the
class of 1904.
The troublfi began on the college ral-
y day. February 22. A play, "Every
Freshman," by Alice Wright of Al
bany, N..Y was given. It was a par
ody of the. old morality play, "Every
man," and a tily slap at the faculty and
their present examination system.
Wlhile the play was in progress sev
eral memberu of the faculty left the
hall, saying that nothing was sacred to
the girls and that they "would parody
the gospels next if something were not
done."
A young woman of Cleveland, O., is
responsible for another escapade that
unset the facultv. Early in the year
this young woman began to hand in
papers in the psychology aeparvmeut
signed "Mary Duncan," a name which
was not her own.
The professor scanned the name
thoughtfully and concluded that he
had lost "Miss Duncan's" . card. 5Ut
he enrolled her in the college list as a
new pupil. "Miss Duncan's work
was excellent, and the professor of
psychology recommfended her to the de
partment for good work. The club
girls were aware of tne auai personal
ity of their classmate and with a great
show of seriousness1 took "Mary uun-
can" into the club. . '
Then "Mary" carried her joke fur
ther. She wrote letters begging ror a
ock of the professor's hair and a
thread of his favorite blue necktie.
The young professor "caught on" at
ast and his dignity was hurt.
At the Glee iclub concert, March 18,
the club sang! about "Mary Duncan,"
and the faculty have expressed dis
approval of "Mary Duncan" in em
phatic terms.
Another difficulty arose from a rroiic
In which a papier mache efflgy of. a
member of the faculty was exhibited.
Meantime the, college girls have gone
ihome for their Easter vacation, and
hope the affair will have blown over
whenvthey return.' ' ,
tGOOD NEWS
We have a full line' of Magazines
and Periodicals. People going to Isew
Haven by way of Cheshire will appre
ciate this fact. Fitzpatrick's Pharma
cy, corner East Main and Wall streets.
OUR LINE OF
fall Papers
AND
, ARE NOW COMPLETE
Every sample roll shown
represents" a large number that
we have in stock, so; there is
no waiting to depend upon an
out-ot-town stock : .
Everything is new, clean
. f . ..... .
and up-to-date.
We have good workmen to
hang it for you.
The ZiglatzM-Marks Co
110-116 South Main Street.
PIANOS.
We are sole agents for such well
known makes as tie POPUIiAR
PEASE, the STIEFP. the WILBUR
and others. We have a few second
hand Pianos at low prices. Full' as
sortment of . Phonographs Records,
Sheet Music, etc
Waterbury Piano Store
24 EAST MAIN STREET. .
You'll Want
New Shoes
for BAST DR. We've got a beau
tiful line and the prices are very
reasonable. Our $3 Shoes and
Oxfords.
for MEN AND WOMEN are as
good as others $3.50 shoes.
They're all hand sewed; In the
latest lasts; Patent Colt Skin,
Vici Kid, Velour and Box Calf.
You don't pay 50 cents more for
a name when you by a pair of
' our $3 shoes. You save it.
Big line of Oxfords for spring.
Try our Liquid Corn Plaster,
price 15 cents.
J. G. JACKIE & SOUS,
73-75 Ban Street.
Roomlouldings
BROOKLYN BUEEFS
Thomas Nolan of Bank street is
able "to be. around once more after a
severe illness, with pneumonia.
The residents of this section are
wondering where their friend the con
ductor who constantly smoked cigars
cigarettes and a pipe on his trips
along the Bank'street line is. He has
gone to Brockton on a short visit. Be
fore, leaving he remarked to a man
who happened to be at the station that;
ho was going to Brockton, Mass for
about a week. A strike was expected
to occur among the trolley men there
and he expected to be of some service
to the trolley company. He said that
if the strike didn't occur during the
week, he would return to Waterbury.
Spring time Is near at hand and per
haps you expect to paint, your. .house
or do some repairs which need paint
ing. Don't forget that A. C. Walker,
the druggist, has a complete' line of
painters' supplies, nad his prices are
right. Drop into the store and get him
to give you figures. It will cost you
nothing and perhaps you can save
money. .
MACEDONIAN REBELLION.
The Albanian Movement Considered
Dansrerona. J. VIENNA,
April 2. The rebellion , in
Macedonia is considered here to have
begun already, and the situation is ex
pected to become worse. , The Albanian
movement is regarded as specially dan
gerous because the sultan will hardly
dare to suppress it, he being surround
ed by Albanian guards at the Yildlz
kiosk. It is therefore thought that the
reform plan will remain a dead letter
in Old Servia.
The report is confirmed that M.
Stcherblna, the Russian consul at Mi
trovitza, was shot in, the back by Al
banian soldiers. It is estimated that
there are 20,000 Albanians under arms,
and a general rising would be extreme
ly serious.
It is stated that the . king of Greece
has abandoned his intended visit to the
Danish court .." at Copenhagen on ac
count of the threatening situation in
the Balkans.
P Carry . Weather auenmXm.
UTICA, N. Y., April 2. Arrange
ments have been made whereby the
rural free delivery mail carriers in this
section will carry flags on their rigs
which will be weather signals, a cer
tain flag to denote changes In tempera
ture, storms, etc. . .
The Baspsoa-Sellew hmim Co
Moving Days.
iQ-Car
. Now on show in . the
new Commercial build
:' ing on Bank street.
THE ENTIRE FOURTH FLOOR
; Is being rapidly, arrang
ed with new goods.
People desirous of see- .
ing this superb stock ',
may do so by calling
at our old quarters on V"
Grand street, for a short
time, and a salesman
will take you over to
the new building.
$40,000 worth of fur- .
niture to select from.
Lowest Prices in the State
lb Kinpsos-Selbw furaihn Co.
For a Few Days Longer at
Temporary Store
141 Grand Street,
Boys'
Patent Leather Shoes
WARRANTED NOT TO CRACK. .
Sizes 12 to 2 at $1.75
Sizes 2 1-2 to 5 1-2 at $1.98
$2.50 Quality Ladies' Shoes,
$198
Boys'
One-Piece Shoes
WILL NOT RIP. TRY THEM
ELM & BRADLEY CO.,
2 Bank Street, . . ,
70
s
BUFFALO MAN MISSING.
5? 'ends OTer a Reward for Informa
tion That Will Lead to His Finding.
Five hundred dollars reward Is of
fered 'to anyone who will locate Mr
Dennison. who left the Hotel Broezel,
Buffalo, N. Y., Wednesday, March 18,
1908, at 7 a. m., elnce which time noth
ing has been heard of shim. V
He is 61 years of age, (looks young
er), height five feet nine inches, weight
about 160 pounds, light complexion,
sandyf hair and moustache, slightly
gray; eyelashes very light and a x dis
tinguishing characteristic; figure ercet.
; When last seen he wore an overcoat
of oxford material, velvet collar, cloth I
rM t-cwi a TTa itrnwA " n a aIv ami V o n1 1
vest with bone buttons, brownish gray
trousers. . : His clothing was made by
Alexander Dunlop, Chicago, 111. .Stand
ing collar, black four-in-hand tie, white
shirt, no studs, gold collar buttons,
gold link sleeve buttons, laced enamel
Regal shoes, tan Dent 'gloves, size 74.
Black derby hat with his initials in
gold.
He carried a gold open face ; Elgin
watch, movement No 2447071, plain
gold case, No 88300, with magnetic
shield case No 07722; The watch wa
attached to a flat silk chain.
He is of quiet manner and a member
of the firm of Sidney Shcoard & Co.
Life member of Lodge of Ancient Land
marks, No 441, F. & A. M., of Buff alo,
n. y.
Information may be sent to Sidney
Shepard & Co.
ROMANCE AIRED IN CITY COURT,
Beautiful OPolish Girl of Good Family
Tires of Her Husband, a Farmhand.
' New Haven, April ! 2. -A (Polish ro
manee involving the love, elopement
?and separation from her husband of a,
pretty girl was aired in the city court
yesterday when John Wagner was tried
for- breach of the peace, hin young
wife being "the complainant. - Some
years ago Wagner, , who was an ordi
nary workman with no particular edu
cation, but with fine stature and other
wise manly bearing, met Katrlna So
llnsfci, a beautiful r3 of good family
and considerable wealth.
. In their native village in Poland
they held clandestine ' meetings, Ka
trlna becoming more and more enam
ored of her new found love. As her
parents objected to their marrying they
finally decided to elope and ; come to
America. Eventually they settled in
New Haven. Their journey from Po
land was not all sunshine, and when
want knocked repeatedly at the' door
love finally flew out; of the window.
Katrlna's love ;, had waned i and she
J.onged for the happy home of her child
hood again. The husband.1 however.
remained steadfast, and 1 despite the
raot that his wife left him he constant
ly tried to see' her and their two chil
dren. The other night he went to
where they lived, attempted to force
his way into the house and was sub
sequently arrested. "
After hearing some details of the
case Judge ;s Dow remarked that he
knew of no law that would compel
either husband or wife to . live with
each other against the win of one or
the other. He advised Wagner to
keep : away from his wife, and on his
promise to do so he would nolle the
case; 1 Wagner consented to this on
condition that his wife return his pass
ports. Mrs Wagner said she would
do this If she could find them. ;
CHANGES AT THE MINES.
Anthracite Worker Begin Under tit
New Conditions Without Hitch.
HAZLETON, Pa. April 2.Th read
justment of conditions in and about the
mines, as a result of. the findings of the
strike commission, which went Into ef
fect yesterday, has not been , accom
panied by any serious disagreements
thus far. The mine workers feel confi
dent " that all of the companies will
abide by the award of the strike arbi
trators, and, while they look for slight
hitches here and there, they anticipate
no serious trouble.
The principal change is the estab
lishment of an eight hour shift for fire
men.' At some of the collieries the
force of firemen will not be Increased.
Instead each man will be expected to
take care of a proportionately larger
number of boilers than under the
twelve hour schedule.
, Where the mine workers do not con
sent to the continuation of the double
shift on Sundays of the engineers and
pump runners bosses will be put on for
the one day that the former class of
employees is idle. Quitting time at all
of the collieries will be at 5 o'clock. ' ? '
SPRING
PAPER
It's Wall Paper, time again.
We think we can offer you a
wider choice of better ' and
more stylish paper than you
can find elsewhere. We think
we can save money for you
too. Come iri and let us prove
it.
THE
A, R Taylor Co
43 CENTER STREET
W
ALL
'TWAS HO APRIL FOOL JOKE.
Good Sized Case Filled With Wearing
Apparel Found on Street. .
Thomas GBolsrer of Court street nT
Harry Bergln of East Main street
made a strange find on East Main
street last night. The boys were go
ing toward the center and noticed peo
ple smile as they passed a handsome"'
dress suit case near ' the corner of
nrrh lfflm oni foiif Xfoin 4iAAfa
dently all taklne it for some sort of an
April fool joke. , J Bolger and Bergln
waited to see somebody pick It up, but
everybody appeared ; dead on , to the
game and some were so "smart" thev
wouldn't even look at It. Finally the
boy went oer and examined the
case and whileVthev tiart snmo donht-a
as to what it contained they thought
it more tnan nicely that there wa s
some mistake about it and concluded
to see What was ori th insfrio ThAir
hesitated about opening it fearing that
i-ucic iui$av on an electric battery m
It and that tho crowd would have the
laugh on them. ; But they opened it,
anyway, and were somewhat surprised
to see it well filled with ishirts and oth
er articles of , wearincr
new and more a little worn. The
Doys carried the case to the Democrat
office, .where Bolger is employed. So
far nobody has appeared .to claim the
property, but It is expected that the
owner, will get his eye on this article
and when he does he will not make 1
mncU delay in heading for the Demo
crat office.
SMITH SAYS HE'S RICH,
At Least $2,000,000, Says a" Springfield
. Laborer. - '.:
According ,to the Springfield Union,
Charles H. Smith of that city claims
to be worth at least $2,000,000, and to
have a large amount on deposit in the
Hartford National bank. Smith, saya
he has never had any use for the'mon
ey; and has considered It nolodv's bus
iness whether he wasjich or poor. In
the meantime he has been working as
a day laborer and teamster.
,iTnfs,tory 'Smlth and he tells
It. now; he ,saysufor-,the love of a wo
man, is that his father. Erastus Smith
of this city, went with the fortv-nlners
to California and made a fortune. He
soont thereafter died. Smith says, as
d'd his mother. The edder Smith's
claim or mine -was afterwards sold out
at. an enormous figure and the money
placed to the credit of the rightful
owner in the Hartfopd . National bank;
so Smith says. Smith is about ' 30
years old. and he rW fhn tns .!..
fallen in Hove he has decided to make
use of his 'great fortune. It Is report-
m uia c on xne strength of his repre
sentations he has obtained credit In
Springfield for
lars' worth of goods and that he has
bargained to buy' a $10,000 estate at
Feeding Hills.
Smith has expressed his Intentf nf
coming to Hartford o totc onniio-ii
from his aHleged ; deposit in the Hart-
rora DflnK to pay for his farm and get
it well started. . - It win wnhdHir h
a surprise to the officers of th hunt
to learn that Mr Smith has so large a
deposit with them. .
STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES.
regular. monthly meeting at the' capitol
yesterday, all the members being pres
ent except Miss Mary Hall. President
Brldgman presided. Members of the
board and the secretary; made reports
of their work during the month, in
cluding ; attendance at a number Of
hearings before legislative committees
on matters in which the board is inter
ested. Miss Bacon reported a visit to
the Girls Industrial school at' Middle
town and Secretary C.; P. Kellogg re
ported a visit to the state prison , when
several, prisoners were Interviewed.
The board will next meet on Friday,
May 1. '
Indian laborer Uneair
INDIANAPOLIS, April 2.-Thre
hundred bricklayers struck here for an
increase in pay from 50 to 00 cents an
hour. At Veedersburg the employees
of the Wabash Clay company, number
ing 108 men,' went on strike. The trik
ers demand an increase of 2 cents an
hour and recognition of the union. At
Logansport 250 masons and bricklayers
struck. AU work has been stopped. At
Fort Wayne the! painters and paper
hangers struck, the bosses refusing to
sign the new wage scale.' At Bvans
vilte between 700 and 800 men and
boys in ten of the eleven furniture fac
tories went on strike for more pay and
shorter hours. The employers will try
to get other men.
StrtUe In New Jrer Tottb.
BfOBRISTOWN, N. J., April 2.
About 200 carpenters and half as many
hod carriers of this city went on strike
yesterday. It is expected that other
trades will follow their example next
Monday, demanding increased wages
and Saturday half holidays. The bosses
are ovganlzed, and the struggle will be
harp. At Elisabeth the plumbers of
that city went oa strike for an Increase
In wages. V, The men were getting $3
per day. They demand $3.50. At Mont
clalr building operations are practical
ly suspended' by the strike of the
plumbers, painters and paper hangers.
Pennsrl-rania Strike.
PHILADELPHIA, April 2. Numer
ous sferitees, none of which, however.
Involved a great number of men, wero
inaugurated in many of the smaller
towns in the eastern .lialf of Pennsyl
vania. Th principal trades tbet struck
were painters, plumbara, paper hang
ers, carpenters ao& bricklayers.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., April 2. Two
hundred and fifty painters and decora
tors, 1S5 steamfltters and S23 glass
blowers har quit work. The men de
mand an fhcrease in wages and recog
nition of the union.
Taooma Strike Settled. .
TACOMA, Wash., April 2. The strlka
of street car men against the Tacoma
Railway and Power eompanyhas been
f3clally declared off by the street rail
way employees' union.
Cincinnati Bnlldlnar Trades Affected.
CINCINNATI, April 2. More than
700 employees of nine architectural
iron structure works have struck here,
iciirectly affecting many others in th

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