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Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1903-1917, February 12, 1904, Image 3

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WATERBURY EVENING. DEMOCRAT, FIimAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1904.
3
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TROUSERS
Our Trousers Sale is meeting with wonderful
success. See what we can give you for $1.95,
splendid values.
V GOOD SUBSTANTIAL .WORKING TROUSERS s
$1.50.
The Kind that will not rin or buttons null off.
(guaranteed, another pair or money returned if i
aot satisfactory)
LOOK IN OUR SOUTH WINDOW AND
SEE A FEW SAMPLES AT
R: HARDER $ CO,
J05 BANK STREET.
L
We're All Right.
We recall a story about a baby who
" tad always, to the few months of his
' existence, been kept in a 'room where
a little gas burned at night. Once he
opened his eyes on utter darlfnes. At
first he showed great terror at "the new
unknown blackness. Then be realized
his own personal immunity f rom what
ever catastrophe might have en
veloped the world,1 and cried 'out re
assuringly, "Baby's all right!" Looting
across at Asia to-day, feel con-
siderably like that baby., All kinds of
disaster may' lurk ; in the clouds f in
' that, direction, but not for us. War
ox . no war,; alliances or single foes, !
victory for Russia or Japan, the Unit
ed States of America can feel its body
and be assured that all is about the
same.. Our security . is '.'due primarily
: to fortune and geography. It is in
creased, however, bythe judgment and
astuteness .of our pilot in foreign, af
fairs. If Mr Hay should suddenly ex-s
pire, and!' the delicate business of
fencing with clever diplomatists were
Intrusted to Sir Roosevelt himself, for
instance, or to somfl one equally '3.e
pendent upon luck for diplomatic safe-'
ty. a certain tremulousness would take
place of our serenity. If an 'untested
democratic candidate should be elect-'
ed president in ; November next, his .
choice of a cabinet would be observed
with serious concern. Perhaps a"
really enlightened democrat would en
deavor to retain Mr Hay, who has
never been known as much of a par y
man. The secretary's present hand
ling of eastern matters has equalled
any of his performances in the past.
He takes everything he can1 get for
this country, while risking nothing.
By closing a treaty with China iy
cable and sending consuls to the
treaty Sports in Manchuria, he has
made the open door a reality, and giv
en Russia ' no pi'etext for ; complaint,
since her professions in the past, how
ever insecure,1 are a complete . answer
to anything to which she may ob
ject. Her newspapers may rave at 'us,
but her diplomats will see that they,
have been outplayed; From the day
when' he Insisted, in. face of general
-incredulitv, that the legations .were
safe in Ping, down to this latest
outwitting of the country which !s the
cleverest . diplomatic gamester ;in Eu
rope, "Mr 'Hay's cautious baldness ha3
been one series of triumphs. ' In only
one' instance have we been- discom
fited in ' our foreign nefrot'atlons in
tbe case, namely of the Kishinef? peti
tion and that affair is nerally be
lieved to -have been hmdld by the
president. Collier's Weekly.
-, i- ' v ' -w -' ' - ' 1 ''" . '
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Leave all job1 printing orders at the
Democrat office, such as tickets, win
dow hangers, 'bills, badges, programs,
door checks, and in fact anything and
everything that can be printed, from
one letter up to a full sheet poster.
COLORADO'S COSTLY -fk
INDUSTRIAL WAR.
, Inthe grim tenacity of purpose, in
the methods f employed, in the number
ennstea on Dotn siaes in proportion to
the population of the state, and in the
appalling cost, both in life and proper
ty, the industrial war now going on in
Colorado is one of the most far-reaching
ever recorded in the labor history
of the world. ' ,
, .Thirty-five thousand workmen idle
on an average of five months each;
4,000,000. working days lost; $10,000,-
000 a .low estimate as a wage loss;
$30,000,000 conservative estimate
loss from direct damage and non-production
; $300,000 cost of national
(riiard ordered to three different .parts
of the , state within nine months fou
the protection of life and property.
A total loss at the mbst conservative
estimate, of $50,000,000. Andthjs is
a state where the total assessed val
uation is less than $150,000,000.
. This is the stupendous cost to Colo
rado of the labor troubles of the year
1003. Sixteen strikes. That is the
year's record. -Sixteen strikes affect
ing from 300 to 21,-000 men each and
lasting; from ten days to ten months
each."-- - ... i;. v
The results: A declaration of war
between capital and organized ' labor
as represented in tne state; the in
crease' of the national guard from 350
men in March, 1903, to 3,000 men ful
ly armed arid equipped; courts and
civil writs superseded in the mining
districts and martial law declared;
the suspension of the writ of habeas
corpus and the enforcement of the
"vag" law; in the mining . camps and
the subsequent deportation of all men
who refuse to -work.1 And, with all
this, the 25,000 miners in the metalli
ferous and coal camps are still out,
and threaten to "stay otit for months
to come, although their places: '. are
gradually being filled with imported
non-union "men-! . i ;
It has passed the point where one
can , refer to it as on "industrial up
heaval." It has become a (Social re
belliona rebellion against every
recognized standard of business as it
exists to-day a rebellion brought
about .by the determination of organ
ized labor , to reign supreme In Color
ado. ,. x tv--
To get at the real beginning of this
trouble you have to go back just
three , years. In , 1901, the state legis
lature, at the insistent demand of the
labor unions, passed an eight-hour
law, applicable to all classes of labor
in the state. A few months later, the
supreme court declared it unconstitu
tional at the behest of the mine own
ers, so the' labor leaders declared. But
whatever' the cause,, that started the
flght.v Labor in Colorado organized for
an eight-hour lay. They went into
politics and united with, the democrat
ic party, and at the; succeeding session
the eight-hour law failed to pass.
Then the unions , took the matter into
their own-, hand. . They ! formally Es
poused the cause of socialism in
June, 1903 and supported the social
istic platform , at the next election.
They ! failed to win at the polls,' and
then came the .threatened deluge of
strikes, with a war cry: ' '''011 fight
Until ' we force an eight-hour atrree-
nient over : the state." Collier's Week-
lly. ,
JAPAN AS A NAVAL POWER
THE
CROWN
PR MCE
Short Sketch of the Heir Apparent
of the German Empire.
On.e of the Most Interesting: Voidb
Men of Europe Resemble His
Distinguished Father In
Maxy Ways.
She Draws Her Seamen From a Fish
ing copulation of 1 wo Million.
. i
In 1853 Queen Victoria presented , a
small steam yacht to 'the emperor of j
Japan, detailing some. British '; blue i
3SS to the duty of, instructing the t i great inheritance like the German
fve' -own is apt to weigh a trifle
took to handle the craft before-they heavy on youthful shoulders. The Ger-
had thoroughly learned "their, lesson, 'inan crown prince was only six years
and on -teir first voyage when they old when he became heir apparent, and
wanted to stop, they discovered that frdm that time the idea of his fu-
' they. had forgotten how this operation ture duties and responsibilities was al-
Avas performed. They therefore W9Vr knt hefnr him till the hov be-
Bieameu rouuu uua rounatno tiuif.ot
Yeddo until the fires, died down, and
then the yacht was towed home.
Since then Japan-has risen to the
position of ope of the greatest naval
powers; and her progress of recent
years ha been no tiling short of mar
velous. At the time of her war with
Clina Jier . whole , fleet displaced
about 30,000 tons; to-day the aggre
gate displacement is more than 250,
000 tons. Japan has a fishing 'Popuhi-
, tion of about 2,000,0ou men, and from
this section of the community she
draw's her seamen. Hitherto she has
been depending upon other countries
for the construction of uer vessels,
but the time Is near at hand when she
will be able to throw off the assist
ance of Jthe western world. Her arse
nals are already capable of building
protected cruisers and torpedo craft,
and a gun factory and armor plate
factory are now being established,
which will soon' be ready to begin'
work. ' 1
Her seamen are men of intelligence,
resource and sea lore," and capable of
quick v acquiring sufficient mechani
urns?
CROWN PRINCE WILLIAM.
came serious beyond his years. , Now, as
'NOTICE.
r.r.f " '
$6 worth, 60, Green Trading Stamps, with this order at75c
1 doz. best Oranges,
I ib. Chocolate Creams,
I lb. Butter, - - -
30c
20c
25c
ye give Green Trading Stamps with Sausage, Frank-r-
furters, ; Shoulders, Bacon, Salt Pork, Tripe,
Pickled Pigs Feet
GO;,
HE UNION SUPPLY
; 118 SOUTH MAIN ST. Telephone 711.4.
Waterville Delivery, Monday.
Naugatuck Delivery, Tuesday and Friday, -f
cal skill to enable them to control the yQ f rf 23 he ghoW8
TTwA ; 1: , marks of his rigid education, being of a
They desire no pampering and they quiet and thoughtful disposition and
can live on the skimpiest food and sleep ,still somewhat shy. ;..-, , ,
anywhere; but in iheir'new ships they With a father of such striking person
have more: air and in some respects, ality as Emperor William, the prince is
greater comforts than ane to be found naturally somewhat in the background,
on many, if not most, British men-ofr , Dut it is not from weakness of charac-
war.
These sailors of r the , east take
ter. The emperor, has always made a
with a stoical calm. They face iau- father and son are much alikeAin many
ger with much the same spirit with ways the stern sense of duty, military
which they take their-pleasure, and in tastes and love of sport, for instance.
nite of their rapid strides which civr As the future head of a soldier jiati on,
i'ization has : made in their country Prince William was encouraged in
their luxuries are" few, and they are things military from his very cradle,
contented -and happy. They are de- tradition relating that at 2 he insl6te4
voted to simple sports, to fencing and : sIeeping with a mini'ture rifle on his
ito acting; no one can ever forget the Tr u
dramatic entertainments on ? board raa; Hes was a delicate, slight boy, and
Japanese men-of-war - who has been made a tiny soldier indeed when he en
privileged to witness them. Nor a6es tered the Prussian foot, guards at - the
the memory soon become dim of one, .age of ten, according to, the custom or
of these ships - when decked ; out in
gala . dress ' with ' chrysanthemums
cherry blossoms and other blossom;
typical of Japan enlivening the' erim
-asnect of the docks. The men ' are
adepts ' in the' making of imitattqn
paper flowers, which so $osely resem
ble the handiwork of nature that at
a casual glance one hardly notices the
deception. 'North American Re
view. -! ;. '. V '::''.
German' princes. With his next brother,
Eitel Fritz, the crown prince worked
very hard, first at home in Potsdam, and
then at the college at Plon, in Schles
wigHolstein. Oh, finishing his course
there, Tthe prince went to Bonn, where he
thoroughly enjoyed university life, and
matriculated with due honors. . .
' It was whilst he was at Bonn that he
was besieged one day by a 'deputation
. r- -
of schoolgirls, who brought postcards
for him to sign. After .the prince had at
tained his majority -celebrated with
much ceremony at Berlin he came out
into the world by visiting foreign courts.
j The prince had often been in England,
where he was much liked by his great
grandmother. Queen Victoria, and when
over there the summer after her death
he ; was invested by King Edward with
the! order of the garter. .
j Last spring the prince and his brother;
Prince Eitel, made a tour in the east,
and came home by Rome, having an au
dience of the late Pope. Leo XIII. spoke
of the young prince as the pambino piu
grande-7-the eldest little boy, much to the
brother's amusement. . Now the prince
has settled down to military duty" in
Potsdam .with his guards' regiment, , ,
; The crown prince shows his English
origin by his love of outdoor life. He is
a crack rider, and has competed in sev
eral military races-r-hardly altogether to
his father's satisfaction, as the em
peror detests horse racing. But shoots
ing is his favorite pursuit not in big
court drives' but a quiel day's sport with
' only a forester '0 'in .attendance. Th
prince has been very successful in deer
stalking, and displays the utmost pa
tience in following his quarry. '
At home he proves his talent as a pi
anist, for all the" princes have been
s taught, some musical instrument, and
the emperor and empress are very fond
of quiet family; musical evenings at
Potsdam. . The question of the day is:
; "Who will the crown prince marry?"
He is a little susceptible, but the choice
of a wife is as yet in the balance.
Who's Your Plumber
Ten years experience in the plumb
ing business In Waterbury ' and . two '
years with a first class concern , in f
New York . enables 'me "to guarantee
first' class wo'k; : and at tbe lowest
prices. Estimates cheerfully fur-,
nlshed. v Jobbing a specialty. .
F. F. GARRITY,
53 BROOK STREET. .
,H;ii.iiii?!0.:''
THE NEW NERVE TONIC
AND KIDNEY CURE.
Cleane the Kidneys and Bladder, purine th
Blood. Puts Flesh on thin paopls. Strenrtbens
the Nerves. Clears the Bruin. , Cures Nervous
Debility, Inuomnla, FalllnR Memory. Restores
the Vim, Vigor, Vitality and Strength ol Youth. '
In both weak Men and Women. . '
This New Remedy "works like Magic, hut is ab
solutely harmless. Weigh yourself before taking. -PrloV
50 ots.j 12 boxes.' $5.00, by malL
We will cheerfully refund the money If you are '
dot bene4ttd. Try It and be convinced.
For ale at Nuient'sv Pharmacy.
; 25 centg will break no man, but
might gain many dollars for him. Just
try an ad in the. Democrat once. . ,
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OFFICERS
c-. JOHN F. DRYDEN. President.
Lesue Dj Ward. Edgar B. Ward.
1 - .,. Vico, President. , ) i Vice President.
FORREST F. DRYDEN, 3d Vice President.
Edward Kanouse.ji ' T. C E. Blanchard.
. Treasurer. Supt. of Real Estate.
Jacob E. Ward. , Wilbur S. Johnson.
Counsel. ' t . Comptroller,
i x F. C .BLANCHARD, Eupervifor Loan Department." ,
Edward Gray, Edward H. Hamill.
: . Secretary. Medical Director.
Valentine Riker. Robert L. Burragb.
; Assistant Secretary. Medical Director.
Leslie P. Ward. , John K. Gorb,
i - Assistant Secretary.' ' ! " i . Actuary.
WlLLARD I. HAMtLTON. ' FREDERIC A. BOYLE.
i ' Assistant Secretary. , , . Cashier.
Frederick H. Johnston, Associate Actuary.
Henry Overgne, George W. Munsick.
Supervisor. Supervisor.
WM. PERRY WATSON, Assistant Medical Director.
Frederick L Hoffman, statistician.
GEORGB H. KlRKPATRICK, Assistant Actuary.
1903
LIFE INSukANCE ISSUED AND PAID FOR, during
including, Ordinary Insurance ($102,822,648), over
ASSETS, en of 103, oyer - , - - " - - -INCOME,
durinsc iqo;, over - - -
PAID POLICYHOLDERS, during 1903, ovr - - -SURPLUS,
end of 1903, over - - - - , - -NUMBER
OF POLICIES IN FORCE 0,447,307), over -INCREASE
IN PAID-FQR -INSURANCE .IN FORCE, over,
. " MAKING THE GRAND TOTAL OF
Paio-for ins
. .
y ranee in rorce over
MILLIONS
. ' ' ' . .- ' ' ' ' ..
72 MILLIONS
39 MILLIONS
11 MILLIONS
10 MILLIONS
5 MILLIONS
12Si MILLIONS
lions
t 'V V"'" ...jv--v--T-Vi
VXr-. V-.-Jr -'-'-':-yfJr
,J. . '"'JFJT
. QsI . ' &XV.j&r
Xotal Paymciits to Policyholders -in Twenty-eiglit Years, over 79 Millions
HOME OFFICE ' , .,.,oJ k, .
BUILDINGS ) A '' NEWARK, N.J.
Twenty-eighth Annual Statement
January I, 1904.: " : t ;
$13,138,291 49
12,063,757 29
". ASSETS
Bonds and Mortgages, . .
Real Estate, . . I . . . .. .. .
R.R. Bonds and Stocks (Market Value) 20,862,307, 50
' . .- f 1 ' ' 'l. i'. .. :, ' .. .. .
'Municipal Bonds (Market Value) . '
U. S. Gov.. Bonds (Market Value) ,
Cash in Banks and Office .
Interest and Rents, due and accrued
Loans on Collateral Securities, . .
' Loans on Policies, . ... . . .
Premiums Deferred and
collection (net), . .
in course of
8,428,728 00
109,500 00
7,6lO,I48 2Z'
. 488,591 45
5,761,775 00
1,614,325 08
2,635,009 41
Total, . . . v - . .
LIABILITIES
Reserve on Policies, . . . ... .
All other Liabilities, . ... .
Surplus to Policyholders, . . . . : .
: Total, . . . . -.
. $72,712,435 44
., ( ' '
. . $61,410,965 00
1,167,445 81
. 10,134,024 63
. $72,712,435 44
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THE LIFE INSURANCE SUCCESS OF THE AGE
THE BEST IN LIFE INSURANCE AT LOW COST
POLICIES FOR BOTH SEXES
AMOUNTS TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS
')''. UP TO $100,000
Virlte for
Information
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IIS3
URANCE CO. OF AMERICA
BRANCH OFFICES IN WATERBURY AND VICINITY : '
g T. p. FORMAN, SwperiMtesMdeMt, Room 8, 43 East Main StWafearbu
j J. P. NASH, Ass't Sup't, Room S, Lilley K Conn.
, J. H. WIIiLI AMS, Ass't Sup't, Rdom 1, Norton Block, 535 Main St., Winsted, Conn.
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Agents
Wanted

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