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Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1903-1917, January 26, 1907, Image 1

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VOL. XX, NO. 43.
WATERBURY, CONN.. SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1907.
PRICE TWO CENTO.
MAURA IS WEAK
TURNING OUT
CASE WILL GO ON
MILtNOl
DESTROYED
SESSION CLOSES
MYSTERIOUS
1 ,.'-,.
CONGRATULAHOrj
Emperor William Please! ti
Chancellor Von Bnelow's Dis
solution of Partfaraecf
So Klsg Alfonso Has Suspended
SHOOTING
Demurrer In the Famous Rebate
Cases; at St Pan! Were
Overruled This Morning
Effort to Extend Right of Fran
; chise to All Adults, Women
as Well as Men
. . (he Sessions of Parliament
In the lleanlbne
Fifty of Them Examined In the
Thaw Case and Only Six
Jurors
Big Fire In Dover This Horn
ing Which Will Canse Loss
of About $600,000
Dr Townsend Shot This Morn
A NEW ELECTION
ing While Laying In Bed
at His Home
WIN FOR G0VERM1ENT
BARDIE AN OBJECTOR
APPEAL TO COlWffiY
Madrid, Jan 26. King Alfonso to
day Issued a decree suspending the
sessions of parliament, as It had be
come evident that Senor Maura, the
conservative leader, who formed
cabinet yesterday, with himself as
premier. could not command a ma'
jorlty in the chambers. . X
An early submission of the issue
between church and state to the peo
pie, through a dissolution of parlia
ment and new elections, is the only
means of clearing up the situation
The clericals and the reactionaries
are jubilant, as the mere fact of the
conservatives being In power will
give them a great advantage at the
polls.
CLERGYMAN DEAD.
Rav Henry Martyn Field, Who Was
Also an Author.
Stockbrldge, Mass. Jan 26. Kev
Henry . Martyn Field. the well
known clergyman and author, and 'or
years editor or the Evanglist of
Pew York, died' at his home here car
ly to-day, after an illuess of several
weeks. Death was due to a gcnoral
" breakdown . Incident to old age. ,
Mr Field was born In Stockbrldge
April 3, 1822, and was graduated
from Williams college in 1838. After
studying theology he became pastor
of a presbytetian church in St Louis
iu 1842. Five years later he went
abroad and on bis return in 1850, be--
t-raine a pastor in West Springflold.
In 1854 ho removed to New York city
to assume charge of the Evanglist.
He was the author of several books
of travel, as well as of biographies of
bis famous brothers, Cyrus W. Field,
who laid the first Atlantic cable, and
David Dudley Field, law reformer.
Another brother, Stephen J. Field,
was .a member of the supreme court
of the United States for 34 years. Mr
Field was married, but' had no chil
dren. His wife survives, and was
with blra at the time of bis death. He
spent thu last lew years of his life iu
Stockbrldge. . ... .... .
. SAYS NO OPPOSITION.
flepmeutaUve Goodrich Talks About
County Commissioner Geddes.
1 Representative A. I. Goodrich was
asked to-day concerning the report
that there is a vigorous opposition to
the renomination of Colonel James
E. Geddes for county commissioner,
and he said that the rumor Is with
out foundation. So far as he was
aware, Mr Goodrich stated that he
knew of no opposition to the renom
ination of the colonel, at least In the
county caucus, and he did not be
lieve that Governor Woodruff had
any feeling against him.
The report has been broadcast In
New Haven and some of the lobby
travelers In the Capitol made It their
business to spread it there, so that
in the course of a day it was gen
erally rumored that the colonel from
Waterbury was going to have trou
ble.
Governor Woodruff has Involved
himself with rumor alao In the pro
ject to have all county commissioners
nominated by the governor hereafter.
It is said that he has seen the ad
visability of showing to the public
that he has no desire to centralize
authority in the governorship and
to that end it is reported that he will
request that nominations for county
commissioners be taken from the
table next Tuesday.
Coal Train Struck Trolley.
Worden. 111. Jan 26. The trolley
pole left the wire as an electric car
of the Illinois Traction system was
crossing the Litchfield and Madison
railroad track last night and a mo
ment later a coal train struck the
car In the middle. Five passengers
were injured, the electric car waa
wrecked and the locomotive and nine
loaded cars went into the ditch. The
electric car was Oiled with passen
gers, all of whom except those In
jured managed to get oat before the
train struck the car.
Held for Postage.
Alton, 111. Jan 2. A letter ad
dressed to Mrs Theodore Roosevelt
is being held at the Upper Alton post
office because the writer neglected to
place a postage Btamp on the en
velope. Postmaster Belts has sent a
formal notice to Mrs Roosevelt that
the letter will be forwarded whe,n
the necessary 2 cents are remitted.
Hotel Burned.
Montreal. Jan SR. A hotel and a
number of store In the village of Kt.
Vincent de Paul were burned to-day,
canning the lora eetlmated at fTaMMk
There was much excitement among
tbe prisoners In the penitentiary lo
cated near the burning bulkllng.
WEATHOL FORECAST.
Forecast for Connecticut: Snow
to-night; Sanday fair rn south, snow
followed by clearing In north por
tion: colder daring evening and
night; brisk to high north to north
west winds.
Boston. Jan SC. The weather bu
reau to-day issued the folknriag
torm warning: Northwest storm
warning at It a. an. All Xew Eng
land nectSuue Mm us on south Al
ias tie coast will more northeast;
wind with Increasing fore canning
strong to high northerly to easterly
to-nigat and Sunday. ,
THE JURORS UTTERS
Are Opened and Read Before React
tag the Men Thus Far Selected
, to Sit in tbe Celebrated
Case. , ; -: ,
New York, Jan 26. Three days of
the trial of Harry K. Thaw have
passed and the net work of all this
time has been the selection of seven
jurymen. To get these seven jurors
101 talesmen, half of the panel drawn
have been examined. While die law
yers engaged have got so that the ex
amination of the talesmen consumes
less time than was taken In tbe early
stages of the trial, the talesmen them
selves have become more wary, ap
parently, and the excuses put forward
for not serving are varied and ingen
ious. It is possible that the remain
ing Ave jurors needed will be found
in tbe 100 talesmen still awaiting ex
amination, but If yesterday's proceed
ings are any criterion this is doubt
ful. Fifty men were examined yesterday
and from this number two jurors was
secured. Five were drawn from tho
first fifty talesmen examined. '
The chief reason for the general
desire not to serve is probably found
Iu tbe order of Justice Fitzgerald
practically locking up tbe jurymen
from the time they are drawn uutll
tbe trial is over. This is an unusual
proceedings and, as most of the tales
men are active business men, it in
volves . possible financial loss, beside
the hardship.
About the. only - physical , exercise
tbe jurymen selected enjoy , now , or
are likely to enjoy for some weeks is
tbe little walk twice dally, accompan
ied by court officers, to and from the
Iiroadway Central hotel and the court
bouse. Tbe men are practically pris
oners. They dine together and then
spend the evening in chatting until
they retire.
; Every letter that la sent to tbe jur
ors is opened and read by Police Cap
tain W. J.' Lym-IT who has immediate
personal charge of the Jurymen. This
Is not done With the mall of prisoners
in tbe tombs. No newspapers that
have in. them any reference to tbe
trial or tragedy are permitted.
Captain Lynch cuts out these parts
of tbe newspapers that refer to the
case and the Jurors have to be con
tent with tbe censorship, Even the
books and magazines are subjected to
the same sort of scrntiny.
Tbe men are comfortably housed at
the hotel, seventeen rooms, with
baths, a private dining room, uav
ing been engaged for them. Tbe Jur
ors so far selected are accepting the
situation in a philosophical spirit and
with the utmost good nature.
The plans of tbe defence, while
they have not definitely developed.
are still believed to be tbose whicu
hav been generally phopuesled emo
tional Insanity and an appeal to tbe
so-called "higher" law. Only the
faintest Indication iu this direction
has appeared at the trial thus far and
that wan yesterday when Clifford W.
Hartridge, chief counsel for Thaw,
asked n prospective juror this ques
tion:
'Would yon take into consideration
all tbe evidence tending to show the
conditlou of this mans (Thaw's)
mind at the time of tbe killing of
Stanford Whiter
There were rumors In the court yes
terday that there had been a serious
disagreement among the member of
Thaw's family.
The report started wnen Harry
Thaw's wife and Miss Mae MeKensIe,
her constant companion. , arrived at
the court house some time before Mrs
William Thaw, and Mrs Carnezte,
mother and sister of the prisoner. The
gomlp was Intensified wben it was
noted that though Mrs William Thaw
sat near her daughter-in-law, the tmo
apparently took no notice of each oth
er all through tbe day.
Lawyer Hartridpe, when hi at
tention was railed to the gossip, took
occasion to deny that there bad been
any disagreement between member
of hi client family.
Predict Failure.
Paris. Jan 2 (.The clerical news
papers predict that the attempt of
Archbishop Vilatte. head of the la-
dependent Catholic church In Ameri
ca, and Father Rouasla. pariah priest
of the church of the Holly Apostle,
to organise n national French Cath
olic church. I doomed to be n com
plete failure. The archbiahop la
termed as schismatic and Father
Rowsain Is classed as an apostate.
Krnator Alger's Kunrrai.
Washington, Jan J. In accord
ance with the wishes of himself nnd
family, the faneral services over the
late Senator Alger, held at the fam
ily renMeuce In this city at X o'clock
this afternoon, were verr simple. The
sen ken were conducted by the late
senator's friend nnd former pastor.
Rev Dr Raacliffe of New York and
Rev Dr Hale, chaplain of the United
State senate.
Ataa of
Madrid, Jan . The Liberal.
foreseeing the withdrawal of the nro-
i tew of aaaoetatlona. declares
that Its ennetanest win eentlnnc to
he tan siaa at tan rennslicaae.
St Paul, Minn, Jan 20 An opinion
was filed in the United States dis
trict court in Minneapolis to-day ov
erruling the demurrers to the indict
ments in the rebate cases recently
brought by the government against
the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis &
Omaha, the Great Northern, the Wis
consin Central, and the Minneapolis
& St Louis railroads. Tbe cases will
now go to taril on the Indictments at
the April term of court
WARNS THE ELKS.
Mayor Fisher Says He Will Enforce
, the Lottery Law.
. Mlddletown, Jon 20. Mayor Fisher
to-day sent a letter calling the atten
tion of J. T., exalted ruler of the Elks
to the law govering the disposal of
article of lottery. The Elks are to
hold a fair next month and the tick
ets issued call for articles between
twenty and twenty-five In number to
go to the tlcket-houder. Mayor Fish
er asys he has many warm, personal
friends in the Elks, .but this, must not
stand In the way of enforcing the
laws as be sees them. The mayor
was to have opened the fair but Ex
alted Ruler Flynn says the invitation
will be withdrawn.'
SLAUGHTER AT GRODNO,
Twelve Killed la Fights Between
Terrorists, Police and Troopa.
GltODNO, ttussla, Jan. 2G.--As a re
sult of a general exchange of shots be
tween the authorities and a number
of terrorists on. the streets of Grodno
five policemen,, a .prison warden and
one terrorist were killed and a num
ber of persons were wounded.
The trouble started when two men,
without warning, shot and killed a
prison warden. The assailants fled,
one of them taking refuge in a church
.ml Vl a nth.. In A n,llrnt. Iinnaa ItiA..
were pursued by the police, and three
policemen, who had effected the arrest!
of tbe man In tbe church, were attack
ed by the assembled crowd, fired upon
and killed. Tbe terrorist escaped.
The police then proceeded to th
bouse where, the second man had hid
den, and as they approacheffthe bnfiir
Ing be opened fire and killed two of bit
pursuers.1 At this stage of the fighting
troops were called out and fired a vol
ley, killing the man who had hidden in
tbe house and wounding several pass
ersby. At Lodz, Russian Poland, a band ol
terrorists shot and killed a policeman
and two soldiers who were accompany.
Ing him on the streets. A patrol al
once retaliated by firing a volley down
tbe street. Two passershy were killed
and aereral were wounded. The mur
dcrers escaped. , '
A Cure For Leprosy. ,
HAVANA, Jan. 28. A commission
appointed by the government has turn
ed In a report to tbe effect that Dr.
Matiaa Duque, who is in chare of th
Hospital For Contagious diseases
probably has discovered a cure for lep
rosy. Two lepers were turned over to
the doctor several year ago for experi
mental purposes, and now these per
on have no exterior traces of th
disease and are gaining notably In
weight Several other case treated by
Dr. Duque are In various stages of iru
provement Dr. Duque' experiment!
have been along tbe line of what h
term the ted mangrove tree" treat
ment
Bartkaaka at MIMIetowu.
MIDDLETOWN. N. Y, Jan. 20. -Fonr
earth tremor, distinct and severe
enough to cause bujldlnga to tremble
and startle the occupants, were felt
In this city and vicinity yesterday. Tbe
vibration were first credited to blast
ing operations, but upon Inquiry It
could not be learned that any work re
quiring the use of explosives was be
Ing done nearby. Report received In
dicate that tbe tremors were perreptl
ble at many point within a radius of
fifteen mlk of ti Htr.
Passengers Were Scared.
The passengers on the car which
arrived at Highland park about 12:10
tnls noon were given n big scare, aa
the ear which had been smoklng
slightly waa seen to be on lire, and !
ins passengers, tninaing mat tiie ear turned back to the window. Con
was going to go up In smoke, made! nor staled that he had stumbled
rash to get out. Word waa sent
to the North Willow street firemen
snd although there was much smoke
unaerneain in car wnen tney ar
rived. In n abort time they eitln-
gutshe the blase by mean of chemi
cal. The ear was No it sad was
burned to such an extent that the
trip to the 'vill could not be fin
ished and the car had to be towed
back to the nam.
Re-atorfcrd With Antelope.
San Franctsco. Jan 26. A dispatch
from Los Asgeles to-day ears: The
southwestern deserts nnd the forest
festrvss of this region are to be re
stocked with antelope, to be brought
from Africa. Private capital has al
ready been secured for the purpose,
and the pro pert. It Is stated. Is al
ready under way. It in Intended to
secure n specie of nntelope that
tart Tea in tbe hot desert regions and
are able to lire a long way from
water. In former days nsteioDes
la southern OJlfor-
THE WORKERS JUMPED
A Number of Them Were Badly
blared and It is Now Thought
'"."' That Some ; Lives Were
v I Lost.
Dover, N. H., Jan 26. Mill No 1,
of the extensive plant of the Cocheco
Manufacturing company, in this city,
was burned to-day, causing a finan
cial damage estimated at between
$500,000 and $600,000, and possible
loss of . life. The fire broke out af
ter the 500 operatives had gone to
work, from a cauBe not yet deter
mined. The flames spread very
rapidly and a number of the work
men jumped from windows and sustained-
injuries. Others were taken
from the windows in the upper stor
ies. Persons thus rescued reported
that some had been overcome by
smoke in the burning building and
the firemen ' immediately began
search which was without result un
til the flames drove them outside the
walls. Meanwhile officials of tbe
mill were busy trying to locate all
employes. , ; ;
Although the location of the ruin,
which faces Washington street, a
wide thoroughfare and Is surround
ed on three sides by a bend In tbe
Cocheco river, there was lltle danger
of damage to other property, help
waa called from Portsmouth to
augment the private : force of the
manufacturing company, . and the
Dover department. The combined
corps, however, .could not gain con
trol until the flames bad begun to
die out for want of fuel. Little ex
cept tbe walls of the structure were
left.
Officials of the corporation stated
that the mill was one of the best
equipped of the plant, and that the
loss. Including damage to stock and
machinery would reach at least
$500,000. The loss la practically
covered by Insurance.
... . T.go of the men who jumped from
the fourth floor were taken to -the
Wentworth hospital seriously, hurt,
and a dozen others were treated for
hurts of. a less, serious nature. The
most badly hurt were:
William Turner, mule spinner;
broken hip.
i James Ashton, mule spinner, both
legs broken.
. The fire started from a hot box
in the spool room, and before, the
frightened employes could make any
effort to extinguish it the flames
spread to the spinning room - and
swept through the big mill. There
were no fire escapes In the place and
the panic stricken employes made a
wild rush for the exits. Those on
the lower floor generally managed
to get out through the doors or the
windows, but those on the fourth
'and fifth floors were not so fortunate.
Employe on the fifth floor rushed
to tbe fourth In large numbers and
finding that smoke and flames cut
off their exit down the stairway
many leaped from the window to
the frozen ground. - Some of the
cooler headed ones remembered there
were ropes In the room placed there
for emergency and attaching these
to the window frames slid down
rapidly, burning the skin off their
hands In so doing.
While the firemen were busy In
getting their forces Into an ad
vantageous position for fighting the
flames and helping out tbe people
on the lower stories four men
crouched at an open window on the
upper floor gasping for air for near
ly two hours before they were dis
covered. An extension ladder was
raised, but the Imprisoned men near
ly unconscious from the smoke did
not dare to venture down this sway
ing path to safety, and realising
their peril. Captain McDonald and
Lieutenant Bradley of the fire de
partment sprang up the ladder and
by their skill and wordi of encour
agement guided the four men down
to the ground. The seen thus saved
were James Connors, Jame Darlen,
Harris Hcuroae. and John Boutler.
Connors said they had been there
ever since the fire started. He tried
to make his war down the stairs.
but he found hi way blocked and
'over what he believed an h u.
'conscious Demons. Tba flrm. h...
jrled to Investigate, and bring down
any who might be cut off.
Ms Dead la Ruins.
At J o'clock this afternoon the
police discovered the bodies of alx
boys In the ruins. They had been
charred beyond recognition. The
boys had been employed la the male
room.
Marriott Will Recover.
Ormosd. Fla. Jan 26. Fred Mar
riott, who waa seriously lajnred yes
terday when his racing aatomobile
wss wrecked while pluagiag along
Ormond-Dnytona beach at a apeed of
nearly 1 JS mt!es nn hour, passed n
fairly comfortable alght aad probably
will recover. It waa feared at first
that the driver had sustained Inter
nal lajuries, but no Indication of
aaythiag of that kind has developed
as yet- He is badly cut aad bruised,
however, aad his retatwy probably
will be alow.'
' Belfast, Ireland, Jan 26. A reso
lution in favor of the extension of the
franchise to all adult men and wo
men was carried at to-day's session
of the conference of the labor party
of the United Kingdom by 605,000
to 268,000 votes represented. - This
was an amendment to the original
resolution which favored the exten
sion of the right of election to wo
men as well as tbe right to vote.
James Kier Hardie, M. P., who was
an upholder of the original proposal,
declared that if the resolution adopt
ed was intended to limit the action
of the labor party in parliament he
would be obliged to seriously con
sider whether he could remain a
member of the party.
After the adoption o resolutions
in favor of substituting arbitration
for war as a preliminary to universal
disarmament and in support of a na
tional education policy, education to
be under full popular control, and
the whole cost of the system to be
met from the imperial treasury, the
conference closed.
, IT WAS BLAKESIEE DAY.
Thousands of Children Lined Up for
Annual Bide.
Ralph N. Blakeslee's anniftl
sleighride to the children of Water-
bury took place this afternoon and
was a success away and beyond the
most sanguine expectations of even
Mr Blakeslee himself, who figured on
entertaining 6,000, but the number
of boys and girls in the 116 large two
horse sleighs must have exceeded
that, but as a matter of fact. It would
be hard to get at exact figures. Mr
Blakeslee and family rode at the
head of the procession and occasion
ally blew a horn that made a noise
which must have been heard all over
town,
People flocked - from all sections
and when the procession started the
sidewalks were thronged with sight
seers and seme say that more people
were in Exchange place at that time
than ever before, not even excepting
circus day. Most of the teams be
longed to Mr Blakeslee ana the rest
were furnished by the factories and
others, one or two being in line from
Naugatuck and one marked "Bristol
Star."
. The weather conditions were just
right and tbe youngsters were in
their glory. .They yelled "what's the
matter with Blakeslee?" and an
swered "He's all right" until they
were hoarse, hollored at those whom
they recognized on the streets and
appeared to have the time of their
lives. Considering the number of
children on hand they behaved re
markably well, much better than on
former occasions so that in addition
to Increasing in numbers the boy
and girls of Waterbury are making
headway along the lines which all
who have an interest in their wel
fare want to see them. It was a
wonderful sight and in another yea"
or so the shops will want to shut
down when Blakeslee day come
around so that the hands may have
an opportunity to get out and take
In the sights. It is now admitted
on all sides that Blakeslee has
Barnum beaten a mile and from now
on the occasion will be down on the
calendar as Blakeslee Day.
Several of the policemen who are
on duty during the night volunteered
their services to Mr Blakeslee and
along the line of march aaw to It
that everyth'ng was carried out In
the proper manner.
IV THE COURTS.
Maa In Jail on Charge of Alienating
Wife' Affections.
Christine Tiherio. who was taken
to jail a few day asn in default of
bail In a suit for danism Tor
alienating the affections of the wife
of Michael Petriona, of Mattatm-k
street s still in detention and the jail
authorities have rcnueoted Attumey
Peasloy. counsel for Petmnia to send
a check for next week' board fur tbe
TIIero. Tbe check was sent to-day
and Tibetio 1 good for another w-ek
In Jail. The complaint aay that Ti
berlo entered Petronlo'a bonne during
hi alMence. took away Mr Petmnio
and thus alienated her affections.
Tbe snit I returnable to tbe diwtrict
court the first Tuesday In February
and Tlberlo will bare to remain in
Jail until then unless he provides n
bond or Pctronio get tired of paying
his board.
The suit of tlie International Book
company againt J. V. Kcnlly was
heard in the dixtrfc-t court to-day l.y
Judge Pealey. Kcully contracted for
a svrie of lemons In a cnrrepotxl(t.t
erfannL He wished te learn tbe art
of window drewing. and after taking
few leason It eeem he got tired
and defined to take any more, thus
rtolarlng bis sgreem-nta.
Patrick Buckler was arrested this
after boob at his boarding house. 315
West Main street, as he was causing
a disturbance, aad giving his board
ing miit res much annoyaace.
Buckley was uader the weather aad
wss looking for trouble, aad was not
at all particular whom he bumped
Into. He made such a racket la tbe
house that It was thought advisable
for the safety of the other ores past
to have him arrested.
iTCnra bstocxat stlu tzj
REVENGE WAS MOTIVE
Hundreds of Dollars Worth of Jewelry
and Silverware Lying Around
But the Assassin Did Not
Disturb It.
New York, Jan 26. Dr Charles
W. Townsend, one of the best known
physicians and surgeons on Staten
Island was shot and probably mortal
ly wounded while lying in bed in
his home at New Brighton, S. 1.,
early to-day. The case is surround
ed by mystery, but from the meagre
details which have been permitted
to leak out by the officials it is ue
lieved that the doctor was the victim
of a man who sought vengeance
from some real or fancied great
wrong. That it was not the act of
a burglar, as was first believed, ap
pears to be borne out by the fact
that not a single article was taken
from the house although hundreds
of dollars worth of jewelry and sil
verware was within easy reach.
This also Is believed to be borne out
by stories which have been told the
coroner by both Dr Townsend and
his wife. Mrs Townsend witnessed
the shooting. The coroner has de
cllned to make known any of the in
formation obtained from Dr Town
send and his wife. He declares that
to do so would tend to defeat the
end of justice. It is inferred that
the identity of the assailant is at
least suspected and that tbe officials
hope to make an early arrest.
Dr Townsend and his wife were
awakened shortly before 4 o'clock
this morning by a sound in their
sleeping room, and a moment later
they were startled by the flash of a
match which revealed a man holding
the" lighted match in one ban'd and
a revolver in the other. Levelling
the revolver at Doctor Townsend the
Intruder ordered him to arise at once
and then, without waiting a moment
fired. The bullet grazed tbe doctor's
body and buried Itself fn the bed
clothes. Another shot followed almost in
stantly, the bullet entering the doc
tor's abdomen and piercing the In
testines. -
A third lodged near the doctor's
heart producing a wound, which.
In Itself, may result fatally."
, The assailant then ran down stairs
and escaped but how he got out of the
house is not known as every door
and window was closed when help
arrived. When Mrs Townsend tried
to call assistance she found that two
of the three telephone wires leading
to the house had been cut. The third,
which was in the doctor's office In
the lower part of the house, ap
parently had been overlooked.
Over this wire a servant in the
stable was notified of the shooting
and word also was given the police.
While awaiting the police Mr Town-
send who herself la a physician.
dressed the doctor's wound and pre
pared for the operation which she
knew was instantly necessary in the
effort to save his life. It 1 feared,
however, that even with the prompt
attention the wound will prove
fatal.
The police were unable to find any
trace of the assailant. AH the doors
and window were locked and no
mark had been left by the fugitive.
The coroner however appears to be
satisfied that the man will soon be
apprehended.
The Townsend home I in the
residential section of New Brighten,
scarcely half a mile from the home
of Charles L. Spear which, not more
than a year ago was the scene of a
tragedy strangely like that of to
day. Spear waa ahot In his home
during the night and died from his
wound. It was at first believed that
he had been tbe victim of n burglar
but an Investigation proved that he
had taken his own life.
In the Townsend house at the time
of tbe shooting there were. In ad
dition to the doctor and hla wife,
the doctor's aged mother and his
four children. All of them occupied
sleeping rooms In the upper part of
the house.
Salome Is Protested.
New Tork. Jan 2C A protest
against the further presentation of
'Salome has been made to Director
Conreid of tbe Metropolitan opera
house by the owners of the honse.
(1TY
Ob Wednesday evening the Big
Seven Social club will give their
sixth annual sociable and dance at
Eagles bail. AH arrangements have
beea completed and the affair prom
ises to be one of tbe best events ever
given by tbe organization.
The members of the Holy Name so
ciety of the Parted Heart rfcurvn sre
reipetl to meet mfiZM this eteu'nc;
ia rhnrru banraient to make arraasr
meats to attend the fum ral nf tb-Hr
Iste brother. I tennis Kearny, tbe un
ion committee sre enriiany invited to
be present nt that hour.
Division No 4. A. O. H . at a meet
ing Thursday nicbt. derided to hold
Installation of officers on February
14. Coaaty Prewdeat McCarthy will
be present a-;d Install the oflkera. A
sociat session wtH follow the Installa
tion ceremonies, la which ail Hi
ke raia a are cordially lartted.
Berlin, Jan 2ff. Emperor William
called on Chancellor Von Buelow ear
ly to-day and congratulated him on
the soundness of his Judgment in dis
solving the reichstag and appealing to
the country on an Important question
of national policy. The emperor
throughout the campaign did not at
tempt by word or act to influence the
result, yet, as everyone knew, be was
Intensely interested in the issue, and
especially regarding the manner Iu
which the country would treat the
colonial (luestion and hnw th annal
ists would emerge from the conflict.
j.aier uis majesty took bis usual
morning walk In th Th r (TO tfor and
then returned to the chancellor's pal-
ace in oruer to discuss the latest re
turns. The nmneror ramp nnr (iw.
palace smiling and seemingly In the
best of humor, almost gaily acknowl
edging the salutations of the waiting
crowd. Kmneror VVlliinm win tw a
years old to-morrow and some one res
marnea tnat tne country had givau
him a fine hirthilnv
ing the growth of Red Republlcan-So J
Traffic Interrupted. -Madrid.
Jan 26 Railroad trsffla.
in Spain has been seriouaiv intAn.
rupted at various places owing to aa
unpreceaenteaiy neavy fall of snow.
Why do some school
children with good
sight need glasses 7
MAINLY TO REST THE EYES.
The ev does not obtain Its full
growth until the aire of twelve, and
during the growing age our modern
education is apt to tax it beyond Its
powers..
Proper glasses will rest the ev in
their work.
UPSON,
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
Boom One. 70 Bank St
(Over tbe Upson Jewelry Co.)
AT THE HAMPSON-SELLEW ST0B2
ANNUAL
CLEARING SALE
All Through the Store
are
RED TAGS
Which Mean
1
25 Discount
There's Splendid pickings
cf fine furniture to be had it
a big discount now that our,
annual clearing sale Is on
BUY
FURNITURE NOV.
Prices are going to ba
higher next season as lumber
is getting scarce and labor and
all rav material of every d
scriptlon Is taking a jump.
n
lot to Zdi A Eula,
111-113 ti CL
Mr-,

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