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Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume] (Waterbury [Connecticut]) 1903-1917, December 31, 1908, Image 4

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WATERBDUY. EVENING DEMOCRAT. . TIIUKSDAV; DECE.MHKH 3t. 1U08.
THE CITY COURT
BOARD OF SAFETY
V
The Curran t)ry Goods Company sales are most carefully prepared and each
i, day increase in strength as they are commented upon.
This Whitg Sale has set the town astir the stocks asssembled for it are im
mense ajid fine they spread through the greater part of the second floor
and overflow to the main fioor.
Undermuslins in Endless Array
Sheetings, Linens and Household Cottons by the yard, Ready-Made
Sheets and Pillow Cases in great quantities.
"NOW IS YOUR TIME TO PURCHASE"
"NOW IS YOUR TIME TO ECONOMIZE WITHOUT SACRIFICING QUALITY."
See To-Morrow NigHt's Advertisement.
THE CURRAN DRY GOODS CO.
Fancy
Red Onions
5c Quart. 35c PecK
We have just received 50 bushels
from Father Duesler, and they are
fine, cured well and will keep well,
too.
If you prefer the red onion,
(which a great many do), don't get
left on this sale, but buy now.
DUESLER BROS.
PEOPLE'S MARKET.
'Phone 469. 21 Phoenix Avenue.
BIG REDUCTIONS
ON ALL HATS
You save money if you
buy now and at this store.
Special prices on Ostrich
feathers.
Allard & Blanchette.
124 South Main Street.
V
i 17ATITFO -
YLUUd me
same, prices much
lower.
is our present shopping" ituluee
inpiit to .Millinery buyers.
F. L. MARKS a Co., Inc.
MILLINERS.
10") liratd 102 Hank
Successors to . F. COWLES.
Vwwwwiwwwwwwwmww
People Whose Oarbag;
, la neglected will end quick rails! by
ending a. postal or railing by telo-
RIGNEY. WATER VTLLE.
HOLIDAY TUTORING
( 'olioifi'. Hitli Sclmol or iramniar
iraiU' Sunlit--.
II. S. (.1 LI.1VKR, M. A. (Yale),
51 Walnut St. Tel. 2229.
PLUMBING.
PROMPT ATTENTION OUR MOTTO
Let ns furnish an estimate
on your next job. We will
tare money for you : : :
D. F. McCarthy,
The Plumber,
BOYS C LUB BUILDING,
24 Cottage Place Telephone 1209
V
E. M
r i
Throngs Attended the Opening of
The Blue Ribbon
White Event
"The Prize Sale
of the Season.5'
The Great White Sales are now
under way and the best of all adver
tising for us has begun The com
ments of those who have been here,
seen the goods, purchased and re
turned home to praise them.
To
-morrow
I
Special to New
Year's Buyers
Bot. Port )
05 rear, price
for the three.
Special New
Year's Price
Bot. Sherry
This offer holds good only
until closing time Saturday
evening.
Store closes at noon Xe
Year's Day.
Woodruff Grocery Co.
'Phone 464.
may
The United Gas Improvement Company.
NOTICE.
The Board of Relief of thp city of
j Waterbury will meet in the at'-
sessors' office, room 10, dry hall,
'Saturday, Jan 2. 1309. at 9 a. m..
j for the purpose of hearing appeals
from the doings of the Hoard of
Assessors and Equalization and to
1 transmit any other business that may
properly come before said Board.
Hours for hearings 9 to 12 A. M.,
2 to and 7 to 9 P. M.
.JOHN F. GARREN
WILLIAM BOWE. '
ROBERT PALMER.
Board of Relief.
" THINK OF GREEN "
FOR CHRISTMAS GIFTS,
i we have a large and varied stork of
Diamonds. Wat' hes. Jewelry. Silver
! ware. Cut Glass and many other ar
ticles in latest designs and patterns
suitable for Christmas gifts. Prices 1
I lowpr than elsewhere. Money cheer
' fully refunded If goods prove not as
represented. Come and look us over i
before purchasing. '
M. A. GREEN,
j Buckingham DTd'g. 200 Bank St. j
Established 1S98.
i
STORE WILL BE CLOS
ED ALL DAY-but this
big sale will be resumed
with renewed energy Sat
urday morning.
We Wish You a Happy and
Prosperous New Year
and suggest ag one way of attaining
It. BUY YOUR PICTURES AND
FRAMES OF CURTIS ART CO. as
we will be better prepared than ever
during the coming year to supply
your wants in pictures and rrames,
also enlargements from amateur or
professional photos, portraits from
daguerreotype, card, invitation, and
announcement engraving.
The Curtis Art Co.
135 BANK STREET.
IMPORTED MUNCHEN LARGER
BEER.
Fine Variety of Delicatessen Lunch
at All Hours.
DRESCHES & XELL.
16 and 18 Harrison Ave.
A Gas Heating
Stove
be connected in any room, can i
easily be carried to any part of the
house where instant heat is required;
is capable of being regulated to just
the heat you need.
Heater, Tube and
Cock, $1.50.
FOR SAL.I BY
.1. Q. JACKLE & SONS, 7S BANK ST.
FOR MEN
MiA0e
honest ALL
THRO oo
$3.50, $4 and $5
4. $2.50 JCX
y$&3Sr Women K (oel
92.QO WDEMARI
"Hfrwod Bunion" thoe for mm and women ....
"Hwriion" ho? for boys . S1.7S&I2 "Bjirdman" shoe for girli
J. G Jackie & Sons.
WE WISH YOU ALL ,
A HAPPY 1NEW B.R
And thank you for the biggest Chr stmas
trade in our history. .
B. Holczer,
199 South Main Street.
is that everything we sell is exactly as represent
ed and as good as can be bought
APOTHECARIES HALL CO.
iMMMMHMMMMMMMWMMIMtMMMWIiMMMtMitHMMMMIMIIV
Ladies !
If you are looking for StylUh
and Becoming Hats at Surpris
ing Prices, come down to lower
Bank street to the old estab
lished original
Freedman's
Bargain Millinery
265 Bank Street.
P. S. Remember the place
as we are not connected with
any other stores by same name.
Second-Hand
PIANOS
At Trices You Can't Resist.
Terms to Suit.
Ask to See the
Weber, Poole, or Liszt,
that we are Sacrificing.
Get in Quick if you can appreciate a
BARGAIN.
The
Driggs and Smith Co.
112 BANK STREET.
Give your feet a rest. Wear In
dian Slippers, made for service and
shaped for comfort. Real Indian
designs. You must see them to ap
preciate their usefulness and value.
Drop in and look them over.
-THE-
CO
52 Bank St.
BARON J. TORKOMIAN, .
REAL ESTATE Eought. Sold, Ex
changed, Loans Negotiated.
109 Bank Street. Room 12.
Start the New
Year
by wearing these famous shoes.
Y ithout a doubt t hpvre the Iiest
shoes made for the money. We
"u- wn,B ,or tnem w m,s
. . 14
$1 to $1.50
75 BANK STREET
Hiawatha I li
Pocahontas I
We beg to acknowledge
with thanks the many
courtesies and liberal
patronage you have ex
tended us during the
past year.
We wish you a Happy
and
Prosperous
New
Year, Store will be
closed all day.
11i1.fi South Main.
BROOKLYN SHEETS.
We wish you a happy and prosper
ous New Year. Upson, Singleton & Co.
The Daughters of Ruta will givs
:t dance this evening in the hall at
103 Green street.
Russell Quinn of Niagara col
lege is spending a few days at his
home on Alder street.
The ice polo game between the
Brooklyn business men and the All
Brooklyn team will start at 3 o'clock
to-morrow afternoon. Weather per
mitting the game will be played at
Tracy's.
Dr George W. Russell, who li
abroad is at present In Vienna. Ho
is studying in a hospital there and
judging from his letters thoroughly
enjoys the work. He Is not likely
to return until next September.
Fonsey Vallone is finding it
haid to get a match with any of the
local boxers. Vallone has not been
in the ring for some months but de
clares he is at present in good con
dition. He calls occasionally at the
L'.rooklyn Athletic club where he
generally trains for hm matches. He
ia much heavier than when he first
s-cught pugilistic honors.
$3,540 TO TREASURY.
Report of Jamestown Commission to
Governor Woodruff.
Hartford, Dec 31. Samuel A.
Eddy, William J. Barber and Thom
as Hamilton, the Connecticut com
mission on the Jamestown tercenten
nial exposition, submitted their final
report to Governor Woodruff yester
day. Mr Eddy Is president, Mr Bar
ber secretary and Mr Hamilton treas
urer. George D. Curtis Is manager
of the commission. Mrs John M.
Holcombe, the Hon F. L. Wilcox and
the Rev Dr Samuel Hart were an
advisory committee.
The financial statement of the
treasurer is as follows:
Receipts.
From state treasurer .... $63,056.44
Sales and rebates 5,153.51
Expenditures.
The expenditures were as follows:
Building and grounds ...$25,106.87
Salaries 5,143.55
House maintenance 2,724.5
Commissioners' expense . 3,222 90
Ceremonies 3,121.08
Colonial furniture and
paintings
Furniture
Insurance exhibit
Educational exhibit
Farm exhibit
Pomologlcal exhibit . .
Tobacco exhibit
Dairy exhibit
Historical exhibit
Miscellaneous exhibit . . .
3,394.27
1.003.65
7,184.98
2,638.73
1, (il2.CS
1,313.09
975.95
2,068.29
1.796.74
1,727.32
2,234.99
Sundries
Total expenses. . . .
Balance returned to
state treasury . . .
. .$64,669.02
the
... 3,540.33
$68,209.95
The three commissioners have been
In office about three years and their
total expenses amounted to only $3,
222.90. All the commissioners served
' without pay. The Item of salaries
(included the salary of the manager
j and clerical serTleeg rendered at the
exposition (tronnds.
A copy of the report, with photo
I graphs, will be kept on file In the
state library.
Tie Zpilarls
Voted oo Increase In Pay
Sergeants and Grade C.
of
At tlie meeting of the bounl of
public safety held yesterday after
noon It was voted to recommend to
the board of finance that the pay of
the police sergeants bo Increased
from $3 a day to $3.25 and that nil
men In grade C who have been In the
department two years or over be In
creased from 2.75 to $3 a day. It
hus been said that If this proposition
meets with the favor of the board of
finance another grade In the depart
ment of police will be established in
order to Increase the efficiency of the
force. The funds to meet the pro
posed Increase will come out of the
appropriation for the police depart
ment and -has already been provided
for, so that It is quite probable the
matter will meet with no objection
from the board of finance.
A petition was received from the
firemen asking for three instead of
two days off each month. The fire
men claim they are paid less than
the firemen of any city of the Rlze
of Waterbury in the state and that
as they are not allowed for time off
only when injured when on duty they
are entitled to another day, more
over as they are constantly on duty
night and day. The petition was re
ferred to the committee on rules and
efficiency, Commissioners Malone and
Lewis, and it is expected they will
file a report at the next meeting
which will be held next Wednesday
afternoon.
A communcation was received from
Superintendent Beach Informing the
board that Supernumerary Patrick J.
Cowper handed in his badge and
stick one day last week, but soon
after changed his mind and request
ed his outfit back, and the superin
tendent declined to give them as the
man had resigned. The board voted
to stand by the action of the super
intendent and accepted Cowper's
resignation as final.
A sum of money, $7, picked up on
the street by a policeman and finding
no owner was placed in the police
pension fund.
It was voted to' advertise for sealed
proposals for another automobile
chemical engine, the bids to be re
ceived not later than 4 p. m. Janu
ary 11. The outfit must carry all
and more than the present chemical
engine carries and must not cost $5,
500. The resignation of William O'Don
nell from the fire department was
accepted. This is the second time
Mr O'Donnell resigned from the de
partment. He has accepted the stew
ardship at the Elks'.
APPEAL OF RED CROSS.
Mrs Kianev of Connecticut Branch
Solicits Contributions.
Hartford, Dec 31. 190S.
To the People of Connecticut.
The appalling catastrophe by
earthquake and fire which has just
overwhelmed a friendly nation calls
for profound sympathy, and immedi
ate relief measures from every part
of the world.
This country will do its duty, and
Connecticut will not shirk Its share
of .whatever can ajid may be done to
relieve the distress of stricken Italy.
The National American Red Cross
has, Issued an appeal to its state
branches for contributions of money
to be telegraphed without delay to
the proper authorities.
The state secretary for the Connec
ticut Red Cross has received the fol
lowing telegram from the National
Red Cross secretary, dated from the
war department, Washington, D. C:
"Issue an immediate appeal for
money contributions lor itanan
earthquake relief."
The Connecticut Branch of the
National Red Cross reiterates this
appeal to the citizens of our com
monwealth, and confidently looks for
generous contributions from the
men, women and children of Connec
ticut, who have not forgotten the
shock and stress of our own great na
tional, calamity on the Pacific coast,
nor the swift sympathy and ample
aid that came to us from over the
seas.
To facilitate the business tne Con
necticut Red Cross has designated a
state committee as follows to receive
contributions and forward the same
at the earliest possible moment to
the treasurer of the Connecticut Keil
Cross, Richard H. Cole, P. O. drawei
68, Hartford, Conn, who will tele
graph the amounts to the national
Red Cross in Washington:
Richard H. Cole, P. O. drawer b,
Hartford.
H. S. Conklin, 9 Central row, Hart
ford. Mrs Frank W. Cheney, South Man
chester.
Thomas Hooker, ISo 40 Churcn
street, New Haven.
Colonel IT. H. Wessells, Litchfield.
Dr W. C. Wile, Danbury.
Morris W. Seymour, Bridgeport.
Hon John H. Perry, Southport.
Miss Mary B. Klppen, Fairfield.
Mrs Antoinette Eno Wood, Sims-;
bury.
Frank J. Leavens, Norwich.
Walter Learned, New London.
Henry H. Bridgman, Norfolk.
Francis T. Maxwell, Rockville.
Hon T. McD. Russell, Middletown.
Frederick S. Chamberlain, New
Britain. Judge John II. Light, South Xor
walk. Mrs C. J. Camp, Winsted.
Schuyler Merritt, Stamford.
Charles II. Bissell, Southington.
Otis S. Northrop', Waterbury.
Guilford Smith, South Wiudham.
Hon Alton Farrel, Ansonia.
Rev Charles P. Croft, Weatogue.
H. Wales Lines, Merlden.
Hon Isaac W. Brooks, Torrington.
Anneals for contributions should
be made In local newspapers through
out the state, to which Bhonld be
added the name and address of tho
local treasurer of this special relief
fund. The names of contributors
with amounts given, should be pridi
ed every day or two. In order that
the general public may be kept Ir.
touch with the wonderful rliot
movement now In progress from
Maine to California. "He gives tico
who gives cheerfully."
SARA T. KINNEY,
Secretary Conn Bed Cross.
Frank Taylor Was Brounbl Ink
' Court By Bis Fatbrr.
The divorce laws of the state seem
to be responsible for the peculiar pre
dicament Frank Taylor, who will be
16 in February, found himself In the
city court to-day. Taylor's father
lives at Wedge's coiners. He has
boen divorced and Is living with his
second wife. His first wife Is living
with her second husband in Hartford
and between bis own father and own
mother on one hand and his step
father and step-mother on the other
hand young Taylor wonders whore-he
is at. His father testified that he
cannot handle him, and the boy ad
mitted as much. Mr Taylor did not
want the boy sent to any institution.
He Just had him In court to see what
he could have done with him, for he
will not work and he will not play.
He stays home nights, but he has run
away three times. He has been
working a year and in that time ha
had fourteen Jobs, his father said. A
few days ago he loft his father'
place and went to his mother's In
Hartford. A day there gave him
enough of the Capitol city. The boy
admitted that his father can't handle
him, neither can his mother, nor hie
step-mother, nor his step-father, nnd
he could not tell the reason why. He
said he can't get along with his step
mother, and his step-father doesn't
want him around the house. The
other day when in Hartford he found
an old revolver and threatened his
mother he would get a new one and
do his step-father because he was Ill
treating his mother. He said that
his mother would like to be appoint
ed his legal guardian, but so long ns
he is under hla father's care she can't
handle him. Such a peculiar case
never before came to the attention
of the court. Judge Peasley did not
know what to do and Prosecutor Mc
Grath did not know what to reconi
mend, but finally suggested that the
boy be put on probation for thirty
days, and the court so ordered.
The trial of a case in which Mrs
Nastazia Wuzsky, her brother, Leo
pold Kusmusky, and his wife, Annj,
were charged with breach of th
peace, occupied the greater part of
the morning. Mrs Wuzsky, who.
looked more like a waxen figure than
a human being, fainted twice before
court opened and had to be helpod
to the witness stand. She was hurt
internally, more by shock than any
thing else, and she was able to spealc
only above a whisper. No one could
account for the marks on her fore
head, her sprained wrist aid
wrenched shoulder. It seemed to be
a case of one woman and three men
against Mrs Wuzsky. Both women
were found not guilty and Kusmusky
was fined $10 and costs and given
thirty days In jail. An appeal was
takeu.
Errleo Napolonl and Francesco P.
Parisl broke loose in a saloon at the
corner of Jackson and Bank streets
last evening and Giovanni Rizzo got
some bad knife wounds. He was
unable to be in court and on that ac
count the cases were continued to to
morrow on ball of $300.
BROKE HUB XOSE.
Hin t ford Accident that Ended in an
Arrest.
Hartford, Dec 31. Because Mrs
Laura Campancella came out of tho
door of her lodging house at 16'J
State street yesterday afternoon just
at the minute she should have been
somewhere else, she got a broken
nose, and Frank Copier, a carpenter's
apprentice, 18 years old, was arrest
ed for assault and battery. Just as
Mrs Campancella came out of the
door to the street, Copier, who was
working ou a staging above the door,
dropped his hammer to the ground,
and the woman caught it on the nose.
She fainted, and by the time Copier
got down on the ground she was lyinK
in the hallway in a pool of blood.'
The sight of the unconscious woman
made Copier's tears flow about as fast
as the blood did, and Mrs Campancel
la was taken to the emergency hos
pital in the police station in the am
bulance and treated by Police Sur
geon F. A. Emmett, and Copier wai
taken the station in the patrol wagon.
He was later released, still weeping,
under bonds of $100.
MANUAL OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Secretary's Office Issues Its Biennial
Publication.
The preliminary manual of the
general assembly of 1909 has been
issued from the secretary of the
state. It contains the roll of mem
bers of the coming legislature and
such other Information as 1b essen
tial for the new members to possess.
The manual also contains, besides
the roil of both houses, a list of the
state officers, clerks In their depart
ments and the names of the officers
elect. '
Like the earlier publication, the
roll finds but forty-seven democrats
iu the house, showing an apparent
decrease of three since election day.
The statistics given show that the
youngest member of the general as
sembly of 1909 is Marcus E. Helm of
East Windsor, who ie 25, and the old
est is Oliver Wr. Mack of Portland,
who was the oldest member of the
house of 1907. He is 81 years old.
ELECTION COUNT DISPUTED.
Morris Mevers Claims That He Wai
Elected Renresentative.
Morris Meyers of the town of Dan
bury yesterday filed with the state
secretary a petition that the legisla
ture examine into the right of Wil
bur F. Tomiinson to a seat in the
house of representatives, claiming
that he himself is the duly elected
candidate. Out of the half dozen
candidates from the town of Dan
bury two representatives were chos
en, M. Burton Rogers and Tomiin
son being declare delected, but Mey
ers says that in the second voting
district twenty-one votes which
should- have been counted for him
were taken from his total and added
to that of Tomiinson. procuring bis
election. The legislature is asked to
verify this and to unseat Tomiinson
In f;it or of Meyers. Tomiinson is a
republican and the petitioner waa a
i candidate on the democratic ticket.

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