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The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1???-1928, November 18, 1908, Image 1

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EXCLUSIVE! SERVICE OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS:
THE CAIRO BULLETIN
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
OF
OP
THE CITY OF CAIRO.
ALEXANDER COUNTY.
ESTABLISHED IN 1868.
CAIRO, ILLINOIS, WEDNESDAY, JCOSNINO. NOVEMBER 18, 1908
fOLtrUZ XL. WO. 322
ijj 111
SEVERAL HUNDRED VOTERS
FORM PURE BALLOT LEAGUE
TO INSURE CLEAN ELECTIONS
Sellers and Buyers of Votes to be
Sent to Penitentiary-Permanent
Organization Form
ed -Leading Men
Declare Themselves
Fully five hundred voters wereiablt
gathered at the court house last the
night in response to me can oi me
Committee of Fifteen, to organize a
Puro llaliot League in Cairo, and It
rvas one ef the most representative
city.
t'i
Iheiinas ever lp'ld in un-
There were probably 4o0
vot. rs and over l'i negro
white
voters;
j. I?;! one of th:
most s:gn; Meant, things
was that, while there was plenty oi
enthusiasm there wu also evident
t.iyre than ordinary earntstiuss it
del. rniination, theie being an ah
scnee of all sign of a disposition to
..peak lightly then- wasn't any tell
in of funny stories and no laughter,
bur muct hearty applause as the
sjk ii kers presented some of the evi s
nought to be corrected and voiced a
.letermination to correct them.
Hon. M. F. Gilbert called the meet
ing to order and said the committee
of Fifteen had suggested V. H.
lluette us temporary 'chairman-. Mr.
Ilcette was accepted by the as
semblage and Prof. T. C. Clendenen
wns chosen secretary, Prof. Iiannis
ti t tn-asi rer.
Chairman Huette made a ringing
little speech setting forth the pur
p;es of the meeting and the need of
thx organization propose.! to be
termed. He expressed the belief that
tlve people of Cairo were ready to
take action In the mutter. Some aaid
It would be impossible to check the
election frauds but he believed It
cenl.i be done, and the colored voters
Wffo going to help In the movement.
Mr Huette grew eloquent when he
appealed to the latter, referring to
tie- five thousand graves at Mound
CHjv National .'cemetery, where lay
thai many men who had left stricken
hearts at home to fight for their
country and for the negro's freedom
the rivers of blood hit I ad flowed
and the mountains of money it had
cost, to gain this end. He asked
what these five thousand men would
say if they were told that all thdr
sacrifice were made only in order
that the negro might hawk his bal
lot about the streets on election day.
He did not believe the negroes pres
ent would stand for that state of
tblns but wonld help to the extent!
of their ability to correct the evils
coin pla ined of. There were shouts of
apj roval from the negroes present.
lion. Walter Warder said he was
present becarse he wished to lie with
th; uheep and not with the goats,
win never there w as any chance for
it,' and this movement certainly c;ii
bivced the sheep, and he wished to
have his name on the list. He be
lieved the Illegitimate spending of
money waa the greatest evil: any
evils in the registration or in the
counting of votes could be easily
reached by the appointment of good
men as election judges and clerks,
and by agreement between the two
pclitlcat organizations; but the buy
ing of votes was the greater evil and
was more difficult to reach. Or
ganization whs net ess a ry to reach)
ibis. .Mr. Warder expressed himself j
In full sympathy with the move
ment. Douglas Ha'liday said he would do
Whatever he cou'd to help the move
ment along. fe ling that Cairo could
h: v and should have reforms at her
t let tions.
Hen. M. F. Giitw rt. chairman cf
the Democratic county central com
mittee, Mid there shocld l no ev
trines to extremes were never tic-Msi-ful.
The movement f-bnubl be
cairn and earnest, and the lam- jhouhl
w iiforced against all alike. The
oii.mittee of fifteen of vhith he i
a n;e.liter, could do little of iwif;
they must have the backing of th"
ixf jle and the men wiio wonld coui
Mit fraud at our elections, and th
viler? who would sell their vot.s.
liiuKt feel that the ..fpe la 1 theii
;. es ou them and were watching
them. The fonntaJlom of repntdi
rf i goven'nient ileenlcd on the
Miritv of the ballot
n.ir Pntler said "an!n" to tie I
is eveimnV He rvf. rrd to the great
ni.n:ter f tranj-i'-nt trir.iinals in th
city who were a bur I n to the -om-li
cr.it y in the corit nd fst.tor in
;hf election e;ii rtintplained t.f. a'.
Iliime! he rPr-l the opinion tv.at
tV -1 i-eritdEf cf vote east by ni-n
.-;K m ere not entitled to xc-te was
very :.im!I. A considerable nu-.br
of rDi men claimed th'-ir hone'
i f re an ', had a rifeht to .! here a!
though tboy might b here o'i'j a
i.;,ert time; l,ut they bad li't'e or no
interest here and didn't car? who
a f!vted. Ther we- a -si l-r
number of other votriM who felt
same way, and these were the
purchasable element over whom th
unending factions or parties en
r.ged in strife. He said there were
plenty of laws on the books to step
ibc purchasing of votes and other
election evils'. The primary election
law was wrong in exempting the pur
chaser am', providing punishment ''
idle seller of votes, lie believed th
compter was worse than the temple. i,
the seducer worse than the seduced.
He believed the primary law was un
cepstitutional because cf the pro
vision referred to. Hut the buyers and
sellers of votes could be reached and
two or three cenvictions would stop
the evih
Walter H. Wood, chairman cf the
li( Pfblican county central commit tea
and one cf the committee of fifteen,
assured the? meeting that the charge
i:.:;de by some people that tie? move
ment was started by people who had
axes to grind was untrue. Not a
member of the committee was a can
didate for any office; so far as he
km w not a in.n connected with the
movement had any purpose except to
correct the election evils that had
been complained of. It cost too
much money to run for office In
Cairo. He relt that to reach th? evil
would be "a treinou.lous job," and if
the good people were not any mote
active than they were at elections
they would not succeed. One great
trouble had been that so few citizens
lock any interest in their elections.
There were never more than three or
fcur In each ward who would give
any time to the elections.
At this point Chairman Huette in
terrupted t lie speaker with a call to
ail who were willing to give one day
to election work to stand up. Every
one rose
Mr. Wood continuing said if citi
zens took more interest in their elec
tions there would be less corruption.
Tin re were no men more afraid of
going to the penitentiary than the
politicians, and if they knew they
w re being watched, they would be
careful. He knew bad things had
hi en done by the Kepulicans, nut uie
other fellows had not been awleep.
Five hundred negroes had gone to
the polls and sworn they cotna not
read or write and permitted the judge
to n aik their tickets for them. They
knew they were swearing a ".1 d
lie- when they did this. Laughter
and applausel. He felt sure he could
h eak for the Republican organiza
tion and say they would aid in the
movement as far as possible. He
hoped the movement would not be
perniitted to die.
.1 S. Aisthorpe made a fervent lit
tl. speech heartily endorsing the
movement. He said it made no dif
fcinice if other cities were bad also,
or wotse; we had to act for our
selves We wanted to be assured
that our candidates for office will be
elected by the people, not by ihe cor
rt! tlenists. U could not be expected
that officials should be honest if they
had to spend three or four times as
much as a-i office was worth In order
t i get it. White people were to
bli.me for the drove of neeroes who
stcod around the iolls on election
da and ifused to vote unless they
wer- paid. The white people had
fsueht lliem this: and there were a
p.x.My number of white men als)
who wanted money. Ooo.l men must
be fleeted fov the ix-ople. it e were
to have good government. Thf r
in:; no intention to reflect on this or
ai y other city administration. We
av." had good and bad a Iniitiistra
liitia in tt, itsiut M m ha- m ttr(,ffe-i
sivt- vln.iniMration today hih l a I
dole much good for Cairo. This
movement a tor the futur. the
piPjifif-e Ixing to fleet goexi men r-fiai-ils
ef politic. nd to eliniinat"
tvie traTtc in the laKlot.
Mayoi ParM.ne nail l.e as pr-e-t.t
t lnd his influeiieo to the move
ti' t.t tor clean f,erTM.n. ani ne
ii.ld do hst he mnl I offi'lallv
ivi -n lit i-luali v to aid in rarrjing
onl tn j.ertu ff ti e mt'i:J.
d -rjz' Jafksf-n : k fo. th r,e-i-.Of-
p--"n. de.!(!nc the.' uni.i
ppoit He !d h -tte. ih
ri.iTt (t his rat to f-how K.eir mn
:; rnnv of the yoitig men ha i
been t'Pine.i hy th h;t foplp ".
f ) t n.enev f. r tl.-r voteji. Lot he
f. ! thf r'n?-T'tativ cf th race
,1-f.nt wi.ni t it m t-.e-,r
;,. , ':, ji. tip f.p:e
iff-n 'ft., ,o th ir. tertiary.
(Ccb ended oa SeccoJ Taffe.)
FIERCE ATTACK
ON AMERICANS
TWO NEW YORKERS WHO IN
TEND VISITING ENGLAND
BRANDED MURDERERS.
IN -HOUSE OF COMMONS
Redmond Defends Them Unionist?
Want Home Sscretary to Refuse
. Them Permit Gladstone
Makes Reply.
London, Nov. 17. The approaching;
visit to this country cf Patrick Ford.,
t editor of the. Irish World of New
(York and O'Meaghor
Condon was the
occasion of an extraordinary at tack
in the house of commons this after
noon. James Craig, rnlonist member
from the eastern division of Down
opened the fight by nuking Premier
Asriuitli if he was aware that Mr.
Fcrd, who had been declared by three ;
bulges to he a known advocate of th
t bp of dynamite, and Mr. Condon,
who had been sentenced, to death for
the murder ol' an English policeman,
intended visiting this country. j
Mr. Craig asked also whether li .
censes perniitted them to do so, and,,
if not, what action the executive pro-;
posed to take. i
Earl Winton, Conservative, followed
this up with a reference to the find
ing of the Parnell commission by ask- j
ing whether "any steps had been ta!:-j
en to prevent these well known atJ-!
tutor from coming lo this country."!
Heme Secretary Gluds'.cne answer
ed Earl Winton in these words:
Condon Was Pardoned.
"I am no aware cf the intentioi.s
of these persons. Neither of them is
the holder cf a license."
.John Redmond immediately .jumpe I
to his feet and hotly appealed to the
speaker. One of the persons men
tioned, he informed the speaker, wuh
an official of the American govern
ment, and it was incredible that such
epithets were permitted lo be applied
to a high official, who has beon In the
servite cf the Cnited States for twen
ty years.
The speaker agreed that if th-
statements In question were true thevZnw .,,
ought net to appear. Mr. Craig offered
to send Mr. Redmond prof's of th .s
truth cf the facts stated in his tpies.
lion. Mr. CladMone, n cognizing the
insufficiency of his first reply, supple
mented it with the following state
ment :
"Mr. Ford, so far as I know, ha.t
not been convicted of any criminal
cflense in this country; as regards
Mr. Condon, a royal pardon, under tin
great steal, was 'given him in 1S7S.''
IL
QUITS RACE
WOODWARD WAS RENOMINATED
FOR MAYOR OF ATLANTA.
DRY TOWN, BUT DRUNKEN
ESCAPADES RETIRES HIM.
Atlanta, da, Nov.
Woodward, recently
mavor of Atlanta, in
17. .lames ('.
nominated fo
the white pri
mary, tonight withdrew fro nithe race,
and Robert F. Maddox, who was put
out as an independent candidate
against Woodward, will be lecte.l
mayor without opposition. The figh"
on Woodward, which resulted In his
rtiretnent, was caused by his drunken
escapade in the red light district t i
weeks ago.
Woodward has already served two
terms as mavor. and Atlanta received
much undesirable advertising by rea
son of his bibulous habits. When his
recent escapades Ixf-ame know a cr
went up for a decent man for mayor
and Woodward was forced to retir
as nomine.
In withdrawing Woodward says h"
was fairlv nominated and could be
elected, but rather than for th city
to.
;d;t iti'o facMoti re- amtire.
his neht in the matter,
j Mr. Woodwatd s dnmk
'whisky sold in half a do'
came front
n (daces in
i t.-pdei hin.
HARLAN NOT TO REITRE
From Supreme Court of Un ted State
Never Autnoried Statenet to
That Eect.
Washington. Nov. 17. Janice Har
lan. f the l ni: I S'.it- upr-ire
Cturt. today der.iel that i' was h'
intention to retire frtm 've b-nci.
"I hav Ein- am borirf-d any one
say I have any purpo 'o r-!i." fc '
r(1K.;arr.j
Whenever I Cfinie to f
t i r
voluntari'T I will !-t the public
know. Jast now
quit th fcnfh."
I sie no ran to
BIBULOUS MAYOR
VAN U1GEN
CHAffi MIND
DECIDES NOT TO COMMENC
ONCE SERVING HIS PRIS
SENTENCE.
N
10 ASSIST ASSIGNEES
In Untangling His Crooked Business
Examiners Could Not Distinguish
Between Forgeries and
Genuinec.
Chicago, Nov. 17.
-Peter Van Vlirs-
illgell, WI1CHU arresi jesiejun.v mi mi
WllCHl)
,o will reneh t70n.fl(10. cans- I ''
, .. ,!., .i..i,i,i ifia m rove-
I'll u M-ufifi'iuii. " r
go temporarily lm desire to beSin In, i
mediately serving- ms pus.n.
tonce.
i He will remain in Chlctin a suffl
'cient time lo aid in untangling bis
i business affairs which the assignees
found in a very snarieii con.tition.
I MJ cievci .-(. - "
'notes and mortgages that the assign
ees were unable lo tell the genuine
from the spurious when they were
presented by anxious holders, and
'ihev'had to he referred to the pri-
; cner.
! Recognizes Forgeries.
i One batch was taken to the jail
and shewed a face value ef about $:!S,
oiin. Half cf the papers, readily d'.:i
linguished by the man who devised
thorn, were forgeries.
Eighty thousand dollars is th-
amount unearthed today, most of
which was in the hands cf prominent
local brewers.
A large number of people in mod
erate circumstances were caught,
howevtr, for sums the loss of wlrlc'.i
will be seriously felt.
Judge Betbea. in the Culled States
District Court today, appointed a re
ceiver in bankruptcy for Van Vliss
ingen's property.
Lost $300,000.
It was learaed today that Van
VHtdn heM lest ttit,,.WiMW
tho Inst five years in exploiting a
patent medicine. He was one of the
cranizers and principal
buckets of a corporation
vears ad vet Used largely
financial
which tot
in maga
other publications. I ni
pi( paratlon. which was a salve for
skin diseases, .lid not have a law
sal" despit,' the prl'usi advertising
and last year Van Vlisslngen is said
to have withdrawn from the corpora
tion with a loss of about $:liin.iwio.
POSTAL SAVINGS
IS
BY FARMERS OF THE UNITED
STATES ALSO PARCELS
POST SYSTEM OTHER
THINGS FARMER NEEDS.
Washington. Nov. 1 7. Progress
throughout the country in lines of
agricultural activity was reflected in
today's session of the National
Grange,- Society for the Promotion of
Agricultural Science, and the Associa
tion of Farmers' Institute Workers
It developed ihat among the farmer:,
the paramount needs were the p.
eels posts and postal savings bank'
The economic handling of farm p:
ducts, the inability of the tanner to
obtain money from banks as easily as
the manufacturer, and oilier problem-.
were discussed.
Proposed legislation for the parcels
post and postal savings bank received
heatry endorsement and commiuefs
were appointed to urge Ihe pass.ig"
of such bills before congress.
ADENOIDS CAUSE CRIME
Dr.
Maxwell Say There Are 100,000
Nev York School Children
Who Are Affected.
New York. Nov. 1 7 Dc' laraticn
wps n.ade today by Dr. William H.
Mi.xwell. it y superintt n l' i t of
schools in this c it v. that ai-neiis in
ihihiten are so alarm. ne!;. .a:ie!ii1
the they produce depravity in bo; s
and eiris who have th'-m.
Dr. Maxwell made t'.is stafep.'-T.t
it: fcsserting that it wa impetat.ve
th.'d the board of education be clothe
with power to con, pel the par-lit" of
(hiidren so aCeeted to 1 a the
ad .-.old growths remnvi
1. If thfy
Lie pr.nit"e.
alu f st c-rta
to remain th" chill i
1 to develop crin irai
(..pdrje. said Ir. Mmwei;.
'There are pKi.ei (hiidren in tie
sflools cf tl,i city KitfTerltig from
tft t.rinn ailmei.t of ot! -T that i
!l!r,. :.... tteiTi defective. A laige ma i
k-:tT cf them have adenoid. Her--j
5'- an army tf Ik and giris who
i;iiis they immediately i-ii:-mdica'
tr'-atraen are I.I. !y to N
coipe .ff -n -ier aaiiut r-r.i ty."
HI
c
AMAIGN
Ell!
A LITTLE SHI
0
At'bUT CHAIRMAN MACK OP DEMO-
CRATIC COMMITTEE SAYS
WE'LL PAY IT.
PERMANENT QUARTERS
Will Be EstaWech Sooit 'Either
New York or Washington To
Make Effort to Dissemi
nate Doctrines.
New York, Nov. 17. The Demo
,.intic national committee finds itself
-.liable to meet the expenses
of the ,
Mate campaign
Chairman
Norman
. 0,llv.
K.J.if tlUo ,10Uf.n mt;ney '
obligations, but
jto pay ait oi our
every bill we owe
i shall regard them
obligation.-,, om
will Of ;it..'.
as personal (did-
jgations."
Mr. Mack explained mat ice uu.u
receipts from all soprces aggregated
only about $o0rt,diil. The d' tailed
statement of receipts and expendi
tures will be filed with the secretary
of state by Herman Kidd.M- on Nov.
IMth
, . ... 1. ,.jhiu fi
I ( liairtuan ;viaei. mmc "....-,
bit blue over the financial cominiou.
announced that the permanent )ia
tiri.Hl headquarters of the Demo
tic uartv would very sncrtiv
be
cr;
opened
York.
New
in
either Washington or
Who Will av It. I
"Who is going to pay fur it'. I
knvw you would ask that tpu siion," j
said Chairman Muck. "Ti e Demo-
r .1... I". .:...! vt-.t i; tsi
I'nited Stat-s is
ei i'lie part oi me . u..e -
going to pay for it. 1 imve had offers
from evfry state in me union ... .....
tribt tH to a fund tor tne purpose, u -
publicans keep boa lipiat tus c pen i-l The Emperor's Promioe.
Washington year In and year out. ,. ,Hi.(,1(,MS of ,,, oxaggeratious cl
NV; are .apposed to do all our cam- M urfi
pa,gu work in three monl '' Um H iliron,,rt, Ms luaj,.Hty lter.
ZT "tat his principal Unparjl
Educate the people from , ta. , to.-nsure -
" , rVaUcnal headnnat -tr either hnwwdtawibH . cowtwiiim.re-
Wnshfngfbn or New York will shcrt- si)nHlbilltles. In coiifortnlty there
!y be opcne.l, and we all shall try to with, his majesty, the emperor, an
educate the people of the country up proved of the chancellor's ulteranco
to mi appreciation of Democratic
prlnciphs."
Mr. Mack spoke with some show
of feeling of a personal iottu- be ntoi
received from Mr. 'Loan, thaiimig
hini for his work in the campaign. As
the letter was strictly personal, be
could not make it public. Mr. Mack
wi'l be in the city for a week or tin
dajs, dosing up the work of t ie na
tional committee.
ROCKEFELLER TO
ME IDE STAND
STANDARD OIL TRUST PROBE IS
RESUMED IN NEW YORK
THREE HIGHER UP OFFI
CIALS SUBPOENAED.
Xe- York, Nov. 17 TWimony
oi.in erning the subsidiary pipe line
companies of the Standard Oil com-
y was
the g
1 so eii
t
heard todav at
t!
heat ing
erntnent's suit to
:.-d eii mist, and
co;ii'.iti announce
lisolve
coin. so!
d that
P
R. k. I.
.,.i;,,i .- .
ih r. John D Arch
A. Moffett. who hiv.'
; n summoned to appear in tl
company's defense, piohably will
t.i-:e the witness stand until late
th week.
The three officials of the com
nip ere-l with subioepae
I'pHed States Marshal Henk.d t
pot
: I i
any
ty
i.Uv.
It is understood that Mr.
.. ..-til du , u I
Ito. kef. I-
do viith
:-! : .-n. on, ... - -
th- forteatini of the Standard '),!
e ,n-1 any and its earls developp.ept
STANDARD DECLARES DIVIDEND.
New Vitk. Nov. I i. Directors f
the Stand ltd ):1 company of N' w
Ji'K-y. wii'ih is the p.uent. or hold
ietf cfiiut.an.. id tin- t i! combit: to-
d..v deilai.-d a ppir: riy .livi-b-tel
Se pet chaie. Thi- was nn ban?
( f
e-I !
iron-, the ivid.nd paid in th
cor r-
t pending ii'iiiit.-r of lat year
i., .ikes a lolI of Jl' in di.i
i-lldh to
ii.- paid this cr This hai be n th
.;.t sl'ic l'e.j. Tl i- n.ippaiiv ha
:i .:;-. ,h-rei (it-tat, t.i,K.
WOULD ACCEPT SENATORSHIP.
N w
Y-
rk Nov 17 I M. D.eiz' ".
I'rn.i'i' D .I'Z'-H iti a ! t
nn-ii.il!;.' ' t'-.nt "at th--
n: w a -t
r tolay
-o ie jt at ion
w i':r e to
. t. ,!:!,
hi :.
if l!,i C(i!!!ia-'eS i.e
.! ept the -flit .1 Strt'
f-opi ,o if Of. r- 1 t'i
; TAFT WILL VISIT CUBA
TO SEE THE INAUGURATION
Havana,
cn g''d
El'-ct Taf:
the inaugti
Jap-'ary 2t
Nov 177-1; is re;f'rte.
autho-fy tha? I':e:!e-it-ri;i
v:.-it He a:.a to a-tend
ra'ien of t-nTal Ocmet
a preii Jer-t o? Cr.ha.
KAISER S
m
PROMISES TO CONFORM HIMSELF
TO THE CONSTITUTION
HEREAFTER.
PEOPLE ARE REJOICED
At Satisfactory Outcome of Confer
ence Between the German Chan
cellor and Emperor Yes
terday. Berlin. Nov. 17 As a result of a;i
Interview between Enmeror William I
and .Chancellor Von ISuelow, ihe form
er today promised lience tortn to con-j
form himself to the constiiltiioti.il i
,.,. . ,. ,mii(.(,s of L
, ,
Oermany,' that H. through the chan
'cellcr and his associate ministers.
This promise was made public in the
HelchKaiuieftcr. the olTiiclal gazelle
o fthe empire, as follows:
"During today's audience granted U
(the imperial chancellor, bus majesty,
'emperor and king, listened for sever
'ill hours to Ihe report made by Prince
jvon Huelow. The imperial chancellor
describes the feeding and its cans-;-!
among the Gorman people in coniiec
1 1 ion with the article published in the
I London Daily Telegraph
London Daily leiegrapn. lie aiso ex
pinined Ihe position he had taken dur
,1,,, r()lu.Ke of ibdtaies and inter
l(,llat U)m ,m 11)is Hultjf-I in the reich
... , ...
81aS- his majesty, me vmih-h,i, j -
(l(,jV(,(j latemenis and explann
iols wj, jt great earnestness ami
lions wiili great
Ihell expressed his
,.v1(.ssed his will as follows:
i,, the reichslag and nssuri
Prince
j Von Huelow of his colli iitiie.,
ci ic ' ".
t'.tn.
People Are Rejoiced.
Huelow had determined upon hand
ling In his resignation if the cnipeici
had not met tne coutnrj neninimr.,
but as such a situation di.f not arise,
the audience ended with the emperor
saying to the t hancellor that he ie
posed full confidence in his wisdom.
The people are greatly rejoiced ai
the outsoiiie and believe that a great
step has been taken to ward freer
government
crown and
and that henceforth th.
pit ion will act together.
HOW GREECE STANDS.
Pisea. Italy, Nov. 17 - Kins George,
of Greece, was reicived In audience
todav by King Victor Emanuel an I
il,.. ....untl of his visit to
..
Vienna. He said assurances had bee.i
received that the Greek Inleresls
would be supported by Austria Hun
gary and Germany, and that h" trust
e, that the Italian attitude be favor-
aide Continuing, he expressed hop"
that Rome would use its good office?
,0 induce Cteal Htitain not
lo OppO't
I recce.
T hi- annexation of Crete to
THREE PER CENT RAISE
Fie.fcht Rates Wdl SaMfy tne
Requirements of th Radroadt
Savs W. S. Brown.
in
f'hirai'o. Nov. 17 W
e;,ipr Vice PI e idetl t . f
V'.ik Centtal I;"'". '
., ti I-' U I'l'h.llll. .te-l
( p
the
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New
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r ha..
;
,ois Manuf.P t iiei:- .,--!
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illV
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that tie- i ;i t ;
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a tl
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r ei nt
eil.l -.1
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.nice in f "
th'- rerpliieni'
This takes
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Down atr-
to
I':' lit '
th" ro
te Of
1
f a
to tl '
TEXT OF HEW TREATY;
d ta Ma
"-td
Fut
,e Beet Made Between
States "d Japan
li. n .
i ; i-'
t t ef
:.- . ti--
fJI.Pr.'!
m
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i t - ",
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of t.:i i.
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IS
i
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lift i further
IS
N
LOVE AFFAIRS
TOLD OF BY ONE OF STATE'S
WITNESSES IN LAMPHERE
TRIAL YESTERDAY.
LAMPHEREANHOYED HER
State's Pos:tion, That Becauss ef Fall
ing Out Between Them That He
Sounht to Harm Her,
Strengthened.
LoPorte. Ind., Nov. 17. That. Ray
Lamphere made threat's against Mis.
Ifiuniiess was
I the state's
Khown by
witnesses
a number of
today and
Stnit n
was able o bring out the fact that a
motive existed for the defend
ant lo annoy Mrs. GunneMa and that
this annoyance terminated on the
morning of April 28, in Lamphere Hot
ting lire to the Gunness house.
The love affairs of Mrs. Gunneaj
and l.amphere were also told by Wil
liam Slater, and In his testimony th.;
state found much of value to strength
en its position f at it. was because of
the falliP", i.i.t between the. two Ihat.
Lamp!,, re sought to harm Mrs. Gun-
:s.
Other witnesses for the state teg- .
tilled ou lilies similar to lliose
brought out at the coroner's impiest
and publislied at mat time.
A. K. Helgc-lein, the iar witnes.i,
told of his anxiety over the disap
pearance of his brother. In reply 10
the first letter of inquiry to Mr-!.
Gunness, he received the followln.j
answer:
Her Cunninq Avoida'.
"LaPorie, Match Ti, I !..
Mr. Axel K. Helgeleiu-I have
your recent letter, in wnicn you wish
to know where your brother A mire. v
keeps himself. Well, that is juat
what I would like to know.
"He came here about the middle of
January. . When he iefi Ucii; Jie 8a!l
hi" wnntfttto Cad Uh bioihei-, v. In
had kept a gamhllng room in Aber
deen. He thought he was In New
York, or possibly had gone lo Norway.
He wanted to spend some time with
us when be returned. hen he wui
in Chicago he said he would be there
so short a lime ihat I need not write.
I have neither seen nor heard fro:n
him since then. I saw a man who
said he had gone back to South Dako
ta. I will close, with friendly greei
Ing.' UELLE Gl'NNESS."
This letter did not allay the stisptc-,
ions of Heigelein. and he wrote again
to Mrs. Gunness, receiving a reply at
follows:
Lamphere Was Crazy.
"IiPorte, Ind.. April 11. 19uS.
"Mr. A. K. Helgeb in Your letter
I have received some days ago, but.
have not been able to answer in re
gard to your brother Andrew. I have1
tried every which way to find some
(rare of him. The man who told me
he is in South Dakota Is named Ijnil
phere, who worked for me a whi!.
lie said he had heard It from somn
one he knew in Mansfield, and he ha I
also probably told them about thu
tl'U'iHi. I know light away lhai U
was a lie.
"lint this I-amphere bcR.ni to find
so many wrong ir.ins to miii mwi ,
until at la.it they took and arre.-de I
him and they had Hire;' da lo ex
amine hirn and see if he was tiliht.
They found htm not quit.' crar. .
enough to put him in a luspiial. but
perfectly sane he is not. Ib I now
t.t un i r bom! a and Is p. 1:115 to nav
t;al next we. k. therefore t here .
.1 f nidation to the ste; i - loid. b 'l
il thus-? I am nn-e ef is that : la
p.- way or am"! or has lak-.-n the p t
-r fr. IP Atl-l'e he fat s pt to tne.
Tl p. an !'.. S wotkiiit 'er nv
1 I
. of 'he ! : r in t ;; b. i .1
-idt. when ir.:p' -r
1 e i no pan.-- on ' 1
I know h.s w !: c. aa I
ten to a .'ii'j;i ;i"l it
Tl
ut
rv
1 r.
'1 -
...11 t he hat thought i f cetn:C hl k
:i Ma ard i' is wrj i.a-ira! ;!'.at '
1 1.
1 h.
re I t,a ! ''! a holt o.
r f h'
letter, t'l' '.'
f i c
i a I nits'.
I
-i'iveiy in re car I t- -h
;-.H;Me.
Wanted Br-cthe- to
Ccwe.
t! at Iro
. , ai. 1 for
,:- a. . hat
! .c a. id I
- (Pie r
i,. re na
ir :-"
r e r--
. e. t I:
ha
j a'-
.1 !
I t:
.iv
. 1.
A &
k
that
say
s 1-
I t
1 !
r .
u- I
,
j
itat Kb':
- ip V e it
- w ;: f
ir be tru. .
, a k! ?
I v, - .
' w
. I 1 1
fad
? n te
t f.-r a
,t 'o '..:n
w 3 l - -e
cioHtar
n h:m. ar
t..ini et
which h-
a lot -d
t'i I
h a i ;
. an : ? "' ' ' r '
ti J'h He had 1
'a? s fir I km.w I 'l!
ail pavab'e to linifif.
:Mak it
if t'eti..
K V v ,
ar l 1- U
Otr-er i.mi'. r: "
1 tl.inV It woni I
ic:3de4 fta It.'i Pas)

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