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The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1???-1928, November 27, 1908, Image 1

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E X C L U S I VI! S ERVI C E O F THE AOSOCIATEO PR ES Or
THE
BULLETIN
f
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
OF
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
OP
ALEXANDER COUNTY.
THE CITY OF CAIRO.
CA
f OLUIXE XL HO. 326
CAIRO, ILLINOIS, FRIDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 27, 1908
ESTABLISHED IN 1883.
SCANDALOUS REVELATIONS
IN THE CAPITOL OF FRANCE
STARTLE CIVILIZED WORLD
CHARGE THAT FORMER PRESI
DENT FAURE WAS POISONED '
BY MME, 8TEINHEIL.
WOMAN'S CONFESSION
Regarding Murder of Husband and
Stepmother tead to Arrest
Relations With the Dead
President Notorious.
Paris, Nov. 2fi. Tlio arrest of
Madame Steinhoil tonight following
liei confession today,' that . for
month since the murder of her
painter husband ami Madame Japy,
her Ktepinother, who were found
strangled In the home of the artist
May tl last, her attempt to find the
fissassins, and inumerahle fantastic
clue? furnished the police and news
pppers were only a , desperate farco
to corceal the real author of the
crime, whom she knew, affords Paris
the biggest sensation it has had for
years.
The excitement produced from
time to time by the Humbert. Drey
fus and Syvot affairs, pale Into in-
significance by comparison, and the
revela-iona which have crowded
thick and .fast during the last few
days, pointing to (he possible expo-un
of a national scandal, promise
to att -act world, wide attention.
Mhi ster of Justice Brland is re
porter already to have beguni an in
quiry into the case to determine the
truth of the allegation that M. Lei
tett, examining magistrate, enter
tained relations with Mme. Steinhell
which induced him to stifle the affair.
The political opponents of the gov
ernment, like Henri Rochefort, have
been trying to make political capital
of the affair by seening to force an
expoi-ure of the scandal connected
with the mysterious death of Presi
dent of ("resident" Faure In 1899. Al
though hushed up at the time, It was
eonini n knowledge among those be
hind the scenes that Mine. Steinhell
was with Faure at lilysee palace
when Faure died. Some (tapers do
not hedtate to print what they term
the story of the lhuson. According
to these stories Faure had met Mine.
Steluhell In the Swiss Alps during
the maneuvres the pear previous to
his death, and she was greatly
enamored of hlni.
Acted Queer at Funeral.1 j
A person who attended Faure's
funeral described to the Associated
Press today how, after the ceremony
at the cemetery, Mme. Steinhell fell
on he:- knees at the grave and placed
a bunch of violets on the coffin.
Then, he said, sobbing she pros
trated herself on the ground, pas
sionately kissing Faure's portrait.
Immediately after this, according to
the same authority, Steinhlll, who
had bo n complacent at the friend
ship existing between Faure and his
wife and who had accepted the le
gion of Honor at the hands of PresI
dent Faure, began proceedings for a
divorce, but through the Intervention
of his family this suit was withdrawn
According to gossip, compromising
papers of some political Importance
were surrendered.
Poisoned Faure is Charge,
The antlSemite Libre Parole
charge Mme. Steinhell with having
poisoned Faure. The newspaper re
calls that on the day of the funeral a
writer on the Libre Parole who had
seen Ihe body said: "All the skill of
the er.ibalmer was unable to preserve
the corpse from the dissolvent ac
tion of a subtle poison." The Journal
continues by charging that Chief of
"Ddtctlves Haniard and Magistrate!
Leydett knew the arrest of Mme.
Stelnt.eil was inevitable and would
lead to a raking up of the scandalous
mvEte.-y of Faure's . death, which.
with difficulty had been stifled for
ten years, and accordingly did their
best t'j hush up the present Inquiry.
The newspaper concludes by say
fng that Faure was1 poisoned because
he s opposed to a revision In the
Dreyfus case.
IDE
nil
I
on ihe negro
HIGH PRAISE FOR THOSE WHO
AF.E INDUSTRIOUS, SOBER
AND WELL BEHAVED.
COMMIIIEE ON
PUBLIC!!! UK
CONGRATULATES PEOPLE
PARTIAL, SUCCESS OP ITS
MOVEMENT.
I
ON
W
HI
Will STRIVE FOI IAW
To Compel Publication of Campaign
Contributions Though Pleased
With Action of Both
. Parties.
PERFORMANCE OF DUTY,
New York, Nov. 2!. The executive
committee of the National Publicity
Law Organize! ion met today and
adopted . the following address con
cerning the publication -'of the cam-
.j 1 . , , . , 'palgn contributions and expenditures
Shouli Be Test Applied to. Negr0eSj)y (hf rfa8uMrg of lhe ,wo naUona,
and White Men Alike Tells of political parties:
Negro Town in ' "The movement, inaugurated by the
SPECTACULAR FOOTBALL GAME
PULLED OFF AT PHILADEL-
PHIA YESTERDAY.
KETCHELL WINS
II
LAURELS
South.
National Publicity Law. Organization
at the close of the presidential elec
X-.Wtldni? In Uo" of 190 Wnile not ' successful
... --' i cs - J
In securing legislation by congresF,
Washington, Nov
a iii.su nuuiiM.ce ui ...: '''M.as been Instrumental in establishing
while men, gathered to witness the 'ihe initial test of publicity of cam-
laying cf the corner stone for the CoI-1)aign contributions and expenditures
ored Vouug Men's Christian Associa- in national elections. The Democratic
Hon, President Roosevelt paid the ne-) National Committee has followed the
groes of the country a high tribute i provisions of the proposed legislation
in congress for publication before and
for their earnest activity in religion"
work. His address concluded as fol
lows.
As (or the white man, let him re
member in this as in all other mat
ten?, t hat to do justice to the colored
man Is demanded not only by the in
terist of the colored man but by the
Interest of the white man also,
Sooner or later In this community
every class of citizen will feel the
effect of the raising or degredatlon
of any other class. "All men up
is a much safer motto than "som.
men down; and It Is to the interest
of every class of any community that
the members of every other class
shall feel that industry, sobriety
good behavior, the conduct that
marka. a man aa being a good .neigh
bor aid a god citizen, should receive
a proper reward, bo as thereby to
put a premium upon the development
of such (ualities. I am not speaking
of social relations; I am speaking of
equality of treatment before the law
of equality of opportunity to earn a
living, of equality of opportunity to
earn the respect that should be ac
corded to the man who behaves de
L'cntly, and Is a good neighbor and
good citizen. There are plenty . of
difficult problems in this country.
plenty of problems requiring Infinite
patieice. forbearance and good Judg
ment if they are to be dealt with
wisely, and which can not by any
possibility receive even an approxi
mately complete solution within a
short time. What Is known as the
race nroblem Is one of the most diffi
cult; and It exists In the North as
well as In the South. Hut of one
thing we can rest assurd, and that Is
that the only way In which to bring
nenre: the time when there shall be
even an approximately fair solution
of th problem Is to treat each man
on hi merits an a man.
The performance of duty should be
th? test applied to white man and
colon d man alike, and each Individ
ual s lould be Judged not by the fact tional Committee has volnnlarily
of hb color, but by the way In which placed itself under the New York
he meets these demands of duty; Htatute, which provides that
and t 10 first duty wnicn each colored
mar. owes both to himself and his
CARLISLE' BEATS ST. L.
But Latter Played a Sterling Game
Kansas Defeats Misr.ouri Ames
f Beats Drake Other
Games.
Philadelphia, Nov. 2(). In a, gauio
that, was spectacular, at. times bril
liant, and often not quite first das,
the University of Pennsylvania fo,t
ball team defeated Cornell this afler,
noon 17 to 4.
The first Pennsylvania score was
primarily due to the forward pass
and poor kick by Walder. The bit
ter's punt went out of bounds on his
own 2!i yard lino and on the next
line up Miller had a beautiful forward
puss to Braddock on Cornell's fire
yard line. ' The rest was easy. Hol
leuback dashed around Cornell's left
end for a touchdown. Scarlet kicked
an easy goal.
The remainder of the half vi
KNOCKED OUT BILLY PAPKE
ELEVENTH ROUND YESTER
DAY AT 6AN FRANCISCO
WAS CLEARLY MASTER
From Start to Finish Almost
Strong at End as Beginning
The Fight By
RomcK
COOPERS
PLEA
IS NUT GUILTY
CARMACK'S SLAYERS IN COURT
THREE ARRAIGNED SEP.
ERATELY BY REQUEST.
as
San Francisco, Nov.
-Stanley
TRIAL SET FOR DEC 8
Attornew Week Objects to Early
Date Fixed Judge Hart De
clined to'Hcar Argument
On Later Date.
Nashville, Trim., Nov. 20. Col.
champion- and John- D. Sharp were formally ar-
yvmeiuaj in uiu criminal
Kotchdl, cf (J ram I Rapids,, Mich., re-j Uui.eun H. Cooper, Robin J. Cooper
gained tho fulddlewelght
t-hiii cf tho world today and reverse I rnlgnr
lib' defeat of last September when !' charged with the murder of ex
Ij? sent Hilly Papke, the Illino:s Senator Edward
the trial set for December 8. Each
wat arraigned separately, the Indict
ments read to them, and a plea oi
not guilty entered, Counsel for de
fense objected, to their clients being
BODES
SWING
IN THE CHURCH
CORPSES OF LYNCHED NEGROES
FOUND ON SCENE OF THEIR
OWN CRIME.
CUT DOWN BY SOLDIERS
Upen Their Arrival at Scene of tho
Tragedy Near Reelfoot Lake,
Tennessee Sheriff Make
Statement.
'Thunderbolt" crashing to the floor
before a well directed blow that
caught his opponent iiush "upon the
chin. '
Ketchell Was Master.
The end came In. tho eleventh,
prior to which Ketchell showed
clearly that he was master of his op
ponent at any kind of fighting. Round
LW round Ketchell forced his oi
ponent and when opportunity offered
planted a right to the head or body,
generally escaping without damaging
returns. Belvincr his aimearanoo.. and
poorly played, Ihe best play being a fr.reinir the flirht thmnahnnt overv
after eletciou. The Republican Na. -'twenty yards run by Hollen back. A minute, Ketchell was stronger up to
I WONDER WHY IS IT?
" 'If any person or com
mittee fails to file a stale
men! or account as above required
or flies a statement which
race is to work for the betterment
both of himself and his race; for Its
ftilt.raHnnal. hut. above all for Its In-
dustral and moral betterment. It Is ,ln n" nform to the foroglng n
to tie great' Interest of the white
peopl-1 no less than of the colored
200 AMERICANS IN
LONDON ATTEND DINNER.
Ixr inn. Nov. 26. Three hundred
Americans and a number of distin
guiditd Engllshment attended the
American Society dinner today. Am
batiidor Reid made the principal
seecii. He contrasted eloquently
lat year's business depression in the
I'rUol States, the gloom of which
h Mid hung over London as well
as New York, with the condition of
tooay.
people that all possible educational
facilities should be given the colored
peopl: anil it Is of even greater In
terest to both races that the colored
quiremenls the supreme
court or any justice thereof, may con.
pel by order In proceedings for con
tempt, such person or committee t.
fine forty yard forward pass by Penn
cjlvanla was spoiled by striking the
ground before a player could reach
it
The second half was bitterly fought
brilliant in ois, but on the whole
more or less draggy. Cornell made
many changes In this period, and al-
the moment of the knockout blow
than was his opponent.
First Round.
They went right together, Papke
!ii;i'is villi a straight left to the
f.i'f-. Cl se tml tl'ig followed. Papke
bad-Ill against Ihe ropes, Ian. ling a
.hert din, right and Iclt to the face.
rti ! . .i t.u a went aiter his man
though I'ennsylvaniA's men showed
. 1. .. .. mt . t u I . , .. . . i. . . ! '
in.- . t.i i..u ...w..K ...t- i-oaciit s I .,.,, 11.n,mf,I.1. p..i, finaliv- .hiv.
did not make many changes Miller's
big run came early In this half. He
file
sufficient statement or account took the punt on his own Jo yard
Application for an order, as
man should steadily strive for his prescribed herein may be made by
own industrial and moral uplift
I ant to call you attention and
the ettentlon of all who care to lis
ten t me to the noteworthy record
of th town of Mound Bayou In Mis
sit sip rj. I stopped at Mound Bayou
a yttr ago while going through Mis
sissippi. .
Tw.-nty years ago the place was all
wildeTieaa. Now a thriving and pros-
perom town nas been built, with a
the attorney general, district attor
ney, a candidate voted for at the elec
tion In resiwct to which the allena
tlons In such petition may relate, or
by any five qualified voter who voted
at such meeting.'
"Secrecy of the ballot is batted iion
the necessity of protecting the voter
from the coercion or Inducement of
improitr influences. Campaign fund
MAHMOUT DEFEATS JENKINS
Ne- York, Nor. 26. Yoslff Man
mnut, the newest of (be Terrible
Tnrks to wrentle In this country, de
feated Tom Jenkins, former cham
pion Tetler of America, in a catch-aa-catch-caa
contest tonight Mah
mout won in straight bout, throwing
Jenkins the first time in 22 minutes
and 40 seconds and the feond ir
ffipj mlT!jeg and nA secHs.
thrlvi ig and prosperous country . publicity Is required as equally es-
roiind about; and every man in the sentlal and strikes directly at the ex
town, every man In the country jlstenre of such Influences. This is the
round about, is a colored man. In fundamental principal for w hich the
the Planters' Journal or Memphis. National Publicity Law Organization
Tetin. a white man's paoer. there in an.l Pa Npw York Slatp hrarwh have
a description in an issue of a conpe contended in promoting the enac
of jetrs aco of Mound Bayou under ment of a state law and in comf-elling
the heading of "The most remark- tB .Motion of congrtx to the nece.
bp town in the South." This ,per ltJ. of Fe.ler ,PRiElil,lon. At no
u"w uuw iuc iub nas oeen
any oen opposition
has there
In Wash
line and with good Interference
started down Ihe field. The whole
Cornell team came at him. but were
bowled over by the Pennsylvania for
wards. Miller wriggled his wav
through, dodging the big red tackier
nd sprinted for the goal line. Fina.
ly a Cornell man manged to catch
him from behind and downed th.'
plucky quarterback on Cornell's 5
yard line. But to the disappointment
of the Pennsylvania followers, the
ball was brought back to Cornell's 45
yard line lor holding.
Scarlet's good work gave Pennsyl
vanla ber second touchdown. Hol
1 ii back's punt went over the Cornell
'iuarteil. k's head. Scarlet tackled
him in the ruixup for the ball, (;aston.
of Pennsylvania, secured it and in
two plays Manier was jammed aero
the line for a score. The punt out
was blocked by Shearer.
. . n n ,r . 1, i - . . . m . . r ,
.ui-uiirii, uiuiai-i. inn uluiagnl
T.ll r I hi- m n nf .tho npc m rn ft
in a thriving frnilnt tmn r 9 IKui , K n
pe..il. Tbere ia not a saloon nor a'of ,h HoU8e " Rpprntatives. not,on.l kencaMonal run
vidois r. sort cf any kind ir tbe!oe8lnD '' '"e pre!
town. There are some .ini people den, ial rampalgn. brcmeht abfut th
on tie tract of land of which the PK of a bill containing all t!i-
This tract In- Provisions advocated by our organiza
town Is the center.
do.Ie about forty square lijilea. a1iUon ,OT publication bfore and after
of it owned by the colored people jleickn. Vnt by arbitrarily attadJin
them, elves. Ten thousand acres of( 'force bill" to tbat measure during
Hnd are in a bigh state of eultiva-.the dosing days of the Unl noadon of
I'on. There Is a big cotton crop, and ! eonares, rendered it impossible of
in 8'l lltion trie colony produce four- enac'ment at tbat time. All the nres-
tConcluded nj Settsjl fai.)
After Cornell bad failed at several
Even the controlling jwwer forward passes. Miller made bis sec
He was given
the ball evidently for a forward pass
play. The Cornell forwards misd
the ta-kle and Miller started down
the field from Cornell' 4 yard Hue
through a brokTl fjdd. After run
ning about IS jardw he stopfied sud
denly as if to fcbool a fiass and as
suddenly again darted across th
field and down over the line before a
Cornell man could get bis bands on
(Ceprlud" OB pcimi Pt? )
(Coacloded on Tb!r fac-)
ing him to the roj.es and forceing
film to cover.
Second, Third, Fourth.
The second was brief. Papke doing
some tffectlve work and at end had
a shade the better.
The third was an evener, neither
hating much advantage, but both
fc.'ving some hard blows.
fourth Ketcnell upene.l with a
tMTific right to th Jaw, following it
with a hatd lett to the same place,
lo.clng Papke to clinch. Papke did
little In this round, the close Ik Ing
dtiarly In Kctchell's favor.
Fifth Round.
Ketchell croned a jonderous right
to the jaw- and both men fell dear
through the roes. but were helped
bacV to the arena and went at It ex
changing blows that iid little dam
ig-'-
Sixth.
Ketchell landed tf virions lefts
to the face and the 1Vk. started to
fie- from that organ. Papke got in
a few hard one. IV. th were hlee.l
tna fioni the noe when they hrke.
The retnd ei)e.l with a strong leaad
for Ketchell.
Seventh. Eightn, Ninth, Tenth.
In the set-nth and eighth Ketche'I
fild al! the i nnli-hing and the rounils
(Tided in I is favor. I'apke ble-dlng
fret-lr.
Ninth Ketcbeil shot a ltft ta the
-(tmach and at foni range rwang
ti Wfts to the head. Papke fought
I'Mk desjieratdy, hut Ketchell force.!
him against the roj and lan.led a
risht and left to the bo-ly. Papke was
I'nion i City, Tenn., Nov. 2. I.fair-i-
Ing to the very rafters of the ehttr. h
which shadowed their crime Sunday,
the bodies of Marshall, Robert 'anil
Tee Stanback, the three despera'o
W. Carmack and j 8 osnufc uuwn vonstauie
iniiaiu uui i ua nuu tit flttl. Oull-
da; were found shortly after 1,0
o' lock this morning by the detach
ment of troops sent from here last
night and a posse In charge of
Mar
shall Stanback had besn shot over
the eye in an effort to Inflict tie
same character of wound as he In
flicted upon Constable Hall, who l
not yet dead, contrary to previous re
ports; Robert Stanback was shot
through the body, a similar wound
hfini inflicted to the one which
caused the death of Constable Bur-
J'UK.
The bodies were cut dowiv by the
troops and were turned over to tho
county authorities. The best citizens
of Tiptonville and the nelghboil.ig
country had demanded that a full and
complete investigation be made of
tho lynching. They were thoroughly
arou8efover the mob and asked that
justice be meted out to the lawles
retldents of Iake comity.
Sheriff Makes Statement. '
Sheriff Kit Halns officially stat d
that he wiU take every s(ep within .
his power t once to run down the
metnbeers of the mob and see that
the -law takes ' Its course. Attorney
General Caldwell stated this alter
n(;ou,t,hat he would order , an offi iial
livertiatIon of the lynching arid" he "
had every reason to believe that the
guilty members of the mob would he
(nought to Justice. Tiptonville
mifeted down today alter a day ami
night nf wild excitement.
The presence of twenty-five 'Mem
phis soldiers, ordered ' by Gov. Pat
terson to the scene with all jiosslble ,
i peed to prevent the lynching at all
hazarda, had th desired effect. The
people of Lake county realized tedav
that the strong arm of the law,
backed up by the military power of
tho state. Is knocking at their doors.
nnd the lawless element now t-tands
h fear and trembling of the eonse
ucences which will surely follow
their rash deed of last night.
CASTRO'S VISIT
I
IS
I S
iCoutian from Finn Ftf9.J
D si lr ti..t..,. .
brought in person Into court and jD r',u tou'K
asked to be allowed to waive formal
airaignment, urging the past custom
in this respect, but the attorney gen
eral Insisted lu following the law to
the minutest detail, and the court
sustained h 1 in.
Objection was also made to the
case being set for December 8 on ac
count of the absence of Judge J. M.
Anderson, who it wan stated is lead;
ing counsel in the case, but Judge
Hart waived this matter aside with
the rnmrk that this tpjestion would
come up later, meaning, It Is sup
posed, that a continuance could be
asked for and considered on its
merits. '
The defendants entered the court
room from the east door of the court
house to avoid the crowd at the south
dooi, Robin Cooper walking first with
Slurlff Sam Borum. They were fol
lowed by Col. Cooper, accompanied
by his nephew, Krnest Cooper, of
ShtlbyvHle, and John D. Sharp with
Deputy , Sheriff Rass. On entering
the court room they were jsiiren eau
iwlfitutu .wuv..-.. , ....;,
Separate Pleas Entered.
.' Immediately" M. 11. Mocks, for the
dt fondants, stated to the court that
coiuisel wished the defendants to
plead, separately and accordingly .CM.
Cooper was asked to step forward.
Ho tiil so and took a seat directly In
fri nt of Judge Hart. Deputy Clerk
Romans Haley then read the Indict
ment charging him with the murder
of cx Senator Carmack. Col. Cooper
lidened closely Mid at Its close Judge
Hart asked. "Are you guilty or not
guilty?" Judge Hart asked. "Not
guilty," was the answer in a clear
voice. Robin Cooper was next called
and the Indictment against him read.
His answer to the usual qurstion was
In a. low voice, scarcely heard be
yond those immediately about him.
Mr. Sharp was called and tho Indict
ment charging him with murder was
llrst read. His reply, given In a loud
oice, which could be heard all over
the room, was: "Nut guilty, sir."
Tltr, Indictment charging him with
being an accessory before the fact
w,',h next read and In the same man
ner and words he entered his plea of
not guilty.
During the reading of the Indict
ments to the defendants separately
the manner of each was close v
watched by all In the court room.
Col. Cooper showed not the slightest
excitement.
With his son Robin the case was
ifl'errnt. He lacked the stoicism of
his father, and besides showing some
effects from his confinement and
'vonnds, he was nervous. Drrlng the
nadlng of the Indictment against him
lie sat with bowed head. He scarce
ly ratsed his head until Judge Hart
naked "Are you guilty or not guilty?"
Then he looked at the court and re.
idled in a calm but low voice, "Net
M-i'tv.
Mr. Sharp presented a different
picture. He. too. was pale, but seem
ingly timre from anger than sny
other cause. His manner was de
fiant and his answers given In a de
termined tone. When he took his
eat to listen to the reading of the
indictments he noddc.l to t'leik Ha
ley to go on with the reading He
ndd himself erect and looked at the
derk wbll he read the to pajx-r
listening cioely to every nord. Hi
answers exhibited great feeling.
Judge Hart was on the (Kiint of or
dering the prisoners back to jrt!
when Attorney tjeneral eJIT M'Ca.-h
addiossed the court an.l t ite. that
an t.jien day aiteaicil .n th ,.xkft.
and ake, that the ea.e be i.et for
trial Dec.
Defense Object.
Attorney Mef'ks for the defence Im-
me.!iateiy arose an I Interposed ,aif New York. Nov. In a thick
objt-tion. He stat-d that it had Ket n ! f.tl v Shr, iy Hook toda the me. I
!..; iwtoo. that the cae would 'frright.-r Ceorsiar. id th WMt
sd for the January term and with'... iin,. ram me I and sank xhe Pan-
that t n.!erftan ling. Ju lee J M. An , e, i,-, -i
it rsin was not exnetine to te in.
th ritv arlt-r fin irfnunl r.f 1
Irslth. He stat.-l that Julge Acdr-
K'P was leading connsel and Brgi d
that th rat hf furt ut at tM IfTti !
Jn,l ltdirt t.itnrtr uui. I "You rant
arrange that latr.- and a!!o.e.I thej Th f,f ,f," l"S"r,. who In
fje to be set on the dt- eame 1. j ' ' womTi and II children, a
Cmtinnlng Jodre Hart said. 'a -hers of be crr. were re
-Mr. Sheriff, you may remand the r,,Ad by h toaU t tb twgl.
p:b-cflers to Jail." jTb freighter was "t -lan-af' d.
TO
NETHERLANDS DOES NOT
SEE ANY CHANCE FOR IM
PROVEMENT IN PRESENT RELATIONS.
The Hague, Nov. 2. The govort.-
nient of the Netherlands will watdi
the forthcoming visit to Kuroi-e of
President Castro, of Venezuela, wiili
Interest, but it does not see In it any
chance for Improvement in the pres
ent relations between Venezuela mi I
Holland.
There is a possibility, however, l ist
acting Preddont (fomez. during ih"
absence of Castro. i,'l take w.nie
stop lmiking to the settlom.'nt of the
trouble.
Tho Dulch government has again
lKiiite, nut tbat it has no Intention of
receding from Its demand for the can
cellation of di-crees Issued by Ca
tro that are today Injurit.g. to a grea
extent, the commerce of t uracao, and
up to the present time Castro h
hon no sign of idling.
1
COLLI
Off Sandy Hook in Fog ftr Pr-
tsns Aboard 0"i of te Vecscis
Los Tleir Lives.
'bound, wph passengers.
The fTrvanoe ent down wiihin tt
, Imsntue after he coTltsion. caT;n:
jio their death three of her !
' gers and one cf ihe cr .

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