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The Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1???-1928, March 06, 1910, Image 1

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El
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
OF :-
THE CITY OF CAIRO
11 a
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
ALEXANDER COUNTY,
(Exclusive Service of The Associated Press.)
VOL. XLII. No. 73.
CAIRO, ILLINOIS, SUNDAY MORNING, MARCH 6, 1919.
ESTABLISHED IN 18C8.
ur
By
N
II
70,000 UNION
MEN STRIKE IN
PHILADELPHI
Officials of Central Labor Union
Declare That 30,000 More
Are Affected
DISORDERS MARKED FIRST
DAY OF GENERAL STRIKE
City Authorities Now Inclined to Believe The
Sympathetic Walk Out Amounts to As Much
A? Labor Leaders Say Police Have
Several Brushes With Crowds
Philadelphia March 5 Disorder sympathizers a dozen cars were at
ln many parts of the city marked the tacked, windows . smashed and pas-
first day. of Philadelphia's great sym-
pathetic walkout of organized labor to
back up the fight of the trolley men
anainst the Philadelohia Rapid Tran-
sit Company. Nearly every section
of the city had Its tale- to tell of cars
attacked, men assaulted by sfHkers ,
or sympathizers, or clashes with the
police when the latter tried to dis
perse the crowds.
At Independence Square.
The scene of the most general dis
turbances shifted from the heretofore
turbulent Kensington district to the
center of the city. The greatest
trouble experienced by the police was
at Independence Square, where do?
onltn tho nnnniincpmpnt hv Mavor
Reyburu that no demonstration could
be held on, that historic ground, a
crowd estimated at 25,000 gathered, I
The police, mounted and on foot,'
were there ' by the score. The Im
mense throng was kept on the move
and It is due to the patience of the
M)lic.e that no serious outbreak oc
curred. A great crowd of striken
i,AM,ln,l tlii.S,frrh Ua mmara nn.l vprrl
not molested '
There was a wide , difference of
oulnion as to the extent of the '
strike. Saturday beitifj a half holiday
3t was impossible to get more than a
rought estimate of the number of men
that quit work.
70,000 Said to Be Out.
A committee of the Central Labor
Union, which Is conducting the strike,
announced that 70,000 union men are
out and that the walkout has affected
30.000 others. ., ..
Although the entire population of
the City looks upon the strike as a
serlo'tts . affair, the effects of which
are likely to be felt Tor a long time,
the city administration from Mayor
Reyburn down profess that the walk
out is not as widespread as pro
claimed by the labor leaders,
Henry Clay, director of the depart
ment of public safety, said today
that he had police reports to show
that no more than 20,000 men are on,
strike. Ii was evident, una me rnu
adelphia industries are not yet pros
trated. The great industrial estab
lishments, such as the Baldwin Loco
motive Worsk. Cramps Ship Yard,
Brill's Car Works, the Midvale Steel
Wern. ail of which are 'rmpn shop"
concerns, were in operation.
nlay Aik "I art s Mid.
No hand was raised today to stop
the conflict which Is rapidly paralyz
ing business. There wbb a rumor that
the labor leaders might request Presi
dent Taft to use his innuence to end
the trouble. Such a move rwlll be
welcomed by the people.. The day
developed nothing in the street car
strike. The Philadelphia Rapid Tran
sit had about the same number of
cars in operation today, a little more
than 1,000. Half of the cars In opera
tion during the day were withdrawn
at nightfall
Dezn Car Attacked.
All during the march of the strike
BELIEVED 62 RAILROAD MEN
PERISHED IN AVALANCHE
Vancouver, B. C. March . Of
sixty-two Canadian Pacific trainmen,
trackmen and laborer? burled by an
avalanche at IRogers Pass, on .the
summit of the Zelklrk Range of the
Rocky Moutalns, early thh morning,
-it, l,r.l .!.! T,t,t..fl'""'J """"W "ic uiwufcin.
Hi: wo "".Th. WMt ior In nU oti.l annw foil
wiite men and thi'rty-ssven Japanese
ate thought to have" perished.
The bodies of only five have been
recovered; The worc of recovering
the dead, and opening- the track is
greatly impeded by the blimrd.
There was another t7g slide of
snow and rock this morning, a mil
east of tne apot where the men were.
ovrwhelmed.
Tliere were no vie-
1 1
sengers and crews forced to take
refuge from flying missiles by lying
prostrate on the floors. Driven away
from Independence Square, several
thousand persons congregated at
Washington Square. A man mounted
the shoulders of several others and
started to harangue the crowd. A
detail of mounted policemen dashed
through the archways of Independ
ence Hall and into the throng. The
crowd scattered right and loft before
the hor es. The orator was tumbled
off the ' sho'dders of the other men
and was swallowed up in the cru-h.
In Kesington, the mill district,
a crowd of big proportions was
cnargeu ny mourned onicers. I wo
Person? wei- injured by blows from
the officers' clubg and three arrests
were made. -
A large mass meeting of the strik
ers was held in the Central Labor Un
ion Hall. Three thousand people
poured into the building. Meetings
were held i-iniultaneously on the sec
ond and third floors.
The committee of ten representing
ithe labor unions tonight Issued a pro-
'aI the transit company for set-
. I nltuinl litf niiKitiicitlti - flint- 4 W si m r n
'".
who went on strike to be reinstated
first. It is not thought the transit
officials will change their attitude.
OVER NIAGARA FALIS
Two. Men Thrown From Skiff Mile
and a Half Above Believed to
Have Perished.
Niagara Falls, N. Y., March !.
Two men, thrown from a row boat
that; overturend in the current of
Niagara river one and a half miles
above the falls, this afternoon are re
ported by the state reservation offi
cials to have been swept over tiie
Horseshoe Falls.
Employes of the reservation saw
the overturning of the hoat. watched
.it,, mcn Ktru!,cie a,,ainst the current
and witnessed the efforts of one man
to swim out. The wrecked boat was
seen, a few minutes later below the
falls.
MRS. CUNNESS AGAIN
Man Says She is In Grand Rapids,
Mich., and Asku Sheriff to
Go Get Her.
La Porte, lnd March B. The "dis
covery" of Mrs. Belle Gunness, the
La Porte murderess, this time in
Grand Rapids, Mich., is announced by
Louis Richmond, who today urged
Sheriff Antiss to send a depriy to
the Michigan city to arrest the wom
an. Richmond says she answers
"very description of Mrs. Gunness,
and came to Grand Rapids immedi
ately after the fire that destroyed the
Gunness home.
SLOW PROGR
:ss.
Wolllngton, Wash.,
March
Slow progress was inado today by
the men excavating In the death
gorge, where the Great Northern
train wag" hurled Into the gorge and
burled by an avalanche Tuesday, and
.today. Rotary plows and hundreds
of men are working night and day
toward Wellington from both sides
of the Cascades. When the engines,
with chains, cables and derricks, 'ar
rive, the ruin will be explored rap
idly.,,,. .,. V. 4 ; v
Coroner J, C. Snyder, who estl
mate the number of dead af more
than a
hundred, believes all of the
bodies
wlil be recovered within a
, ,
ek,(
E INDICTED
ON 13 COUNTS
CHARGED WITH FIRST DEGREE
MURDER IN TWO OF THE
11 TRUE BILLS.
STRYCHNINE TABLETS
Alleged to Have Been Given Col. and
Chrisman Swope by Hyde
Other Ind'ctments Cover
Typhoid Cases.
Kansas City, Mo., Dr. R. Clarke
Hyde, husband of the niece of the
late Thomas H. Swope, was indicted
on thirteen counts In eleven indict
ments returned by tho grand jury that
has been . Investigating ; the Swope
mystery . for the last three weeks, at
! : :!0 o'clock, tonight. , V "
Two indictments charge first degree
murder in connection with the deaths
of Colonel Swope and. Chrisman
Swope. Dr. Hyde is alleged to have
given them strychnine tablets.
One indictment accuses Dr. Hyde
of manslaughter by bleeding .lames
Hunton, cousin of Colonel Swope, in
a neglectful manner.
Most surprising, are the eight in
dictments in connection wiUi the al
leged poisoning Of the Swope family
and visitors and attendants of . the
Swope household. Dr. Hyde is ac
cused in these indictments, which
contain ten. counts, of poisoning with
typhoid genns with intent to murder
Margaret Swope, Stella Swope, Sarah
Swope, Lucy Lee Swope, Nora Bell
Dickinsin, George F. Coinpton, Mil
dred Kox nnd Leonora Copridge. a
colored girl. All of these persons
were stricken with typhoid fever
while Dr. Hyde was attending th?
Swope family.
Capiases for the arrest of Dr. Hyde
will not bo issued until Monday. He
is at present under $50,000 bond in
connection with the case now pending
against him in Justice Loar's court In
independence, charging him with the
murder of Col, Swope.
Prosecutor Virgil Conkling said
that as soon as Dr. Hyde is arrested
on the charges brought by the grand
jury the case in the Independence
court will be dismissed. It has been
continued three times.
Dr, Hyde received the news of the
indictments calmly.
When the trial of Dr. Hyde will
begin is problematical. It may bo
(Concluded on Seventh Page.)
A GERMAN EXPEDITION
To
Go to South Pole Hat Virtually
Been Arranged by Lieut.
Filchner, Explorer.
Berlin, March 5. A German south
polar expedition has virtually been
arranged by Lieut. Filchner, of the
general army, under the auspices of
the Geographical Society. Filchner
announced at a meeting of the society
this evening that the expedition
would start in October of this year
If the necessary funds are' forthcom
ing. '..; V, '
Filchner U a well known pxnlorer
and was one of the first to reach
Lhassa, Thibet. In 1JW3 and 1905 be
lexplored Turkestan and Persia..
-MLUorr WolO iTctl Yf , N s- .
C P, C&Z?- " "h ) WPT HovS.) Pc-Acrj 7A.uk. I
EABLf DAYS OF
THE REPUBLIC
SEEN IN VALUABLE LETTERS
AND DOCUMENTS FOUND IN
ATTIC OF THE CAPITOL BY
HOUSE MEMBERS.
Washington, March 5 In an tin
lighted and cob webbed corner of the
attic of the house of representatives,
covered with dust and yellow and
falling to, pieces from age, the house
committee on accounts has rescued
large letters and documents of the
early days of the. republic, which are
of the greatest historic value. Among
them are letters from Washington,
Jefferson, Lafayatte, Hay and Mon
roe. ' .'' ''
Two of them are letters written .by
Martha Washington and Mary Todd
Lincoln, - the former concerning the
proposed removal of tne body of her
misnan.; irom mount, vcrnon to tne
crypt hi the capitol and the other, ap-",
plying to the government for a pen
sion. ; Both are " addressed to the
speaker of the house. The house to-
jday voted an appropriation of $2,500
to" hare these historic papers cared
for and deposited in the library of
congress as t'je "house of representa
tives' collection.
FARMAN BREAKS RECORD.
" Mourmelon, France, March 5.
Henry Farman today established a
new world's re'ord for anasroplanc
flight with two passengers, remain
ing !n the c'.r for one hour and ten
minutes. '
Going to Meet Roosevelt.
Pfll P flATFQ AfiC QLT! statement made upon Information fur
UULI Ufl I LU nlit ' Otl nished by others, whereas, Pinchot,
This Season's Tournaments Assigned
By Directors of Western Golf
Association Yesterday.
Chicago, March 5.-Following Is
the assignment of the dates for the
coming season, announce, todav hv
the directors of the Western Golf As
sociation: ' Western Amateur Championship,
Mlnikahda Club, Minneapolis, July
25-30.
Olympic Cup, Mlnikahda Club, Min
neapolis, July 23.
Western open championship, Bev
erly Country Club, August 31- Sept 2.
Westward Ho Golf Club open tour
nament, July 7-9.
Calumet Country Club, open tour
nnment, July 12-1 G.
Skokie Country Club, invitatiow
tournament, July 19-23,
Tom Morris Memorial Trophy,
June 10. ,
ANOTHER DISASTER
IN THE MOUNTAINS;
I DEAD, 6.MISSING
Tacoma, Wash., March 5.- -A mes-
sage here tells of a slide at Moun -
taindale, on the Chicago, MIIwauKe-
and Pnget Sound Railroad thla morn-
Ing. in which one man was killed,
five Injured and five or six missing,
and the missing are HeJIeved to h
dead in the canyon below. .
The conditions in the mountains
are terrible. Sev?ral bridges : have
yone, and in one placa three-quarters
of a mile of track la wiped out. - In
spots the track la under fifty foet of
rock, trees and, snow.
I IDS
HIS TESTIMONY
AND FORMER SECRETARY GAR
FIELD GOES ON THE WIT
NESS STAND.
ADJOURNMENT IS TAKEN
By Investigaora Till Next Thutsday
Garfield Givet History of Ad
minictra't.fcn of In
terior Office.
Washington. March r,, Gilford Pin
phot concluded his part in the Bnllin-ger-Pinchot
inquiry today, and James
H. Garfield, former secretary of the
interior, and other prominent mem
bers of the Roosevelt "tennis cabinet"
took, the stand. Garfield had only
fairly started the testimony, how-
ever, when adjournment was taken
until Thursday next.
Pmchot's story ended with the re
iteration of the fact that he had lit
tle or no personal knowledge cf the
facts to which he had called atten
tion and with a general defense of tho
forest service. Ho summed up the
various "inferences" he desired the
committee to draw from the docu
ments previously Introduced and from
the statements of witnesses yet to
come, . '
Abort tho only interesting point
made by Attorney Vertress during
;the day was his suRgestlon to the
committee that Pinchot had charged
t'alllnger . with "wilful , deception of
the president," for a possible mis-
in defending himself for having made
misstatements to the president like
wise oh information of others, de
clared that he only made a "simple
mistake,"
During the hour and a half he was
fin thrt btan.l 11'II-MmI.I nrnut tnl, a
detailed history of his administration
'of the affairs of the department of the
interior, especially with respect to
the withdrawal of lands containing
water power sites. He declared that
there had been no subterfuge, no
dealing In the dark.
uartieid insisted that the super
visory power of the executive to
withdraw and hold lands from entry
'had' existed from the beginning of
'Mir,. irAi.npntiwi.tt ,1,1. 1 .,nt, nn int.ni.fint
nit,- pis Y t;t ium. 11 1, ii 1 ill r n;. O.II I II II l I I'll L
right, vested in the president as cus
todian of public property. As to the
charge that power site withdrawals
were too large, Garfield said he
thought a great mistake had been
made In not making some of them
larger. , . , ...
24-HOUR A DAY CLUB
Of the Washington Y. M. C. A. Hears
President Taft's First Anni
versary Address.
Washington, Mar di 5. President
Taft made his first anniversary
speech last night at a dinner of th
1 twenty-four hour day club of the Y.
M. C. A. The president frankly said
that being" president was no easy Job.
I 'Yon call this the twenty-four hour
a day club. I don't know of any
other institution entitied to bear that
(name, except possibly the presidency
of the United States. Other offices
or the government pan be filled by a
number of different persons, but as
long as the president is alive and
.kicking, It Is twenty-four hours a day
for him."
L
ESTIMATE CUT
SIX MILLION DOLLARS LESS
THIS YEAR THAN LAST
ADMIRAL VON TIRPITZ AN
SWERS CRITICISMS.
Berlin. March 5, The German
naval estimate this year is $0,Oon,-
000
tea? than last, year's lgures, ac-
i-oniiiiK ui Admiral von nrpitz, ma
tin" minister, who spoke before the
Reich fas today. Replying to Count
OpperdorlT s criticism of the. govern
ment's policy it) the construction' 'of
warships on loans, and the Krupp
monopoly on armor plate, Admiral
.Von Tirpitz said that the .ystem of
GERMAN
loans for warship building ..world practically on party lines, the senate
hf,"e,l1.9n'i,afttr!!leh mr ?Tt"the cIoso of the session of tho
ships would be bunt from product . . , , . . :. .
ti-.yation. legislative day, March 3, today passed
Continuing, the marine minister, 'he administration postal s:rv!ngi
said that all -attempts of the German bank Mil. , ,v v ,
Hungry hi umiw nun oroU to,
break tut the Krupp monotioly
bai
failed, but he b. rred tjo iious
that:
German v obtained , better armor
plates than anv other country.
Chancellor Von l-eihrnnnn-Ho'tweg
made a strikingly pacific speech on
international relation
"Our relations .w id -England. Hi
ciear open neiore everybody s eyes.
It is not necwarv to rnnent tbnt nui-
fleet is not for Bircres-Ive mirnnse.t.
but for the prelection .'of our coasts
and commerce."
T
ON SHIP SUBSIDV
MEASURE INTRODUCED BY HUM
PHREY IN HOUSE DENOUNCED
AS A DELUSION AND A SNARE
BY DEMOCRATS.
Washington, March B. Tho admin
istration ship Buhsldy bill, Introduced
by Representative Humphiey, of
Washington, was denounced as ltia(
ing unfairly "with congress and the
people," and as being "a delusion and
X " share, shrewdly devised 'to Satch
the unwary and mislead public sen
sentiment," In the minority report
filed today by seven , Democratic
members of the committee on mer
chant marine and fisheries, led by
Representative Spight, of MIsiKS'ppi.
The minority report declared that
the profit now derived ' by the govern
ment from handling ocean mall would
be absorbed by th j Morgan .syndicate
ami other lines on the Atlantic coast
and by the Sprockets ftne on the
Pacific coast, so that no new lines
would have the opportunity of shar
ing in the subsidy. The report urges
the passage of tho subsidy bill t
cently introduced by Rei.re entati vc
sjnlfri,,
UNITED STATES TELEPHONE
COMPANY WILL COMMENCE
CUTTING AGAINST THE TELE
PHONE AND TELEGRAPH
rr I
Cleveland, Ohio, March 5..The
Ii IT R
FIRST STEP III
THE BATE WAD
first move in the possible r-te wan,mnl8 from '"S the funds to relieve
was made here today by th United
States Long Distance Telephone
Company again-1 tho Telephone and
Teleeraph Company. Control ovtr
the former corporation, which in
cludes the local Cuyahoga Company,
was recently obtained bv the Mor
gan interests, wKie their opponent..'
control all the Hell Tolophono Lines.
Tho formal decision to cut prlceii
was made at a in ;et,lng of the direc
tors of the United States Company
when President DavK of Columbus,
was authorized to reduce and read
just rates according to his own dis
cretion so as to meet competition.
Attended To.
The Vicar (to eexton) Why don't
you see that tho seats In the church
are dusted now and then, Tombs?"
Tombs (the sexton) "I do, sir, the
Congregation does it every Sunday
morning, sir." Philadelphia Inquirer.
AMBITION GONE, REBELS
ARE HASTILY RETREATING
Managua, March 5.---Following the
recent dlsa-trotis defeat, the revolu
tionary forces are reported' to tie
llsbanding, nearly 200 mea having
lesterted in the vicinity of San
Vicente within the last week.
The government authorities now ad
mit the insurgents were vtctorlo'iK
In the battle of St Vicente and lu
the fighting: last week at EI Morrtto.
small town on the coajt of Lake
Nicaragua, east of San Ubanado, and
Jthe retreat of the insurgents after
POSTAL BANK
BILL
AND U. S. SENATE CLOSES THE
LEGISLATIVE DAY
MARCH THIRD.
OF
ONLY ONE DEMOCRAT
Voted For the Measure, All Others
Voting Againat ItSeveral
Amendments to the
Bill Adopted.
Washington, March 6. Drhing
nf (b 7, raaf
favor of the bill, and 22 against U:
All the negative votes were cast hv
Democrats, even McEnery, ", who had
voted with the Republicans through
out the consideration f the bill. In
the end lining himself up with hi
own party. Senator Chamberlain, of
Oregon, was the only Democrat who
stood with the Republicans
Tnc 1)111 authorizes various money
u,u,;r posioniccs to accept sums irom
one dollar or more from the deposi
tors, and , to deposit these sums In
local banks, where the money la to
remain unless withdrawn by the
president In case of war or other
exigency. In case of this withdrawal
the funds are to be invested in gov
ernment securities but with the pro
viso -that such securities shall not
draw less than 2' iter cent Interest.
Control of the funds Is vested in a
board of trustees composed of the
postmaster general, secretary of the
treasury and attorney general. The
aggregate balance allowed any d"
poslter is $5 )0 and no person will be
permitted to deposit moie than $IM)
in one month. The government la re
quired . to pay two per ;cent interest
and must exact not less than Vk Wf
cent from the banks, an extra quarter
of one per cent being required for the
payment of expenses and losses.
It is calculated that such a law,
would bring much money otit of hid
ing and result In a fund ranging from
live million to one billion dollars.
The first vote was taken on the
hCunimins amendment to the Sinoot
amendment, which looked to the au
thorization of the withdrawal from lo
cal banks of postal funds in case of
war or other exigency, and Cummins
sought, to modify t by making It ap
ply to war as the only exigency jus
tifying withdrawals. The CummltiB
provision went, down under a vote of
40 nays against 18 yeas, the affirma
tive vote being cast by the so-called
"insurgent" Republicans anL a half .
dozen pemocrats.
Later' the Smoot amendment was
. ?. I ,1 V"V.? """.T1?
...l...4r..l nftnu I. L , 1 ! .1
ny H" insertion in me anie.numpni, oy
n , . ,, , ...1,1. i
jjjiftH, ifiimillK tllal fllliun WillMlI w 11
should not be invested In government
'securities carrying less than 2 '4 per
cent.
Two fither amendments were agreed
to. One was suggested, by Senator
Bailey, and permits the withdrawal
of postal funds by the original de
positor 'upon demand," and the other
by GaUingor. specifically Including
savings banks . and trust companies
doins a banking business among the
banking Institutions permitted to ac
cent deposits of postal funds.
The "Insurgent" Republicans wer
much elated over the acceptance of
j the Borah modification. They con-
ttnd that it will have the effect of
reducing to a minimum government
securities In which postal funds may
i be invested, and prevent the national
.themselves of a class of securities
which is not popular with them. On
the other hand, It was contended that
the Borah provision would never be
accepted by the house and,, therefore,
will not be a law.
BALLOON RACE DATES.
New York, March 5 The Aer"
Cluly of America, today com
pleted the calendar of balloon races
for the season of 1910. July 5 and C
Aircraft Club, Peoria, 111., (pro
visional.) August 12 Aero Club of
Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind. Septem
ber 17 National championship bal
loon race from Indianapolis.
OLD POLITICIAN DEAD.
Janesvllle, Wis., March 5. Klron
W. Bemis, 08 years old, member of
the Wisconsin legislature In 1858,
died here today.
PASSED
these successes Indicate tbat their
ammunition was scarce.
. Rumors "are cwrwat that General
Charcmorro, the Insvrgert leader, is
anxtotiH to, abandon the struggle, be
ing disgusted with the lack of co
operation from the sympathizers in
the province of Granada,
. The government authorities today
published a cablegram from Panama
that General Chamarro had Impris
oned General Estrada, the ni-ovlston!
president, and had proclaimed him
self yrestdnt.
V, . :..v,',,,. " sft'T-i.Vii'iVrtwl

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