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The Clayton citizen. [volume] (Clayton, Union County, N.M.) 1906-19??, August 10, 1916, Image 3

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The Clayton Citizen
Published every Thursday at Clayton,
Union County, New Mexico, and en
tered at Postofflce at Clayton, New
Mexico, as second class matter under
the Act of March 3, 1879.
E
Official Paper of Town of Clayton
EDWIN WILSON, Editor
Subscription per year $1.00
August 10. 1916
For Governor
SECUNDINO ROMERO
For District Attorney
HON. ORLE L. PHILLIPS
WANTS AN EFFECTIVE SYS
TEM OF RURAL CREDITS.
We propose to promote by
every practicable means our
agricultural Interests, and we In
clude in this program an effec
tive system of rural credits.
We lavor tlis wise conservation
of our natural resources. We
desire not only that they shall
be safeguarded, but that -they
shall be adequately developed
and used to the utmost public
advantage. From Mr. Hughes'
speech of acceptance.
HUGHES POINTS THE WAY
The speech of the Repúblicas earn-
AldaU for President was a keynote
tpteoh. Indeed. ' Not one person 1
the great aualeace at the Carnegie
Hall meeting was In doubt for one
moment at U just what he meant by
everything he said.
His address was comprehensive, log
leal, clear and all sufficient (or the
ocasión. There can be no dispute
as to this. Plainly Mr. Hughes It a
man who "knows what he wantt when
ke wantt it," and it it the opinio
f political authorities who heard him
and who have since read his remarks
Chat be knows, also, how to get It.
K was incumbent npon the Repub
lics! candidate to confine the scope
f kit remarks to the -limitations of
Che occasion, but his crushing analy
sis of the shortcomings of the pres
ent administration of the government
Is merely an earnest of what the tone
and the contents of his speeches will
ta when he gets on tha s'.utup.
At Carnegie Hall Mr. Hughei ad
verted to every general question that
Is apt to be a serious issue In the
campaign and In language that will
he absolutely clear to every man or
woman able to read he stated his
plnlone. hit convictions and his pur
poses. On the stump he will argue
those points la detail. At an orator
he It eloquent, his personality attrac
tive and his marshalling of facts so
cohesive that he holds hit audience
to the end. He maket it easy 'for
them to follow him and hit points
aire not lost.
There was nothing equivocal, noth
ing apologetic in the Republican can
dldata's saeech of acceptance. He
called a spade a spade, and the unani
mous opinion of those who heard him
was that he shot to the center and
rang the bell. The Republican cam
paign is now open, and those who
will speak and write and work for
the success of the Republican ticket
can wish for no more adequate cam
paign document, no more satisfactory
statement of issues than are found la
the candidate's salutatory.
MUNITIONS PLANTS TO BE
, SCRAPPED
The greatest munitions plant ever
developed by this or any other country
the aggregate plant that has given
us our "war babies" and "war brides
and the Allies the ammunition to stop
the German drive is about to be
thrown on the scrap heap.
At the very moment when the peo
pie have been brought to realize the
American government s poverty in
war preparedness, the factory that
might glV. us that preparedness is to
be discarded unused.
This factory is the combined ma -
chinery and investment of the private
concerns which leaped into the muni
tions business at the call of Europe.
Almost every town in the United
States has had a taste of the prosper
ity resulting from the munitions bus
iness. There is scarcely a prosperity
resulting from or other has not been
manufacturing for the war needs of
Europe. To do this work a vast quan
tity of special machinery has been
installeu. It has been installed at a
high cost, an extravagant cost, but
Europe has paid every nickle of this
cost.
And now, with such a plant at the
disposal of our own government, in
stead of using it for our own pre
paredness we are permitting it to be
scrapped. Who is responsible? A
short-sighted administration in Wash
ington. A short-sighted Democratic
Congress.
N
PI-LINES
H
R
U
The black -lines embellishing this
paragraph indicate that the writer
has Shuffled Off. No such Luck. It
means, simply, that Pi Lines must
wander forth in search of another
Column In which to parade. We may
find such a meal ticket in Union coun
ty, maybe in New Mexico and per
haps not at all, depending largely up
on whether the employer has ever
read Pi Lines. (Readers are at lib
erty to twist the meaning of latter
part of the foregoing sentence to suit
his or her particular fancy.) We take
with us our justly celebrated - crea
tions, Bill Greenpole and his ex-wife
and Sadie Veré de Vere. Though
Miss Vere de Vere has acquired a du
bious reputation following her abduc
tion and forced detention in local po
litical rendevous we feel that she has a
fighting chance on the New Meal
Ticket. The kind and tolerant indul
gence of readers of this column and
the many compliments apropos The
Citizen under our guidance will be
remembered long after we are forgot
ten. Adverse comment we have al
ready forgotten except for its teach
ing. The new field holds new advent
ure, likewise the job of winning a
new audience. The change is accept
ed with genuine regret. This, ladies
and gentlemen, constitutes our best
tribute to Union county folks. Adios.
3
' Many newspapers in New Mexico
have their little "special feature" de
partments, usually conducted by some
member of the editorial force wherein
that member has the fun of airing
personal observations. F'instance the
New Mexican sports "Jabs in the So
lar Plexus," the Albuquerque Journal,
Pep and Punch," the Clayton News
has "Claytonetts" The Citizen has a
lovely assortment of "Pi Lines," (read
ers of Clayton papers say Clayton
etts and "Pi Lines" are very, very
clever.) But the one in the state that
strikes our individual notion is "Life
in Our Town" a typographically
quaint corner of The Silver City En
terprise. F. A. Bush is the chap who
grinds out dope and following is an
episode of a waif kitten which, owing
to circumstances over which the kit
ten had no control, narrowly missed
being named "Woodrow." The story
follows:
MATT FOWLER
WAS OUT LATE
ONE NIGHT LAST week
AT A PICTURE show
OR SOMETHING
AND HE WAS walking
ON SIXTH street
AND HE heard something
AND LOOKED down
AND THERE was a kitten
RUBBING ITSELF
AGAINST HIS shoes
AND HE PICKED it up
AND SAT it on the steps
OF THE Baptist church
AND TOLD it to be good
AND IT purred
AND MATT told it
HE LIVED with Fred Borenstein
AND FRED hated pets
AND WHEREVER it lived
IT OUGHT to go home
AND MATT put it down
AND WENT on
AND LOOKED back
AND IT was hikin right after him
AND MATT stopped
AND IT cried
AND MATT told it
IT WASN'T right
FOR A LITTLE kitten
TO BE following
1 STRANGE MEN
SO LATE at night
- . AND IT purred
AND MATT got sore
AND SCOLDED
AND LEFT it
AND LOOKED back
AND IT WAS coming
AS FAST as it could
AND MATT turned his head
THE OTHER way
AND TRIED to forget it
AND COULDNT
AND STOPPED
AND PICKED it up
AND TOLD it to keep quiet
AND PUT IT under his coat
AND TOOK it to his room
AND FIXED a bed on the chair
AND PUT out the lights
AND WHEN he woke up
IN THE morning
THE DARNED little thing
WAS ALL CUDDLED up
á&rrrW'T-- ñ' ira
Hi .
"My Good Mm. tW
UNDER HIS arm
AND SOUND asleep
AND IT WOKE
AND COMMENCED meowing
FOR ITS breakfast ,
AND MATT had to meow
TO FOOL Borenstein
WHO DOESN'T like little cats
AND FRED is around telling
THAT HIS friend Matt
MEAOWS LIKE a cat
AND MATT presented the kitten
TO THE Enterprise
AND ASKED us to name it
WOODROW
BECAUSE OF its beautiful notes
BUT IT Isn't a Woodrow
SO WE decided on
CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT
BECAUSE SHE put one over
ON CHARLEY HUGHES
I THANK YOU
Page 3 Col 2 Pi Lines
The high price of spring frys leads
us to believe that hens have been post
ing up on birth control.
Even though Villa is reported as
"on crutches" he continues to qualify
as international phantom.
-With Old Sol batting 105 in the
HER SILVER TRESSES
PUT HER IN PICTURES
Zadee Burbsink, Metro Actress,
Fine Type of Grand Da-.ne
Zadee Burbank, who has played
many "grand dame" roles in Metro
wonder-plays, is again seen in a
prominent part in "The Eternal
Question," a new five-part Popular
Plays and Players' production. Mrs.
Burbank is an excellent typ:, and
her services are always in demand.
She has an abundance of silvery
white hair and the features of a
true aristocrat. Mrs. Burbank did
not go into motion pictures until a
.Zapee BURBANK
little more than a year ago, when a
director induced her to take up the
work after seeing her hair.
Mrs. Burbank's hair turned white
within a week when she was quite
young. There were three sudden
deaths in her family, including the
death of her husband, and the shock
and worry attending caused the
phenomena of her hair changing
color. She is a descendant of the
famous old Watts family in Phila
delphia. She was born in Watts
street, which was named after the
family. Mrs. Burbank has the dis
tinction of being the "first girl that
ever walked over the Brooklyn
Bridge. She was sixteen years old
when it was completed, and she ac
companied the committee of men
who walked over the rough planks
'aid over the iron girders.
en.-i an.-
tnt Forget AnvthiuK
CUTE! to Ira Tn M
shade on the border it Is reasonable
to assume there are no "raw" re
cruits, not even "rare."
Anticipated vacations make the
daily grind more difficult.
POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
T. J. Crumley announces his can
didacy for the republican nomination
for sheriff of Union county, and ear
nestly solicits your support in the
republican convention
Preparedness
The nation's problem, is the vi
tal issue in your life, young man!
Will you tackle life half awake;
half developed, half efficient?
Or will you buck the line with
your mind alive, .trained and
card- indexed for use as your
opportunities call?
The Untrained man may win
but the odds are against him.
WHY TAKE THE CHANCE?
The University
of New Mexico
AT ALBUQUERQUE
is ready to prepare you. In your
home state University you can
get a thorough college education
at an actual, necessary cost of
$195.00 a year; and if you will,
you can earn the money as you
go. Sixty percent of the students
in this University are doing it.
New Mex. Needs
Trained Men
Opportunity waits for them. At
present 80 University students
are earning the money for next
year's college expenses in good
jobs held out to them by men
eager for even half trained men.
Tlie University
Opens
August 22nd
Time enough to arrange for
your course if you act NOW
For complete information
Address
David I. Uoyd
PRESIDENT
Albuquerque
New Mex.
JOSUPIl
ATTORNEY -A
CLAYTON, NE.
eoi. E. u. j
Public Auct
I cry sales any vA
sales a specialty. 1
guaranteed. ' Rates re.
Call, write or wire me for
MT- DORA, NEW MEXICO
WOODWARD & BLUE
Attorneys at Law
Telephone Exchange Buildit
Clayton, N. SI.
Summer cottar A a speciaVty.
Established 1911
SCOTT B. WILLIAM
Real Estate and Insurance
Notary Public
Cloudcroft, Otero County, N.
!COL. J. A. SOWERS
AUCTIONEER
Farm Sales a Specialty
Commission 1 per cent
Write or Phone me for Dat
Wanette, N. "M. '
SEE G) C. SMITH '
For Real Estate and Insurer
Contest Cases Handled ;
Efficient!
Office in First Nafl Bmk
0
I.' O; o. f .
Clayton Loó
Meetings every
7:30, in I. O. O. .,.
mer Building. Visitii...
bers always welcome.
H. H. Errett, N. G.
R. S. Holmes, Secy.
Fidelity Abstract 1 1
INCORPORATED
. ABSIRAasUil, "
C0YF.YAMG,
NOTARY
D. A. PADDOCK
SECRETARY
Clayton - . New Mex.
j'
HILL BROS.
And Gcncrel Hauling.
Phone 58-e.
H. L. McNEEL
Dealer in
rafJiisisp
Wall Paper, Paints, Oils, Varnishes,
Window Shades, Linoleums, Plaster
Board, Wall Board, etc.
A postal card brings samples to res
dence for Inspection.
CLAYTON
:"'T ivr'v"- ' " -

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