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The Daytona daily news. [volume] (Daytona, Fla.) 1903-1926, January 02, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93063916/1922-01-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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'::Lz:iji?:onal
- TIE WEATHER
Fair tonight and Sunday; not much
chang in temperature. Moderate
shifting wind.
LOW TC3
ON TIS OCE All C2AC1I
Today t 3:22
Tomorrow ..4:12
DAYTONA. FLORIDA. MONDAY. JAN. 2, 1922.
5 CENTS PER COPY, OR 20 CENTS PER WECC
J
X II II I!
i i M iii i i 1 1
HHRQ - PPT S?P
I
cm- pass
liCS PDEtM OF DEATH OF SEI1T00 PEHOOSE IS
-'.
MB. SAY
FOLLOWED TODfl. BY MllE
for his iff oraEposiii
rcrra out
7C! 3 LESSON
PV;2 STATES.
cr
CEt:::ETT-SIIELLY
feature of
) Crrrt! Each Other in
7 IZjrn, Tartkalarry on
; c3-Ccrman Cables.
H:NGT0N. Jan. 2
V Washington was amazed
The marriage of Miss Frances A.
Shelly to Clarence R. Bennett was
solemnised at high noon today in the
First Congregational church on Volu
sia avenue.
The church was most tastefully
decorated with a profusion of bamboo,
palms and sm.lax, with a large wed
ding bell of white and evergreen sus-
above the altar. A special
the decorations was 22
lighted candles, significant of tin: new
year.
, f becoming suit ot hand embroidered
j white georgette, trimmed in satin
rosebujanosiilt French lace, wiUi
silk nToline hat draped with a gorgeous
, while plume; white kid beaded slip
pers and carried a beautiful bouquet
of bride's roses and lilies of the val
J at the sensational disclosure j
i 'Jeged secret agreement be- Tho groom was neatly dressed in I
i France and Japan for the! a becoming suit of navy blue. j
; Uatkino. ' Tn ceremony commenced wit.ii an!
..hment here in Washing-, ()rgan ,)V Mrs Artnui. N oti . ;
i taeur mutual aims in the r ar j aD, wa, f0iiowe,j i,y a sdo by .Mrs.!
I representatives of the Far I. M. Ramsey, sister of the bride.
' (China) republic declared! At the first sound of the weddine;
Uve additional evidence 0fimrt"h- lh,e fo!'"ins bridesmaid and j
. . , a I ushers entered : Misses Margaret Stan-j
Tt intrigues on the Asiatic j torl Mild,,,,) Simmons. Keba Harris,!
And. i Julia Zachary. Messrs. .1. A. Hazard. I
' Ted Myers, Richard Niven. Jr., aud i
cNittt ask Cor jeore.scuta tion in t'urtis Gardiner. . j
j&Jerence. all we ask for is a! N(,xt pntered the matron of honor.
to tell our story," said, M. 8v.r- j Mrt) w Kamsev, dressed in a h;i'i '
one 01 tne leaocrH r me 11 i tifijl dress of white silk lace over blue
SCRAMBLE IS ON FOR THE
POSITIONS HELD BY
DEAD SENATOR.
i WASHINGTON. Jau. 2- The death
of Senator Penrose leaves ti big pap
; in the Republican ''old guard'' ieailer
ship vhich had already besun today
to bring about an upheav.il in the
i National and -State politics of the
-. party in which he was such a con
: sp'cnous figure for so many jcars.
While th body of the Scnat r rest
: fd in his Philadelphia home, propar
Iftniv to the inneral a scramble for
the important R-'pubiiean committe.'
: assignments in the Senate rendered
; vacant by li it death was under way.
j Senator .Mcf'iimb.'r. of North I'al-:
i oti. ranking republican member of
i the all-hnporf ant. Senate Finance
i Committee, was s'.atr-d to succeed
: Penrose as it's ririirnr.n by the nis
i toniary rule of Seniority.
I Tf." vacancies on tile banUnm and
I currency, iinnigration and naval af
fairs commitiee-, of which Penrose
! bart b nc been a member, were to be
j filled by th" Republican committee on
com m it tees.
Republic;' n memhers of the Senate
"agricultural bloc" were casting
longing eves upon trie openings oi
fered 1,'iem in the banking and cur
rencv and til" tinance -ommittees left
by tie? death of the PptiKylvuni.i
Senate-. A clash lietweeii t!iMn :u;il
R'-pMblici-n Senate; frota Ka:-tern
m delegation. "We ifero denied
Ting, and therefore wo look re; I
b to the only method we have-",
,ling to world opinion.
le lx:uients which we made
t speak for themselves. We
(others, which it may be udvis- '
lit bring to public attention."
B far easlerijcr:! were frank to ;
(they did not have the original;
i of the alleged Franco-Japanese;
ment. These, they asserted, re-j
in the archives of the foreign '
H at- Paris and Tokio. While ;
-arefully refrained from disrlos-
he source iof their information, j
wpression was obtained that the ;
nents weer obtained in Tokio.
kdally the I nited States can take',
gnizance of the detalis made by i
Iberians, but the matter is caus-;
n "unofficial" situation. The I
f department was ilosed today!
oWcials w ould, of course, make j
Dminent.
t revelations of the far eastern-1
iowever. were uuickly seized
(by opponents of the conference.'
Senator Borah, for one, pointed
ie inciilent as an "object lesson
ie t'nited States." i
e members of the Senate tor
relations committee professed
o be surprised at the reported j
face of a Franco-Japanese en-:
They had suspected as much.
a stated by one. ever since the
t communications conference. ,
h met In' Washington soma i
is ago to arrange the disposition :
le former Cerman cables. ;
informed of the developments of
conferem e by Norman Davis, at,
time undersecretary of stale,
represented the I'nited States
e conference. Davis appeared
fre the committee at a number of
it sessions, lie disclosed tuat
ce and Japan had supporte.d each
practically at every turn in the
lation of the ex-German cables.,
he is understood to have ex i
sed the 'opinion at that time that
kinco-.laiine?e entte was being:
ged. if it did not already esist.
lay's development indicated:
ly that whatever else may result;
the revelations tnad" by the Chita
sentatives. the Alleged Franco .
,nese alliaue w j i ciiine i for.
comment when the Senate gets:
(i to the job of ratifying the work
e confereu e.
The disclosures as to the Fraiico
nese entente uiii or may not he'
L" said Senator P.oiah today, in
Wilting on the aftuirs. "We muet
Irally await further developments'
j bear all sides before we reach
innal conclusions our:-clv s.
Sm;'s impre. -ion. bowi.-vcr. is that
I lsdosure i are ti'ue simply be
O What i allegid to be revealed
r-cb-ely in k'-epin (,.-, wa
things are done.
Take, for instance, the Moroccan
Jr. Tuere was an opi-n i)ubii--hed
ity Ix-tween ertiiii Km opean pow
I and then there as a secret
Foment made let ween two of them,
th wan direi tly in lontradution
Ihe spirit pro) the purpose of the
with a lovely bouquet of pink roses,
followed by the bride. Miss Princes
Shelly, on the arm of her father. I . S
Shelly, wliii proceeded down Cue cen
ter aisle, while the groom. Clarence
R. itenuett. entered le, the side en
trance and was accompanied by his
groomsman, M. I.. Bane.
The ling ceremony was performed
by Rev. W. 1.. Lewis, pastor of the
Congregational rhun li. '
Immediately following the wedding,
the entire wedding party proceeded
to the Shelly home at 127 Crandview
avenue. Seabreeze,, where a wedding
breakfast was served.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarem e Dennett will
leave by auto this afternoon for an
extended wedding trip.
Stat-i-. ho d-:-ire to retain
trot of lii" cymiiiitti es wa
as inevitable.
'. oniplete ie;il,;;n:t;eii
ant orumiiteff assignments
o be worked out. bv tip
l.iiders t ii e cut a n of
Hi-' !;'-p;'bi:eait Heii.i-ori;-
t'. ill',,.- .-.-IS 1:11 " of til
"-M K'.lad" 'I' iaei ,-,. A .
twe -n tile asiricuil utal.
and iiidepetident Senator
putdicaii party, ami their
th-'ir ton
- regarded
oi import
: may h;ve
Republii an
in
r
tin? "big boss" of the Republican or
ganization of his state since the death
of Mat hew Stanley Quay.
; His political enemies at home, grow
ing increasingly restive under his
leadership, were ready to eize t lie
reins he held when Senator Knox died
and the appointment of a successor
i fell to Governor Sproiil, with whom
Penrose was no longer on . friendly
, terms.
- White House influences prevented
an open broach, however, and Sen-
i-ator Crow, himself a sick nan. was
appointed to fill Knox's place as a
nioiiis of patching nn a temporary
jtrip- between the Penrose and anti
Penrose forces in Pennsylvania.
Crow had joined with Sprout in ou.-t-
; ing tae Penrose speaker of the House
at Harrisburg during the fight be
tween the Penrose ar.d anti-Penrose
factions earing tlie last session of the
Pennsylvania legislature. Crow, for
.years Republican state comiuiiieeuian.
had been a Pi si rose ally before the
, "break" with tio- "Hie Hos."
Govi'Viinr Sproul is known to have
senatorial aspirations, and be may
snccned to Penrose's beat in the Sc-n-
j ate, but not without considei a tile op
position from Penrose's friends in t li:
Pennsv Ivania oi 'ga ni.;.i ' ion.
Funeral Arrangements Not Completed.
PlliL.Di:i.PII!.. .bin 2. Arrange,
men's had not been completed this
mo'rniiig for the "funeral of Boies Pen
rose. v ho died Saturday night in
Washington. His brot her. Dr. f'ha.
Crowds at
Reception
at Capitol
Harding Reviyes
Annual Affair
After S Years
i;
r n t
. i -Jill I
- - ,
RATIFICATION ASSUMED
LOSS OF SUC AND HALF BIL
LION DOLLARS IN 1S21
COMPARED WITH 1S23.
p.
B
a iv ;
Colo:
for t
aw.
bi'.'
!.,
in
break
mks,
o-t of
P
re
pro:
of
;.ri'.
lit tie
- situ;
The
o.
SefVi
iv ; !,,
ivania
! lo
d Hi
was
!i'-r. 'ir
He n:
W'il :t
t;ir;
w on
Penr;
final
! frum
pians
t h.
r.
at
I o iv is
e ,
ie.-.l',
i won!
lOSSiilje
iyn-".
s!i of the
Iwnera! is
nro..e had
1 hi.-, death
i qiee! and
- Senator's
IU
pr:
111 v
t i'
BIG GAf.'iE ON THE
COAST TODAY WILL
BE PLAYED IN MUD
, PASADKN'A CALIF.. Jin 2 Th-re
was ever', indicnta.n today that the
Htinmsl Kat versus Wo-.t foot:. ail
. classic of the tournament of rose,, in
; which the un lefei.'ed Wushiiu'ton
; and Jefferson eleven will dash wit'.
! the Cniversity ot Califm nia. v, oi ! ,
' played in a sea of mud. Ileaw run,
i starting eailv etei'dav and contltin
: 'p? over night, thoroughly soaked the
; turf of Tdurnamert park despite ; --
cautions taken by covering the !';.
w it'a t-tr.iv.
To.'.iv brmudit clearing sVv-
: crol w eather. There were indi. i'-n-i
that the 'jaine ,ottid ie- psne j under
I excellent conditions, cv-,t for tin
, muddv tield. The ten, per it n-- v -ideal
for football
The Fastern t
; e:;di
' lllill.li
I'ell'os
i i'eu:i-h
: liven ii
the last
i i'emo. e
; the pOW'
o V
lainif
ill tin
:;ia w
motit :
v. as i
the
n.ite
ml
, WASHINGTON. Jan. 2 The cold
est weather of the winter did not
prevent official Washington, the dip
lomatic correspondents and a goodly
portion of the "general public" from
, turning out en masse today for the
j tirst White House New Year's recep
I tion in eight years,
i This annual custom of a personal
exchange of greetings between the
; chief executive and the public, discon
i tinned during the Wilson administra-
tion, was revived when the President
I and Mrs. Harding took their places
, in the famous Blue Room at 11 o'clock
; io receive the tirst of their thousands
of guests.
The Harding's tirst New Year's re
i s ption promised to eclipse in attend
, am i' and brilliance scores of similar
affairs which have been held at the
White House in past years.
Members of I he cabinet, the Piesid
: i nl's Secret in, Forejgn Ambassa
dors, and the direitors of the Fan
I American union, headed the long line
: of guests. The foreign plenipotentiaries
presented a brilliant picture in their
j gaily colored uniforms, adorned with
! silver and gold brain. A bower of ev
, ergreen and flowers formed a back
' ground for the President and Mrs.
, Harding.
The President's official family drop
ped out of the line when they h id
me, tod the executive and his wife.
and jo : ned with the Harding's in ie
i ceiving t hief Justice Taft and his col
leagues of the supreme court, otiie:
: mi mbers of the judiciary, former
members of the cabinet, and Ambas
sadors and Mmisteis to tie-Stat.-;.
; In tile I'jily afternoon, tl
assistants and directors of all
neut departments were to bp.
d. loi owed by members of
societies. After two o'clock.
DCBL1N. Jan. 2. The tide of senti-j
ment in favor of ratification of the!
Irish peace treaty grew stronger to-J
day on the eve of the meeting of Dan
Kireann. Sinn Fincrs in the Thurles
district, including even the extrem
ists factions, unanimously adopted a
resolution demanding that their rep
resentatives in Daii vote for ratifica
tion. The archbishop of Cashel. in a new
year's sermon said:
1 Hero can be no hope tor a peace-1
ful new year if Dail fails lo ratify tne
pact. Rejection will mean terrorism
and turmoil."
The Thurles district was tint scene
of violent conflicts between the Sinn
Feiners and Hritish military forces
oeioro un1 armistice i .
Farmers of County VYateifmd met American commerce, staggering
at. Dungarvan and adopted a residu-Kinder the greatest annual losses in
tion saying that if the treaty were not j its history, faced the new year to
ratihed. per cent of the voters in j -.i i - i. t
.he e.mn.v unnl.l 1 ,e ,i..i ,r,.c..nl i Wl bright prOSDCCtS for a
;n Dail Kireann. j
Apparently accepting ratification as!
a foregone conclusion, the Sinn Fein I
minister ot labor announced the t re-
ation of t out iliation m:ich ini-rv uith !
power to art immediately to prevent a j ot international business recorded
threatened railway strike. The West-! for this country since before the
meaui council ontereu trie rcpresonta- i
.- .. .. war.
lives oi uiai ouniy in uau to vote lor
ratification.
WOriDTC'IIFEU.
to i:r7 lq fc::it
. oa:.:::3 past m
i Impotts From Great Brxtaaa Show
Decline of $280,000,000 and
Almost Same From Canada.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 2.
complete recovery.
America's world trade during
1921 lotalled only $7,000,000 in
round figures, the lowest volume
HAYS CONSIDERS
MOVING PICTURE
Crnt-
NF.W
. Iler.ll
' (b.l-i
jovern-
ri.'Ci'iv
pat rii ! :
the g.n
( IRK.
Hays .:,
!-iicr.l'e i
pn ti
-it ie
w a - also
! publican
in.-!
i fact: i
k iiiiui
ot" his
t;
!di
parly
s! rile,
as dm i:
:Tu! lit
rum !i
Veal s ,
EIGHT ABOVE ZERO
IN NEW YORK TODAY
mi
i 're-,
public wa- to
dent and Mrs.
"open
til-
be
Ha
ems
admitted,
ling or.t
' until :
iit
111!
:w
i ;;k
it: Hh
.1.1!
sen
: ui
n 1
tu-y a;
LET'S HOPE THIS ONE REACHES THE GOAL.
ateil with w
ruin has kot th
rising and Coo h
ported to be
Califronia t-'im I
nr
m
oi l. !,
field.
keep
1 111 W.i
ondit
! em p-'-raf u -v
N'eaie's men
lb nt muddev
;el hoped for
P. i v
a -
ut an- no -!ou- !i
The wet field will
tl-e- .-core dow n to
the football
a r
fa-t ti
mii'-ldy
ate to
limit.
trida v.
P.ett;n-J h
on filiform
Fven money
California will win by !
dowiu-. There was pb nty
money n sight, indicating
of the V,' & J supporters
d -h:n. d r
. to 2 to 1
was beinir
pr-
m "
arlv
iCH'i
I w o
of
Ce
il tl
iron:
e re
Th
il ry
i .Ti a
to-i.r
d ih:
t-,,
.1 -te
belli
e aii
ity of their team to tike tlie m,
of th" California "wonder"
which has not tasted defeat o
sej-ons. and las vear c-iiiuuere'l
State oil the same field. 2s t i
n t.i
been
h:.
treaty w hit )i w as gi
"All this has now
beyniid any doubt.
lli et the CXis'ence ,,f t
agreement was denied over
again by the powers that,
apd by the foreign miliist
governments whit npo'e ii
stab'
torii
t Vi ,,
Ohi-
-' i ; -fa.
i MU51 5k.P HR,50.M
! COUtO'T QUlTe ?ACW
U 5o ill Turn The '
' ; vto8 oves To Vbu-
! u A'y ) NOW make Good! j
I.
According to the, depart-
j ment of commerce, this represent-
ed a loss of $6,500,000,000 over
i ihe volume of commerce trans
j acted in 1920, the "peak." year in
j American trade.
' The. downward plunge of the iia-
nnmviflkl wmtnT n,s ronvHerce, However, tialted in
PliSiTlli'j Rr rllRT 1 thp un "f last year-anl iu ' miK-r
I UWlllUllf ICLi Ulll j reports showe I an upward trend had
started. Government experts today
Postmaster : were optiniistie of th New Year, con
,i b- would I lidently predicting a - sharp recovery
erati-ii 10 an, in American world traae. Both 1111-
n the motiov1 ports and exports felt the full force of
iii-lu-tiy of a bichly p ud ; o : depression during 1321, although gov-
l i rnnient experts were quick to' de
ti ie- tact I h..v. le. eivd a ' dare the declines "only natural" after
s iiiui U-n. I i -tier fimii the mo i the pak year of 1 S2. Imports for
t'tte :ndi!-rrv ." Hav - said. 1 l it year, totalling only $2,r.Kt.0'.'.
,e t-i 'n-.t n i -et.ta'ive. .a were less than half of the imports of
. -!: in W.i-li iitti n .f.nuarv the year previous and iu the last livj
a full .u d H ink -i'--en- .'-ii I years. Similarly, the total exports,
a uiv. my .Ui-w :." atiiounu'ng in roun-f tiguies to S4.5(H.-
ikiii oimi. At re onlv tier ent of the
i rcvious yeai's totil. an 1 also the low
est ie -orded in the last five years.
On-- -i-rions condition revealed by
ihe year's commercial reports wau the
iraiii oi vn ports over exports. In 1 SI 9
lie- -j,i:ts held the lead by $3.2.-
i.ii
id t.
onid
::oun
COMPTROLLER OF
CURRENCY FINDS
PROSPECTS GOOD
i : "-.' - ! ' .'an J
S:,i'.-.- :, i-ien.:,!
), wi,;le in the following vear
ti s b ad !!! elf to $i.."ai.ii(iit.iioo. ,at
-.-r ii-ia.-viT. iiiijiorts f-lim!tet on a.
.iip.ii'i't : . e -i ab- UIiiil the lead of II-"!!.-
Was lilt to ?.aoil.i.MI,Oil(l. This
a . is a colli pat .-:'! ve loss of one- billion
-I, l i : : S l!l t 'VO V'Nt rs,
- ;C I e Kiow-d
iintry
, i ry
lie PC'
The nation's ex -:
!-s in volume
in the wond. ix-
Jvxh'i and Germany, as
i tne previous war. The
i n ..u to 70 )-r ce:.;.
ii. ill exports to Mexico to
.11. -i.e. while th" ili(r-a-e
di-reiiir.y totalled $!o:.
ilea'.e i !iipment of wheat,
u. aud lard ip i ouaied tor tilt:
..'- P-.-e.- ,1 ' ;.' ts -o Cn-j' jtr.t
'1'e ! t o f 1 .I.p-i.i.'i-i I compar-il
: : - rade. w'nii- a
'narked '!! .vport tra'ie
. ie A- '!,- -,:.:i,e t-iae. ti-
!. 'i $2:e. ." in ' ii- ';.:'ie in
., ii d 5.1". IHUI.it.i.1 ;)t tie- I'iilr
.! .-.:. - -: - -ii .., Il-.l-,! Ji( i n ..
:: , ' n--;".t mg vein.
.. !.:
- . "i
r i.-i i .,,.,irv bTLAMER ASHORE ON
UrUCIAL HOLIDAY THE ENGLISH COASr
AT CAPHOL IODAY
-i y. P d
. t - ,
s
I

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