OCR Interpretation


The Pickens sentinel. (Pickens, S.C.) 1911-2016, June 16, 1921, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93067671/1921-06-16/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

GOLDEN CREEK NEWS.
Health ris very good around here
at this writing.
The Sunday schcol was very good
at Golden Creek chu'ch Sunday.
Mr. Pcrry Sidel1, of Greenville,
1 visited his eCn Saturday and Sunday.
Mrs. Jes-;e 1Ullincl v1, ;isited Miss
Erna Roper Sunday.
Mr. and:( 'irs. C. H1. Roper, of
Hunters Mill visit: M1 . and Mrs. W.
B. Roper, ci (entrJ, Sunday.
Mr. Gh1. s .;all, of -out.h Georgia.
visited h1, _ite,rT. H.Billin
ly, Satuida;,y.
Mr. and M Elgin 1illingsly v --
ited MVr. and Mrs. Claudle Nickles50m.
of Noris, 1/'riuy; and Saturdy.
Mr. Nathaiiel I (. and ..I r.
' r P r e i Mr. C. _-. Ro r' S:.
'-.in
Uthey
Satui(a n. 1
hody 'o a w mw
1egins at2 S::10 o'clock.
We are strry to l.-ena that
Ollie and Nettie Elnburr had a
runaway .'erape Sunday afternoon
and were hurt. very badly. Their
} many friends hope they will soon be
well again.
Daddy's Pet.
HUDSON REUNION.
The Hudson reunion will be held at.
the home of MI's. S. M. Hudson on
Twelve Mile, July 4. The public is
invited to attend and help to make
the day enjoyable.
D. Pierce Hudson.
PETERS CREEK ITEMS.
We are having very warm weather
at the present and crops are looking
very good considering the dry
weather.
Rev. Mullinax, of near Mar :
preached at Peters Creek Sunday a.
the Pastor was absent.
Mrs. J. E. Foster has returned
home after spending several days
with her daughter, Mrs. W. W.
Porcher, of Greenville.
. The musical at Mr. W. E. Hunt's
last Satrrday night was quite a suc
cess.
Miss Aileene Baker, of Dacusville,
spent the w ek e'nid'with Miss-Elnora
Singleton.
Rev. J. E. Foster has presented
.himself with a Saxon car.
Miss N!:.thdece Sa'mmons has re
turned home after spending a week
Sin Greenville with Miss Bertha Hill.
Some few from this place attend
ed the ball game at Marietta Sat
urday afternoon.
Come to the B. Y. P. U. ev'ery
Sunday night. We're glad to have
you.
Daisy.
FOR SALE BY F. E.
ALEXANDER.
Within a f'ew rodsZ ofx
Sthe Wesleyan Colege.
Cerdra. . C., a 12
SAMB..RAI
Pickens, S.~.t C.
GOD RNTN
RIGH PRICE.
Prompt delivery on your Print.
,ng. High-grade work. Right
pt-ices. Letter Heads, Bill Heads,
Statemients, Envelopes, Circular
Work, Pamphlets, etc. Cotton
mill forms a specialty. Linotype
composition for the trade.
EASLEY PUBLISH
ING CO.
Telephon 47. Lasky c.
The Story of
Our States
By JONATHAN BRACE
I.--DELAWARE
TO''10 1.1 -
% Uw e J" , - W1 A 1t1":,
falls the htno
F {'.4 ,
/ K . 4, t1 I . .( Il.l" 1i
ri inl :h
17b7, it oiiiiaily 1d14 ( I 1 ,. 1', 1'
Stitutit'll ,nti n th s v.; :- a
2 (1'I. 111:( 11 . . " .
h in n cf Ill .ll arl( Ii rewm 1 &,;!1
14
it .' 1la :' A. " .
r 1 -
1' . :f' . 1 4.~ l .\" 1 . i
ti 1.. . I-i(. '. 1 .!'.I 11
\. tii vt l'.h .
4 ; (:1 ' . tlitfI :1 4LI .1!11 ("L f
the Debiw i.re rvr; lldit
f tiv( runt, the p;v,(. .1r of thle %
1 uith 'o(lny ' ' N th r
hands, alnnexed this t(1ritory. But
it (i( not i cl. g riti i l ll1uIltchii ,
for 10 3004 the En:tglish took,
l~uos(Ssion.. When("1 l'enn1sylvanial
was deeded to Wiiitim, Penn he
desired access to the seacoast
arid at his urgent request Dela
ware was transferred to Penn's
proprietorship. From the be
ginning of the eighteenth cen
tury, however, Delaware had its
separate legislature, and atthe
titne of the Revolution it be
Crinte an independent state.
Delaware is next to the small
est of our states, havih.g an a-ea
if only 2,370 square miles. Its
participation in presidential elec
tions is limited to three electors.
This is arranged according to
population. Each state is entitled
to the same number of presiden
Iial electors as it has miembers
of congress, so the influence of
the different states in voting for
the President varies from Dela
ware's three electors to New
York's 45.
As to the derivation of the
name Delaware, this was appro
priately given to the state from
the river, which in turn was
naned after the bay and the bay
was called Delaware in honor of
Lord Delaware, who was gover
nor of the Virginia colony in
1610.
(?c by McClure Newspaper Syndicate.)
The Story of
Our States
By JONATHAN BRACE
II.-PENNSYLVANIA
s ta te to
~adopt the Con
.stitution was
P 1 ennsylvaunia.
SIts a rea -of.3
45,126 square
--- wiles is larger
than the comb]1ined New Eng
hind states, except Makine, with
New Jersey thrown in for good!
measure. Its name m e a n s.
"Penn's Woodland" and was so
namedI!( by King Charles II, who
granted this territory to the
Qu a k e r, Williamu Penn, and
Illnamed it iln commaemoraition! of
I'ennai ftther, who had been a
disl'tinigniwid adrul~iral anid on
termIsi'.I 01 iCweulir friend(sip and11
iintum'ley with thei. royl fami Ily.
fI lt000,'whiich the kinig owed Ad
riri u i'enni. (On this baisisr it
o iiliiy ((Vt ablout Nt.. a squalre
h4 li 4e'tte hi tr
Ii Iit- i h I e ived tiliinily~i 4
n e t~ the rid 41
he l\ evl \\u 4h
n a etlwil. 1.0t r 4'
} ft ltaarallt 4.th
i d iit tili1r
ihtili- | I e h t\ iir
ih ein iis i. ttd IiItii-4
4JIroprt ..y .,' rn i e r Qu' r
reh:i Iwith l~e' hity' r l et bound
AlIaonn ixnal!twa
this whie became int iousl dur
thark bietween the~ tlaive and th
free .iles4. 1
(@y Mct'luro Newstpaper synelicate.}4
The Story of I
Our States y
By JONATHAN BRACE
XXXII.--MINNESOTA
to1 Go I4N 9, -
*~~~ No h" ut 1ecio
forneI, '" ri
" a~ :h i ,t'l ii - L -
:1 i'u . NI r .' i h' w :"! t
" 12 ::tit'irtiy byt .
. : 'nil'urc el . . I ."it
* 'sissip i Ivt wh I h w.;an t 1e1.i
ti tle -t rnl o tia((1.n' wa~ t{.;
1 ir( nc exulorr -it !\" ::!".. *
. r and thee e stah;ih , t ve
iited, wt et it, azl of 11.id *
4 'hvated l0.!n *Qte s t by L-;< r
Iart a the pre ent Uper of Mi.
Re slssipi'tan rieacedl 11tn 1'' - of*'
ST.!ries of ny llira, I.1ia
As to the wsr p4rtion of
T t.( .litt. :hi t wit wa not u
tht p .nuin et:tentus, welr
wad . u t fr in the . ll flit.
iutilt at the in oS. As I:
r I t''er 'ie diied, toWaie
isuc limpeotat fuornors Inpa
t 1841, ather" t) (11( Gtier buit"
of th er'ritoes o Liaiint
Alsis r i tu.di lawa."
prThe trat hite fan to pene.
trate to the ne M innes s the
French expilorer, Duluth, who in,
41678 huilt a fort oin Lake Super
for and there established a very
extensive fur trade. Two years 4
later, Father Hennein and two
f companions were sent by Lta
I Salle to explore the Sper is
sissippi and reached the Falls of
St. Anthony, where Minneapolis
now stands. But it was not un
til the Nineteenth century that
permanent settlements weret
i mde. In 1822 the first mill wal
built at the Falls of St. Anthony,
where were destined to arise
Isuch Important successors. InI
1841, Father Galtier built a
chapel dedicated to St. Paul, and
this as the foundation of the
present great city of that name.
As to the name Minnesota,
the state was so called from the
river that runs through It, which
in the Dakota Indian language 4
makes the words "inne,"
t meaning "Water," and "Sotahl,"
meaning "Sky-colored." Some
times the state Is called the
"North Star State," from the
motto on its coat-of-arms.
Minnesota was admitted to the
Union in 1858. Its area is 84,
682 square miles and It Is the
'most important of our wheat
producing states. It has twelve
presidential electors.
(@ by McClure Newspaper Syndicate.)
T he S)Iiitry of'
* II .4 '1((2H:ODE A iS-1
. iiIii 1 at, .LAND-2 is:1 t
* (I'.))] li~t .iot reall the
* Ili(lt i ice(I Inamie of this4
i the st (f tileerisiate el,1
namlles te"tteo hd
Ish'ndand 'rode Planta-1
Stios. SI,1(t orinate from two
disinct(settye1n248 s.q Te is. 2
w as fode byeidtrillams in
* 3W.lie wasor thae patosr of a
chfulbm of'i Saem s muhe larger
bu teridtoth Nrrgase
1rd~) b It ldus entenh
0: (Id hetow Nwhipae eSicte.-)
The Story of
Our States
Vy JONATHAN BRACE
V.--CONNECTICUT
- 0 N NII C'Tl
\ ably h e first
en ate in aii the
i by ! writ
4 -II, .*e.ji .1. ia'
V \\a it'.:Iv 7l1t u ti ttto1111i,
.%: ga. It . :t ht. ilf rn
tf .I.\ver:tn . ... t! he 1!: 'Puri- y
f in te-: I: 1 b' ...i" l 1 ! W a ' r.i tw
f r d t'.. " ' . d r t Vhe Seth
%4
h ii ' h h'r lloolwr,
i t l Ii I ,\ t( . i.l
S n 'id - t l ia r . d t h e t ( 'r:h li -
Ie'r 1.0 le .-t t It l \V indsor, une'i
thIe from \Vatertown estub -
is ether hlit W. For ta few
years they reinuaiieI a peart ct'
hiissachusetts, but early in 1(319
the people of these three towns
nmet and drew up a written con
stitution and agreed to govern
themuselves. Meanwhile, in 1038.
a large comupany of colonists un
der the leadership of John Day
enport arrived from England and
settled the town of New Haven,
later spreading to Milford and
Stamford. These two distinct.
colonies were later united nad
took the name of Connecticut
from its principal river. This is
an Algonquin Indian name mean
ing "long river." It becntie the
fift h state to join the Union
when it adopted the Constitution
on .lamary :1, 1788. It is some
tines called the Land of Steady
lalits, but is more popularly
known as the Nutmeg state from
the humorous accusation that
its peddlers were accustomned to
palm oft wooden nutmegs to
their custoniers. The area of
Connecticut is 4,905 s q u a r e
miles, the third smallest of our
states.' Its population, however,
entitles it to seven electoral
votes for president.
(@by McClure Newspaper Syndicate.)
The Story of
Our States
Jy .ONATHAN MCE
XXIII.--MAINE
I~ haze of an
11tlquity the old
* Icelandic sa
* voyage in
* 1000K bcy Leif.
4son of Eric the YTedi who .valed
*from G;reeancd to I dabradior andt
idownt the etoast oef Maine. T hei
next probable voyage to this
*coastt wais by .1 thna b'uot Ina 1-l197
an td lat en by his st .91.asian.
*It wasi hocvt'er, (Calpt. .leihn4
*Sanitmh. the lead]ing a.ril 'of t~
settIlernentt att .amtestowni Iho
il ted as fai'r nort h tas the I'enaoh
* co'(t an Rd first drew a rough .'L rt
of(if . *
*lIn the grunt bay ,Jan;s I to
the14 I'yiuth Colony M1:: was ,
incInlded in their territnry. 'p
r t' ltin tiiZ 1 ) king' ic ' r'r
th *ru:try b~etw eon I 1. \ -
* ' i hiit rn setin. .c an b
e ::il si at o e
14to the i t i -
1 one . Th t:
* c;
* Ni
upto
- r h t - -
* I I. tht lI e -a~c
, c (I i ..oal oti~ itsrc IVtl 11
* (the i neth~ itul;: ne n i* an
i mi tin the('i hter 'Ir
* ti' u whiharles jetg:t ulyt.
Inn :tto Gaorgie. ((Jt hattd :.readyf
*tha.et rominv Nsewy 0 Etl
4 1 as ditigushng th"-ni-.
f the by tatlue isw thepr Ellatere
State*.e....e..Isaen... is***-**3,0*.-... *.quare *
The Story of
Our states(
By JONATHAN BRACE
west
yr i t o r y, (If
4; 'twhich Ihi'
(Pt 1)1' , '.vil'.l,;I .
611 11 l cii -
J C Ii 1 i nl t it ( -w;
* hI it ~i wIII I IIIi
cl it w isl tse " t t ~
t"'i!*4llt(' :l l ": '.: , \I I,
} ('8 u I S (Ph i :It tI i 1 !,t .
1' 1' t l 1 Iup t . * .
rivt r. F ranc , t ' - h t t - . *
lltrattion~s of ha .
! ht:rth1 :old the eatr -
S ['rei 1 riehts fro. :, I e .
Iri J' 1er.d this it3 4 t -
s th' r i-.' thi , i~e ,-*
l ! ain tit 11: I' di (- t*.f ,
11:e clhirtr t n 11 et 1 I . -.t
- :nil( util al r tII he cot iuut ley y -
t" the \\'St .t
T Irench were the Trlty of
't ia f(.* tiethobi in (17 t , bt t
S ::il 1 1( ot n ers. W itt h i irtly *
S La toIi; drift t tward , ti :'
ly estal li'-he("l th~eir stItl"I n S
i tht ftrtie Iberioal govA- 4
ter a 1.it 16% p riodt c:f warfare,
i*I wich the Idienns tlay.d a
leaiog part, the N thwot Ter
eritory as finlly wedd to the
United States by the Trety of
I1nd.endenc in 1783. And Vir- Y
{ ginia andt otiher stites, which
ha~td laid cehtiin to portions off
this region turned over their
trights to the federal gove
-entThe government of the North- *
west Territory was formally
created by the ordinance of
} 1787. People from the East mi
grated into this territory in
* such numbers that by 1803 Ohio
was taken into the Union as the {
4seventeenth state. The fourth
largest state in size of popul la- }
t ion. Ohio has 24 electoral votes j
for President, while In area,
with its 41,040 square miles, it i
4ranks only thirty-fifth, which
shows how densely it Is polmn-4
laSted. It is noted as the state
of Presidents. P'resident Mlart-i.
4 ing inakes the seventh o hioat ;
to fill the presidential ofice.
e The name Ohio is derived from i
the Iroquois wordu -hete-yo,
meaning "beautiful river." It i
was first applied by the Inds- t
Ians of the Five Nations to what
we now call the Allegheny riv-j
er, one of the chief tributaries
of the Obhio. Gradually the
name came to include the whole
river, sometimes even being aip
Splied to the Mississippi. Later
it was confined to the river he-4
t tween Pittsburg and Cairo. and !
a ppropriately the first state
formed on its northern bank
4 was named after It. Ohio Is
often called the Buckeye State
from its large number of horse
chestnut trees.
. (@by McClure Newpaper SyndIcate.)
iThe Story of i
jOur States
By JONATHAN DRACE
$ XIV.--VERMONT
Wo HEder iva
4 4 in of
: ont comes(5
Sfromt the
I .Illolnt," o r
F 1rench~i whoi~ were proJlbby tihe
firtt' white InlenlI St s tholse l(ofty
* tlely give tis stat its Inaine.
ThIIis was Iinuy ,wn
hyng upi the trllal ntow It aled
. Jilte hi nU . I' l 2I:t 1
P h *is 'r nn n P etle
- . t un n . n 17 - tIr t
* ii
* tjn M a i n'. I
* P;tr t .i-. 't
hat t in its w as :1... t:r>s d t.h
* -tte to Jtr<.bit .-Svery by e
ti(11 i 1 791 it waIs hptiIiittd to
Sthe Un I ill as5 th3e lirt 1drhtiOnl to*
Inl Sizet VerIllI tihls t1,5(,'
+ 5il'1ar rt. 11iIes. and3( its S ongJres
Hional dtelgatiohlrilZrner four,*
Stit 5u ('asts four votes'. for the.
plresidtent.rcN~tpjs ynct)
((c) oy Men e es-apr ydiat.
The Story of
Our States
By JONATHAN BRACE
XXI.--ILLINOIS
f~r 7: p gA 8 K A ~
I MA, the
S in scc.i t i scl i 1 i
life site if atI
\ V + p.,; iliolian villan
14j ,1j " :11d it w'sz
:ru he tre ihz t
I':.tlaer rii e1l'ztte 4. cfter his t I
c.iw \"(- v of the 1Ili :oiz river,
J n .Ii::hed si ,lesuit 1inijsioni1 ill
Ic. our years ilter Lit Salb- -
' lIc lretlih exploer11 , ta.-. -
Ihr ly~ the t'rent Lakes,lanai
'.'; :I:i nye iver andl( pushal"
' 1 t' i lh+ !!linie.is hiver, w i t!ieh
1 .;1'. t! 0. r i1 .' ladittu trib'es
\: , .l 'I.: r:. '- 0 ii, ~ 11 ' u( i l- I
' . cc' n ..it cr' his ,- i n t
1 al tc hr1 o u':.h a Ia: 1 !1-andl
, ', 1' f ;n ig li v.ib s ic .... I!i, .
it'!ed t 1":I1e I ie Ianoth lr c 'exp
whicb he i.I! lt1 iit el.:arci cf
hcis e'ia:en Tentcy. Thle tfort
he found TllIn rins but, l tiunllly Sue'
(''e(!dk Ai l(ocalt inlg und1(1 rescuing
'Tont y, who had been diriven out
by the Iroquois Iidiiis.
This riverwavny to the Mississip
pi heenltue one of the leading
liv enuIes of coinlunication be
tweeni the French in the North 4
anid Louisiana. French settlers f
soon located here and estab- +
lished the most friendly rela
tious with the Indians. In fact, +
thoulh the Illinois country was
ceded by France to E0ngland In
1763, the sentiment of the ndi
1ans and10 F'rencih together was so f
hostile that it was several years
before the territory could be oc
elupied.
IJur ing the Revolution it was
George Rogers Clark and his ex
uetdition into the territory north *
Iof the Ohio which captured Kas
kiat and drove the English
from this province. Various
States claimed rights to parts of
thin territory, but these were 4
bunally c ededi to the federal gov-t
ernment anid In 1787 it was
forlmed Into the Northwest Ter- I
ritory. This tract extended from
I n'emsylvania to the Mississippi
Ind was eventuailly divided Into
4 Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Michi
4 in 1818 Illinois was admitted
its the twenty-first state with an
lrei of 56,6615 square miles. The
* ,tate is one of the most level in }
the country an11d is often calledI
the Prairie Stute. Politically
Illinois is the nost important
state in the Union next to New
York and Pennsylvania as It has
twenty-nine electoral votes for
t president.
(@ by McClure Newspaper Syndicate.)
SThe Story of
SOur States
By .JONATHAN BRACE'
XXIV.--...MJSSOURI
.nne ".HIETH- ER
was actually
visited by De
disovryof
S$te Mit sissip
pi 1is14 no tinitely known. The
first ault hentie exphloraltion1 of
thi(trrior wats by the French,4
.1(11iet and4( Fatther Ma rquet te in
It73t. i''rench1 set Ilers gradualIly
l41 ntcqd iln M1~isuri, in 17ti St.
Lou'ii beinghlJ settledc. 'i'his was4
tlrain I'rance thce Lou1isiuicm Ter
ritorly of whc'icvh issoui wav~s ai
I4llcizatjion jgreaitly increased4c4
n cnr e:. I irtunan Ic f 1 787,1
uha- l* . \ h-d .I e- l A in th
* :.. I c ari y to tel ter
n ct of th M .sss i p
ccc Icin e i o l h
- ccibo d i hhi r . .-c
tu~a Ne h ..:: u~ no c- b JUhe
*f:-n ' cs 3! e *u I cvi c rorni :
wh 'h ie~e i. ouri c s ac cii
of a blci~e e.\ cn in frorncl t he I11
to i the ccjF('y Mounis. I .1
(d4(d, It waV~s this Ilgittion bu
uc bih, Eiiijccrarily sunothIereud lat
11h1t tIrlne, bcurst forth in the Civ
Missou'ctlri is ini thle focrefionit
oif the linitorianrt stiates iln14 natin.
al iolitics as5 i has (ighIteenl
electo~ralI ves(( for presidezil. It y%
areaQ1 1s (. .'0t squarl e muiles,.

xml | txt