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Cochise review. [volume] (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1900-1901, November 19, 1900, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94050513/1900-11-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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COCHISE REVIEW
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BISBEE, ARIZONA, MONDAY EVENING. NOVEMBER 19, 190U.
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IT.OFEB9IONAI,
A. D UPTON
ATTOllNKX-AT-LAW
AGENT FOR LAND 80RIP
Tombstone, Arliouu.
M. O'CONNKM.
ATTOKNKV-AT-I.AW
orrios; wallaob buildinq
UISUEK
A J. OAMKL
LAWYKK
U1SHBK, ARIZONA
Mlnb b Law a Speolaltv
WILLIAM J. KILPATRICK
ATDNKV-AT-I.AW
UU W. Pennington St., Tuoson, Aria.
Will practice in all Court of the Territory.
MARCUS A.SMITH
Al'tOKNIT-A'MAW
TUCSON, ARIZONA
WiU practti lu District Court of Cochise
County.
'QHAKI.RS BLSNMAN
ATTOTMfKYAT-l,AW
TUCSON, AKIZONA
-' 'WU1 attend all teruis of Court lu CocliUe
Counts.
ft PBAHK B. HBBXVOaU 8KTHB. HA8AUD
F ,'MHKEFOBD A HAZ2AUD
ATTOHNKTO-AT-LAW
, TUCSON, ARIZONA
j AOhNTS BOH LAND SCRIP
f ' '
(If (, CHAMBERS
' UKNTIST
i'' Appolntmeuts Made ly Mall
V" ' Po7 IUSBKB
fc. , -
QR. J. W. FARRINQTON
DENTIST
BISRRK. ARIZONA
.Seeelalttee-DUeaMS of the oral cavity and
rown and bridge work. All operation per
formed. Q L. HDMONDSON. M.D., C. L.OAVEN, M.D
'PHYSICIANS and SOKGKONS
To Lowell A Arlaona and Calumet A Heola
Muds Companies.
' i-Telephone Ho. 86.
"hMSBBB ABUONA
p A: 9WBKT, M. D. TL. No. 6
8. q. carujton. m. d
a. r. hickman. m. d.
physicians and sorosons
To the Copper Queen Consolidated Mining
' Co. and A. A 8. K. R. R.
QR. ISAAC H. WATKINS-
-EHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
BENSON, ARIZONA
..wUHoo! Rear of Drug Store.
-iS:
-iC-'JK.WlXLIAMS
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
BISBEE, ARIZONA
Notary Public and Conveyancer. Bill col
acting a specialty.
. RAILROAD TIME TABLES.
-.-- - - f im, - -. - t-, ft i-i n r-rirrsii-u-ij-i.-i.
Arizona & South Eastern Railroad
Pacllo Time one hour earlier than City tltne
Northward
Southward
Miles.
Stations
Mlltm.
iUiij iii lit
Safe h flla
HS 5 I 5 J
a. M. Miles. Station Milt, f . m.
l!XO
jn
.. South Blsbee
8:7
. . Don LuU
4:8
Ntoo Junction
8:8
.. Packard., ..
fio
. Banning.
S
:a
1;10
UtRS
12:13
12:26
12:66
11:45
116
11:15
11:00
10:10
A.M.
10:00
. Water Tank.
4:8
.Charleston,
Ax.. Valrbank .Lv
Lv.JTalrbank.Ar
1:8
N.MAA.Oroulng
u:u
"..Contention
8:2
.Land .
0:8
4r ..Benson .Lv
Flag Stations stop ou Signal.
T. R. STILES,
Q.P.AP.A.
It. C. MOROAN. .
Superintendent.
Southern Pacific Railroad.
WSSTBOUNU.
Pass.
1:57 p. in.
7:20 "
9:40 "
Benson, leave ,
Tucson, arrive
Maricopa, " ...
Tusoa, arrive .. ., 8:00a.m.
Los Angeles, arrive ... .12: noon.
BABIBOHMD.
jtenson, leuo ... . W;06a. w.
WiUeox, arrive . . 10:42 "
Bowie, " ... 11:55 "
Lordsbuiv, " 1:45 p.m.
Darning, " . .., . . 8:80 '
EiPaao. ... " . 6:00 "
Phoenix, " ... 8:10 a.m.
Passengers for Phoenix, from the east or
west, remain at Maricopa over night. Sleep
ing car and hotel accommodation.
New Mexico and Arliona Railroad.
WBSTBOttM).
Pass.
Betuou, leave .5:80 p! m.'
faSbank, arrive , 8:18 "
Notales; "... 9:ou "
BABXBOUHP.
Mogalts, leave . ..5:10a.m.
falrbaak,' arrive 7:67 "
'exsoB, " ; :o "
80 0
M It
:li 4.0
8:25 8.8
8A1 IS. 4
:U W.4
1A1 - xs.a
7:32 80.0
J:10
7:84 88.8
87.8
im w.e
1:10 48.8
6:00 68.8
Lv...UUbee Jlt
M 8 I
CI 0
61.8
48.8
42.9
tt 6
801
28.8
19 0
17 7
15 7
08
0
BURNED AT
1 lit STAKE
The Remains of Bandit
Alvord Discovered
DISFRANCHISES THE NEGROES.
Newspaper for Sale in Arizona
Strike at Terrc Haute
Items from All Points.
LlMON, Colo., Nov. 10. Chained lo
a railroad rail set firmly in tbe ground,
on the oxact spot whore ho assaulted
Louise Frost, Preston Porter, Jr., or
as lie was familiarly known, John Por
ter paid a terrible penalty for his doed.
It was 6:30 o'clock when the father of
the murdered girl touched the match
to the fuel which had been piled around
the negro, and twenty minutes later a
last convulsive shudder told that' life
was extinct. What agony the doomed
boy suffered while the flames shriveled
up his flesh could only be guessed from
the terrible contortions of his face and
the cries he gave from time to time.
The executioners, who numbered
about three hundred citizens of Lin
coln county, had not the least sem
blance of the ordinary mob. Their
every act was deliberate, and during
all the preparations as well as through
out the sufferings of the negro hardly
an unnecessary word was spoken.
Grimly they stood In a circle about tho
Are until the., body was entirely con
sumed, and thn quietly took their
way back to Ltmon, from whence they
departed for their homes shortly after
ward. When asked his opinion regarding
the burning of the negro rapist and
murderer, Preston Porter, at Limon to
nlffht. Governor Thomas declined t
make any statement whatever. Early
in the week, in an interview, the
governor was quoted as saying
that he had nothing to do with the
matter.
Sheriff Freeman of Lincoln county,
after the prisoner was taken from him,
remained on the train, and presumably
went to his home at Hugo. Ho was
strongly opposed to the lynching, and
only consented to take Porter back to
Limon from Denver under the strong
est pressure from the people of .his
county.
The general sentiment expressed in
Denver approves the execution of tho
negro, but deprecates the method
adopted.
HURT ALVORD KILLED.
Tucson, Nov. 19. The discovery of
a human skull near the Casa Grande
reservation, says the Herald, fifty miles
north of Tucson, strengthens the the
ory that Burt Alvord was killed three
months ago by one of his pals, ridding
Arizona of one of the most desperate
gangs of baudits which has ever in
fested its wilds. Burt Alvord, who
spent hid youthful days in the town of
Casa Grande, died within a few miles
of his birthplace, probably at the hands
of one of the criminals with whom he
had been eluding officers for months.
William Stiles, upon whom suspicion
heavily restn, is in jail at Tucson, where
he has been languishing for about
three mouths He was thrice u traitor
and has been branded by both his fel
low baudlts and the authorities. lit
once volunteered evidence for the gov
ernment, subsequently betrayed the
authorities and liberating his erstwhile
criminal companions from jail, later
forsaking them.
The discovery of a skull and bonus
oy Mose and Herb Drachmau and J. L.
Pernel, commercial traveling men, who
were ou a duck hunt, opens, n field for
much speculation aud at the same time
partly clears a mystery springing from
the unusual silence of Alvord for sev
eral months. He was lu the habit of
sendlug humorous communications to
tbe sheriff's of the several counties, of
southeastern Arizona, aud otherwise
naklng his existence and prosperity
well known among the peace officers
who were unable to entrap him, but re
cently there has not been a word from
Alvord.
The remarkable silence several weeks
ago gave rise to the suspicion that
Alvord fell a victim to the volatile
temper of Stiles, a Mexican half-breed,
or to the treachery of "Bravo" Juan,
another treacherous member ef the
noted gang of train robbers and mur
derers. Weight has been added to the
theory by late developments, and the
discovery of the skull and its identifi
cation as tbe romains of Burt Alvord
by .lack McCoy, a resident of Crasa
Grande, who was well acquainted with
Alvord since their childhood, is taken
by many as conclusive evidence that
the leader of a bloodthirsty gang fell
before the bullets of a traitor in his
gang, much in the same manner that
the famous Jesse James succumbed to
the treachery of lila'clbae friend.
The travelling men followed foot
prints and cavs upon the skull and
humane boiii'tf which were scattered
about, in a sequestered spot near the
reservoir. The bones and skull were
stripped bare by coyotes, and the only
remnant of clothing was a piece of cloth
which probably had formed a part of a
hunting jacket. The skull was indenti
fled by a decayed tooth, conspicuous la
Alvords set of ivory, and a demarka
tlon of the skull produced by a blow,
and similar to one which Alvord carri
ed through life.
QOOD FORTUNH.
North Attleboro, Mass., Nov. 19.
The Crowell family and all their rel
atives in this place are In great glee
over news from England to the effect
that the whole lot are heirs to $30,000,
000 left by a John Crowell 100 years
ago. At his death Crowell left a will
bequeathing hie money to his relatives
"when found." Ho had a brother who
came to America when the two wero
quite young..
A few years ago Thomas Crowell was
found lu an infirmary in Halifax, 1-1. S.,
totally blind and broken down physic
ally. Prof. Frazier, a Buperintendent
familiar with the will of John Crowell,
dUcoAered that Thomas was a relative
in direct descent of John. The Crow
ell family got together, and E. H.
Crowell, of Somervllle, went to Eng
land as their' representative. He re
ported that in all probability the find
of m'000,000 would be ready to dis
tribute among the heirs in a few weeks.
ARIZONA REPUBLICAN SOLD.-
Phoinix, Nov. 19. The largest
newspaper deal ever made in Arizona
culminated today when Charles C. Ran
dolph sold the Arizona Republican to
Colonel S. M. McCowan and Dr. George
W. Vickers, representing the Arizona
Republican company.
The incorporation papers of the new
company were filed today. The capi
talization is $50,000, and the directors
are Colonel McCowan, Dr. Vickers and
H. J. Lee.
Colonel McCowan will assume the
editorial management. C. C.Randolph,
who bought the Republican four years
ago, has made it one of tbe best pay
ing newspaper properties in the south
west. NEW ZEALAND.
The question of granting preference
to British goods in the markets of the
col6nies in still under discussion in New
Zealand, but an expansion of ideas is
taking place and reciprocity with tho
United States is now being coupled
with the proposals for a preferential
tariff on articles manufactured within
the British empire.
NO CELEBRATION.
Belgian tradespeople and hotelkeep
era who are lamenting a serious loss of
trade owing to the late anti-British
manifestations are now antagonizing
any demonstrative reception of ex
President Kruger, should he visit Ant
werp. The burgomaster has already
deelared that ho will allow no out door
celebration in the ex-president's honor.
STRATTON PAID 3,000,000.
VICTOR, Col., Nov. 19. W. S. Strat
ton, it is reported today, has sold his
stock in the Portland Gold Mining com
pany at 85 a share to English investors.
Mr. Stratton receives 83,000,000-for hie
one-fifth interest.
A BIG STRIKE.
Terre Haute, Ind., Nov. 19. Over
7,000 Indiana miners were idle today,
owing to a strike Inaugurated last week
by the hoisting engineers, who number
less than 300 in this state. They met
the Indiana coal operators here last
night, presented a scale agreed Co at
Danville, 111., Nov. 3, and demanded
that the Indiana operators sign the
scale. The operators offered to pay
the scale until the miners' anuual con
vention in January, and then leave the
whole subjeot open for settlement,
claiming that the eugineers had nof
right to impose arbitrary conditions.
The engineers demanded thiuvtheir
proposed scale be effective from Nov.
15, 1000, to Nov. 15, 1901. The operat
ors objected lo this feature and tlip en
gineers quit.
THE NEGRO VOTE.
Atlanta, Ga Nov. 19. A bill to
disfranchise the negro was introduced
in the lower house of the Georgia leg
islature today by Mr. Hardwick of
Washington county. A bill similar in
character was introduced at the last
session and defeated.
The bill is expected to raie the issue
of a constitutional convention for Geor
gia, and is said to be presented for that
purpose. If the measure sfn be
come a law it. would greatlj lestrict
the negro vote of the state. Jt pre
scribes an eduoational and property
qualification for suffrage.
WILD SUPPLY SCOTLAND.
People who laughed at the prospect
of tho United States supplying this
country with ship building . material
have changed their views. The steam
boat Chatfleld has just, landed part of
Its freight at Belfast, and coming on
to the Clyde has discharged 1!,000 ions
of steel ciop, ninety tpns of angles and
T's, fourteeu tons of steel flats, s27 tons
of steel rounds and forty tons ot steel
angles. There Is not much certainty
in this, but it represents just the-sort
of beginning that was made with
American coal.
A NEW VALUATION.
For many years the municipal au
thorities of Oxford hane thought tho
valuation put on their university build
ing for taxation purposes too low. A
new valuation has just been made by
which the college properties will ho
assessed on values raised by no loss a
sum than 21,524 ($104,745). The uni
versity will, of course, resist this at
tempt to draw from their coffers, and
long and expensive litigation may be
expected. .
Dragoon News.
Several mining companies in the
Dragoons are shipping their ore to El
Paso, among which are tbe Copper
Belle, Great Western, Peabody, Black
Diamond, and recently the South Bis
bee Copper company, which is located
in the southern end of the range known
as the Mule mountains, says the Pros
pector. Recent returns from the South
Bisbee's ores show what values obtain
in the carbonate 'ores of the Dragoons.
The Copper Crown of Arizona Min
ing company, capital fSJ,000,000, with
directors residing in Minneapolis, Min
nesota, and in Arizona, own eight
mines in a body, also in the famous
Dragoon mountain range. They are
taking out rioh carbonate copper ore
for future shipment to smelter, and are
sinking a working shaft.
A working force of nine miners and
a foreman are crowding development.
All indicatiens, and development so
far, show that the company ard in good
ore, well located, and should make a
paying mine of the Copper Crowu.
Assays of the ore, made at different
times, show from 9J per cent to 48 per
cent copper with low values in gold
and silver.
Tho Black Diamond Company south
east of the Copper Crown group, began
systematic developments in 189S, and
haye opened up a fine body of 50 per
copper ore. They aie capitalized at
$2,000,000, and stock is now selling at
par to build a 150-toa smelter.
Large Capital is going into copper
mining iu Cochise county, especially in
the now famous Dragoons.
At Pearce, directly east of the Cop
per Crown and Black Diamond mines,
is located the Commonwealth, which
was bought about live years ago for
$375,000, and has since paid the com
pany over $4,000,000 iu profits. They
are now installing a uew 30-stauip mill.
The ores in the Dragoon copper belt
carry good values iu gold and silver,
making the" possibilities of large prot
its. ihminhig here, far beyond Mich i
gan, withlts low percentages of coppei
to the ton of rock which has to be re
dueed in its stamp mills to obtain th.
miueral, then smelted and refined.
Dragoon copper ores can be smelted
into bullion, carrying the copper, gold
and silver, and shipped to refineries
and all values saved.
Arizona is fast gaining upon Mon
tana and Michigan In output of copper
and Is evidently the coining lender of
the United States. Arizona luodin-ed
in 1899 over 25000, 000 tir cupper.
Notice..,
'lues U lu i,ntlf ihuiMr. Paul Mor
gan is the ohh tuner representing us
lu tlilfe section at the present t'iii.
The Zellnkr Piano Co.
WELL KNOWN W0MA$
Pleads for the Lives of the Haider
man Roys.
PnouNix,- Ariz., Nov. 10. Annie
Sullivan of Tucson, a well "known
woman, n!urtniug the name of Eva..
Hlanchard. made a dramatic plea br-
fore
Governor
M.'
Murphy this morning
tor clemency for the Ilnlderinan broth
ers, who were hanged at Tombstone
today. Slip arrived from Tucson yes
terday, and was treated courteously by
tho governor, but sho has been in tears
oter since the interview. The govern
or informed the woman that he was
convinced of tho guilt of the two man
slayer.-, and that I hey must hang. She
sent u telegram to the presidenCmalft
ing a plea for respite, stating that if it
were granted she would go to Wash
ington and prove the innocence of the
doomed bov.
She was unacquainted with either of
the hanged men, but interested her
self in the case, spending money to
secure a communication of thoir sent
ence, because her companion, Joe Vi
lev, a well-known Arizona gainbTerand
sport, had been convinced of innocence
of.tho Halderman brothers by S. - H.
Hopkins of Gonzales, Tex., their at
torney. Eva Blauchard is tho daught
er of a prominent St. Louis contractor
by the name of Sulhvan. She owns
considerable property in St. Louis and
Tucson, and is a constant and liberal
contributor to philanthrO'pliundeV-
takings. "
Of Value to Miners
Where a person or company has or
may ran a tunnel for the purpose of de
veloping a lode Or lodes owned by said
peron or company, the monoy so ex
pended iu said tunnel shall be taken
and considered as expended onsaldl.ode
or lodes, and such person or company
shall not be required to perform work
on tho surface of said lode or lodes Mn
order to hold the same, says the Min
ing and Scientific Press. The annual
labor of $100 on each claim may be'per
formed under the above section by
wore aone on a tunnu cutting", 'or
which ie driven to cut such claims. The
patent expenditures of $500 may also be
made in such tunnel. A party may
patent one lode on the line of his tunnel
for each $500 of labor spent in driving
the tunnel.
There is no provision of law for 0at
en ting a tunnel site. But it may main
tain an adverse claim for the' protec
tion of its line and tunnel rights.
Every tunnel, whether a crosscut or
run upon a vein, is presumed to be for
the development of lode claims, and in
each case its rights are very clojely de
fined by law. If the proper notice has
been posted on the site, establishing
the boundary lines thereof, 'stakes set,
etc , and the record only made, the
work must be prosecuted with reaconu
bio diligence; the land office rules that
a "reasonable diligence in prosecuting
the-work is one of the essential condi
tions of the implied contract. Negli
gence or want of due diligence will be
construed as working a forfeiture of
thoir right of all undiscovered veins on
the line of tho tunnel." A tunnel may,
like any other kind of claim, be aban
doned; but noglect to work does not ef
fect an abandonment; such neglect only
operates to deprive it of tunnel rights
along Its lines.
The Copper Bullion.
Mr. P. H. Clark, general manager of
the Copper Bullion Mining company,
w hose property is In the Dragoon.dls
ti ict, Cochise county, Arizona, return
ed this week to Los Angeles from San
Fr.mclsco. To a represent atlve of. tho
Lus Angeles Mining Review, when
asked about the workings on the Cop
per Hullion mines, he stated that the
company kept about fifteen men at
w.irk, and that the tunnel they are
driviug is now in nearly 700 feet.
Mr. Clark said that in their shaft No.
I they were down 200 feet and will sink
it dowii to the tunnel The formation
on tho copper bullion is the same ab
that ou the entire belt in the dragoons,
being a emuaet'of porphyrj with lim,
cupped with a verj heavt, muhe
vein of iron and manganese
Nei to it is u big. djko of quarts
porph r, over 100 feut in width, with,
perpendicular walls from .50 to 80, feet
iu length, uextto the liuio. This dyke
runs without a break for 0.000 feet ou
the contact.
Mr. Clark brought with him from
the mine some samples of sulphide ore
taken at a depth of li50 feel in the shaft.
An assa of tho same ore guv.- 00 per
ton, making at present values, a total
of $270 per ton. L. A. Review.
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