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The Coolidge examiner. [volume] (Coolidge, Ariz.) 1930-current, February 26, 1932, Image 5

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94050542/1932-02-26/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE END OF THE ROAD
Private advices from Phoe
nix are to the effect that no
purchasers have yet been
found for the latest issue of
tax anticipation bonds offer
ed for sale by the state of
Arizona, and that certain
Phoenix bankers are now on
the coast to see whether
some kind hearted institution
or individual can be found
who will come to the finan
cial assistance of the great
state of Arizona. Its to be
hoped that the efforts will be
successful, else the state of
Arizona will be in exactly
the same position which the
city of Chicago, the city of
Philadelphia and even the
city of New York now find
themselves. There will be
no money to pay road work
ers, clerical help, school
teachers or officials.
Phoenix banks are accept
ing no state warrants; Bis
bee banks are doing like
wise. The county of Cochise
gets a nice fat check from
the state treasurer for our
portion of the state school
money, and then finds that
he cannot cash the warrant.
And this is the second war
rant that he has received
from the state which came
back marked “N. S. F.”
Thus we come to the end
of the road!
Now, whether we like it or
not, whether it is “feasible,”
whether “we can’t let the
functions of- government
fall,” or whatever excuse
may have been made here
tofore, we are up against the
plain facts. The colt has
been given plenty rope and
there has been a lot of cav
orting, but finally he is
wound right up against the
snubbing post and must lis
ten to reason.
The course is plain; there
is but one answer. The state
of Arizona must cut expen
ses ; the expenses of state
government must be brought
within the revenue accruing
to the state. That means the
elimination of a lot of fanc
ies and frills. That means
coming right down to essen
tials, and nothing more.
It is an old story and every
citizen in the state knows it
well because he has gone
through every angle of it.
When this depression first
hit us, everyone of us sought
new sources of revenue—we
found none. Then a lot of us
used the good credit which
we had built until it became
strained—and our creditors
began to insist. Then we
came to our senses and
brought our expenses with
in our revenues. And most
of us are not only required
to pay our regular expenses
but to skimp a little closer
and pay a part of the debts
we contracted with interest.
The state is no more po
tent than its citizenship. No
rules of finance apply to na
tional, state or municipal sys
tems that do not apply to in
dividuals or corporations. If
a state owes money it must
be paid—else it finds itself
in the “dead-beat” class just
as surely as an individual.
And some of the school ex
ecutives in Arizona will sud
denly awaken one of these
cool mornings to find that
school expenditures in Ari
zona are coming down. Am
ple warning has been given,
and the school executives
have had ample opportunity
to clean house. If it isn’t
done quickly, these same ex
ecutives will find inexperi
enced and unsympathetic
hands wrecking things in
great shape. Schools as they
are operated today are lux
uries, and the people of the (
state of Arizona are not
financially able to afford lux
uries. Teachers can’t work
long without salaries, and
salaries cannot be paid un
less money is available. A
state warrant looks nice, but
you cannot buy food and
clothing with warrants un
less they can be turned into
cash. The time to trim is
now!
Yes, we come now to the
end of the road. The new
road will be hard to travel.
We have a lot of excess bag
gage which we had better
begin to dump right now!—
Bisbee Review.
COPPER AND COTTON
CROP HOLD LEAD
Value of production of
basic commodities in Arizona
last year is estimated as $62,-
000,000 in the Arizona Busi
ness Review for January is
sued this week by the Ari
zona Industrial congress.
Notwithstanding material
ly reduced output and values
due to the lowest average
price of copper since 1850,
the mining industry continu
ed to rank as the largest in
the state in production value,
the report shows estimates
given cover agricultural, live
| stock, mining and lumber
productions, all showing
much smaller values than for
some years, due to drastic
declines in commoditv prices
in 1931.
Mining production in the
state last year was estimated
at $36,000,000 by the U. S.
Bureau of Mines the Business
Review points out, while Ari
zona crops were given hypo
thetical total value $16,500,-
000 in preliminary estimates
of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture. Copper held its
rank as Arizona’s leading
product and Arizona retain
ed its place as the nation’s
greatest copper producer, al
though output of the red
metal fell to 397,000,000
pounds for the year. At aver
age prices this was valued at
$33,000,000, while gold pro
duction amounted to $2,500,-
000 and silver to $900,000.
Cotton also held its place
as the state’s leading crop
despite a crresponding de
cline in value. The federal
crop estimates included $4,-
500,000 for cotton, $3,276,-
000 for alfalfa, $2,877,000
for lettuce, and $1,381,000,
for cantaloupes, Citurs fruit,
also were near the million
dollar class in value.
Industrial Congress esti
mates place a combined va
lue of approximately $5,-
800,000 on estimated ship
ments of 140,000 cattle to
outside markets and slaugh
terings of 70,000 within the
state. Shipments of 300,000
lambs, 500,000 pounds of
mohair and 6,500,000 lbs. of
wool are estimated at $2,-
100,000.
The review quotes privates
estimates placing Arizona
lumber production last year
at 88,000.000 board feet, be
lieved to represent some
thing over $1,000,000.
The congress publication
reports that no authentic es
timates. are available on va
lue of general manufactur
ing production in the state in
1931, but estimates that pro
duction of all manufacturing
and mechanical industries
did not exceed $25,000, bas
ing the figures on compari
son of 1929 statistics report
ed by the U. S. Census of
Manufactures with opera
tions and values prevailing
in 1931.
ALL BUT ONE STOOD UP
A Cochise county preach
er, at the close of his sermon
last Sunday said: “Let all in
the house who are paying
their bills stand up.”
Every man, woman and child
with one exception, stood
up.
The preacher said: “now
isn’t that fine —what a won
derful congregation I have
now be seated!”
“Now,” the preacher said,
“let every man not paying
# his debts stand up.”
The exception, a careworn
looking individual, with
the marks of hunger upon
him, wearing last summer’s
suit, slowly assumed a per
pendicular position.
“How is it, my friend,”
the preacher said, “that you
are the only one in the con
, gregation not paving his
' bills?
: “Well, you see. it’s this
■ way,” said the exception, “I
run a newspaper and the
. brethren here who stood up
■ are my subscribers,, and—”
“Let us pray,” almost
i shouted that minister.
PROCEDURE FOR APPRO
VAL OF LAND SALES SAN
CARLOS PROJECT OUT
LINED BY GOVERNMENT
Disbursing Agent Indian
Service To Act For
Secretary
|. Compliance with the leg
is'lation creating the San Car
los Project requires that un
til one-half of the construc
tion charges are paid no
sales of project land are va
lid unless and until the pur
chase price is approved by
the Secretary of the Interior.
This provision in the San
Carlos Act* as well as in all
recent reclamation land acts,
was designed and included
in the legislation to prevent
land speculation and high
handed promotor’s profits.
It was intended to apply to
new projects where the raw
lands might be acquired and
disposed of entirely by specu
lators. Needless to say, this
precaution was entirely un
necessary so far as the San
Carlos Project is concerned,
but having been included in
the Act, it must be complied
with. The exact language of
this provision in the San Car
los Act follows:
‘‘ + * * and shall provide
that until one-half the
construction charges
against said lands shall
have been fully paid, no
sale of any such lands
shall be valid unless and
until the purchase price
involved in such sale is
approved by the Secre
tary of the Interior, and
shall also provide that
upon proof of fraudu
lent representation as to
the true consideration
involved in any such
sale, the Secretary of
the Interior is authoriz
ed to cancel the water
right attaching to the
land involved in such
fraudulent sale; and all
public lands irrigable
under the project shall
be entered subject to the
conditions of this section
which shall be applied
thereto:”
Disbursing Agent authorized
To Approve Sales
According to word at the
San Carlos District office Mr.
Joseph A. Special
Clerk and Disbursing Agent
of the Indian Service at Cool
idge, has been authorized to
approve all sales where the
purchase price does not ex
ceed three times the assess
ed vaue of the land. In case
where the purchase prices
should exceed this limit, the
proposed transaction is to be
submitted to Washington for
approval. In the latter in
stance, it is thought that tele-,
Singing In
The Rain
Is a pleasing fact
when you are snug
and cozy in your own
little home. Home is
man’s greatest privi
lege—why not make
your start towards one
while material and la
bor are at rock bottom
P.W. HAMILTON LBR.CO.
“Where Quality Meets Price.”
THE COOLIDOE EXAMINEE
graphic instructions can be
obtained. The assessed va
lue, as expressed in the au
thorization, refers to the re
gular County tax-roll assess
ment.
This matter has been be
fore the, District officials for
some time and they have
been successful in having the
Government provide for this
local and as near as possible
i convenient administration of
this somewhat burdensome
and inapplicable provision
of the Statute.
THE CASE OF GEORGE BRATT
George Bratt who seems
well named, is a sliver tramp.
With his wife and four child
ren he journeyed across the
country in a house on wheels ■
pausing dor a while in Tuc- 1
son, then on to the coast
where he landed in San
Francisco. There he took a I
house, but couldn’t pay his !
rent and was evicted. When ;
the constables put his things'!
on the sidewalk, he left hisjj
wife and 4 small children ;
standing amid the furniture 1
and walked bravely away, ;
declaring that it was “socie
ty’s duty to care for his ;
family” and has not been j
seen since.
His wife told the authori
ties that she thought George
Bratt was doing the right
thing—she gloried in his
spunk—and that he was
merely fighting for a princi
ple.
Os course, she added that
LEGALS
'
Notice For Publication
Department of the Interior
General Land Office at
Phoenix, Arizona
January 28, 1932.
Notice is hereby giyen that
Stephen K. Phillips, of Rt. 7,
Phoenix, .Arizona, who, on
April 1, 1920, made Desert
Land Entry, No. 045300, for
SVo, Section 4, Township 6 S.
Range 8 E., G. & S. R.
Meridan, has filed notifce of
intention to make Final
Proof, to establish claim to
the land above descried, be
fore Henry A. Morgan, Re- 1
gister, United States Land
Office, at Phoenix, Arizona,
on the 18th day of March,
1932.'
Claimant names as wit
nesses:
Fred Tait, of Phoenix, Ari
zona ; David O. Clark, of
Phoenix, Arizona; Richard
C. Shiflet, of Phoenix, Ari
zona, James Daley, of Cool
idge, Arizona.
HENRY A. MORGAN,
Register.
First publication Feb. 5, ’32.
Last publication Mar. 4, ’32.
society had deprived him of
a living, this being the plea
of all sliver tramps. But has
society deprived George
Bratt of a living? We think
not. He was sent to Am
herst where he was graduat
ed. He went on the stage.
He taught school. He work
ed in a furniture factory.
But he either didn’t make
good at any of them or he
had the itching foot and
spent years in wandering.
There was no depression
when he came to Tucson two
years or more ago. But he
couldn’t find work. He had
had school teaching con
tracts but passed them up.
He had had acting contracts,
but passed them up. He
wanted to wander. He knew
he would always be able to
Equip Your Farm
with
INTERNATIONAL
HARVESTER MACHINERY
E. C. GRASTY
IMPLEMENT CO.
Casa Grande Coolidge
COOLIDGE |
Business Directory j
The following enterprising firms of Coolidge take this method of solicit- J
ing your patronage. fi
DR. V. E. POWLEY j
THE PIONEER ;
CHIROPRACTOR
PALMER GRADUATE
Office at the J. B. Boon residence, Harding AveJ
Block west of Main ;
Residence calls answered (#A l;j
day or night IfLJjZI;;
+»#######################################># j'
Charlie’s Barber Shop jj
Hair I
Cut
2nd door south of Bargian Center ;;
All work first class jj
This Space jj
FOR SALE |!
x ![
I >
Popular Dept. Store!;
Coolidge, Arizona
The Shopping Center of the Valley j:
Quality Dry Goods, Notions,
Shoes and Wearing Apparel
For the whole Family - -
Hines Drug Co. ;;
The Rexall Store
A Particular Drug Store
For Particular People I;
get by—he said so in Tuc
son—and why worry about
the future?
But the time came when he
did not get by. His family
became hungry. The wife
who Has already born him
four children is soon to have
another. Why consider them
a responsibility? No. No.
MAKE YOUR HOME
MORE ATTRACTIVE
We have all materials required to redecorate
your home.
See us for Color Schemes and
Fuller’s Paints and Varnishes
and our figures on your Decoration need
Use your Radio for ZENA DARE suggestions
each Wednesday noon over KT A R
phmpiii
“Every thing To Build With”
Coolidge ]
!; Mercantile Company ;j
j: Everything You Want j
11 Orders of $2.00 or over Delivered
■ *##*»**»»*##*#*#»*###*»»»»#»»*»#####*»»#******<
Avoid Fire Hazard ]
Have a Licensed Electrician
; do your work
: Estimates given on Wiring, Reparing
and Power Hookup
Electric Service Co.
;j. CONDON, Propr. Coolidge, Arizona
\
\
This Space
i FOR SALE
1
'INSURANCE <m ~ 1
l je j
| 4, Coolidge V
I B. G. LETZRING - !<
REAL ESTATE BROKER
; “Selling The Earth”
OFFICES
| COOLIDGE ELOY
; Coolidge Dry Cleaners
It is Time to Haye Your
FALL AND WINTER COATS
i CLEAMED, PRESSED AND REPAIRED
| We Operate a Modern Plant
M. 0. KENNEDY
i , Coolidge, Arizona
GOOLIDGE FACTORY,
; S. D. BLACKWELL, Proprietor
| RENOVATING OLD COTTON BEDS LIKE NEW
New Cotton Beds made to order
Feathers Sterilized v
SECTIONAL FEATHER MATTRESSES MADE
i ONE DAY SERVICE
Society is to blame that this
irresponsible person has four
children and is soon to have
a fifth although he is unwill
ing to stick to one job until
he attains success. And so
he walks away, proudly
boasting that he is fighting
for a principle.
BUNK !—Tucson Star.

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