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The Coolidge examiner. [volume] (Coolidge, Ariz.) 1930-current, June 29, 1934, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94050542/1934-06-29/ed-1/seq-7/

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MULBERRY SQUARE
o sr«s*< Ms**** SBltt O*. LIDA LARRIMORE WNT Imtw
CHAPTER Vll—Continued
"Where* Hi ther?"
“Having lunch with Mr*. Iceland."
Janie kicked her heel* together.
“It’s * committee meeting."
"When do we hare lunch?"
“We don’t. Rachel U In bed
with neuritis."
Cel'.a mored restlessly around the
mom. How shabby it looked! No
one had duated The flower* were
drooping. Ciimj>MN] through the
rain-splattered window* the Square
wa* diamal and forlorn. How could
Janie be contented. reading beaide
the hearth?
“Peter Bruce "phoned you." Janie
aald.
"What did he want?"
"I don’t know."
•Vila didn’t care. Peter Bruce
with hie thick red hand*. Wa* this
to f*e her life? Fhe dfoOped like a
wilting flower Into the chair he
•d© the hearth. If onljr Carter
had come ...
Hugh came In presently, fella
brightened a little. They had a
picnic lunch In front of the Are:
•crap* of chicken, buttered toast,
cocoa and cakea
Hugh talked to fella and
watched the ablne of the firelight
on her honey-colored hair. Lovely,
he thought, the mrre of her throat,
her delicate oval face. She would
always be lorely. Her bone* were
beautifully formed . . .
Janie lay on the hearth mg and
looked at Hu;h. fella would make
him miserable, ahe thought. Hugh
wa* sincere and honest and fine.
He would worship fella and fetta
would take advantage. Janie didn't
want Hugh to be hurt. It was mis
erable. being hurt. "Don't fall lo
lore will her. Hugh. Oh. darling
laughing Hugh!" . . .
The door bell rang, fella alipped
away to answer It. A tail young
man In a belted coat atnod oo the
raln-«p!n*hed step*.
“la this I>octor Ballard's real
dence?" a southern accent.
"Tea." The rain wu falling oo
Ida wavy dark hair. Ills face was
'lark even when he smiled. Hit
tee»h were very white.
“1* Miss Ballard at home?"
fella answered In person
"Why. farter Shelby!" The sil
ver harp strings were tautly drawn.
She advanced to meet him. both
hard* extended In a pretty gesture
of greeting.
“kly ear broke down." Young Mr.
Shelby was explaining, smiling
down at fella, holding both of her
bawls. "I left It and came ©n the
train.”
fella led him Into the living
roon. She chattered brightly. She
fntr*duced him to Janie and to
Hugh.
Hr ought to wear costume*.
Janie thought. A brocade vest, a
coat with velvet lapels. Strange
that l.<* flace waa dark even when
he smiied . . .
Women like a suggestion of mys
tery. Hugh thought He doubted' If
even In the very far South they
spoke with such an exaggerated
drawl. He thought of the gambler
In "Show Boat" It arena I—that waa
hit name, fella seemed nervous.
He wished he could help her some
how . . .
"Have you had lunch?" Celia
asked when Hugh had tnlen his
coat and Janie had pushed the arm
chair close to the Are.
“Well. no. As a matter of fact—"
He accepted a cigarette and bent
to the lighter Hugh snapped.
Lunch! fella thought of Ilachel
In bed with neuritis. She thought
of what waa left In the Icebox. She
thought of Mother lunching with
Mrs. Poland. She felt very badly
used.
Janie was sorry for Celia. Sh#
couldn't bear It, somehow, to see
her shaken and nervous. She
wished she had dusted this morn
ing and rearranged the flower*.
"Our maid is 111." she explained
to Carter Shelby, “and Mother
Isn't at home. Last night we killed
the fatted calf." She smiled her
wide gay smile. "There’s nothing
left but the bones."
Hugh laughed. Why will ahe say
such thing*? Celia Inwardly fumed.
Carter Shelby smiled.
“The prodigal son." he said, “did
not de(»end on a motor ... Mul
berry Square! You described it so
beautifully, Celia."
Celia's Ups trembled. Janie thought
r ery quickly.
"Why don't you go out to Aunt
Locy'ar’ she suggested.
Til call her." Celia felt almost
grateful to Janie.
They heard her talking at the tel
ephone In the hall ... "If It
wouldn’t be too much trouble." The
silver harp strings were singing.
"Tbsnk you. Aunt Lucy! That’s
simply darling of you . . ."
She was smUlng when she re
turned to the living room.
“I’ll run you out." Hugh offered.
“No. thank you.” Celia’s smile
was not for Hugh. “Aunt Lucy la
•coding William in with the sedan."
THE STORY FROM THE BEGINNING
7 sh* quiet hoti**hf'l4 rt I .©tor Ballard, in Mulbsrry ftquar*. jrn ish
fal I>r. Mush K«nr.*djr com** a* an assistant. to »t*y a y*ar Jans* ia th*
unaJTr Srd and 1 k*t»i* nln»t*sr,-y»ar-ol<J daughter of Dot-tor Itaiiard. H#r
oid*r * »t*r. Cells. a t>«tt*4 beauty. I* away from horn* on a visit, Janie
ia tmj re»»ed by the young doctor. He !• introduced to many of Janie's
old friends, among them young Tom McAliiatsr and Janie'a Orrat-l'nc!*
< scar! I Hugh regard* .’»• I* a* a *r- *ll girl, to b* treated a* a cl
•era a photograph of fella, and l* impressed by her b v#iine»e Mr* Itai
iard d:*>■.- uragee Janie's evident partiality for th* young doctor, but th*
girl r«ail*ea *h* is artualijr In love with him. Ceil* return* home Hh#
accepts Hugh's open admiration as her due. He is Just on* more in her
train of admirers. Tom McAilister is another, and Carter Bhelby. whom
eh* ha* met t>n her recent visit, is a third. Sh*lby is hebeved to be
nealthy. and Celia longs to escape from th* "drabness" of Mulberry
Square.
11l
“Hugh." Mother stood In the liv
ing room door. Her expression wss
worried and anxious.
“Ye*. Mr*. Ballard." Hugh looked
up from th© rboss board. Janie
halted the victorious march of the
j Ivory knight.
"fella seems terribly upset"
Mother's band trembled against the
! dull blue portiere. "And th© lK»c-
I tor Is out. Will you fix her up some
j thing to make her sleep?”
A few moments inter Hugh
knocked gently at fella’s door.
“some In." a faint voice called.
fella lay propped up against a
heap of fluffy pillows In the lilac
| and Ivory bed. Her face was wan
and wlstfuL
"What is It, fella r Hugh drew
! a chair beglde the bed.
• "I’m utterly wretch*!" Her lips
quivered. Her eyes were misted
with tears. "I can t go to sleep."
“Drink this" He lifted her head
from the pillow, tingling at the
touch of her hair and the petal
smoothness of her skin.
She drank the mixture like an
obedient child, her misty eyes lift
ing above the rim of the glass.
Tell me what happened. Celia?”
Hugh settled the pillows behind her
head. “You’ll feel better if you talk
It all out"
"It’s Just —me.” 17)© silver harp
strings were muted to threads of
sound. "1 can't bear to be diaap
-1 pointed in my—my friends."
That Shelby aith his m<-< king
©yea! Hogh's hand knotted into a
capable flat.
'Tell me. Celia." Ills voice was
unsteady. There was a hammering
in hit ear* She Iboked so lovely
and he’pie** and fragile la the neat
of fluffy cushions.
“Don’t. Celia! Don't cry !**
“Life is so hard. Sometimes I
think I’ll go Into a convent."
-fella r
Tt would be heavenly, Hugh."
She wore her "Saint fecella” ex
; pression. Hugh saw her. lovely,
fragile and forever beyond his
reach in the somber garb of a nun.
| “No more hurts and disap{>oint
ments. Just nothing but silence and
praying and peace."
“My lovely felia!"
"You do understand me. Hugh?"
fella returned from the convene
She smiled faintly, a poignant
smile, misted over with tear*. "You
don't think I'm Just an over seusi
: tire little gooae?”
Her hand lay like a porcelain
flower against the spread of lilac
silk. Hugh stooped quickly, brushed
It with his cheek.
"Celia.”he said brokenly. “Celia!"
CHAPTER VIII
f | 'HE White Marsh creek wound
A Its twisting course through
stretches of yellow-green reeds.
Janie pulled occasionally on the
oars to keep the boat In the cur
rent In between times she sat
very still and thought of many
things. This was her last day at
home.
Father waa fishing. He sat In the
stern of the boat and patiently
trolled a line. It was a labor of
love. There were, apparently, no
fish left In all of the winding creek.
Father didn't seem to mind. He
puffed on his pipe and watched the
laxy ripples. Dear Father! Janie’s
heart swelled with tender affection.
She could feel It, pressing against
| her cheat, knotting a lamp In her
i throat
She was glad ahe was going
away. It hurt more than she could
bear to watch Hugh fall in love with
Celia. He still went swimming
with Janie and teased her and
called her "a good little egg.” But
It wasn’t quite the same.' He was
moody and thoughtfuL His eyes,
when he glanced at Celia, had a new
sort of worshiping look. It had
happened— Janie thought back
through the past two weeks It had
happened, ahe decided. Just after
Carter Shelby had come and gone.
It wa* strange about that visit
The postman brought no more
square gray envelopes. Mother
dreamed no longer over the picture
of a rose brick mansion.
Celia refused to discuss the mat
ter. Mother and Great-aunt Rose
| believed that Celia had dismissed
Carter Shelby because he had failed
to measure up to her high ideals
It brightened Celia's halo. It shed
a radiance about her. It made Janie
a little sick . . .
"This is a good place to stop."
. Father pulled in the trailing line.
, “Let's see what Rachel parked In
the basket. I have an appetite these
I days"
, There were sandwiches In the bas
, k<-t and peaches and cookies stuffed
with fig*. Janie sat in the bottom
, of the boat, hugging her knees In
her arms, leaning her head against
Father * knee.
She was going away! It would
be three months until the Christ
mas vacation. Three months and
three hundred mile# stretching be
tween Janie and Mulberry Square.
Perhaps. then, she wouldn't mind
so much. Ninety dart. Hugh had
marked them on the calendar In
the office. Hugh . . .
Til ndsa you. little fellow."
little Fellow! Hugh called her
that. He railed feiU "darling."
She had heard him In the garden
one night. Ihirling! Darling!
thirling! . . .
"I’ll mist you. Father," she said.
"You aren't really eating. Janie.
You're nibbling like a mouse."
"I —I’m not very hungry."
“Aren't you feeling well?"
"I have a lump In my throat."
“Tell me . . . Can you. Baby?"
She could always tell Father.
Aa far back as she could remember,
she could always tell Father about
the things that hurt. Only this time
it was different . . .
"It's going away. I guess."
"We'll do something pleasant to
night"
“I have an engagement with
Hugh. He asked me to have sup
per with him at the Inn berauoe
It's my last night at home. We'll
dance for a little while" . . .
Dancing with Hugh. There would
be a moon. It wa* waiting now In
(he sky. misty, unnoticed, a thin
white ghost of a moon . . .
T m proud of Hugh." Father said
warmly. "Between us we're doing
a pretty good Job."
They were sdlent for a moment.
The reeds all around them rustled
with a gentle aiurring sound, like
the rustle of the taffeta skirts that
Mother uaed to wear . . . “Janie
is such a plain little thing." "Curt
sey to Aunt Rose, dear. See—like
OUa doe*." "fella la a sweet tem
pered child. Sing your French song.
Celia." Celia! Celia! OUa!
OeMa! . . . “Darling, darling,
darling." sang the Chines© night
ingale. It was Hugh, talking to
Celia In the garden . . .
“Next June,” Father presently
said, “you and I are going to take
•Naxt Juna," Father Presently
Said, "You and I Art Going to
Taks a THp."
a trip. A fishing trip to Canada."
Father's voice was excited and
pleased. “Jumping Trout lake. I
haven't been there for more than
twenty years.”
“la It pretty?” She wanted to be
i interested In Father’s lake. But ahe
wasn't, really. She kept hearing
the Chinese nightingale. Only it
wasn't a nightingale. It was Hugh,
talking to Celia In the garden . . .
“Janie! You're crying, Janie."
“No—no, I’m not.”
“There's a tear on your knee.”
She saw It. catching the sunlight,
a small round tear on her bare
brown knee.
“What a funny place for a tear!”
i She tried very hard to smile.
TIIE OOOLIDGE EXAMINER
(“Janie—" Father's voice • was
very gentle. “Are you unhappy,
, dear?”
i She nodded.
'j “Why?”
She couldn’t tell h!m why. It
, was like being happy, mixed up
with so many things; being glad
to go away, not caring about Fa
ther* lake. Hugh was In lo\e with
j Celia. “Darling, darling, dnrling.
sang the Chine*© nightingale" . . .
“I Just feel »ad." si)© «aitl
“You car© so about thing*. Janie."
“I wish I didn't." She looked up
at him with trouM©d young eyes.
"It isn't a had way to be. You
nr© hurt more oft©n but you enjoy
1 everything more. Remember, Janie,
■ if you couldn't feel very unhappy,
j you could never feel very happy.
I*> you understand?"
' j “Yes. Father."
1 He talked to her. then, a!»out be
-1 Ing brave and learning something
from all the bun*. It was sad and
! very i*©autiful She wanted to feel
* how much she loved Fnther. how
' happy ahe would be to camp with
1 him on the ahor© of hi* silver lake.
But she couldn't somehow. She
kept thinking of dancing with
; Hugh. Her heart grew larger and
larger. There was nn aching in
j her wrist*. All of her was racing
forward toward the evening. She
I didn't want to race away from Fa
ther. It was something she couldn't
help.
Suddenly guilty, she pressed her
cheek against his knee.
“Why. Janie!"
“I love yon. Father." she said.
II
Janie dressed with the greatest I
care. Filmy under!hings. chiffon
stockings, garters with wee pink
rosea. There was going to be a
moon . . .
She brushed her hair until It
shone. If only she could be as
pretty as OUa! Just for tonight.
Father said she was prettier Inside.
If only Just for tonight she could
wear herself Inside out!
Th© creamy dress from Paris. It
was a beautiful dress. She thought
she looked rather nice. Perhaps *h©
could borrow Olla'a shawl with the
silky golden .ring©. Aunt R>>a©
gave tt to Celia for Christmas.
Celia was not in her room. Janie
wondered Idly where Celia had
gone. She thought she would use j
a little jwrfume. a drop on the lebe
of each ear. There was a new bot
tle on Celia s dressing table. I.iSi©*-
of the-valley . . “That's bow I
thought of you." Hugh had ssid.
“Liliesof-the valley." Janie pushed
in tbe stopper. She wouldn't touch
it, not even a single drop.
Where did OUa keep her shawl?
Janie crossed to tbe wardrobe. A
letter was lying on tbe floor be
tween the cream and Ivory desk.
Janie reeognlted Muriel's writing.
She picked up the letter. A sen
tence caught her attention . . .
“Carter Shelby had dinner with us
last (light" . . . There was a
mark on the paper, the mark of a
small French heel. It must have
been an angry heel which stamped
with a great deal of fore*. Even
1 the nail print* showed.
The shawl was not In th# ward
; robe. Janie decided not to rum
mage around. She could a*k Celia
Just as weiL
Celia was not downstairs. Janie
questioned Mother.
“She went out about three
o’clock." Mother was setting the
table. “Why are you wearing that
dress ?"
"Hugh asked me to have supper
with him." Janie spoke the words
slowly. It made them seetn more
real. “Just set the table for
three"
“Be home by ten. dear. You'll
have to make an early start In the
morning.”
Tomorrow? There was no tomor
row. There was only a moon and
tonight . . .
The clock on the landing struck
six. Hugh bad not come In. Celia
had not returned. Father came down
th* stairs.
“John," Mother said, "I'm wor
ried about Celia."
Father was familiar with Moth
er's worrying habit
“She's out on Manor street," he
said easily, “or at Rhode's, per
haps”
“It Isn't like her not to tell me,"
Mother fretted. "She knows how 1
worry. You’d better eat something,
Janie. Goodness knows—”
"I’m having supper with Hugh.”
Saying the words aloud reassured
her. She heard less distinctly the
clamor of fear In her heart.
Through the hall through the liv- ;
log room, out on the porch, back
again to the halL The clock on
the landing struck seven. Were they
together, Celia and Hugh? . . . j
“I am simply distracted.” Moth
er was talking at the ’phone. Tv#
called everybody . . . Hugh Isn’t
here either. . . . Well, I had
thought of that” . . .
TO BB CONTINUED.
LONG “VOYAGES”
OF SEA HOBOES
Drifting Derelict* a Menace
to Shipping.
The recent sighting of the “ghost
•hip” llaychimo n«*nr Point Barrow,
after she tjjj.J l». *n lost to the sight
of men for a year and a half, calls
to mind one of the sea’* most capti
vating mysteries, though a dread
menace to every sailor—the derelict,
write* I.oul* 11. Bo lander in the Hal
tlmore Sun.
The P.ayehlmo Is. or was, a Hud
son Bay steamship loaded with a
SfiUO.OOo fur cargo. In September.
1881, she was trapped In the Ice off
Wnlnright. The following month air
plane* from Nome rescued the pas
sengers, crew and part of the cargo
On Christmas day a heavy storm
broke. The next day she dlsap
pen red, but a few days later was
sighted by Eskimos. On their report
a trapper visited the ship and re
moved $33,000 worth of fur*. Again
she disappeared, but was seen again j
by Eskimo* In April, 1032. Since
then, so far a* the writer knows, no
human eye has ever sighted the
sturdy steamship, clutched In the re
morseless Arctic Ice.
There Is something fascinating,
something compelling In the thought
of these lonely, broken, shabby sea
hoboes drifting over the seven seas !
at the mercy of wind, tide and cur
rent. Though a menace to sober
shipping there still clings to them an
atmosphere of romance.
One of the most famous derelicts
Don't give up!
IDO NOT want to give trji... but why do I
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Mr. Coffee -Nefves
loses another victim
nBHB f' A MAN FORVOuT^
TAKE ME NERv-] AS LONG AS Hj£s COM-*.
SITTING AROUND. > RATABLE, WHAT DOES
■ SMELLING UP f HE CARE HOW UPSET /
E FEEU ?
| WITHER, aren't vcu a p-gj / CHASE HER
j LITTLE OIT HARO ON B 'j C OUT IN THE {
!™vMy H Ht 4 &?rr« f wOTSBusoiM) »rd,too!>
BOSnrAfcOUND CONSIDERATION TOR . .J|
J > rp ME...WHEN YOU 7 / |
-J j KNOW MV INDIGESTION y I
IS DRIVING r-f V ' 1
7' “
. i
nj have i ?... i'llSAy 1 have!
SHE CERTAINLY GOT BACK HER
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f DAD, HAVE YOU ] SHORT ORPER_! | A [ L " THAMR | I
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'(>A»,GED UTELY? DRINK FROM 1—
known to seafaring men wna the
schooner B. It. Woodslde. She was
forsaken by officers nnd men some
hundreds of miles east of Savannah.
At once she headed straight for Eu
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Still another famous derelict was
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Japan Honor* Edison
A society has been organized in
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monument to Thoma* Edison. It
will be at Yawata, In Yamnshiro
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tained his first supply of bamboo
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and you haven't shavedTU. if he really
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OH ALL RIGHT 1 LOOKING LIKE A t CONSIDERATE.
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personal courtesy, delicious
food, reasonable prices, con
venient location. No
parking worries. ttlSuAk
Wok. roue w i-,*/
r***rt-alion* not*.
THE GREAT NORTHERN HOTEL
JACKSON 81.V0., DE ARBORN . QUINCY STS„
CHICAGO,ILL.
EARL L. THORNTON, Vic«-Pr«».
7

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