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The Coolidge examiner. [volume] (Coolidge, Ariz.) 1930-current, July 14, 1938, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94050542/1938-07-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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ARIZONA
AIR" ■
® Hancock
FIX LIMIT
The United States, Great Britain
and France have agreed to fix the
limit on future battleships at 45,-
000 tons which will tote 16-inch 1
guns. For a long time nations have
been limiting war equipment. Only
certain kinds of guns, bullets, gases,
ships were to be used in war. They
have even talked of making war
“humane”. We have never been able
to understand just what they meant
by that.
The truth of the matter is that
war between nations is a ganm and \
they have built up set of rules by j
which the game can be played.
These rules they revise from time
to time just as the sporting world
revises its football rules.
Possibly if nations would stop
playing around at the war game and
discarded all the rules and an
nounced that they were building an
equipment, without limit, to whip
any nation that came down the
road with a chip on its shoulder
things would clear up a bit. If you
are out to whip a man. supposedly
because he needs to be whipped,
why bother about the size of battle
ship that carries the gun that blows
him to pieces? After all. if you are
going to kill me. it doesn't make
mucn difference to me what you
do it with, f will only ask that the
job be done swiftly and complete
ly. If you use a gun that blows me
to pieces you are the fellow who
will have to look at the bloody
mess, not I.
FOR DEFENSE
Our own great argument and
justification for the enormous ap
propriations recently made for
more battleships and war equip
ment has been that it is for the
purpose of defense in case of at
tack. Well, now. if some enemy
nation attacks us and it becomes
necessary for us to defend our
selves against the attack, why
should w e show any consideration
for the fellow who is seeking to de
stroy us by trying to be “humane”
in the size of bullets and guns we
use against him? Our claim of
“defense equipment” and the
limitation of sizes of guns and
ships is inconsistent. Either the
enemy needs to be destroyed or
he doesn't. If he does, destroy him,
the bigger the battleships and guns
the better. If he doesn't need to
be destroyed we should not play a
war game with him with both using
“regulation equipment that equal
izes the chances of either side for
victory.
And “human?" There is no hu
mane warfare. There never has
been and there never can be —un-
less it is based on Jesus’ saying:
“If thine enemy hungers feed him.”
ANOTHER SEVENTY FIVE
YEARS
There is something deeply pa
thetic in the last and final reunion
of the old soldiers of the Blue and
Gray held last week at Gettysburg.
The members of those opposing
armies have dwindled to a mere
handfull. Hundreds of wheel chairs
had to be used to help them
through the celebration. Once
enemies, trying to kill one another,
they met as friends on the battle
field to talk over the events of
three quarters of a century ago.
How silly that war must look to
them now. And how slowly did the
fires of hate burn out.
In another seventy-five years the
army of the Blue and Gray will be
a distant memory and this side of
that seventy-five years even the
men who fought in the World War
will have passed on. “The shouting
and the tumult dies, the captains
and the kings (and the soldiers)
depart.”
Our children’s children will read
the pages of history we have made
for them. Across those pages, cover
ing centuries, they will see the
blood spots the human family has
put there and the “reasons” for
them. They will wonder how “civilii
zed men” won “civilization” by
such barbaric means and still call
ed themselves “civilized.”
VANISHING AMERICANS
It seems there have been many
stories of vanishing frontiers and
vanishing Americans. Nearly all
our frontiers have disappeared and
the Indian has been called the
vanishing American.
It seems, however, that he will
be here much longer than some
Americans who we felt at times,
would be with us forever. Remem
ber the days when the livery busi
ness was tip-top and man who own- j
ed one was considered fixed for
life? He has been gone these many
years. Vanished! Where could you
rent a horse and buggy today Re
member when we envied the great
artists and the Victor people be
cause they had what we called a
‘dead cinch” business selling ret- ,
ords? But when Marconi stretched
his arms across space with th<>;
wireless he just messed that busi
ness up terribly. Records are still
sold but many a man in that busi
ness a few year* ago has gone out
of business.
1 reently had occassion to go to
the depot in Prescott. It is a pood
size building. A train came in. T1 eie
were about a half dozen pe pie
present. It recalled memories of
other days when the depot was die
most important place in the com
munity. Business men, housewi -es.
practically everyone who could, aad
to go down to the depot to see the
train come in and gc out. Our la>
was not complete without it.
The depot was the social con act
spot of the community. It was th< re,
or a half hour later at the post
i office, that we knew who ha< a
new dress, hat. shoes, or learned
| the latest gossip in circulation. To
day the depot is the last place
where you expect to find folk.
ANOTHER ONE
And it is coming home to us now
that thsi ice man will also join he
ranks of the vanishing Americans:
in a short time. Ten years ago a j
man with an ice business had a
j “sure thing.” Then came the elec
tric ice box. Every man now lias
his own equipment. It wasn t alto
gether practical at first. Then i*
•improved. Soon for jent,
were advertized as having this
extra rare special equipment. To
i day, in our cities, you can hardly
rent a place unless it contains one.
Companies who use to handle
ice. employing men to do their de
livering. are now farming out their
routes because they find profits
decreasing so fast that they do not
consider it any longer profitable
for them to keep going.
There are really no “sure shot”
things in our commercial world be
| yond the grocer, the dry goods
i store and a few things like that.
Our world is pushing along fast and
: threatens many a present day sound
business. The men who promote
these businesses will someday join
the “vanishing American” The In
dian —the poor “vanishing Ameri
i can" fellow we use to feel sorry for,
l will be here long after many of
those who predicted that he would
soon be a thing of the past.
TRIALS AND JURIES
! It’seems that the original idea
was to give a man what he was
entitled to. including punishment
if he committed crime.
Today we do not know what the
j idea is. Often it seems to be to
find some way to conclude that
no matter what a man did, he
didn’t do it. Latest puzzler is a
IjOs Angeles jury that came to
i the conclusion that a man who
planted dynamite in a detective’s
car to blow him up so he could
| not testify and which did blow
j him up to the tune of over a
hundred woulds and three months
i in jail, did not do it with murder
-1 ous intent. Next comes a murder
i case where a man, after killing
I two people with a gun, is not
guilty of murder by reason of
insanity. He fell off a horse when
'he was young. Come to
think of it, I fell of a horse sever
al times when I was a kid and
was thrown off even more. If we
let ’em get away with that sort
of thing as they are doing in
creasingly, I will be entitled to
get out and kill half the folks in
my neighborhood—they yell—“I
was insane when I did it—l fell
off a horse when I was a kid.”
Murder is no less murder when
committed by an insane man, just
j as murder is no less murder when
committed by a drunk. People who
kill when they are insane or
drunk may become {and
drunk again. You may save their
necks because of certain pleas but
| it still remains that the blood of
their victim cries up to us from
the ground.
o
Greyhound Bus Schedule
Leaves Coolidge
1 Westbound
|to Phx. (via Florence).-. 2:45 P.M.
to Phx. and Coast 10:37 P..V.
Eastbound
j to Tucson and El Paso 11 A.At.
to Tucson and El Paso .... 4:15 P.M.
S. P. TIME TABLE
Effective February 13th
EASTWARD
No. 44 9:27 AM
No. 4 9:47AM
No. 2 11:52 PM
WESTBOUND
No. 1 4:51 AM
No. 3 8:26 AM
No. 5 -7:12 PM]
PINAL COUNTY TENTATIVE BUDGET
FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30th, 1939
Upon motion duly seconded the Board proceeded to make the Tentative budget
as follows, of the various amounts requir .1 for the various fund/s, to meet Public Ex
penses of Pinal County. State of Arizona, for the ensuing year, from Ju,ly 1. 1938 to
June 30th. 1939. and the Clerk of the Board was instructed to publish the same in the
official paper of Pinal County.
SCHEDULE NO. 1 GENERAL FUND
to 'Z
£ V
I_ » >3 3 .2
, -i- e t ® Z
0/ Z O' c
ti cs a ii
S 3 r o X co
3 • £ CO M <K
m rt 3. IT- ” t,
r tc a>
5 —a: 2 J 3
G r g ft. S ~
•e « "o t ® t »
Cft- <£ S 3 <£ >
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:
Salaries of Members and Clerk $ 6.000.00 $ 6,000.00 $ 6,000.00
Publishing Minutes and Notices 700.00 475.03 700.00
Office Supplies and Misc. Expense 900.00 900.76 1,200.00
Travel Expense Attending Meetings 1,250.00 947.55 1,200.00
$ 8,850.00 $ 8,323.34 $ 9.100.00
COURT HOUSE:
Janitor’s Salary $ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00 $ 1,500.00
Fuel, Ice. Lights and Water 800.00 901.70 1,000.00
Repairs anu Misc. Expense 3.400.00 5,254.09 1,000.00
$ 5,700.00 $ 7,655.79 $ 3,500.00
COUNTY HOSPITAL:
Salaries of Sup't. and Employees $ 8,525.00 $ 9,798.51 $13,080.00
Supplies, Fuel, Ice, Light, Water, Phone, etc .... 11,120.00 15.455.02 15,000.00
Repairs to Buildings 60.00 42.59
I—X-Ray Unit 3,700.00
$19,705.00 $25,296.12 $31,780.00
HEALTH DEPARTMENT:
Indigent Medical Outdoor Relief $ 8,000.00 $ 8,223.95 $ 8,500.00
Burial of Indigents 2,000.00 3,140.00 2,500.00
Examination of Insane 350.00 325.00 350.00
Coroner’s Expense 250.00 427.6!) 400.00
Registrar of Vital Statistics 500.00 572.00 550.00
Health Officer Salary and Expense 800.00 754.00 800.00
Quarantine Expense 300.00 181. OS 300.00
$12,200.00 $13,623.72 $13,400.00
SHERIFF’S OFFICE:
Salaries of Sheriff and Deputies $29,250.00 $29,813.40 $30,900.00
County Cars 5,500.00 7 489.93 7,500.00
Office Supplies and Expenses 3,100.00 2,397.31 2,800.00
Meals for Prisoners 2,600.00 3.637.40 3,100.00
$40,450.00 $43,233.04 $44,300.00
COUNTY ATTORNEY’S OFFICE:
Salaries Attorney, Deputy and Stenographer ....$ 6.100.00 $ 6,100.00 $ 6.100.00
Office Supplies and Expense 850.00 884.81 850.00
$ 6.950.00 $ 6,984.81 $ 6,950.00
COUNTY ASSESSOR’S OFFICE:
Salaries Assessor and Deputies $ 5.700.00 $ 5,700.00 $ 5,700.00
Office Supplies and Expenses 725.00 950.92 1,200.00
Travel Expense 1.000.00 860.52 1,000.00
$ 7.425.00 $ 7,511.44 $ 7,900.00
COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE:
Salaries, Treasurer and Deputies $ 5,700.00 $ 5,700.00 $ 5,700.00
Office Sunplies and Expenses ... 3,800.00 3,878.33 3,800.00
$ 9.500.00 $ 9,578.33 $ 9,500.00
COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE:
Salaries, Recorder and Deputies - $ 5.700.00 $ 5.700.00 $ 5,700.00
Office Supplies and Expenses 1,400 00 1.248.12 2,100.00
$ 7,100.00 $ 6.948.12 $ 7,800.00
ELECTION EXPENSE:
Supplies. Election Boards Etc $ $ 3 5,000.00
CLERK SUPERIOR COURT:
Salaries, Clerk and Deputy $ 4,200.00 $ 4,200.00 $ 4,200.00
Office Supplies and Expenses 700.00 436.35 700.00
$ 4,900.00 $ 4,636.35 $ 4,900.00
SUPERIOR COURT:
Judge’s Salary 3 1.800.00 $ 1,800.00 $ 2,025.00
Office Supplies 500.00 429.09 500.00 ,
Bai]iff 100.00 81.00 100.00
Interpreter 'V...... 100.00 5.00 100.00
Court Reporter Salary and Expense 1.200.00 1,662.16
Juror’s Fees and Mileage 3,500.00 3,012.40 ■
Juror’s Meals and Lodging 300.00 218.02 00 0 °
Miscellaneous Expense 1,000.00 1,486-/0 1,500.00
$ 8,500.00 $ 8,694.37 $ 9,325.00
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE:
Industrial Commission Insurance 3 750.00 $ 1,518.54 $ 800.00
Pountv Tails 2.000.00 1,323.99 2,500.00
Agricultural Extension Service 1,600.00 I ’coq'qq 2 «nn on
Abstract and Extend Tax Rolls - 600.00 599.99 00000
Insurance on County Property 1,500.00 045.6 ’ '
Interest on County Warrants 4,500.00 3,040 0, 4 ’
County Advertising I’onnnn
Miscellaneous Expense - 1,150.00 883.5 ’
$12,100.00 $ 9,911.77 $14,500.00
COUNTY SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT:
Salaries. Supt. and Deputy 3 4.200.00 3 4,200.00 $ 4,200.00
$ 5.800.00 $ 6.030.43 $ 6,200.00
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE: •• *
Salaries No 12, 4 5,6, 7,8, 9& 10 $ 7.200.00 $ 7,132.26 $ 7,200.00
Interpreter’s Salary 100.00 10.00 100 00
$ 9,100.00 $ 9,410.30 $ 9,500.00
CONSTABLES:
Salaries, No. 1, 2. 4,5, 6. 7, 8. 9 and 10 $ 4.200.00 3 4,200.00 $ 4.200.00
Miscellaneous Expense 350.00 361.25 400. )
$ 4,550.00 3 4,561.25 $ 4,600.00 |
THE COOLIDGE EXAMINER
} New Hospital Construction $ $37,616.13 $
GRAND TOTAL GENERAL FUND EXPENDI
TURES $1G2.530.00 $210,120.31 $188,255.00
Estimated Receipts from Misc. Sources 23,100.00 39,926.72 25,600.00
$139,730.00 $170,193.59 $162,655.00
i-xcess on Sales Tax over Estimate (1937-/.S) 14,236.13
$139,730.00 $170,193.59 $148,415.57
I Estimated Receipts from Sales Tax over
amount required lor Bonded Indebtness .. 23.266 00
unount to be raised by direct Taxation $139,73u.00 $170,193.59 $125,152.37
Treasurer’s balance (NONE)
Special Levies Authority State Tax
Commission 27.000.00 36,380.00 36,380.00
ACTUAL TAX LEVY $166,730.00 $161,532.87
SCHEDULE NO. 2 ROAD FUND
05
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ENGINEER'S OFFICE:
Engineer’s Salary $ 3,300.00 $ 3,300.00 $ 3,300.00
Clerk's Salary 1,800.00 1,800.00 1,800.00
Surveyor’s Salary 2,11)0 00
Office Expense ! 1,000.00 783.35 1,000 00‘
Engineer’s Travel Expense 900.00 873.96 900.00
Industrial Commission Insurance 3,100.00 2,816.83 2,500.00
Interest on Road Warrants 1,000.00 3,155.72 3,000.00
$ 11,100.00 $ 12,792.86 $ 14,600.00
ROADS AND BRIDGES:
Maintenance $ 71,580.00 $129,277.09 $ 99,172.00
New Equipment 32,060.00 33,318.99 12,442.00
GRAND TOTAL GENERAL FUND
EXPENDITURES $11,4.740.00 $175,525.94 $126,214.00
Estimated Receipts from Misc. Sources 47,420.00 63,740.14 52,162.00
Amount to be raised by direct Taxation . 67,320.00 $111,585.80 $ 74,052.00
Treasurer’s Balance (NONE)
i Special Levy Authority State Tax
Commission $ 25,000.00 $ 40,000.00 $ 40,000.0(
ACTUAL TAX LEVY FOIi ROAD
AND BRIDGE PI'RPQSES $ 92,320.00 $ 71,585.80 $114,052.00
SCHEDULE NO. 3 SCHOOL DISTRICT BONDS
tfi l/l
a u s_ o m
CL W p fl l i
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® fa cS Ss>, 3 ®
U) faS ® 4) ol Q
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< £ <j (S 3 & a £ £
v
DISTRICT NO. 3
Interest $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ $
Redemption 3,500.00 3,500.00
DISTRICT NO. 4 (SECOND)
Interest 1,200.00 1,200.00 1,000.00 1,000.00
Redemption 2,500.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 2,500.00
DISTRICT NO. 4 (THIRD)
Interest 550.00 550.00 1,000.00 1,000.00
Redemption 1,500.00 1,501).00 1.000.00 1,000.00
DISTRICT NO f
Interest 100.00 100.00 ' 100.00 100.00
Redemption ISO.OO 180.00 180.00 180.00
DISTRICT NO. 11
Interest 700.00 700.00 500.00 500.00
Redemption 1,500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00
DISTRICT NO. 12
Interest 50.00 50.00 60.00 60.00
Redemption 250.00 250.00 300.00 300. on
DISTRICT NO 15
Interest .... 1,230.00 1,230.00 1,000.00 1,000.00
Redemption 3,400.00 3,400.00 3,400.00 ,>,400.00
DISTRICT NO. 17
Interest 50 00 50.00
redemption 200.00 200.00 150.00 150.00
DISTRICT NO. 21 (SECOND)
Interest 2,500.00 2,500.00 2,500.00' 2.500.00
Redemption 3,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00
DISTRICT NO. 22
Interest 420.00 42Q.00 450.00 450.00
Redemption 435.00 435.00 400.00 400.00
DISTRICT NO. 25
Interest 40.00 40.00
Redemption 250.00 250.00 210.00 210.00
DISTRICT NO. 28 (SECOND)
Interest 2,000.000 2,000.00 ••---** o V.nn AVV
Redemption 500.00 500.00 2,000.00 • 1 ■
DISTRICT NO. 30
Interest
Redemption 500.00 500.00
UNION HIGH SCHOOL NO 1
Tntere t 1,500.00 1,500.00
Redemption 3,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00
UNION HIGH SCHOOL NO. 2
Interest 2 500.00 2.500.00 1,000.00 1 OdOOU
Redemption ZZZZ’".. 7.000.00 7.000.00 9,000.00 9,000.00
UNION HIGH SCHOOL NO. 4
Tntprp<st 2.400.00 2.400.00 2,300.00 2.300.00
Redemption:::: 1.200.00 1.200.00 1.200.00 1,200.00
HIGH SCHOOL NO. 15
Redemptitn-: : I YsOMO 2.500.00 2.500.00
(Continued on page Five)
THURSDAY, JULY 14, 1988

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