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The Coolidge examiner. [volume] (Coolidge, Ariz.) 1930-current, October 03, 1941, Image 5

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FRIDAY, OCT. 3, 1041
Founders of Legion Sleet at Convention
r -~-
V -4fr '"1
ISltf „ NW * Nj n
Founders of the American Legion are shown as they gathered at
the twenty-third annual convention of the Legion In Milwaukee, W.s.
Seen looking over a collection of mementos from the first Paris ear ;s
Inrming the group are: Leon Sr’/uiti, Alabama: Lee "‘.rncr, St. P.'iil,
Minn.; J. P. Pfcil, Milwaukee, Wis.; and J. 11. It " ’ing, W. Vi.
i
A' IKIZONA
AIR I
; bv TEX HANCOCK j
MISSED THE BUS
When Hitler failed to invade
Knglund immediately after Ihtn
kirk t'hurrhill said he had missed
the bus—or boat. Another way of
saying that he had passed up his
golden opportunity.
We are beginning to wonder if
maybe England hasn't also missed
the bus in the Russian situation.
There is an old saying that if
you don't risk anything you don't
get anything. It would seem that
England's time to strike at Ger
many ts while Germany has her
greatest job of taking care of
Russia. Os course we have been
given to understand all along that
Germany would whip Russia
eventually—a matter of time. If
this is true it would seem that an
attack on Germany by the English
would be easier now than after
Russia has been wiped off the
map. England is not going to de
feat Germany by waiting on her
own soil. Enough attack on Ger
many to comt*el her to divide her
forces would be a big help to Rus
sia and not endanger England as
much as waiting will.
According to the way things
are going, or have gone, the tale
will he about as follows: Russia
next, then Turkey, then the Afri
can mop-up and then England.
After that it is up to us to lick
all Europe or stay home and turn
the rest of the world over to the
Nazi.
CHANGING WORLD
We suppose that every age
thinks it is the most rapidly
changing age in history. That is
because the world is never entire
ly stationary. The human family
is perpetually going either forward
or backward. Change is evident to
all who have an eye to see it.
Rut our age can be called the
most rapidly changing of any
period that we can recall. When
things move along so fast that a
world map. three months old. is
out of date, that Is good going.
The other night we dug up a map
of Europe that we bought three
years ago. A short look at a map
that old will give you a sort of
shock. We read about the change
In the papers every day and have
a general idea of it but comparing
maps brings it all out to you in
a most forceful way—and you
look and can hardly believe.
UPS AND DOWNS OF NATIONS
The ups and downs of nations
is nothing new. They have been
going up and down all thru the
ages. Rut the “downs” have never
come in such a wholesale manner
and with such rapidity as has oc
curred in the past decade. We
know how civilizations have risen
and faljen. how great kingdoms
and empires have come and gone.
We know of whole races having
been swept from the earth to
give place for new and different
peoples.* But we more or less try
to think of our own age as being
stationary in that sense. It is not
so.
There is no such thing as a
permanently superior or inferior
race or nation today. There are
degrees of quality in different
peoples but mechanical force or
power stands as a threat to all
quality and all progress.
WORLD REVOLUTION
We are passing thm a world
revolution. Some of it Is peaceful
and some is not. But revolution
has always been a part of pro
gress. Indeed most of it is a
peaceful sort, the orderly process
of casting aside outgrown modes
and customs and practices. When
it comes along peaceful lines we
have always called it progress.
When it assumes armed revolt —
we call it war.
Communism, Nazism. Facism
are instruments thru which dif
ferent people are revolting against
conditions they do not like or do
not want. Os course we think
they are the wrong instruments
but that fact they have come into
I
such i«wer is proof that some
thing was wrong or inadequate
with the old.
The same unrest and dissatis
faction is existent here in our ow n
country but thus far we have
managed to make the changes by
peaceful and gradual means.
We have only to look bark over
the past ten years to see that the
United States of today and the
United Slates of 1$»30 are vastly
different things. We have reshuf
fled our national mind or attitude
toward a dozen vital things. We
have centralized jsiwer and gov
ernment control. We have seen
the growth of labor movement that ;
possesses a potential power of
controlling our whole industrial
life. Aid conventions have tumbl
ed down and we are walking along
in a new “freedom” that is so dif
ferent from the old that it startles j
us when we stop to make the j
comparison. Hut it has all been a ,
gradual, slow and peaceful change, j
WHERE DO WE GO FROM
HERE
Where we will end up nobody
seems to know. In fart the revo
lution (peaceful ns it is and has
been) has all our outstanding
leaders muddling around, wonder
ing what they are going to do
about It. We have cut loose from ,
the |>aHt and are now in the mid- j
die of the stream. We THINK we I
know* our direction. If we can I
hold to tlie direction we will may j
be work the thing out.
Consciously or unconsciously,
willingly or unwillingly we ar«
having to adapt ourselves to the
changes. Sometimes we do not
even konw they are going on. We
Just wake up some morning and
discover that the change has been
made.
One thing is certain—our whole
complicated civilization is beyond
the comprehension of any one
man. Almost of any group of men.
We are going to have to work it
out in patches. We will experi
ment here and there. Some will
work ami some will not. 1 bat
calls for more discard and mon
experimentation. But it will be
worked out eventually. It will not
come in one great convulsive
event but by slow processes. The
biggest fun of being alive today
is in being able to watch the show
as it happens.
NEVER THROUGH
But there is no end to the pro
cess. Every’ time we put one
problem behind us another rises
up to take its place. Each ad
vance brings its own responsibili
ties. That is why each age thinks
it is the most rapidly changing
age in history.
If you come back to earth a
thousand years from now. (if tin
human family lasts that long.) yon
will find the human race still
struggling on. bowed down with
problems and situations, faced j
with unrest and change, reaching
out for that better something that
each generation, in its time, has \
ever sought to obtain.
The ultimatte is a succession of
achievements strung out thru the
ceuturies. If it were otherwise
we would have vanished front the j
face of the earth long ago.
o
Bean-Anderson
Rites Held Here
Miss Emma gene Bean and De
line Anderson, both of Tiger, were
married here by the Reverend J.
D. Easter in Community Presby
terian church at high noon Sun
day.
Caroline Kent was maid-of-hon
or and Joe McNew was best man.
The bridal party Included Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Bean, the bride’s
parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Black,
and Mr. and Mrs. William Black,
all of Tiger; Mrs. Lucille Kelle
her, Mrs. Pauline Hopkins, both
of Coolidge and Mrs. C. Kunde of
Mammoth.
The young couple will make
( their home at Miami. Arizona.
o
• A trash pile caught fire behind
i Pinal Grocery Friday afternoon
; and Coolidge Fire Department was
t called out, to find the blaze ex
> tinguished when they got there.
MERRIMENT TO
RiGN DURING
' PGSON f IESTA
Fiesta Days are coming —days '
1n which to make merry, to S
laugh, sing, and wear your most j
colorful raiment. October 2.1. 24. j
j 25, 20 have been set aside as I,e- j
gion Fiesta and Rodeo Holidays.
For these four days Coolidge will
j become an old world town of gay
senoritas in Spanish shawls, man
,ti 1 las ami fan-shaped combs. (’*
j balleros will appear in colorful
scrapes and wide-brimmed Mexi
can hats.
One of the largest carnivals in
the west. Zeiger Shows, have been i
engaged for the holiday period by
legion Fiesta Days Committee
under the general chairmanship
of John D. Goree.
The carnival grounds will he
located on Main street just north
of Hines Drug Store. Merry-go- j
j Rounds, Ferris Wheels, Side
! Shows, peanuts and popcorn will
j add to the prevailing holiday spir
it
To complete the festivities there
will be a rodeo at Martin's Des
ert Beach on the newly completed
rodeo grounds. Here, under the
direction of Tom Clark. widely
known Tucson cattleman, who has
been engaged as arena director
and promoter, cowboys of the old
west w ill match their skill with i
horse and lariat midst many a j
lusty yippee!—“Ride ’em Silver.”
So. Senoritas, put a rose in your .
hair, bring your guitars, senors
and join the holiday throng for
Legion Fiesta Days.
Stars Plan
Guest Meet
Members of Ocotillo Chapter,
Order of the Eastern Star, will
hold a guest meeting Wednesday. ;
October sth, at 8 p. m. in Ma
j sonic Temple.
Each member of the local chap
| ter will bring a Star who Is not a
i member of this chapter as her
guest. A special program has
been planned in honor of the vis
iting Stars.
Local Happenings
• Mias Juanita McCullough and
Gerald Hammonds drove Miss Ann
Hannah to Tucson, Sunday. Miss
j Hannah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
|P. B Hannah, was returning to
| University of Arizona after spend
! ing the week-end with her parents.
• Law renct v. < illoug!
at State Teachers College, Tempe. i
spent the week-end at home. Mrs
Bello McCullough, his mother,
and Mrs.- Anna Humphries, hit j
aunt, accompanied Lawrence as !
far as Tempe Sunday evening. >
from where they went on to Phoe
nix to visit Mr. and Mrs. William
Kemper.
• Mr. nnd Mrs. R B. Smith nnd !
children Joyce and Bobby of Fort 1
Thomas, spent Sunday with Mr ,
and Mrs. Robert Springfield. Mr
Smith was principal of the high
school at Fort Thomas when Mr.
Springfield taught there.
• David Hood, who has been vis
iting his mother. Mrs. F. P. Jam ‘
ieson for a few days, left Tuesday i
for Globe, where he has accepted i
an appointment as range supervis- j
or for A.A.A. for Gila county.
• Clayton Hanna and Woodman
Moore, returned Friday front two
weeks tour, during which they vis
ited Salt Lake City, friends in
Idaho, and stopped over at Wash- I
ington, I). C. Mr. Hanna left for
Long Beach, California, Monday
morning to bring his mother Mrs.
George Hanna home. They re
turned the following day.
• Ronald Herman Pottebaum. who
has been visiting Mr. and Mrs.
j Herbert Hanna for two weeks, will
leave for his home in Gila Bend
tomorrow. Ronald is Mrs. Han
; na'a nephew. He and Mrs. H. R.
; Pottebaum, his mother, have re
| cently returned from six week's
visit to relatives in San Antonio,
Texas.
* j
It’s a fact that many people lose
everything because of cyclone
and damage by wind. In a few
minutes, a life's work can be
lorn away. Don’t take chanc
es. Insure today and be safe
tomorrow.
J. J. JONES
ARIZONA LAND <SL
INVESTMENT CO.
Coolidge, Arizona
THE COOLIDGE EXAMINER
STATE PRESIDENT
GUEST AT CLUB'S
ANNUAL RUSH TEA
Week-end Offenders
Face Justice Monday
In Local Court
Sixteen Indians were fined $2.00
each and sent out of town by lo
cal justice court Monday morning
for too enthusiastic celebration
over the week-end.
One of thte number crashed I
through the plate glass window- of
Howard’s Barber Shop on Main
Street when he was struck by an
unknown assailant.
Other sentences meted out were
Paul Cowan, fined $15.00 for a
misdemeanor.
Boyd Halloway, termed by lo I
cal officers a "trouble maker,” j
was ordered to leave the district
for a period of six months.
I.uthy Douglas. SIO.OO fine for
disturbing the peace.
I PRICES EFFECTIVE FRIDAY & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3 AND 4—FLORENCE AND COOLIDGE STORES
TALL CANS n New Crop
* Evaporated A ||M| mm I'VX Cleaned And
Pinto
3 FOR th» many good things to be
*lf found at your neighborhood jq LBS
- - ~ offering a wide variety of fine * tjT*^
Jr food* at the lowest prices... i
m P with a money-back guarantee
on everything you buy. ®
Should Any of These Items Be Advertised For Less Be Assured SA FEWAY Will Not Be Undersold
f AIRWAY COFFEE lb. 13c [
Many Kinds KITCHEN KRAFT
CANDY BARS and GUH 3 for 10c FLOUR “’** 11.51
Van Camp’s HOUSEHOLD
HOMINY 325 c RAISINS 4lb.pkgs.24c
RED LABEL anorp L'lRI
KARO 5 lb. cans 29c BAKING POWDER 10 oz. can 7c
GARDENSIDE pftitf “
C 0 R N 3 ~ 25c PEARS 15c
i GARDENSIDE Cut Green
BEAMS 3 -25 c ffcUE S 21 oljar 14c
i GARDENSIDE
TOMATOES TOASTEEBREAD 16oz.loaf6c
I TOMATO JUICE I=2sc CRACKERS 2‘ ~ 1 ->C |
For Savings and Defense Buy National Defense Stamps Sold At All Safeway Stores
FARM FRESH FRUITS AND / SAFEWAY GUARANTEED MEATS
VEGETABLES steer chuck pa |
CABBAGE Ip ROASTS. Ib -17> 9
Crisp, Solid, Green LB. It- ROUND BONE CUTS LB. 20c M 2 g
POTATOES No. 2 s lb. STEAKS lb - 25l
100 LB. SACKS 89c lv Choice Cut. Round or Sirloin
| APPLES 33 lb. box 7Qc SALT PORK lb. 1
| BELLFLOWERS FOR COOKING f J Fancy Eastern . Lean U !
I ~ ~ . „ EASTERN SLAB mr n i
BANANAS 3lbs. 10 C BACON lb. 25
( Golden Rip. Green Tip, LU »»TH’S SLICED 2* 18. j
[ONIONS 5 lbs. 1 rt c HAMBURGER lb. 1C c
| SWEET SPANISH A LEAN FRESH GROUND
yTmS 4lbs. IRe BEEFSTEW lb. f 9I c i
I FANCY PORTO RICANS CHOICE LEAN RIBS * Z
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
Residents Receive
Flying Instructions
Among flying students who hav*
: instruction at the local field, each
| Wednesday are Art Wahl, Susan
Chadbom, Virgil Brown, Bob Hum
i phrey and Earl Wright.
Jin. Wimberly, Casa Grande, is
j tlie instructor. The plane is an
j Interstate “Cadet” with dual con
trols.
o
• Eugene Anderson, l.’l year old
Bth grade student, broke his arm
playing football Tuesday. He is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. N. An j
derson.
o
Rainbow Girls
Install Officers
V\ ednesday Night
Earveline Palmer was installed
as worthy advisor of Coolidge As
sembly, Order of Rainbow for
Girls, in formal ceremonies held
Wednesday night at Masonic
I Temple.
Ruby Sparks, outgoing worthy
advisor, acted as installing officer,
Hetty Faye McEuen, installing
marshall, Mrs. J. J. Jones, install j
lng chaplain and Mrs. Leon Smith !
installing organist.
Mrs. Joe Sherrill was present !
as substitute for Mrs. C. A. Chris
tenson, mother advisor, who was
unable to attend because of ill
ness.
Corsages were presented to
Rainbow officers as a compliment
front members of Coolidge Eastern
Stars.
Refreshments were served fol
lowing the ceremonies. Lee Ella
Odom was refreshment chairman,
with Vera Mae Campbell and Ella
Mae Bammert assisting as co
Everyone seems to be of
cheer at Martin’s . . .
and a
any
niglit. You won't find
friendlier crowd anywhere.
Everyone's here for a good
timC yOU your share
■IH Martin’s Desert
COOLIDGE
PHONE 124-J3
chairmen.
Those taking office with Miss
Palmer were Sarah Ixmise Arnold,
associate worthy advisor; Evelyn
Troutt, charity: Gloria Appel,
hope; Frances Short, faith; John
nie Jean Dixon, recorder; Barham
Talla, treasurer; Elmeretta Naf
ziper, chaplain and Ella Mae Baui
mert, drill leader.
Mrs. Alice lies was installed as
a new member of the advisory
board.
Page Five

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