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The Clifton clarion. (Clifton, Graham County, A.T., Ariz.) 1883-1889, August 21, 1889, Image 1

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THE CLIFTON CLARION.
VOL. TIL
CLIFTON, GRAHAM CO., ARIZONA: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1889.
NO. 19
CLIFTON CLARION.
PBBLISHID WlDKESDiTS BT Til
CLUTON CLARION PUBLISMG CO.
W. W. JONES, Manager.
TERMS :
ONX TEAR (In advance) 4.00
ix months .so
3" To British subscribers the subscription
pales sf The Clauox i jCI, postage prepaid,
obscribsrs may remit by exchange on New
Tork.
Fit A. M THE REGtTLAR MEKTIX09 OF
. Coronado Lodge, No. 8, for btsu, will be as
follows:
Saturday,
Saturday,
Saturday,
Saturday,
Saturday,
April lrsatuwav, "ept. f
May II Saturday, Oct. 6
Juiie SiSnturdav. Nov. 2
Jnir K Saturday, lee. 7
Au. 10
J. ABRAHAM, W. i.
Tnos. Surra, Secretary.
OmCUL ElRECTORT OT GS1H1M CODHTT.
r hob ati ju noi:
JOHN BLAKE ...SolomouTiUe
hxbxff akd xx-officio asskssob axd tax
collkctob:
Wit- WHEI.AX SolomoLTiUe
Deputy W. J. PARKS.
TBKASritEX:
W. W. DAMRON' Soloinonville
roryrr bxcohder:
KDUARDO SOTO SolomonTllle
Deputy P. S. SOTO.
district attokjtxt:
4. It. PATTERSON Soloaionville
raviron:
C. D. BROWS Thatcher
board or SCrXRVl'OKS:
I. A. CUTTER Ft. Thomas
J. X. BALLET Bailey's Wells
V. DYSART . SolomonTille
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
JOHN H. LACY, SI. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND 8TJEGEON,
Office: Oo Main Street,
Cui-rosr,
CSTIN C. WRIGHT, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Office: Opposite D. C. M. Co.'s Stom,
JC0XK5CI, .... AkIZOSA
JJR. J. A. LORD,
DENTIST,
First-class Dental Work. Best of References.
Operative or Mechanical Work at fair prices.
tf'Consultatiou tree.
Omit: At Cliktox Hotel, Clifton, Akiz.
t
M.EGAN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Office: Off Main Street.
Cliftos,
Akizona
St. PATTERSON,
ATTOBNEY-AT-LAW,
District Attorney of Graham County,
flOLOMOXYILLE, - AB1ZOSA
JEFFORDS Jb FRANKLIN,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
111-51 Pennington St.
Tixsos, ..riz.
p J. CLARK,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Cl.IFTOf ,
Am ion a
ARIZONA & N. M. RAILWAY.
TIMK TA1JI.K.
GOING 90UT1I. UOTNO NOKTI1.
LvClifton .. 7:n a.m. Lv Ld'ahnrg 1:20p m.
N. Siding. 7 SO Summit.. :2)
8. Siding. 7:: ArDu-.cau .. S:2rt
Guthrie . 8:08 Lv Dnnran . . 8:30
Coronado 8:24 Sheldon.. S S4
York's .. 8:54 York's .. 4 2rt
Sheldon . 912 Coronado 4. Mi
At Duncaii. . 9:42 Guthrie . 5:li
Lv Onncan .. 9:52 S. Siding. S:44
Summit ll:n) N. Siding 11:50
ATl.Ml.ur.f lS:0im.- ArClinn:i 0:20
r-ASSEXGFB BATES.
Clifton to
North Siding
South Siding
Guthrie
Coronado
York'B
I Clifton to
.50 Sheldon S:5fl
Til rim.ii -Hn
I.
l:Kl
2.1(1
Summit 4.8")
Lordalur,f 5.90
Children between five and twelve years of aire
hair fare.
If- One hundred pound? of baggage carried
free with each full fare and 50 pounds with each
half fare.
rnzir.iiT RATES.
nt classes of freight: r
3 ? H j 3"
a o. a f
Q ft -. ?
3 S r. S
3
s a.
at m
tlif0't- I
X. Siding.. 3 .713 TJ . S .l .57
M. SiMiMs .... 1 04 7'.' 50 45' .79
Onthrie 17" 1 SB 1 01 7r 1 :6
Cr -aio x 3 if: i ss 1 or l -l
York's ! 1" i-T I" 1 x- 2 37
sh.iu n 1 .17: 2c" 2 11 if 2 82
Du .cai I 4 2 S 7. J 79 S 17 $ 72
Summit 7 7'' 5 4 K' X 4-. 5 Ht
Lordsburg ...110 60 8 00 "On If "0
M !iinx timbers, 6x0 and 8 x 8 x 12 aud up
wards, 7.00 between Lordsbnrg and Clifton.
classification:
C ke. Bullion anl Copper Matte Firth Class
ore valued at .5o aud over First Class
Ore vol and at SISO and under Sfcond Class
Ore valued at S100 and antler Third Llai a
ire valued at sriOand under Fonrtii Claa
Liiiienluiio Third t lasa :
Mining timbers Sixth Cifs I
Mattes cortaininfr silver First Class i
Not otherwise specified Second Class ,
JOHN SHKNNAN.
(riViDl Sup'l.
THE ARIZONA
COPPER
STORES.
CLIFTON,
LONGFELLOW,
Keep always on Hand a
GENERAL jlEKCHASDIS:
IXCIUDINO-
WINES, LiaUORS & CIGARS
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, HARDWARE,
DRY GOODS, FANCY ARTICLES,
MUSTERS'
A Jhill Line of Miners' and Prospectors' Supplies
Constantly on Hand
JIM SMITn.
tP CENTRAL STORE, s
TORRANCE
-DEALERS IN-
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
LADIES' AND
FURNISHING
All Goods Sold at Reasonable Prices.
Profits.
No Trouble
Detroit Copper
Morenci,
Mm i General SfeSiii
AND-
MINEES' SUPPLIES.
A Full Supply of Kverythinc Needed by the Miner or Prospector
ieKept constantly in Stock.
COMPANY'S
METCALF
Full and Complete Stock of
' 5.
j
f
S UPFLIES !
at Reasonable Prices'
JACK TORRANCE.
& SMITH.
GENTLEMEN'S
:-: GOODS
Our Motto
Quick Sales anc Ere
to Show Goods.
Co.'e
4
Arizona.
DECAY OF TRADITION?"
Fha Invention of Writing Seems to Ilav
Put an End to Folk Lore.
It is said that the invention of writ
ing injured the power of memory, and
years ago. before the schoolmaster was
abroad, as he is nowadays, it was pos
sible to meet with many instances of
strong memorizing capacity among
persons who could neither read nor
write.' Complicated accounts could
be kept by the aid of a "tally" only,
and the memory of many a small far
mer or petty rural shopkeeper was his
only leuger and order book. It is cer
tain that since the art of writing has
become an almost universal accom
plishment the faculty of memory, be
ing less needed, is less cultivated.
Lo'ig afjer. the invention of letters our
f)refalK6 rested much upon oral tra
diti()rr Jt.sutiquarians assert that one
of the ancient races of Italy possessed
no written language, and even where
written characters were in use. oral
tradition formed an important supple
ment to them. Folk lore tales and
Lai lads have been handed down from
lip to lip for centuries with curious
fidelity.
Vhcn oral tradition was recognized
as a vehicle for actual information
more care was taken regarding the ac
cut&y than would be the case in these
- Tlin .lit iMWitni ionlmiclv (rimi.1.
ed atime honored form of words even
in ihi'ir prose narratives. Breton
prajsants. notably those who possess a
ttit as raconteurs, will repeat a
f'.tairtfiU or a story with scrupulous
Utl. lly to the established form iu
Miey have ul ways heard the in-
'I I'll!..
rts related, and will check a trav-
"tii 111:
ea-storn story teller deviates little
ns tune honored recital of talcs of
love, adventure and magic; we recog
nize all our old friends from the
"Arabian Nights" if we halt to listen
to a professional raconteur in the
streets of any oriental town. In the
days of war against proscribed books
faithful memories were often utilized
to preserve prohibited works from ob
livion During the persecution of the
Waldenses, in the Thirteenth century,
when their version of the Scripture
was prohibited and destroyed wher
ever found, their ministers committed
whole books of the sacred volume to
memory, and repeated chapters at re
ligious meetings. It would be tedious
to enumerate the many instances in
whieli tradition has preserved what
written histories were forbidden to
chronicle.
On the whole, oral traditions are
strangely accurate; strangely, when
we consider how facts are frequently
altered and distorted when occurrences
are related by successive story tellers.
The child's game of "Russian Scandal"
(in which a secret whispered to one
person and reeated to a circle of
others, is usually altered out of all
recognition when repeated aloud by
the last hearer) is played every day iu
society. And yet local tradition will
faithfully chronicle the site of a battle,
the burial place of a hero, the date of
a siege, and sometimes, after gener
ations of historians and antiquarians
have scoffed at the unreliable local le
gend, a later investigation will dis
cover that the despised traditional story
was the true one after all. Centuries
of repetition may have slightly added
to the incidents or distorted some of
the facts, but the main talo is strictly
exact. The reputed treasure trove
may prove but a trifling hoard, the
battle field smaller in extent, the graves
' of the heroes less numerous; but in
' each case local tradition is true regard-
ing the facts that occurred and the
locaie where they took place.
Tradition may at least claim to be
as accurate as ancient history; though
this, perhaps, is faint praise. Oral
tradition is usually free from con
I scious party bias. The repeaters of
i traditional lore carry on the tale as
they heard it, but now many an cJo
' queut historian appears to assumo a
brief for one side or another in every
party contest and to write his history
with a view, not of elucidating facts,
but of representing certain historical
characters as angels or the reverse.
Such writers are always the pleasant
est to read; an "impartial historian"
is sadly dull, as a rule; but when a
biased writer plays the part of Clio,
tradition may often prove the safer
guide of the two. Folk lore, if not
an altogether reliable guide, is seldom
totally at fault in its statement of
facts, and tradition has frequently
kept alive memories which might
otherwise have perished altogether.
Books may bo destroyed and history
willfully garbled, but it is less easy to
extinguish local tradition. Manches
ter (Lug J Courier.
Too Late Even for Leoocq.
A gentleman who was "burglar
ized" about two years ago reported; his
loss to the detectives aud offered natu
rally to assist them in every way. At
first be called frequently to ascertain
if any news of the thieves had been
obtained, but being met always with a
negative his visits became infrequent
and finally ceased. lie had forgotten
the matter altogether till recently,
when he was called upon by one of
the detectives, who stated:
"We have got a clew."
"That is good. Is it a promising
one?"
"Certainly. We have discovered
the thief."
"Better stiil. You have bim ar
rested?" "We can't do that It is too late."
"How is that?"
"lie died last week, confessing to
the robbery."
It's s c-rmd (vr.r ifi cjt a clew. -
' i cut Aviio aueiiijiui io ucviaiw ii-oiii me
r.iorthfidox version with "Nay, nion-
, the story should begin thus,"
iiinir the rearular form of the tale.
PLAYED HIMSELF FREE.
fha Adventure of a Russian Pianist Who
Wanted to Co to Germany.
I Arthur Friedheim, the famous pi
' mist, wished to cross the western
Russian border, for the purpose of
tilling his engagement to play in sev
sral German cities. As a Russian sub
ject he was obliged to go through all
sorts of formalities wiib Russian
. officials before leaving the country.
: Two weeks before the date of his tirst
I concert he asked the captain of the
' city of Sl Petersburg, where he was
stopping, to ask the governor of Li
vonia to ask the mayor of Pernau,
where he was born, for the consent of
i the Pernau police to the departure of
I Arthur Friedheim to Germany. Of
; course, the mayor and the police of
i Pernau had nothing against Mr.
I Friedheim or his concert tour in Ger-
many, and they said so in a letter
which they sent to the captain of the
capital by return of mail.
Owing to the wretchedness of the
Livouiun mail service, this answer
! was stranded in a fourth rate post
; ollice a few miles from Pernau and
lay there four weeks. At the end of
the second week Mr. Friedheim had
broken two engagements to give cou
; certs in Germany. At the end of the
: third week he had broken four en
gagements and was receiving tele
grams by the score from German
theatrical managers whom he had
disappointed. The fourth week
brought telegrams and demands for
an explanation, but no letters from
Pernau.
Friedheim was in despair, r.nd re
solved to cross the border without
passes. He tried it, was arrested and
taken before the chief of the district,
who sent him to prison after confisca
ting his papers. In Friedham's pocket
book was a package of his visiting
cards and several newspaper criticisms
of his playing. The chief concluded
that he had caught the murderer of
Arthur Friedheim. He had Fried
tieim, whom ho suspected of murder
ing himself and confiscating his own
papers, doubly ironed aud doubly
guarded. After pi-otesting and ap
pealing for a whole day, Friedheim
got an audience with the chief. He
reiterated in vain the statement that
he was Arthur Friedheim, the pianist.
The chief wouldn't believe him. Fi
1 nally Friedheim begged to be allowed
to prove his identity uy playing. The
chief, who was something of a musi
cian, consented. Friedheim was march
ed through the street to the chiefV
house between two soldiers and was
set down before a piano. He played
the second Rhapsodie of Liszt. As soon
as he finished, the chief removed the
guard, saying: "Now 1 know you
are Friedheim." The pianist was re
leased on his promise to return to Su
Petei"sburg for his passes.
Upon his arrival in the capital Fried
heim found the letter from Pernau
and his others papers ready for him.
Four days later he began playing in
Germany with a record of seven brok
en engagements behind him. New
York Sun.
A Modern Pocalieotas.
I have lived in the far west, where
the red man roams over the plains,
for the best part of my life, and dur
ing all of this time I have been search
ing for an ideal "Indian maiden." 1
wanted to find a dark eyed beauty
with a wealth of black hair hanging
down her back. I wanted her to be
graceful, and I wanted her to wear a
short dress, with beads all over it, and
I wanted to see the "finely molded
brown arms" that I have read about
so often in Mr. G. Feniinore Cooper's
novels.
I wanted another Pocahontas. After
searching for six years, during which
timo I could only run across pigeon ,
toed, fhit nosed, disgusting looking
squaws, I came to the conclusion that
there was no such thing as an Indian
maiden. I began to believe that the
story about the beautiful Pocahontas
was all a myth. I had nearly arrived
at that doubting state of mind, when
I would just as lief have believed
'.hat America was never discovered al
all, whan I found this willowy like,
graceful, dark eyed Cheyeune beauty
Yes, she was all of this and more,
too. She was clad in the prettiest gar
ment I have ever seen a woman wear.
Her dress was short and displayed her
fiiely formed buckskin leggius.
There were beads embroidered all
over her dress. She would have turned
the city green with euvy. All this is
no stretch of imagination. She was
truly a beautiful "Indian maideu"
my ideal was found at last aud her
inline was "Eufaula." Cor. Pittsburg
Dispatch.
Love Me, Love My Dog,
Young Wife I'm afraid, mother, that John
doesn't love me as much as he used to.
Mother Why, child, what could have put
such an idea into your head?
Young WiTs Oh, nuiLher, you ought tc
see how dreadfully he beats poor little Fido.
Yankee Blade.
A Dramatic Catastrophe.
Supe (to stage manager) Say, guv'nor,
have you got a life preserver?
Manager No. what's the matter?
Supfi The Roman general fell overboard
into the tank with bis helmet on and be u
fleatin' around head down. Time.
Suspended Evolution.
Ee Aw, weally. Miss Blossom, do you be- i
lieve man sprang from the ape? '
She (very tired of his attentions) Yes, I i
presume some men have, but there are other?
who have never yet made the spring, or at i
least never sprang very far. Omaha n orld.
A Decided Drawback.
"Gracious!" exclaimed Mrs. Backwoods,
"the paper says that the fashionable folks in
N" York have '5 o'clock tea.' They must
pet awful hungry afore bedtimw "Harper's
Bazar. 0
Where Work Is Pleasant.
Neglected Wife Why don't yon go to
workf
Husband (a ne'er do well) I ain't got no
tools.
Neglected Wife Deacon Smith offered you
i'i to ti J his fence, and vou have a saw, and
a plane, and a hammer and nails. What
more do you want'
Husband The saw ain't no good, and I
ain't got no file to sharpen it Ole Smith kin
Bx his fence hisself.
Same Husband (ten years later) Histl
Say. wife, I've escaped from the peniten
tiary Gim me some other clothes, so I kin
light out agin.
Wife My, myl How did yon get out!
Husband I dug forty feet underground
with a two tined fork, then cut my way
through two feet of stone wall and ten inches
of boiler iron with a saw made out of a tin
dinner plate. New York Weekly.
Delicate Shades.
Bonton Flathers, Esq. I suppose you dont
speak to the common herd any more. Miss
Luckeighf
Miss Luckelgh who has just realized large
ly) Why, certainly 1 Mr. Flathers, how do
you dof Life.
Most To; Honest.
A day or two ago a middle aged man called
at police headquarters and asked to see the
superintendent, and as that official was out
he said he would call again. He returned in
the evening, but too late, and as he would
not. state his business to any one else, be was
told to come next forenoon. He did come,
but the superintendent was very busy, and he
finally entered the captain's private room,
took a small package from his pocket and
said:
"Captain, this does not belong to me and I
have no right to keep it."
The captain opened the paper, and lot a sil
ver dime was revealed.
"Where did you get this" asked the offi
cial. "Found it on Thirteenth street,"
"Well, what of itr
"Some one lost it"
"Yes, I suppose so, but why did yon bring
"it here"
"Because t want to be honest. I could not
find the loser, and so I brought it here to be
advertised."
The captain arose and talked to him is flva
different languages, and when the man Sew
down the hall he was beard to remark that
if he ever found another ten cent piece he'd
be hanged if he wouldn't chuck it into his
pocket and let the loser go to Halifax. De
troit Freu Press.
The Money Saved.
Detective I have discovered, sir, that your
confidence bookkeeper, Mr De Clerk, is a de
faulter to the extent of many thousands of
dollars. As be has lived plainly, and has not
gambled in stocks, he must still have all your
money in his possession, but if we arrest him,
you will never get it, of course, and if we
corner bim and try to compromise for half or
two-thirds, he will probably skip to Canada
with the whole boodle
Business Man My goodness! Mr. De Clerk!
Mr. De Clerk Yes. sir
Business Man Mr De Clerk, a few days
ago i refused you the hand of my daughter,
and I afterward employed this gentleman,
who is a detective, to look closely into your
personal character and past history His re
port refers in such detail to your correct
habits and business aptitude that 1 have
changed my mind You shall have her.
New York Weekly.
Perfectly Satisfactory.
"Have you any work on punctuation?" aha
asked at thr- Ujok store.
"Sorry to say we are just out."
"Well, perhaps you could tell me what 1
want to know. What does a mark under a
word signify?"
"That is to emphasize the word."
"Oh I see Thank. you.
And as she passed out a clerk beard her
whisper to herself:
"And James put five marks under the word ,
'Dear!'" Detroit Free Press.
The Least of Two Evils.
"James," said Mrs. Slasher, "1 wish when
you go to town today you would stop and
match these ribbons."
"Clara," replied Mr. Slasher, "you go and
let me stay home and mind the baby."
Cloak and Suit Review
A Hopeless Task.
Husband (100 years hence, when women
rulei My dear. 1 expect to go to town to
day. If you could spare mo a little cash
Wife (from bed) Certainly, darling. Yon
will find some loose change in my pocket.
Cloak and Suit Review
Physically True.
Landlady Be careful how yon whip thai
carpet. It's a very fine piece of goods.
Tramp (working for bis dinner) Yes'm.
It's hard to beat. Ouiaua World.
Offering a Snbstitute.
"See here! The calico you sold me wont
wash."
"It wont, eh ' Then let me sell you a wash
machine." Detroit Free Press.
Only One Way.
Westerner Yes, sir, 1 believe it is abso
lutely impossible to reform a horse thief.
Easterner Nothing Easier. Make a sailor
of him. New York Weekly
Plantation Proverba.
It doan pay to do much talkin' w'en you'd mad
enuO to choke,
Kse de word dat stings the deepes' am de en
dot's uebbah spoke;
Lot de udder feller wrangle till da atohm am
blowed away,
Den he'll do a pile ob Lhisktn "bout de things yon
didntsay
- Yankee Bhula.

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