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The Clifton clarion. (Clifton, Graham County, A.T., Ariz.) 1883-1889, August 28, 1889, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94050557/1889-08-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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TOL. TIL
CLIFTON, GRAHAM CO., ARIZONA: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 1889.
IsO.20
THE
CLIFTON
I I A k I I
CLIFTON CLARION.
Published Wednesdays bt thb
CLIFTOK CLARION FUMJSM CO.
W. W. JONES, Manager.
TERMS i
OX2 YEAR (in advance) 4.0O
SIX MONTHS -50
3 To British nbscribcrs the subscription
price of Th Claeiox is XI. postage prepaid.
Subscribers ma; remit by exchange on New
York.
FA A. M THE KERCian MEETINGS OK
. Corouado Lods'e, No. s, lor M, will be as
follows:
Mnrdny,
Saturday,
Saturday,
fraturdny,
Saturday,
April 13 -ntortiav, . i
May II .Saturday, Oct. &
June s;.;uurdiiy. Nov. 2
Jul i.'Mitumav, acc. , i
Vn' 111'
J.' ABRAHAM. VT. M.
Tnos. Sjurn. Secretory.
OfnoiAi. Directory o? Graham Cochtt.
probate jkpue:
JOHX BLAKE Solomonville
gHERirr asd EX-orncio assessor and tax
COLLECTOR :
ff WHELAX Solomocville
Deputy W. J. FAKKS.
treasures:
W. W. DAMRON . Solerooiiville
rocsTT recorder:
EDl'AEDO SOTO Solomoaville
Deputy P 3. SOTO.
district attorney:
A. M PATTERSON Soloniunville
scrvetor:
C. D. BROWN Thatcher
tlOARD OF SUPERVISORS:
H. A. CUTTER Ft. Thomas
J. K. BAILEY Bailey's Wells
K. DYSART Solonioiivillc
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
JOHX H. LACY, M !., .
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Oflire: On Main Street,
Currox,
rSTIX C. WRIGHT, M. r.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Office: Opposite D. C. M. Co.'s .Store,
i
Uosxxri. - - - - Arizona
JJR. J. A. LORD.
DENTIST,
First-rlsss Dentnl Work. Best of llefcreares.
Operative or Mechanical Work at fair prices.
J j-Cousaltatiou tree.
OriTcs: At Cluto.n Hotel, Cluton, Akiz. :
M.
J. LGAX.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAV,
Office: Off Me.in Street.
O-inos. - - - Arizona
A.
M. PATTERSON ,
ATTORNEY-AT-LA-W.
District Attorney of Graham County,
?OLOXOXVILLE, ... ARIZONA
JEFFORDS A FRANKLIN,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
S1I-2U Penningtou St
T J- CLARK.
Tucson, ARIZ.
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Ci.rrTON.
Arizona
ARIZONA & N. M. RAILWAY.
TIME TA 1)1.1'..
going south. -i;ot:;; north.
Lt Clifton 7:f m. Lv l.d'sbnr 1:20p.m.
X. Sidincr. 7 :. Summit 2:20
8. Siding". !:' At lluiM-ilu . . 3:21)
Guthrie . h:N Lv Inim-an . . SMI
Corouado 8:24 Sheldon.. 3:52
York's . :.' York's . 4:2
Sheldon . 9:13 Corouado 4:f!
Ar Dnnrau. .9:42 Guthrie 5:12
Lv Duncan 9:52 S. .-i l:n. R:44
Summit ll:ii X. Siding .V.'iO
Arl.'dsl.iirgl.:im. ATCIifto:i B 20
PAftSENCLK RATES.
Clifton to Clifton to
North sttlins -SB Sheldon . .. 8:30
South Siding . 7 Duncan 3:311
Guthrie . l.:i Summit 4. SO
Coronado l:oi LoTdsuur.; ... . 5.90
York's 2:ll
Children between five and twelve vear3 of aire
half fare.
One hundred ponnds of bntrprtire carried
free with each full faro and 50 pottuu- with each
half fare.
FREIGHT RAIEJ
. Followin-; are the rates per ton on the diffcr
ot classes of freight :
? 3 S? 2
s 2, ;
i - c. tr
i n
m -3 ta
a cc c
X ?
Cliftoi to I I I
N. SidiiiR 4 .71 8 ..17 8 .i 8 .Ttl
.S. Siding 1 01 ! T'.lj .V. 4.!
Guthrie 1 79 I 3ij 1 m 7!'
Coronado .. 2 .V 1 si I .t,r I K
York's ... Is 1"! 2 S7 1 77 1
Sheldon ' S 7:ij 2 S II 1 i
Duncan . . I 4 Wi 3 7i 2 7! 2 17
Summit ..17 7 5 Ni 4 sii S 4-.'
Lordabnrj; ! 10 ftol f f 6 DDI 4 67
I .57
.7
1 36
1 M
2 37
2 K2
.1 72
ft Mi
X J
Mining timbers, 6x6 aotl 8 x 8 x 12 aud up-
wards, $7.00 between I.ordsburg and Clifton, j
CLASSIFICATION:
Coke. Bullion and Copper Matte Fifth Class
Ore slued at I.V)aud over First Class :
Ore vn'neil at 8i;l and uuder Second Class j
Ore valued at SIiio and Ruder .Third Class
Ore viljcd at . aud uuder Fourth Class
Limestone Third Class j
Aiming tuuheri, yixth Class !
Mnues coutaiiiiiiK siKi-r First Class
-Not otherwise apeciBed Second Class .
JOHN SXLKNaN,
t
.up
t.
THE ARIZONA
COPPER 'COMPANY'S
STORES.
CLIFTON, - LONGFELLOW, METCALF
Keep always on Hand a
GENERAL MERCHAIllIM
INCLUDING-
WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS.
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, HARDWARE,
DRY GOODS, FANCY ARTICLES,
MINERS'
A Full line of Miners'
Constantly on Hand
JIM SMITH.
EP CEESTEAL STORE ?
TORRANCE
-DEALERS IN-
GEKERAL MERCHANDISE
LADIES' AND
FURNISHING
All Goods Sold at Reasonable Prices. Our Motto : " Quick Sales and Small
Profits. No Trouble to Show Goods.
WM. CAMERON & COMPANY
MANCFACTCREKS
ILL KINDS
SHINGLES, SASHES, BLINDS, DOORS,
MOULDINGS, ETC.
y-v y- 0 i
Office : Comer of Stanton and Overland Streets
i
!
T I , rI1T4",r" W j
-i-J A-J I- -1"X Vy I 1Zj " 15 .
Full and Complete Stock of
SUPPLIES !
and Prospectors' Supplies
at Reasonable Prices
JACK TORRANCE.
& SMITH,
GENTLEMEN'S
:-: GOODS
axd dealers in
OF
LUMBER,!
THE ARIZONA KICKER.
Ita Motto la "Ihe and Let I .We" An
Obituary anil b Free Pom,
The last issue of The Arizona Kicker con
tains the following Interesting items:
Can't Do It. We have been offered $25
in cash and a barrel of wild plum vinegar to
publish the record of the man who runs the
weekly further down the street. While there
is no doubt in our mind that he is a bigamist,
horse thief, barn burner and anarchist sym
pathizer, we know what belongs to decency
and we positively refuse the bribe.
There Is too much mud throwing among
the editors of the west, anyhow. They seem
to have forgotten what is due to the position.
If one of our doctors kills a patient by astne
mistake the rest are always ready to swear
him clear. If one of the editorial fraternity
makes a trip, the rest are eager to pitch into
him. It shouldn't be so. There should be
nore of the fraternal spirit more of the
pride of profession. Therefore, while we are
perfectly satisfied that the bald headed, bow
legged, squint eyed old coyote who calls him
self tbe editor of the moribund dish rag
eleven doors below ought to be in state prison
for life, re ore not going to forget what be
longs to tbe amenities of editorial Ufa
Passed Away. "Injun Joe," as he was
Familiarly called, has finally passed in bis
checks, although he hung on for a year longer
than any one thought he could. He crept
into one of the A. & T. stage coaches and
surrendered to the grim destroyer. VV e al
ways looked upon Joe as half witted, but we
'beg to acknowledge our mistake. In his lost
hours he wrote down the fact on a bit of pa
per tbat we owed him seven dollars borrowed
money, and that bit of paper was left where
it- cpuld not help but be seen. The first we
j knew of his death was when the coroner
1 brought in the note. We borrowed the money
rL .. r. 1 7. .n n u t JnnMl II.
we supposed it bad slipped his mind. We
shall probably have to pay it, but whether
we shall do so before appealing to the law re
mains to be seen.
Deserving or Patronage. It Is over
seven months since the A. & T. coaches were
pfct on to connect oar town with tbe outside
world. Tbe Kicker has not before mentioned
the fact, for the reason tbat no pass was sent
to us. If a stage coach or a railroad com
pany starts out with tbe idea that it can pad
dle its canoe without the aid of the press, the
best way is to give them rope. We have
been giving the A. & T. lino rope. Tester
day it threw up its hands and sent as a beau
tiful annual pass.
Tbe Kicker now takes pleasure in calling pub
lic attention to the fact that the A. & T. Stage
Line company, limited, has three roomy and
comfortable vehicles running from the post
office to Topknot Station, on the U. P. rood,
nine miles away. The fare is very low, the
drivers safe men, and the speed satisfactory.
It is an enterprise which deserves patronage,
and we hope the company will have the sup
port and good wishes of every citizen of the
town. Detroit Free Press.
tie Won't Enthuse.
"This George Washington they are making
such a fuss about was the old George, wasn't
hef be queried, as he leaned against the city
hall fence yesterday.
"He was," replied the other.
"Wasnt the George Washington, of New
Orleans, who fought twenty-three rounds
after his left arm was broken r"
"No."
"Wasnt that George Washington, of Chi
cago, who carried a billiard table around a
square on a bet of &f '
"No."
"There was a George Washington in Omaha
who held up a bonk cashier for 0,000. Do
you think he could be the man!"
"Oh, no. This is the original George
used to be president."
"Led the American army and suffered at
Valley Forge, didn't hef
"Yes."
"Crossed the Delaware one night in the
winter 1"
"Yes."
"Got the bulge on Cornwall at Yorktown?"
"He's the oue."
"All right, then. If he's the man I'm not
going to split my coat up the back. If it was
some of the boys I've met I'd be willing to
help the thing move off lively and push 'em
np a peg. 1 never try to get in any work on
a dead man. He can't recip." Detroit Free
Press.
A Very Human Little Boy.
Little S , 4 years old, was taken to
church one day, and, in the course of the
service, it gradually dawned upon him that
the attention of the congregation was cen
tered, not upon himself, but upon the clergy
man, who was unobservant of S . He
felt the neglect keenly. He exhibited signs
of restlessness, sighed most wearily, and
finally attracted the attention of a lady sit
ting directly behind him, who leaned over
and whispered:
"What is the matter, S r
"Oh," he replied, ' I can think of so many
tilings to do so much better than this."
Drake's Magazine.
A Bright Little Boy.
Susie Tommy is a bright little boy. He
is going to school now, and is learning very
fast.
Tomnry (aged 6) I know what a lot of
words mefin.
The Young Man Who Colls on Susie Do
yon, indeed?
Tommy Yes, I know what "pals" means.
The Young Man What does it meant
Tommy (triumphantly) You and Mr.
Brown ore pals, and pals means companions
in crime. Yankee Blade.
A Sad Sight.
Bagloy I saw a melancholy sight a few
days ago a messenger boy standing pen
sively on a street corner.
Fogg That's nothing.
Bagley No; but some one had hungon the
boy's back a sign that read: "Will move
about May L" America.
Sir. Qulclrwit Moralizes.
Mr. Quickwit (to Mrs. Coarsoair, who is
profusely bedecked with imitation diamonds)
Madame, you remind me of an open faced
watch.
Mrs. Coarsealr How sot Te, he, he!"
Mr. Quickwit Your crystal is so promi
nent. Jeweler's Weekly.
Literature in vuicago.
Eastern Man m chicogoi-couectmg sub-
tcriptions for the Browning club, eh I What
do you need a fund fort to rent a hall?
Chi:agoIYouth "o. we have a hall; but
we w nt to raise money enough to buy two
copies of Browning and a billiard table.
Sew Vert 'Weekly.
ONE WAY 'TO TRAIN A 'BRONCO.'
A Western Lad Who Docs Not Believe In
the "Throwing" Principle.
It has been and is still believed by
some that to break a bronco be must
be roped, thrown, beaten, conquered
before he can be utilized. I believed
so once, but tbe method has always
struck me as a dead failure. Were
the breaker of as tine intellect as the
bronco, in many instances ho might
gracefully submit to a reversal of situ
ations and allow the bronco to train
him, for out of the brains of broncos
we may learn wisdom, as well as out
of tbe mouths of babes and sucklings.
I had a friend once, as brave a man
as ever graced a saddle, leveled a
Winchester or loved a child, and ho
owned a bronco. If he would saddle
the animal once or three times a day
the pony must bo roped, thrown and
blinded on each occasion. My friend
said it was the "Dature of the brute."
I knew he could not be wantouly un
kind to anything-. It never occurred
to me that it miglit be education, and
that nature had nothing to do with it
Several years later the madam and
I were camped near an old log road
in tbe mountains in the vicinity of a
friend's ranch. One morning, as I
was about building the fire for coll'se,
the ranchman's sou, a lad of IS. catr.ci
up the road with a bridle on his arm.
He stopped near us and began to whis
tle, as oue would for a dog. After ho,
had whistled a few times I heard a
whinny, and in a few moments the
rapid beat of a horse's hoofs broke
upon the sweet peaceful ness of tha
summer morning. Looking in the di
rection of the sound, 1 presently saw
a pony coming down the old road ou
a keen run. A dappled gray pony,
with ears erect and mane flying; his
neck was outstretched and his eyes
seemed to Hash with exquisite pleas
ure; he came leaping on as if moved
by thoughts of love, absolutely free,
beautiful in form, graceful in his lib
erty and Lu every movement. Within
a few rods of the lad the reckless
gallop resolved itself into a swinging
trot until he reached his friend, when
he came to a halt and rubbed his nose
against the boy's shoulder. The loud
whinny was softened and the arched
neck pressed against the lad for
the expected caress. It is a good twen
ty years since that bright morning,
and vet the memory of it is as fresh
as if I saw it now; I can taste again
the very sweetness of the baisam
laden air, can see the tender blue mis)
that lingered about the distant hills,
and see the pony's head resting
against the boy's shoulder; aud ii
seemed to me then as it does now, that
if there had been hands - instead ol
hoofs, he would have hugged the boy
and would have kissed him on tht)
lips, instead of on the hand, had he
known how.
"Where did you get that horse,
Harry?"
"Out of 's band."
"You lon't mean to say he's a bron
co he's too kind and handsome?"
"That's what he is."
"How long have you owned himf"
"About three months."
"But how did you break him?
Eupposed that they had to be roped
and beaten and"
"Now, don't you believe a word ol
it. I haven't even spoken cross to
him; have I, Dick?"
The pony corroborated tho state
ment beyond cavil. The madam went
out and shook hands with the boy and
hugged the horse, and I should no
have blamed her had she hugged th
boy, as I looked down into Ins honest,
laughing gray eyes.
Patience and its attendant genius,
kindness, without any exhibition of
man's "dominion," a simple endeavol
to bring- himself up to the horse'i
standard of intellect, and tho result
was two loving friends. That they
could not talk Greek, Latin or Eng
lish to each othi-r dignilied the situa
tion; the understanding between them
was quito perfect and beautiful in its
eloquence. Forest and Stream.
Chevreul and the Photographer.
j The late centenarian, JL Chevreul,
' although one of the patrons of photo
; graphy, refused during the greater
I part of his long life to have his picture
: taken. Not until 18S3, when in his
j ninety-seventh year, did he overcome
j this antipathy. It happened, as h
j wrote to a friond, in this manner: "1
j entered the carriage to go to the insti-
tute, when a gentleman in tho poliiesl
i manner possible addressed me: 'ilon-
sieur Chevreul, you can do me the
greatest service.' 1 replied that I was
m a great hurry, but he persisted and
beggad permission to accompany me
in my carriage. I acceded to his re
quest, llo had scarcely taken hii
place at my side, however, when he
said : 'Monsieur Chevreul, you can be
my fortune or my ruin. I am a pho
tographer.' I trembled, but ho added .
The emperor of Brazil (you know Doro
Pedro, who is a true savant and who de
corated me with tho Order of the Rose),
wishes to have your photograph, and
if I succeed in obtaining your permis
cion, my future is assured.' I could
not resist him, and in the name of Dom
Pedro accompanied tho photographer
to his studio. ' Chicago IleraJd.
Only Three.
The conversation turned upon a certain
gentleman who is not what you may call a
brilliant speaker. "lie has only three faults,"
a friend apologetically remarked: "1, he
reads his siiecches; 12, he reads them badly; 8,
they are not worth reading." La Caricature,
Too Fraternal.
"You're a nice editor, ChubbsP "What's
the matter nowr" "Why! you say 'the pub
jshor of The Daily Voice is an unmitigated
jJs." "Well, he isl" "But you add: 'We
sdvise our brother journalist to reform his
stupil ways"" Chicago Ledger.
HARD ON TEE NERVT.S.
A dog down in Pennsylvania swallowed th?
baby's rattlo the other day. It hasn't af
fected the dog seriously, but it's awful wear
ing on tho people of the lioua Every time
the doe moves it sounds :is thourh a rattle-
' snake was aft?r you, ami the result is thEt
about two-thirds of the time everybody in
the house is either climbing up on a chair or
jumping down from ono.
J OCT OS KLY.
"George, I called to see you this morning
and the maid said you were out." "Yes,
unclu, 1 r.:n sorry th:;t 1 was.'' "But you
were not, for 1 st'.w you sitting at the window
as I come away." "Yes. that's just it. the
maid did not specify, she only knew 1 was
ouL. Sometimes I am staying out, some
times walking out and sometimes looking out.
She was stupid not to say which."
DEPRAVITY IS HIGH PLACES.
Queen Marguerite of Italy plays the violon
cello, ily tho most desperate expei lien t-s :irul
constant vigilance on the part of the rovij
fmiuiy the matter has been kept secret for a
long time, but it has leaked out at last. On
account of the respect-anility of the queen'
comiet'tions we suppre.-s her last name.
a lV.ctraxce. -"I
see,'" said th man with the newspat-r,
"that a Ffeueh journalist has been kilit-.i in
a duel." "At last?" exclaimed the man read
ing the time card. "Yes. died of old ase
waiting for thaother fellow to come." "'We'!,
the French are terrible fighters when they
mako a business of it.'"
e:cpati:iateo.
Particular Hoarder-7i;L- fish, vrsitor
. Truthful Waiter ipiii.-n::lyi Was kihui ' ' i-.
morning. Particular Boarder (nppnu-.u ;-
Yon did right to 1. .i it Truth 'ui Wait :
(inquiringly) Ye... ,-.r Pariieamr Board j
(Mrmlyi iiecausa it iia ? been usaore ' i 'ii;4
it had forgot how to stvia!. and wouia i.avv
drowned if ever it went to sea again
THAT'S ALL Tf;..l SAVES THE POSMS.
The "elocutionist"' has hid his light und?r
bushel as long as he can He is now deter
mined to let his light shine, to lift up I'L-vou-a
und spare not and to magnify uls of.iee
for all it is worth a::d toot his horn 'if he
doesn't sell a clam. A Chicago elocutionist,
discussing the elements of a successful rei-ira
tion, speaks of "otlvjr pieces like 'Alother
Poet,' -The K.-:vi," cm! like productions o;
no great litra- men that produce mar-. M
' ous effects when weil rendered." Ol tei
wondered -vhat kept those mediocre jingie
alive so long, when some of ray own tinest
eiibrts, worth to go ringing down '.te echo
ing aisles of the copy dummy, stranded ou the
shiagly beach of the cold and suii' u V Ii
It's t'uo "reading" that has rescued Slrt.
Crowning and Poe from the insatiate maw of
that relentless monster, O. B. Livion, Sr.
tlobert J. Eurdetto in Brooklyn Eagle.
Lessons of Experience.
Anrious Mother My son, that young
lady you admire knows nothing about house
work. Son Well, motier, you know you don't
either. ,
'"True, my son. Your father's brother,
however, married a girl who did, aud the
money she saved was invested ia real estate,
and they are, now living in a brown siono
palace."
"Oh, well, his fortune couldn't all have
come from that."
"Maybe not, maybe not; but yenr father
and 1 are living m a rented house, and one of
our old servant girls owns it "
u Incorrect D!apns:3.
A business man and financier cf tl;9 first
rank in Boston is so aiisentminded that lie
j occasionally forgets to go to his dinner. His
customary hour for this meal when he re
members it is 2 o'clock. The other day,
quite alisorbed in business, he worked stead;
i ly on until 4 o'clock, and then began to have
; i quite natural sense of emptiness and yeorn-
j tng in his stomach.
J "Dear me," he said, musingly, applying
' the Hat of his hand to his waistcoat, "I Won-'
; dor what I ate for dinner that disagrees with
aiel" Boston Transcriot.
Where They Fail.
Caller (at a potograph gallery) That is a
grand picture of tho centennial paraJe;every
face perfect.
Photographer (proudly) Yes, it is an i:i
stantaueous picture of the troops on tue
mul ch best 1 ever took.
Caller Yes, every motion appears to have
heen caught; the marching troops, waving
Hags, galloping horses, rushing crowds but
what are these blurred spots ou tha grand
itanilsf
Photographer (sadly) I don't know, but 1
;;uc.s3 they ai-e babies. Puck.
Strcitjrth In Union.
"Which do you love most, your papa or
four mammaf"
Little CharltL" 1 love papa most.
Charlie's Mother Why, Charlie, I'm sur
prised at you. 1 thought you loved me most.
Charlie Can't heip it, luuinma, we men
have to stick together. Texas Sittings.
His New Ilorhe.
if .rri qi
'Say. mister, why don't yer let him out
l - -lL:i' lioiu'J'" UC -
Ono Whaler afiit-ient.
First Coy (with a penchant for tho seal
Bay, Billy, wouldn't yoa wish you could go
a-wualiug
Second Hoy Xo! Dad docs all the whalln7
fo;- our familv. Dostou Budget.
A Chicago Ciplouia.
Dullard 1 seo old Killmer has taken ta
do'".'.ri.)i;. Is he haviag any success f
Lfil.tly Su:'ctssj Why, be cured twenty
eight hums last winter. Lowell Citiiou,
It Would l.relik tht !Ci:K:iKMlitMlt.
Miss Crimp People say 1 looK lixe my sin
ter What do you thuiK about it, Mr Wofty
Mr Softy (her sist-r's beau I thiui; ye,
look very much Iikb your sister, but picas,
d.in't iill iifcr 1 sai ! so. Yankee Bhidu.
.v-s
a f . ... "

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