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The Florence tribune. [volume] (Florence, Ariz) 1892-1901, February 26, 1898, Image 1

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VOL. VII.
FLOKENCE, PINAL COUNTY, AKIZONA, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1898.
NO. 9.
IS
H 13 7
wili ewer the coming jmr prepared to jive to the
me past quarter o: a century comrioiiuons irom u pens ol the great literary men and women oi the
world, illustrated by leading artists. A brief glance over its prospectus announces such reading as
OUR PACIFIC PROSPECT
nwTcrrt r.-. mi !' vtu cvxv.u.iti, t, nt- ( s or a isthhu ciai
Bf Hn. l)A I ll -rL-?;.Vf? :, WOUTHIS'.IQS V
EiSTKRV SlBFUIl iD Tllir PlflFIC t5 IliU'lOf t: I r W Ilt rilltlr ou
n, ttentss coxzai b, cu-iuum r.M-xim
RODEN'S CORNER THE NOVtlL OF THE YEAR
by Hhkhv Seton MRPRtM n, au'i-r of "Th S-ers." --l:-' nr--r:'.'es in short fiction v.ill
be contributed by su:Ji aut-..ir as W U Howt-;i. Itichir-i IL.tu.ik Ian, Prandcr Matthew,
frredenc Keoiicgtou, Kutii Mcfuery St-iart, rh."e -aui bt a senes of ar;,ci oa
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE E0S6PE. POLITICAL AftD SOCIAL ART AND THE OP
ARMIES AND NAViES STUDIES IN (WtftiCAle SOCiElY AMERICAN CHfUCfEB SKEJCHES
Postage fret to ail tutvr.'Xrt in t'ne Uniitd Stilts, Cnnads, and JV.f..
Sub. f 4 a year. Addr.ts HASPEH 4 BKO I HEKS, Pus't, N.T. City. Send for free prospectus
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1 thorouphly op.toate periodical for women, will enter upon Ha
thirty-dm volume in 1898. During the year it will be as heretofore
A MIRROR OF FASHION
Paris and Hem York I Each issue will contain carefully pre
Fttmhinnm I pared drawings of the advance fashions
rU3HUII9 i ,... ,,! V V..-L I.. ,.
A Colored Fashion
Supplement
Cut Paper Patterns
A Bi-Wetklf Pattern
Sheet
LONG SERIALS AND
Two famous anthors will contribute
T. W. HininM
41 z4L 1
aenai stones to the bazar in inoH. ine
first deals with Scotch and Continental
scenes, the second is a story of a young
girl, versatile, and typically American.
Mary E. Wilkios
Octave Thanet
H. P. Spofford
ftf . 5. Briscoe j fir.,,
DEPARTT.lETrrS Al-fD SPEQ.'U- ARTICLES
OUR PARIS LETTER THE LONDON LETTER
Fy KA TH if, SK 1S FORUBT Bf tin. tWLT.vei' SKfl '5
CLL'B WOMEN HUMOR
By MAXiiAHhT H. Wf.LCIt
There w.ll b a wrirs of articled on Ktiquette.
nice. Art. te f iav. omrn 1
aroening, H ousepii:g, L.te and
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donn tSc will present to Its readers a faithful pictorial repre
sentation of the world a most interesting and important news.
THE KEWS THAT EECOKES HISTORY
National and Inter
Rational Politic
Social and Economic
Questions
Industrial Etitsrprlse
Art and Literature
' I S. K. Ciocketi
LONG SERIALS AND SHORT STCHiES
Twolongserialswillappeardttringthe J BtSM CA7T
year, contributed by authors of inter- THE KWMImn kkbxsts
national fame, and wiil be illustrated. Bf frahe R.isrin:KTox
Owen vVf sfer i These and a score of equally prominent
Howard Pyte J writers will contribute short stories to the
John Kendrick Bangi j Wagicrvin 1808, making the paper espe-
ssary e. nilKina aaliynctiinncuon. uttnirieaturcsaretne
DEPARTMENTS AND SPECIAL ARTICLES
THIS BUSY WORLD . . FOREIGN NOTES
Bf m. b. turns - . Bf pocLTxer BiesLon
LETTERS FROM LONDON ' AMATEUR SPORT
Bf ARSULD WHITS BfCASPAB WHITlfSY
A SPORTING PILGRIMAGE AROUND THE WORLD
Inthelnterest of the Weekly, Caspar Whitney is on his way around
the world. He will visit Siam in search of bij game, making his
principal hunt from Bangkok. He will visit India and then proceed
to Europe to prepare articles on the sports of Germany and France.
20c. a copy (tend or ret prospectus). Suiscriftion f.00 a year.
Fotfe free in iht Uni1r Stetes, Cauitbtt and Mtxiro.
Address iUBPfcB BB0THKb.s, Publisher., Ken York City
i Caspar Wbitacy
V
W. D. HotIlt
t - r
;y-v.a::f.iii-,i-iyf
SOME OF THE STRIKING
THREE SERIAL STORIES
' 1 THE ADVENTURERS
FOUH FOR A FOP.TUNG
Bf ALBERT LES
it a stirring narrative of four
companion who have lo
Ju&KjS Bf H.B.MARMIOTT WATSOlt
a a thrilling story of a fight for
a treasure concealed in an old
erastle n the mouniaitu ot Waics. cated a Jong
SHORT FICTION
In addition to the three long serial stories, the publication of which vil1 continue duritij; the entire
year, ttiere will be short stories of every kind, of wbich it is only possible to mention a lew titles here.
Hunt, the Owler The Blockadera A tiarbor Mystery
Bf STAKLBT J. WEYMAlt Bf JAUXS BARXXS By JUU.1 K. Sl'SAXS
The Flunking 0 Watklne' Oboat A Great Hnul A Creature of Circumstance
B, JOUX KBXURICK BANGS Bf BOPfllK SH KTT Bf UURGAS BUBZkTSVS
0
!
ARTICLES ON SPORT, IRAVfcL, UIU
Elephant Hunting In Africa
Bf BYDltBY BROOKS
Flrat Lessons in Tiller and Sheet
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DEPARTMENTS
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Addrese HABPEK & BKOTHEKS, Publishers. Franklin Square, N. Y. City.
ij) (P f
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reading public that which has made it famous for
i
p lp
C U. Warner
dtZKt
Willi Slsck
the baZA-R will issue, free, a colored
fashion supplement. Cut paper patterns
of certain gowns in each number will be
made a feature. These will be sold im
connection with each issue at a anifoTTn
price. The JUzah will also publish bi
weekly, free, an outline pattern sheet
SHORT STORIES
Ion
WILD EELEN
O W1LL1AU BLACK
RAGGED LADY
By HT. D. HOWELLB
These and a score of other equally
prominent writers will contribute
short stories to the Bazar in 1898,
mWtM: the paper especially rich in
Kf JOft.V I HSDSII X XA.
.VZW.-A-J5AVCJ 3 A JSV- 4 it
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Publitkcra, New York City Ocare Ttamrt
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The Weekly will continue to participate
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nomic questions, and of the development
of the middle west. Its special corre
spondent in the Klondike region will trace
the story of the great goid discoveries.
Carl Schori
F. R. Stockton g
1 1
FEATURES FOR 1553
THE COPPER PCINCES5 . si
b, sim uvsrom
It is in thebowela of the earth where
the hero has his adventures, and
from v.-her he rescues the Princeas.
lost lortune.
Aa Amterkon Explorer In Africa
Bf CTRCS C.ADAM8,
Laving Out a Golf Course
Bf W. S. VAX TASSEL SVfPtUOf
PRIZE COMPETITIONS
Short Stories, Sketching, Photography
Adams
Fouht:ey Bifttlow
SKELETON REGIMENTS.
Twice as Ma-jy Potmatcra oa Kiitlat
ed Soldiers In the United State.
The United States army is not a very
large, powerful or imposing organiza
tion in comparison with any of the 'arm
ies maintained by the leading powers
of Europe. It is a curious fact that
there arc in the service of this govern
ment more thnn twice as many post'
masters, for example, as there are en
listed eoldiers. Ia other words, the
United States has not an army large
enough to permit of a policy of plac
ing one soldier at every post office in the
Ur.it,-- States in time of some su(Min
emcry-cccy, and even iff he siretiptb of
1he army were doubln l its force would
1.1 ill be insufficient for such i par
pr.se. This wn-'Hion of ttfTaire is net tl-inp-
to military men (.-eDernlly, and
army officer? have many times .onsid
ered t!i r.d '.inability of the adoption of
ioavi bybtt'iii 1j whxii the ttxtiigtlt of
the army in some sudden- emergency
could be increased. The prize essay of
the military service institution for this
year, for example, deals with the ques
tion of establishing a ej-steni which in
time of need would be utilized ia raising-
a volunteer army for almost imme
diate service. The essay is at least, in
teresting, although naturally it is
written from the point of view of an
army officer.
According to this essay, the best sys
tem to provide for any sudden emer
gency of wtar would be one which had
been mapped out- in atrvance, and for
the proper working of which some
preparation had previously been made.
The esay proposes in effect that the
regiments of the volunteer army shall
be rr.ised on a system which allows one
regiment to each congressional district,
and one also to each territory, exclu
sive of Alaska. Such a system would
call for a force of about 435,000 men,
or 361 regiments, each regiment hav
ing 1,200 men.
Of these 301 regiments the greater
part would naturally be infantry. It
is proposed, for example, that
225 regiments of infantry, CI
of heavy artillery, 30 of light
artillery and 4 of cavalry would repre
sent a fair apportionment. The officers
of these regiments would be commis
sioned under federal law, the colonel of
each reeiment beine n. riMtilar. with n
rank not btre that r.f major of the
aeT.ive lift of stHe army, find his scrvi"
refpirement t.oing- m-trirfod to not
in-.irr- tbon. one month in (-at'h year. By
t-'?re Etu'h .sytH-Tii as Tl.' 1t.,1s rh. hn..u,
'i:.t. wh-'n war rhonld- break out, at
h-o-t. the (ifrt-ers of the different regi
ments 'vol. Id be men of some extieri
nive in miliary affairn. The proposi
tion is- somewhat oniual, but ill not
likely to be adopted in this country so
long us the present ejT,teni of the na
tional guard is in existence, Boston
Advertiser.
AMERICAN VS. FOREIGN ENGINES
ElnRllsli Journal's Refnaal to Dcllewe
In American Recorda of Speed.
The Engineer of London does not, we
are sure, intend to pose as a humorous
journal; but, nevertheless, it is some
times quite amusing, particularly when
trying to demonstrate to its own satis
faction, and to make its readers be
lieve, that things regularly done here in
America are, as a matter of fact, "im
possible, don't you know."
In its issue of September 10 is pub
lished the official record of the fast
run between Philadelphia and Atlantic
City, N. J., for the month of July Inst,
this record showing the time, from start
to etop, to average 49 minutes for the
45 miles the figures varying slightly
on different days. The table was fur
nished by the Baldwin locomotive
works, and showed the performance
of the train in detail for every day of
the month, while accompanying it was
a profile of the road, showing the grades
traversed.
One would imagine such information
from such a sorce to be entitled to ac
ceptance in a respectful manner, and, in
fact, for the time being, the figures were
flowed to go unchallenged, and in its
!f.r?e rf October ?2 the. r-.T'Tiror crr-rt
put -Sshetl a letter from E. K. dark,
of Lcei'y. testifying that he made the
irin OTi Hie locomotive of the tra'.n on
1 fl.iv when the distance was covered
ni 47 minulcp. Jn i Is issue of November
ii), hov iver, the paprr returns to the
t s n li'iH'j? g editorial, and, re
i. niig to the ofiicial record before pub
lished, it says: "Beyond all question,
that official record is quite fallacious.
It is not true either in substance or in
fact. It is a record of mechanical im
possibilities. Nevertheless, we think
we have actually got the scientific truth
in Clement Stretton's letter, which Will
be found in another page."
Eeference to Mr. Stretton's letter,
shows that it relates to a run made in
1S93, when the time made was 554 min-
tites. There is not a scintilla of evi
dence against the record of 1897, but
because of the elowor time in 1803, the
record for the last season "is not true
either in substance or in fact."
Now the question is: Does the En
gineer really believe that because a cer
tain rate of speed was not attained in
1893, therefore it cannot be in 1897, and
that anyone who claims it can be is
mendacious, or does it deliberately in
tend to resort to mere pettifogging
methods to deceive its readert-? we
must confess that we see no other al
ternative.
Nevertheless, the Engineer is forced
to admit from Mr. Stretton's figures of
the run as made four years ago that
American locomotives do make faster
time than English ones. American Machinist.
THRIFTY ICELANDERS.
Ther Are Making Pregrreae, Utjt Need
he Teleccrapfa.
. Not only are the Icelanders steadily
increasing in material wealth, but "they
seem to be making the best use of their
enlarged opportunities. As there nre
no great capitalists in Iceland, the gov
ernment is compelled to take the in
itiative in many enterprises that in
other countries might better be left to
private individucls. Thus a large ap
propriation has been made this ses
sion for subsidiziug steamship con
munication with Denmark and along
the coast. When these nrraagemciitli
are c, minted it. will b ptM-.iWt' for the
toti.-iet to reath Ieeiund much more
readily than is the cait- !..:-,;. A tx,-;-tr.v.'t
tits beeii made with a l;;:!.if:l, com
pfuiy by which 18 trips a year v.UI i,t
ii-atb- Uttwecn Ilejisjutik and "0X'n-b.-ij;-n
sn-l n:x ti aloj-.tr f!:o c-vist.
Kvra tno:o t;;.;t :'or re future
devolt-pmen; of L'.ela;.; U tha pi-cj:t!!":
plan for telegraphic coinau-:iieation
with the Shetland islands over the Fa
roe islnuda. A large appropriation for
this purpose was uaaiiii-otisly passed
by the aiihicg, nr.d the Danish goverii
rnent has p'guified its inteniicn to give
the measure substantial aid. While nc
final arrangements with either cf the
companies that bid for the contract has
been made, there is no reason to doubt
that the plan will be successfully car
ried through. A natural extension cl
the idea would be a North Atlantic cable
between America and Europe, with
Iceland C3 a stopping place. One di
rect practical and scientific result of
the present scheme would be to add im
mensely to our meteorological re
sources by furnishing daily weatherre
ports from Iceland.
Of immense importance for the health
of Iceland is the new, arrangement oi
the state medical system. Thirty years
ago there were only seven official phy
sicians in the whole of Iceland. Under
the new arrangement the island will be
divided into 42 medical districts, eacu
with a regular physician. A salary
varying ia amount in the different
classes is attached to the position in
addition to patients' fees, which latter
are reguiateod by government ordi
nance, and there 16 a pension. But
when one thinks of the enormous dis
tance to be traveled on cokl, dark win
ter days and nights, there spcti to ?
1.0 occasion U envy tbt- Iceland r
vonnt:7 dix-t-.rs their salaries nnd pen
siong. N. Y, Independent.
THE PROTECTED UQSTONIAN.
lie la llerctt-.rtl Ai- nit hi Vlirsttli Hl
An imaginary liostoaiaii-, 01 1 rising in
he nioruiiij;, lirr's hi3 whole toilt, lis
breakiast, aad lirciLfaai ei-icc ud
governaxtent supervision.
Nor do this average Bostonianand his
family escape from public control upon
rising f rem the table. The children are
by law compelled! to go to school; and
though there is an option, to attend
a private school, the city gratuitously
furnishes a school and school books.
A3 for the father himself, when he
reaches his door, he finds that public
servants are girdling his treeswith bur
laps, and sttirCiiing- his promises for
traces of the gypsy moth. Without
stopping to reflect that he has not been
at.ked to permit these public servants
to go upon- his property, he steps out
upon a sidtfcwalli constructed ini accord
ance with public requirements, crosses
a street -paved an watered and swept
by the public, and enters a street car
whose route, speed and fare are regu
lated by the public. Rescuing the cen
ter of the city, he ascenct-j to his office
by an elevator subject to public Inspec
tion, and reads the mail tltat has been
broourht to him from till parts of the
United States by public servants. If
the dimness cf his office may cause
tim to regret that sunlight appears to
be outside public protection, he may
be answered that by recent provisions
the height of buildings is regulated and
malicious construction of high fences
is prohibited. If now he leaves his oGice
and goes to some store or factory in
which he owns on interest, he finds that
for fmnal-e employes chairs must be pro
vided, that children must not be em
ployed ia certain kind 8 of work, that
dnntrerous machinery m-i.st be fenced',
thnt fire esee.pes must Ik furnished, and
j.robably that the goods -produced or
!! must be marked or -packed iu a
ct r'.;irv v. ay, or must reach a eertnirt
standard. Indeed, whatever this man's
business may be, it is almost certain
that in one way or another the public's
hand comes between him and his em
ploye, or between him and his customer.
Prof. Eugene Wambaugh, in Atlan
tic. What Her Heart Sold.
Confiding Daughter Oh, mamma, I
really think Mr. Nobranes intends pro
posing soon.
Fond Mamma Indeed?
"Yes, and if he does, what shall I
say?"
"Be guided entirely by the dictates of
your own heart, my child. Remember,
my love, that Mr. Nobranes is heir to
at least 5,000 a year. You would
doubtless go abroad on your wedding
tour, and enter the first circles of so
ciety on your return. It would be a
lovely match for you. But I have no
desire to influence your choice. WTiat
does my child's heart say?"
"You are sure of the 5,000 a year,
and all the rest?"
"Perfectly sure."
"Then my heart says yes.' "
"My own darling! What joy it will
give me to see you married to the man
you love." Loudon Tit-Bits.
WOUNDED IN THE IMAGINATION.
Inlijae Sfarfiiin of a Segro TVI10 Uai
Not Horn : Pic of a Ilallet.
The wonderful effect of the imagina
tion upon the mind of man has been
demonstrated repeatedly by persons
who were willing to exici-itnent.
Speaking of this peculiarity, a New Or
leans physician who was for many
years connected with the Charity hos
pital gave a striking illustration in
the course of a conversation with a Sun
reporter.
"As you know," began the physician,
"I have long taken au interest in gun
shot wounds of the abdomen, and have
followed th irer.tiucnt of tsome very
complicated cases. I was in my room
at the hospital one day when an am
bulance Kurt'con came to mo and said
that a man suffering from a g'-ir.: hot
utand in the abdomen had been
brought in for treatment, like 90 per
cent, of such cases, he was colored, far
the southern negroes, unlike their
northern brethren, have more faith in
the pistol than in the razor, and pre
fer to shoot up a rival in love or busi
ness to the more laborious method of
carving, so much in vogue north of Ma
son and Dixon's line. The wounded
man, a big athletic chap of 30, was
stretched upon a couch, and at the first
glance his time seemed to have come
to leave thi3 world. He was breathing
laboriously, and the ashen stamp of
death was a pparent in his f aee. I asked
him where he had been wounded, and
he placed his hand upon the left side
of his abdomen, where the blood showed
plainly upon the light material of which
his clothing was made. He had all the
symptoms of a man bleeding to death
as I stripped him for a more critical
examination.
"When I got a look at the wound I
found it a mere tear of the flesh, not
much more than skin deep, from which
the blood was flowing quite freely. I
saw that the bullet had been deflected
by something, and told the negro to
stand up. lie groaned violently and as
sured me that it would be the death of
him to move, but I finally persuaded
him that he was not hurt at all, and
that after a dressing of collodion bad
been applied to the wound be could go
home. It was a study to watch the
man's face as the truth dawned upon
him. Fear gave way to doubt and doubt
to the r-rr -tiicte rt-ili-atiou 01 tin: situ
;ilon, :n-l he grinned frora ear to ear
: he ; !-. -! tip. I asked him to shake
h'.a clothes, and as lie did so the bullet
dropped to the floor.
"1 had noticed tl.tt the man wire a
1 .diet set in a bra.-p mounting a- a si erf
tiin, and as he fJoikI before rue I re
marked :
"'You seem to be fond of bullets. 1
lias that, cue in your bt-arf pin a his
tory?' " 'W-what bullet?' he stammered, as
he felt for his pin and with quivering
fingers withdrew it from its resting
place. 'I nevah bad no bullet in niah
pin, boss,' be said, in terror, and thea
I noticed that it wasn't mounted as a
jeweler would do it, but sort of wedged
into place, with a lapping of the edges
here and there.
"I asked the man how many times he
bad been shot, and he said twice. Then
it was all clear to me. One ball had
spent itself upon a button, which was
found attached to the bullet on the
floor, and the other had struck the
strong brass crescent scarf pin and had
wedged itself there. That negro cer
tainly wasn't born to be shot to death,
and I know he hasn't been razored yet,
for 1 met him in St. Charles street the
other morning with the unique pin in
his scarf." N. Y. Sun.
EARLY EDUCATIONAL METHODS
The Whole School Snelled Oot In
fjnfacn.
Rev. George Channing wrote an ac- 1
count of the school of his youth, which
he attended just after the revolution.
Girls and boys attended together the
primary school, and sat on seajs made
of round blocks of wood of various
heights, which were furnished by the
parents. Children bowed and kissed
the teacher's hand on leaving the room.
The teaching of t-jn Uirip was peculiar.
It was the last lessen of the day. The
master gave out a lor.g word, say mul
tiplication, with a blew of his strap on
the desk as a signal for nil to start ic-P'-lher,
and in chorus the whole class
spelled out the word in syllables. The
ti-oeher's ear was so trn hu d and acute
that he at onee detected any misspell
ing. If this happened, he demanded the
name of the scholar who made the mis
take. If there was any hesitancy or re
fusal in acknowledgment he kept the
whole class until, by repeated trials of
long words, accuracy was obtained.
The roar of the many voices of the large
school, all pitched in different keys,
could be heard, cn summer days, for a
long distance. Alice Morse Earle. in
Chautanquan.
A Hard Counter.
Benham (during a quarrel) Well, if
you want to know it, I married you for
vour money.
Mrs. Benham I wish I could tell as
easily what I married you for. Tit-
Bits.
Dolled Chocolate Glaae.
Place a small saucepan over the fire
with one pound sugar, one-quarter
rsftund crated chocolate and one-half
pint water; stir and boil till it will
form a thread between two nngers;
from fire and stir until a thin
skin forms on top of glaze; then use
at onee; spread evenly all over tne
cake and set a few minutes in a cool
oven. American Queen,
Royal snakaa the food para.
pill
AJctu'-e! fun
ABOUT VACCINATION.
Some Canaea of the Failure of Opera'
tloas.
Many .people follow the safe custonf
of being vaccinated every five or terr
years, since it is -well known that the
protection against smallpox afforded by
this procedure -may become exhausted'
after a time. Usually such vaccination
does not take because the immunity
conferred by the previous one is still
present, but it is not safe to trust to
this too implicitly, since a person may
be susceptible to the disease and yet'
for some reason, the vaccination may
cot take.
One should be suspicious if the arm
is exceedingly ore, for this does not
always mean that the operation, has.
been a success, but often; just the eon-'
trary. The inflammation may be due'
to the admixture of some impurity with'
the vaccine matter, or as is more likely,
to contamination by an imperfectly-'
cleansed- lancet, the fingers of the'phy-"
fician or of the patient, ortiieclotliing.
Jn such a case the strange microbes
kill the vaccine.
Agniu, the vaccination does not suc
ceed and the person is thought to b al
ready protected, but a few dbys later'
.n fever declares itself, such as typhoid?
.fever, measles or scarlatina. This fever
is often- incorrectly attributed by the
patier.t or his friends to Infection by
Impure vaccine matter, while thetruth.
is that the disease had already beetv
caugn t bu . not yet developed when, the
vaceination was made, and this, like the' .
severe infiar. mation, a'.w kills the.1
virus.
Another frf-quent cause of failure is
that the vac-cine Ivmp'o. is not insert' ti
tir-pp! enough. It plionld be insr:-'!
beneath the. pride rcn is into the true
skin, as showr by the exudevtion of
very minute drops of bloodi If the
scraping is mnde too deep, however",,
the blood! will flow in gTeater quantity
and may wash a,way the vaccine virus,
and so lead to failure.
Finally, want of s-uecesB may be due
to the fact that the arm bas been .o
ered too soon, and consequently the
lymph has been rubbed off before a Jfli
cien't time has elapsed to permit oi is
absorption.
Because of the many, often unavoid
able, accidents such as thewe, wbich in
terfere with the success of vaccination-,
the operation- onght aDwaya to be repeat
ed in two or three weeks, if the first
attempt does not- take. Youth's Com
panion. Dealred Rearalta.
"She actually flung1 herself at his
head!"
"H'm! What did he doT
"He flung himself at her feet." Bos
ton Transcript.
Wolf Children.
The adoption of hvrrrjan inianta by-
wild and carnivorous quadrupeds has
obtained more or less credecc among
the vulgar from the earliest agea, and,
while such to-day evre for tte most part
pooh-poohed aa idle tales, the akeptics
have little idea cf the avidence that ha
beer: c ff-red in subsisaVation thereof.
Half a century ero the iconoelaat who
would have dared question that
Romulus ar.d K;n". owed their nur
turing to a nhe- wolf vtoul.l have been
laughed to seor by Meat lovers of the
classics. Tweuy-frve y ta,r later the ani
mal was substituted, oa the part of tu
tors, by a woman named Lupa a most
inglorious conclusion, derived solely
from imagination. To-day the tendency
to ignore all sentiment causes euch
ideas to receive scant courtesy, and,
when sentiment is introduced es evi
dence, is met by the undeniable state
ment that the same miracle ist ac
credited with preserving the Iivea of
many gods and heroes of antiquity.
t--onsequentiy, ir a single cajae of a ahild
being fostered and reared by animals
can be substantiated beyond question,
the result, will be to rehabilitate aa hta
tory much literature that, solely on this
account, has been relegated to tha
realm of fiction. Lippincott'a.
e o
Beware of "cheap bafc
fag powders. Alum makes
good medicine but bad foodv
Ask your doctor.

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