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The native Virginian. [volume] (Orange Court House, Va.) 1867-187?, July 30, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94051044/1869-07-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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' York Pianos.J ,
office and warerooms : !
No. 7 North lanert-jr •*. near Balto. st
BALTIMORE, MD. I
C lEEE'S Pianos] liave all the latest |
,uin>veinents,lncluding tho AgraffeTre
tvorv Fronts, and the improved irem-h
on ftllly warranted for five years, with
',"„e ofexohange within twelve months
snttrel) satisfactory to purchasers,
end hand Pianos and Parlor Organs al
on hand, from SS9 to SSOO.
ences, who have our Pianos in nse:—
~,1 Robert 1-'- Let?. Lcxhn-ton, \«; Gen
llobert Hansom, Wilmington, N C ,Mi
Mci-snn Mrs M A Keblinger, 1-rofeseorH
Kicuards,lirJohn it Baylor. Dr Woods, w
, nmm..;, J T Antrim, Albemarle county.
Terms liberal; a call is solicited.
~.,. -
CORTEAN & CO.,
;i8 and 918 Baltimore Street,
BALTIMORE, MI).,
I IVC I* O ~*■ 1' -El ~*■
TABLE CUTLERY, FAMILY BABOWABM
PLATED TEA AND COFFF.E SSSVICS,
I irks, Spoons, Castors
| r Res, ifWMwic! sad Nock Knusare
. DER*, SHOVELS, TONGS,
STANDARDS AND HOI'SK ITIINISIIIXO UOOOB
Of Brut Variety.
T IE Goods have all been selected
.' "torn the most celebrated makers, and
iinranteed to bo first class in quality,
in "pattern, and beautiful In design—
sloAhaviih' been bpught »«_?___•?_?]
ft i.i prices.on account ol the depression
Ii ade winheoflSredtocustomemataeor-
Bdlngreduetloß. uiHTLAS . to.
• i!,er 25, 18118—ly. .
-_._*»_ lEVINO A. BOCK,
ADAMS A BACK,
[IMPOBTER3 AND JOBBERS Or
AND DEALERS IN
IT", CHAN&EUHmS, COAL OIL, Ac. 1
•o. 33» Baltimore Street,
And Hi tlennnn Si-eat,
AL T I M O R E , M D.
___ ars now n_notaotnnng onr own
IV LmtHM, and can oiler inducements In
tin' branch ol business.
tsiiS—ly.
T kmv% volnfoM lIOBIE. I
U rJtESCt. I). DIET/& CO.,
80S . i "'■ ' West Baltimore Street, bit i
Howard and Liberty Streets,
I A L T I M O R E, M D. ,
datlonery, Perfumery,
I tNTBHfNG GOODS, COMBS, Ao_ Ac.,
,i,t to be undersold.
n 10,1888
ii spbarroflV m. c. chbrch, south
Selfoyand Dulany,
.OKI-SELLERS AND STATU iNKHS,
332 W. Baltimore St.,
BALTIMORE, Ms.
r. SEI.BY,
W . 0, IHILANY.
-. i licr 15,1867.
JOB G. McVEIGH,
WITH
J I-RESTON PARR, Jr., AO.
i.:) Hanover, near Baltimore Street.
BALTIMORE, Ml).
'' ' ' LAMPS, Ac.
,NX WARE AT FACTORY PRICES.
a 2u,lSod
~Ki:i., A. J. l-.ill.Kl'i'X, J. F. HELLS*
inn iiss in
*CV GOODS AND NOTIONS
■JST> Baltlinnre Street,
I) ALTIMOBE, MD .
. ii 10, ISOB j
MAETBY HOUSE,
A. B. MILLER, Proprietor,
BALTIMORE.
-ember 15,1507. I
AGENTS WANTED.
I to $200 Per Month!!
a Commission from which twice
at amount can be made by selling the
improved
COMMON SENSE
;MILY SEWING MACHINE,
Price $IS.OO.
.•Circulars and Terms address
C. llliW'l-'.RS A CO.,
mth Street, Pbihulelphla.Pa. |
ary 15, ISM 9. 1
HEW SPRING GOODS.
■; r received to-day a 10l of bcanti- i
1 Prints, and variety of Notions which |
BY BAGBY & STOFER.. f ■«■•*"»«'• 5 2« " Bftl °- lataltntior - | TERMS--13.00 IN ADVANCE.
IL ORANGITcOURT HOUSE, VA.. FfllDA? MORNING JULY 30, 1869. NUMBER 38.
.! A.d t,r*i Tt. AA I. 1.~,
SPCCBSROB TO J. W. KALIS S CO.,
ALKXAANDHIA, VIBGINIA,
TTAVINO purchased the entire stock
I 11 or the late firm, at the old stand,
No. ISY King Street,
I Invite those who have so liberally patron-
I them, and the public generally, to give
i call. Having ft large stock on hand, I
prepared to se'l as cheap as can be ismght In
the State. My stock consists of Hardware,
Cutlery Carpenters' Tools, Doors, Snsh,
Clinds. Door and Window Frames, Brackets,
Mouldi-igs, Balusters, of different paterns,
and Newel Posts. A largo stock of French
aud American Gloss, double and single thick,
ol all sixes. Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Paint
i and Whltewnsh Brushes, Lcwlb's Pure White
Lead, and other brands of fine quality, Put
., i*,,—_*ti _. nm i Machine OIL Also,
ierior quality,) Cement, Calcln
"h and Felt, for Roofing, Ac.—
of Pub's celebrated Cur Au
-9 Vues found in first class
r ~
>rs for LumO*>T- Bjjok sad.*"
ing Material promptly attend-
Beckham A Co.
, BROTHER A CO.,
IS TO GREOORY 4 ENGLISH.)
_ L COMMISSION
AND DEALERS IN
,«. msno. Plaster, Ac,
. 43 King Street,
iNDRIA, VIRGINIA.
, advance! made on con
—am.
HI FBefieh,
Manufacturers of
s& Tin Ware i
WORKERS IK
! AND SHEET-IRON,
id Dealers Generally
IE KEEPINO ARTICLES.
o. 7 X. Royal St.,
EXANDBIA, Va.
I NOB-EXPLOSIVE! CHEAP I
SO BMKLL WHILK SOBNINU !
tallized Oil,
TEX TED JULY, 1867-
CD IN THIS STATS ONLY BT
dson, Euther & Ce>.
No. 34 Kins Street, I
AN DRI A, VIRGINIA.
Burners, Lamps and Lamp
, hand. Send for Price List.
stw—ly. |
I till T. II ERRIi'H,
MANUFACTURER OF
LES, HARNESS,
lies, Collars, &c,
•Jo. 35 King Street,
EXANDBIA, VA.
) otT cheaper than any other
ith of New York. A large stock
_EIAM OWRKB'
r Duke and A Ifrnl Sts.,
.EXAXDBIA VA.
L Monuments, Tombstones,
■ry description of Grave Work,
Brown Stone steps. Platforms,
>iug, Gaps, Curbs, Spout Stones, i
tens will be promptly attended
■k executed with neatness and
reasonable terms.
a—ly.
I. ROBINSO * ft SO*,
GROCERS AND
KSION 'MERCHANTS,
*r King and Union Street,
ANURIA, VIRGINIA.
ULAR attention paid tn the
if Grain, Flour, Tobacco and all
mtry Produce. Goods forward-
LLIAM \vThEITBEHT']
WITH
IGE WASHINGTON,
[SSION MERCHANT,
flee No. 1! Union Street,
CANDRIA, VIRGINIA.
(TJ I.All attention paid to the
of all Kinds of Country Produce,
orders for Groceries, Guano, Plas-
Kisb, Bolt, Lime, Ac.
bTtTtsjiimaw, ~
SALS and retail deaiek is j
:furishing goods,
d and willow ware,
and Plain Tlnw are,
TABLE WARE, BRUSHES, AC,
No. 12S, King Street,
EXANDBIA, VIRGIN -A,
1868 _
NDEItS AND MACHINISTS.
ESON. «. H. COLLINS.
mleson A Collins,
_tj ___>JI3 -53E1.-a-»®
<r Royal and Wilke. Streets,
ANURIA, VIRGINIA
SO _of every description made
it lioHse. Cosh paid for old Iron
ier 20. '08—ly.*
T. CREIGHTON & SON,
IMPORTERS, AND DEALERS IN
HARDW ARE
AND HOUSEKEEPING GOODS,
No. S8 King Street,
ALEXANDRIA, VA. .
April 10,1868.
WILLIAM H. MUIR,
MANCFACTCR AND.DEALBR IN ALL IW-'S CF
CABINET FURNITURE,
Cliairs, Mattresses,
POOKING GLASSES, Ac.
r of King and St. Asaph Streets,
U.EXANDBIA, VA.
,1888
JOHN A. GEIB,
LIETY STORE,
No. 113 Kins Street,
ALEXANDRIA, VA,
inTIONS of all kinds constantly on
band, and tor sale at the lowest cw»h
.« Musical Instruments oi all kinds;
illngTacuile, Violin and Guitar Strings,
.ptcmbcr 18, ism_ ,
Winner A siayiaaker,
ni:,tl.KßB IS
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
DIIY GOODS,
OAKPETINQS, OIL CLOTHS, MATTINGS Ao
Corner King *■ Uoyal Streets,
ALEXANDRIA. V V. '
• niisi nci,\>i. ■
Sweetheart, though 'tis years sine* we part
ed.
Are the voices of mem'ry asleep?
Though life's river rolls broadly between us.
And the ford with each day grows more
deep.
When the spires of the chestnut are wbit
ttie air filled with sweet hawthorn
reath,
And the words of the birds call the oow
lup from the long winter deaths
greay nights of winter are short
day opens blue-eyed and clear,
lawn with the faint streak of
n,
le sun of the May of the year:
lily looks np from the river,
reed from its long fro/ten bed,
never taint spectres arising
i*e and our youth, from the dead T
s of the thrush and the black
nice melts us aiawst to tears,
heart never ;throw In reraem-
B
o'er the river of years 7 j
>3MCXI Tniriß
SOME UIRLS.
HEY WEST AHD WHAT THEY
SAW
IT ONE WHO IS INTIMATELY AC
SD WITH THE CIBt'CMSTASCSS,
ICAIED IC THE OTHER.
S LITTLE GREEN CALICOES."
rfect was the picture of two
tie pairs of clean pantalettes,
little Green Calico dresses, as
rl In the porch at A , one
soon morning, watting for
'-to come with the car
_ ist fifteen years ago ! To wait
foi"Uncle T with the carriage was
a process always to be gone through at
A , and when it bad been duly
performed on this occasion, and the
carriage had at last come ; a big green
basket was lifted in with a supply of
If snacks; "Grandma" entered
d finally the little green call
; their places. How tho little
mulled within them, and thrill
lowed with the mighty realisa
dn, *omeu*aerc.' How could two
sen calleoes hold all that glon
ng of rolling on—on—on—up
, with a real packed-up trunk
and going away over the moun
a great many_ new houses, to
iat many strange, people, aud to
s and days and days I Oh It
*_n*i! The little Green Cali
ost burst wide open in the back,
:ess ot emotion ! They had of
■etl ladies aud "termed like" all
s happening, but now—over
tg thought '.—here was the real
arriage in fact, was lumbering
owly. up and down a succession
red hills—the beautiful, fresh
r was opening wider and wider
lorlous, starlug, burning day;
little Green Calicoes still moved
sort of bewilderiug ccstacy !—
cmed borne on air, aud at last,
ley catue to a plaiu. neat, rather
ooking, weather-boarded house,
Ir Grandma said "we will stop
id take dinner with old Mrs.
," they beheld not at all a oom
ace weather-boarded house, with
•dlnary aspens and a few sweet
ibout it; but a magnificent struc
t in lovely bowers of roses, and
ed by the noblest, grandest of
Mrs, c -'s dinner being over, the
the little calicose resumed their travels
in the same ecstatic frame, and being
Bght on their way, come iv due I
se to their "Aunt X 's." Here
b was a real, actual, existing sprin. I
•, right in the yard, and no picture
or story book about It I 'there were
beside, two entire "hydrangeas" In big
white tubs, and full of pink blooms sit
ting each side the path which led to the
door; It was certainly like enchantment
Another striking feature about' Aunt
K. 's was. that "Cousin G "
kept a store just across the, road, aud
that he had there, among other wares,
certain small glass plates and candy ;
thus affording the little Green Calicoes
an opportunity fpr spending some ot
their live dollars. Tliis,tothem, inex
haustible sum,had been allotted by their
Grandma tor-pocket money, and may
be said Indeed, to have been the only
cause of disquietude and annoyance,
the little calicoes had '. The terrible re
sponsibility of spending those live dol
lars, and the-gnawing anxiety while a
single cent of them remained, settled
sometimes almost like a weight upon
their young spirits!
The visit finally out at their "Aunt
X 's," the little Green Calicoes weie
transported tliencc to their "Cousin
__ry •__ -Vand theu—what a fairy
land! What an Aladdin's Palace '.—
There was a cottage in the yard "hioh
"Cousin Mary" had said was "for the
children." There were beautiful walks,
and beautiful drives, and above all
there were dining days, when "Etta"
and "Nanny" came out in small "silk
attire I" Upon this development, the
I little calicoes bethought them of certain
I elaborately trimmed silks which had
been packed up for them, but which
their Grandma would never admit that
a proper time had come tor wearing.
It may be popularly supposed that our
degenerate race knows few conditions
---
girts are assembled in their first silk
dresses; but none ea.i speak with more
positive assur»riCe of the tact than we
four, then and there collected I Thefe
was a proud feeling within lis winch
seemed to defy the world, and an in
dwelling Joy, which threw a bright
light into every corner of life I
there wasgreat play ing of "Come, oh
Come with me," with Intervals of "I'll
Watch for Thee,' on guitar at "Cousin
Mary's". There was also great sitting
In porch at nights, and a due proportion 1
of having "devoted admirer" in "Wil
lie"—
But the time came for this Arabian
Knights entertainment to conclude,
and for the Junior and more uproar
ious of the httle.Green Csfllcoes to be
■mid screams and cries, ruthless
ly from her "Cousin Mary T
sl" The elder calico, being al
f an enduring Character, preserv
»mposed demeanor throughout.
And now, the same •■Uncle T ''
the same trunk, with the silk dresses
packed In—the same Grandma—the
same big basket, and the same little
Green Calicoes arrive at Salem,
'they went Immediately to "Cous
|ji X 's" where the lesser and more
uproarious of the little Green Calicoes
proceeded to disgrace herself in the
fullest manner. Being in deep grief
Ivlng the T , and not bav
b acquaintance with the small
i she (the junior calico) "lifted
oicc and wept sore !"'
expedients were resorted to—
ig continued unabated. Until
idma" through the din that she ■
er slap the Junior; this demon
of heartlessness and barbarity
art of the host, brought junior
• ciitaa-e of yells; when a pass
, no doubt observing the scene
thout and seeing at a glance
c discipline was needed there,
i at the door- paused upon the
c Junior's nose, and stung her
reserve! Here was a crisis!
| Unearthly shrieks sent the air ! Chil
dren were despatched in all directions
for oils, camphors and other ameliora
tives, and after this no effort was made
to restrain the Junior, -who screamed in
the most satisfactory manner, and with I
■tie Interruption up to the mo-1
>f her departure from Salem.
solitary consolation which she j
1 herself while there, was a
piece of rock candy and a stlek
of cinnamon. In short her whole re-
Itions of Salem were only relieved
■ fact that it had afforded facili
r investing every remaining cent
sefive dollars.
the infinite gratification of the
- family and its collateral hran
the travelers finally resumed the
'they resolved that their most
it relative should not escape and
eded systematically; Mr. Harry
|, 'slicingthe next pomtof attack I
There the little Green Calicoes were
shocked aud thrilled to hear their
Grandma declare tnat unless she got a
fair nights' sleep that night, she should
return Irrfmediately home. As soon as
this proclamation was Issued, all the
keen little wits about tho house were
set to work to devise some plan tor se-
Bg sleep. Upon due consultation
"Aunt A- " a hop pillow was
provided, and cure enough its balmy
influenoe won the fitful Morpheus I
After this triumph over difficulties, the
expedition moved steadily on, proceed
ing next in order to their "Aunt
T——— 's". It turned out a matter of
some intricacy, by the way, to get to
"Aunt T V and the little hearts
sunk within the little Ureen Calicoes as
they penetrated farther and farther into
a dark, lonely forest of pines. Twi
light came—still nothing but dreariness
and pines. At intervals, the carnage
I waa stopped and reasonings and calcu-
I latious were entered Into between
whether they could be pursuing the |
right road. Then, after leading to no |
definite ccncluslon, the consultation
would cease, and the little party mo*
solemnly on deeper and deeper Into the
pines; until, at last, Just a* night and
despair were settling down, the dim
outline ot a tall, spectral-looking house
This was their veritable ••Aunt;
T 's," and here the wretched llt
tle;callcoes had to spend three miserable
miserable, miserable days I They wan
dered through lonely, desolate rooms,
and looked Into old sepulchres of press
es, and thought l* was just such a place
as people ought togo through ajgreat
many pines to get to; and which they
ought to be willing to go through a
great many more pines togctaway from.
A leading feature about this weird, un
earthly old house was that there was
nono other but sulphur water ever used
about It. There was no spring accessi- ]
bis but one ot strongest sulphur, aud
this "Aunt T —" had come to con
sider somewhat In the light of a luxury; j
but her sulphurious tea, and other gun
powder regimen, threatened entire ex- I
termination of the little calico ! Their
i Grandma fortunately observing this
j dangerous tendency of things, gather
ed up her forces and set forth once
1 more to retrace the labarynth of pines
i and regain the world ! This done, the
i excursionists found themselves at
"Grove Hill". Ah! how the little
i Green Calicoes revived at sight ot the #
big porch tull of bright looking ladies
and gentlemen, who were waiting to
welcome them there,—the lovely flow
er gardens and the groups ot beautiful
children! Their late experience of
pines and "Aunt T *s" rolled a-
tffelr hearts were flooded with the glo
rious sunshine of "Grove Hill". Soon
upon arriving there, however, aiialrs
assumed rather a discouraging aspect;
when eld Mrs. G Intimated that
it was her intention to come straight
home with the travelers,- and to bring
likewise,- fifteen young persons who
■sirous of making a visit to the
little Green Calicoes listened
igly—they thought of Buchanan
It copiously ! Their Grandma
remonstrated with Mrs. G—ass*, and
represented that it would be an accom
modation if that lady would defer her
visit until siic '"Grandma") con Id
spend one day at Buchanan, but Mrs.
G — remained firm, and the blight-
Ittle Green Calicoes were hurried
without seeing Buchanan I
as began, continued, and ended
is first traveling experience of
eminently Green little Calicoes,
is did the great world open upon
in a variety of lights and shad
ows !
■ (TfiEISD.) j
CINDERS IN THE EYE.
following is from a comniunl ca
tion in Heartltand Home, by an eminent
physician;
"Called to prescribe for Mrs. An
drew's inflamed eyes! learned that she
had a bit ot cinder In bef eye; occurred
while travelling on the cars four days
teye very much Inflamed, painful,
attended with severe headache.
Is one ol hundreds of cases where
le knowledge would not have been
a dangerous thing, and would save a
worldofpain. Nothing Is more dis
tressing to a traveller than a piece of
-'oder in the eye, and no disorder is
Ireniedlc:!. Oalllng the lamily
was not an eye-wash thai .. tr »- |
ws needed to believe her suffer-1
it the removal of the foreign sub- I
. The cinder will be found jnst
leath the margin of the upper lid
there Is a small grove or gutter
i flow of tears to the inner angle
eye. Foreign bodies tend to fall
Into this groove, and if they arc very
angular, like cinder, they adhere In
spite of the current of tears which now
flow in great abundance, and sooner or
later carry off smooth substances
Now, If you will,raise the margin ot the
I lid and turn it over, the cinder
in of sand will be exposed, and
asily bo removed with the point
encil. or with the finger oovered
andkerchlel. 1 then demonstrat
s simple operation on one ot the
thus: Taking my pencil in my
ttnters, with the thumb and first
linger of ny lelt hand I seized the eve-1
lashesof_ttie upper lid, and drawing
the lid gently out from the ball, prersed
the point of tbepencll downward upon
the upper sufacc of the lid, about one
fourth of an inch from its margin, and
at the same time carried the margin
upward over the pencil by the eye
lashes when the lid readily rolled over
the pencil so as to expose completely
the gutter described. I then asked one
of the young ladies to perforn this oper
ation upon her mother, which, alter
two or thrco failures, she accomplished
and as I had predicted, small angular
pieces of Cinder were found beneath
the margin ot the lid, which 'she very
adroitly removed with the point of the
pencil. Mrs. Andrews expressed im
mediate relief. So much Interest was
felt In this painless operated, "Jhat all
Rn performed It, being much aided
[Hiring the person operation upon
ik downward when the lid was
everted, and upward when the
tor wished to restore the lid." :
POISONED BY A RAZOR j
(arber named William Brewster,
; business at Chatham, Ontario,
! six weeks since, was called to I
a man whose death was occasion-1
a lung fever; the instrument ho I
was afterwards laid by, to be used
oro as a razor. But, being one
Ing without a knife, and desiring
srpen his pencil, Brewster used I
the razor for the purpose, and during j
the operation cut a slight gash in tho 1
left fore-finger. In an hour or two the
finger commenced aching, and contin
ued to grow worse, until the whole hand
and arm were fearfully swollen, and the
flesh. In spots, assumed a mottled ap
pearance. Having doctored for four
weeks, without success, among the
skilled physicians at Chatham, Brew- I
ster came to this city to seek rellei at |
the St. Mary's Hospital. He had lost |
the entire use of the arm, and it had
I swollen to four times its natural size,
the flesh emitting a bad odor.- Detroit
Free Press.
DISCOVERY OF A CAVE.
A party of bee-hunters, while engag
ed in hunting bee-trees on Saturday,
discovered a cave in the cliff tnat over
hangs the river bank near the Mint
Springs, two miles above the city.
The entrance to the cave, was sosecurely
hid that it was discovered by the mer
est accident. A strong wooden door
closed the entrance, and the arrange
ments were such that it could be secure
ly barred from the Inside, preventing
the intrusion of inquisitive persons.
The Inside of the cave bore evident
marks of having been inhabited at
some recent period, and from Its size
It will afford ample accommodations
for a dozen or more persons. It is con
jectured that It was a hiding place lor
deserters during the war, and since, it
is supposed, has been occupied by ne
gro convicts who escaped from the
canal, upon which they were employ
ed.—Lynchburg News.
THE EFFECT 05 GEN. GRANT.
The Vlrgln'a election was rightly
considered a very important one. Itr
effect on the administration has been
to induce an Immediate and entire
cbana-e of policy. Seeing that its only
salvation Is In going with the popular
feeling:, the President has determined
hereafter to throw the entire support
ot the Administration in favor ol what
is now believed to be the dominant
party In those States. Judge Dent, a
brother In-law of the Preslaent, will
be the candidate of the Conservative
Republicans in Mississippi for Gover
nor of that State, and will have the
support ot the Administration. Thus
the success of the Conservatives In Vir
ginia has already borne good fruit.
The result of the elections in Mississip
pi and lexashas virtually been decid
ed. The days oi tlic carpet-bagger and
scalawag are numbered; and with their
defeat the Southern people can again
raise their heads and breathe freely.
VALUABLE HINTS TO BUSINESS ME*.
Everybody knows that, the surest and
quickest way to accumulate is to ad
vertise; but everybody docs not know
"how to do it." "The Inside Track has
some good ideas on the subject, which
may be of practical value to some of
our readers:
An advertisement is not always val
uable in proportion to the space it oc
cupies.
A prominent advertisement once or
twice will be effective, II followed up by
a steady card giving business aud ad-1
dress. I
Do not take dcrwn your sigh in dull
times. People read newspapers all
times of the year.
If business admits of it, several small
advertisements with your name repeat
ed every time, will avail more than the
same collected, with your name repeat
ed only once.
Do not fear to have a small adver
tisement by the aide of a competing
one. The big one can't eat it up,
A short advertisement, four times, is
better than a long one only once.—
"Bragg is a good dog, but hold-last is
better?'
Small advertisements, and plenty of
them, is a good rule. We were all ba
bies once, yet we made considerable
Do not advertise unless you bare
something worth advertising.
The easiest way In the world to throw
away money Is to advertise injudicious- j
The easiest way in the world to ac
cumulate a fortune Is to advertise Judi
ciously.
The sewing-machine men—leading
makers—agreed about a year ago to
live up extensive advertising. The re
sult has been to decrease their business
one-third. The piano men have dou
bled and trebled their business by ad-
H, T. Hclmbokl returns an income
of $152,205. All this comes from ad
vertising. Dr. Helmbold's expenses
lor advertising average over $10,000 a
week. The road to fortune is through
the advertising columns of the news
naners. "A word to the wise is suffi
cient "
i My success Is owing to my libeT.**tty
in advertising.— Bonner.
Advertising has furnished me with a
competence. —Amos Lawrence.
I advertised my productions and
j made money.—Nicholas Longworth.
Constant and persistent advei Using
Is a sure prelude to wealth.—Stephen
Girard. , _
He who invests one dollar In busi
ness should invest one dollar in adver
tising that buslneas.—A. T. Stewart.
j ~ . »-S>s. ' — ——-
A LONDON DOMESTIC TRAGEDY.
I A docsmtic tragedy with scarce a
parallel for its depth of horror was re
vealed on Monday, the 28th of June, at
No. 15 Hosier lane, Smithfield, London.
Tho facts were : !
Acting in accordante with the sug-1
gestion ot a letter received at headquar
ters, that the officers of justice should
go to 15 Hosier lane, where they would
fee "an unexpected sight," the police
rcpared to the house, and, forcing an
entrance, found eight dead bodies, vic
tims of prussio acid. Walter James
Duegan and Emma his wife were lying j
surrounded by their six children, all
in the embrace ot death. Duggau was
a silversmith, who, from misfortune,
and not by fault of his own, had lost
his situation, and was about to be turn
ed out of his longings, adrift upon the
great Loudon world. He seems to
have been an affectionate father as
Emma Dnggar.was a tender mother,
but both man and wife would appear
to have succumbed to 111-fortune and
So the game as hopeless. The
-of the children was. beyond
c, the deliberate work of the
not In wrath, but from the
sant, who afterwards destroy
slves. The lifctle limbs were
composed,' the young faces
xpresslon of perfect tranqulli
lere was no trace of distur
the apartment. The family
jponatthe e_lste! ofmarrl-g
-b, wherein were written tue j
d eate of birth of the children,
iiarrlage certificate of the par
carefully pinned to the leaf,
limselt wrote and posted the
the authorities, and then went
prepa'ed tor them the "unex-
Uht" which it promised. The ]
tragedy was the result of an
social condition and as such
I tlemar.d the earnest constd- '
fthe thinker and the states
t WABBLERB OF OLDEN TIME,
is nothing new under the sun:
the romps, the hoydens, the
, termagnmts, and the tom
s as old as the oldest English |
ir the most venerable English!
One might have thought that I
or of that ancient Interlude,
uglcr," had drawn his Abigail
rsonal observation in oar own
teeth, she brideleth, she swlmmrth
nd fro,
leth not one hair awry', «ne tryp
i like a doe;
in the streets, going or coming
aeward, . __
rerlth and warbellth, like one In a
Hard."
■ «*S> —
Vhile trudging along one day
l soldier met a Methodist cir
er, wboin he at once recogniz
icb. but affected ignorance of it.
•o.nmand do you belong to. in
die preacher. l A Texas regl
i Van Dorn's army. And your
'l belong,' solemnly replied the
ir, 'to the army of the. Lord.'
my friend,' said the soldier,
got a very long way from head-
.-».. —
■A gentleman asked a lady known
I to "be uttaiiy Ignorant of the languages,
•How did you get along when abroad
to make yourself understood?' 'Oh,
my tlear sir,' replied she with quite a
French air, 'we. had an inferrupfer with
us '.' The same lady having arranged
some statues in th? adjoining room, re
quested the same gentleman, before he
left the same day, to step into the next
•impartment and see, nor antics {antiques)
A your.g man* in California,
whose ti iends had cease J to correspond
with him, woke up their interest by
sending letters to business men in his
native place, Inquiring the price of a
tolerable sized firm. Several affection
ate letters came from the friends by re
turn post, and two or three a day have
come ever since, including one from an
old (and cold) sweetheart.
.♦» '
_ Au old coquette is like a rose
bush in winter—the flowers and leaves
having fallen oft', the beauty and Ira-
KS PtTBLISnED WSSXLT ST
.W. Bagby * A. ». Sl***t»r
terms or arßscniPTioN.
3 months « ■ *l 00
6 •' ITS
»• '« 12 '» , 800
Clubs of Aye, one year 12 50
Clubs often, one year, i 2 00
Clubs of twenty, one year, Si 00
SSr* Voluntary com niunlcutlons,containing
interesting or Important news,solicited from
any quarter.
S3-Rejected communications we cannot
undertake to return.
Sa-ObituWy notices exceeding Aye lln*t»
will be charged for at our regular advertls
ng rates.
S»- All letters on business connected with
he office, must be atddressed to the "Native
Virginian."
As the season Is coming on for sow
ing this crop we give a few directions
for planting, with description of somo
of the most approved varieties for farm
or garden. The turnip lias beert ewlti
rated as food for man and beast from
time immemorial. In England It is,
and in this country It will probably be
come, ono ot the staple farm products;
Early Whits Dutch.—A medium
sized flat turnip, ot quick growth.
Juicy and of excellent quality-
White Tor STBAr Lisvbd and Rs»'
Tor Str-af Lbavsd sre inferior to none
of the early sort; round, flat, and mldl
um size; very small tops, with but few
leaves. Growth upright, tap-root very
small.
White Glose.—Tlils is of the most
perfect globe shape; skin w.'iite and'
smooth ;ieaves dark green; strong and
uniform grower. Keeps well, and is
best suited to field culture.
Yellow Btons.-I sa very hard,
round turnip; top smalL Excellenttc*
keep.
Yellow Gi.088.--The best of the yel
low turnips for tablo use, and also a
fine variety for a field crop. Good size
and shape.
The fall crop is generally sown
broadcast, but much the larger yields
are obtained by drill culture.
Land newly cleared and burnt over
aid old pasture ground plowed during
the summer, and well manured and
ashed, will produce the clearest and
best turnip.
The Rcta Baoa or Swf.dk forms a
class more or less distinct in its many
varieties. They are all hard, close
grained, and endure a considerable
amount of cold without Injury. Keep
well with little trouble, but are not fit
for table use until towards spring.
They are mostly grown as a field crop,
and may be sown a little earlier than
the fall crop of turnips,
AmcJhg the most desirable varieties
are Skibvjso's RtTA Bag a and Whits-
Swede.
.»__——
FEED THE E&uTI TREES.

Jt must be apparent to every refiect
in_ person that the material round a
bout a fruit-tree, which renders impor
tant aid in the production ot fine trult
of any kind, must nccesssrily be more
or less exhausted after a vine, bush, or
tree, has produced abundant crops for
several successive seasons. For exam
nlo: A large pear-tree or apple-tree
will frequently yield from ten to sixteen
bushels of fruit annually. Many trcea
have produced more than twice these
quantities at one crop. »__.__.
Atter a few seasons, the material tnat
the roots must be supplied with, in or
der to develop fruit, will be more or
lessexhau-ted. For this reason, frui*
begins to fail: and the failure is often
attributed to an cast wind, or soaie
mysterious atinospheslc i nll v c nee,
when. In reality, the _iole cause Is sfar
vation, arising from an impoverished
"°The remedy is to leed the roots of all
kinds ol fruit trees with lime, wooii
ashes, gypsum, chipdirt, bones,fishes
and anything that will renovate au im
poverished soil. It is evident that
truit-trees cannot produce fine truii out
of nothing, or out of such mater.al sa
may be desirable for some other pur
pose.
ASTARAGUS CULTURE.
This now popular vegetable is a na
tive of the salt marshes of Europe and
Asia. The seed may be sown either
iv the spring or autumn, in drills about
one inch deep, and the rows wide e
noueh apart to admit at hoeing about
a foot. An ounce of seed M sufficient
for a drill fifty teet in length. Keep
the soil mellow and free from weetrs
during the summer, and In the fall or
succeeding spring the plants may be
set out in beds, about a loot apart each
way. The beds should be narrow, so
as to admit of cutting to the centre
without stepping upon them. Ibe
plants may be alowed to remain 'n the
seed bed until two years old. fcetore
winter sots in,cover the beds with about
four inches of manure. A good many
varieties are advertised, with but uttle-
I dift'ereneci. Salt is excellent manure
for asparagus, and efficient assistant to
the cultivator, keeping down the weeds
| with very little labor.
TOMATO_WOBM.
As there Is an unusually large num
ber, this season, or the pests known as
the tomato worm we would caution
those who are in the habit of taking
them from the plants witli their hands
sipiinst doing so. They are violently
poisonous—their bite or sting frequent
ly resulting tatally—a case having re
cently come to ©or knowledge, through
one of our exchanges, where death eu
sued within three hours atter theinllic
tion of the wound. We presume the
most of oor readers are acquainted
with t*iD appearance of the worm,
which Is green in color, corrugated.
one to four inches.
, * i
SHADE FOB PASSIES AND FUCHSIAS
These flowers sutler fiom full ex
posure to our hot suns. We suggest
Iss s cover under which they may have
comparative shade and a moisier soil,
a little, light overarching trellis, on
which some climbing plant or delicate
foliage, such as the groj-sjd-nut or cyp
ress vine, may be grown. In addition
to this, the ground may have a further
protection of mulch, prepared from hall
decomposed leaves. By these means,
full and continued bloom may be se-
I cured to pansies and the fuchsias
throughout their seasons.
TO PRESEBVE DOMESTIC WINES.
Wines after having been heated to
the temperature of 140 degrees l-\, will
neither turn, become diseased, nor de
posit sediment. This is the discovery
of M. Pasteur, of France, and its value
has been confirmed by Major Ander
son, the present proprietor of the cele
brated Longwortn wine house of Cin
cinnati. The process is also said to be
beneficial in restoring wines which are
degenerated.
.«..
A gentleman was describing to
Douglas Jerrold the story of his court
ship and marriage, how his wife had
i been brought up in a convent, and was
on the point ot taking the veil, when
his presence burnt upon her enraptured
sight, and site accepted him as her hus
band. Jerrold listened to tba end, and
quietly remark d: 'She simply thought
you better than nun.'
bSBBBB.™ - - -
M An exchange paper say.* %
"Truth is In typst, out is or outset ont
by more important matter."

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