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The argus. (Holbrook, Ariz.) 1895-1900, June 24, 1899, Image 1

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VOL. IV.
HOLBROOK, ARIZONA, SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1899.
NUMBER 29
V
i
f
Q
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Some Important Happenings in
the South
THAT MAY PLEASE OUR READERS
An Assortment of Newsy Events That
Occurred In our Midst that Cannot
Fall to Interest.
Oxnard is to have a $10,000 hotel.
The telephone has invaded Catalina
island.
The Pomona cannery has made an
other run of apricots.
Santa Ana now has a midnight-saloon-closing
ordinance.
The Ocean Park golf links will open
with a tournament June 24.
The condensed milk factory at Bu
ena Park is working night and day.
Anaheim's anti-slot machine ordi
nance will go into eeffct in two weeks.
The Tuna Club of Catalina is to fish
for the Associated Charities of Los An
geles.
Will A. Harris of Los Angeles will
deliver the Fourth of July oration at
Re dl and 3.
A convention of Southern California
farmers' clubs will be held in Pasadena
in September.
Baron Bismarck and Baron Corne
lius von Stegel are at the Hotel Coro
nado from Germany.
Riverside will appropriate $50 or
$100 for advertising during the com
ing N. E. A. convention.
All of the cows supplying milk to
the people of Pasadena are to be sub
jected to a tuberculean test. ,
Tamassas, the old Indian at the
Oceanside reservation, who was said to
be 114 years old, died last week.
The Pasadena citizens threaten to
bring suit against one T. H. Phillips,
who, it is alleged, guaranteed a rapture
cure and failed to carry out his con
tract.
Ventura Native Daughters will give
a ball, the proceeds to be devoted tow
arris a medal for thp California Vnlnn
teers in the Spanish and Philippine
wars.
Charles Williams, 23 years old, was
accidentally drowned at San Diego,
while T. Perry, the grandson of a min
ing millionaire, aged 45, committed
suicide by the same method.
Los Angeles and San Diego, both
boasting serious bicycle accident on
the same day! Really this is delight
ful. This proves that the scorcher
and human depravity are universal
ills, and afflict alike, the just and the
njust.
A call for 300 date palm leaves and
2000 fan-palm leaves has been issued
by F. Q. Story, chairman of the Com
mittee on Decorations, who will direct
the work of adorning the city of Los
Angeles in honor of the delegates to
the N. E. A.
A Southern Pacific surveying party
is in the field between Anaheim and
Whittier in the La Habra valley. The
intention apparently is to lay a line
from Anaheim through Fullerton
across La Habra valley to join the
Whittier branch of the Southern Pa-
cific.
The absence of the fool killer from
San Diego, when the recent mining
craze has cropped out has made pos-
sible a continuation of the tragic story
of the Yukon valley. The cursed doc
trine of something for nothing con
tinues to roll up or lay out its vie
tims.
If the expert fishermen continue to
haul out the finned denizens of the wa
ters as they are reported to be doing
at Catalina, and the coast resorts gen-
erally, there will not be enough left
to furnish any recreation for the com.
mon people when their vacation time
comes.
Five thousand tons of apricots,
plant to can them, $30,000 cash in her
treasury, cheap electric power and
light, and saloons open till midnight,
make the prospects of the Santa Ana
resident bright and pleasing in the
superlative degree. Los Angeles
Record. .
The San Bernardino Times-Index
"notes that . "The county clerk is kept
busy issuing marriage certificates."
Now this is the sort of news that peo
pie like to read, for, as all the world
loves a lover, so does all the world
know that certain prosperity must
be in a neighborhood where marriages
are plenty.
Redlands will parade on the Fourth
of July. Happy thought! When the
grand marshal tangles his sword in
his legs and falls and steps on him
self, how easy to attribute it to the
slippery, oil-covered roads? And Red
lands is a prohibition town, too. Great
are the bibulous resources of the av
erage Redlander.
The presentation to Colonel Bang-
ham of Pasadena of a beautiful sword
and equipments as an evidence of re
spect and esteem by his fellow citizens
is an act to be commended. These
things serve to keep alive that military
esprit that has brought such invalu
able results to our arms, and covered
the nation in glory.
At last, at last! Hueneme is in the
swim with a Fourth of July celebra
tion. It has been said that the pro
gressive element of that paradise by
the sea was so thoroughly soaked in
salt water that they could not pull
their shirts over their heads for fish
bones. The celebration most effectively
knocks out this libelous story. Los
Angeles Times.
Anaheim is in the line of progress
with both feet. One foot is on the de
spicable slot machine, which must
leave town for keeps in two weeks
time, and the other is planted on the
happy fact that perfect red cherries
have been raised on the Eyman ranch,
and many acres more will be planted
to them. Canned cherries would be 3
source of great income.
San Diego is raising a fund of $1000
with which to entertain the visiting
teachers who go that way in July.
The Reception Committee of her
Chamber of Commerce has taken up
headquarters at Hotel Vincent in Los
Angeles, and in several other particu
lars the people of the southern sea
port have evinced their deep interest
in the great event of next month.
Pomona, according to reports, has a
gang of night-prowling, whiskey-drink
ing boys who ássault peaceful people
and think it smart. When these fool
ish boys find themselves lined up
against the real battle of life, they will
have abundant opportunity and cause
to bitterly regret such idiocy. Prosti
tuted years and powers form a bitter
legacy to mature manhood.
President Ferguson of Pomona Col
lege deserves hearty support in his en
deavor to raise $50,000 as an addition
to the present endowment fund. The
college has grown and strengthened
healthily of late and promises to be
come apotent factor of the intellec
tual and social advancement of the
State. The cojlege is founded on lib
eral lines and is full of the spirit of
growth.
A little girl of Los Angeles, whose
family was about to move to Arizona,
and who had heard that country spo
ken of as forlorn and particularly God
forsaken place, was saying her prayers
at her mother's knee the
night before their intended
departure. She said all she had been
taught, and then, with peculiar empha
sis, she said: "Now good-by, God, for
tomorrow we are going to Arizona."
Visalia had three pretty contestants
for Goddess of Liberty on the ap
proaching Fourth of July. In the in
terests of harmony and patriotism 11
three of the strikingly beautiful creat
ures .were elected and all three will pa
rade. To make it a red-letter day for
the triune goddess the committee al
lowed each one $10 for a gown. The
gigantic intellect that wrought this
unique result will never die bald
headed.
The new cannery Is not unalloyed
happiness to the people of Ventura,
as, according to the Signal, the can
nery management is taking a fall out
of the people in the matter of prices.
That is a game two can play at, and
the men who run the cannery will find
themselves the under dog without the
pitiful tribute of sympathy, for it is
natural for a Californian to hate any
thing that savors of trusts, and the
Ventura plant comes near that mark.
The City Recorder of Pasadena
adopted a novel method of correcting
an unruly boy when he took him home
with him and treated him- to music,
good things to cat, etc., but it worked
well, and if it were possible to first try
a similar method on all children there
is no doubt that a much larger propor
tion of these youthful offenders would
be saved from lives of crime. Never
theless, there are boys whose peculiar
temperaments make them unrespons
ive to anything but a good official
spanking.
The Newsboys Association of San
Diego met and adopted resolutions of
sympathy for the family of the late
Thomas M. Gardiner. The American
newsboy is a compound of cusseddness
and tenderness, which makes him a
unique factor in metropolitan life.
Himself the center of undeserved an
athema and petty persecution.his heart
is tender to those who are, or have
been kind to him, and, though he
would scorn a truce when a fight is on,
he would give his last nickel and
greatest service to one who remem
bered him. The memory of the late
Thomas Gardiner may have more pre
tentious laurels to grace it, but none
so far from self and near to God as
this tribute of the poor newsies of
San Diego.
PACIFIC COAST NEWS
Important Information Gathered
Around the Coast.
ITEMS OF GENERAL INTEREST
A Summary of late Event That Are
Boiled Dots to Snlt our Busy
Keaden.
Fresno The first carload of green
deciduous fruit shipped from Fresno
county the present season, was shipped
by the Porter Brothers Company to
Chicago. The shipment consisted of
pears, Simoni prunes, Burbank plums
and Tragedy prunes.
The Navy Department has ordered
the trial by court-martial of Paymas
ter Willis B. Wilcox, now under arrest
at Mare Island navy yard. The charge
against him is "scandalous conduct
tending to the destruction of good
morals," and the single specification
alleges that he was drunk at Mare Is
land.
The Pinkerton detectives, armed and
in uniform, have been ordered by the
Chief of Police to keep oft the streets
of Portland, Ore. The order is made
under the state law passed by the last
legislature, prohibiting armed bodies
of men, or armed patrols other than
those appointed by law, from parading
upon-lhe streets of the city.
The altruistic wave has lighted on
Fresno sufficiently heavy to permeate
the guileless breast of John Chinaman.
The Chinaman summoned an under
taker to his bunk house to bury a
child. The undertaker demurred on
the reasonable ground that the child
was not dead. . "Oh, he go die velly
quick; you likee, you take him now!"
San Francisco The Ohio Society of
California has sent to President Mc
Kinley an invitation engraved in a
plate of gold, asking him to become
the guest of that organization in this
city. The society is already raising a
fund for his entertainment, it being
generally believed that the chief exec
utive will visit the Pacific coast later
in the year.
In Spokane, Wash., they arrest peo
pie who throw waste paper and things
into the streets. If such a law were
made and enforced in Los Angeles, it
would be necessary to build a fence
about the city, station a hurry-up wag
on and a fat policeman at the gate,
and otherwise copy the city jail, for
this miserable habit is as general as it
is offensive.
The Santa Cruz Sentinel tells of a
young man who left Soquel and went
to war, being engaged in the battles in
Luzon, and of his return and immedi
ate resumption of everyday common
farm labor. It required a patriot to
fight in Luzon, but a true hero to stur
dily resume the arts of peace, and set
so high a mark for thousands of others
to copy when they shall return from
the front.
Governor Richards of Wyoming, has
ordered a detachment of the state mil
itia stationed at Buffalo to take part
in the pursuit of the Union Pacific
train robbers. The latest report from
the outlaws located them on T. K.
Mountain, one of the spurs of the Big
Horn mountains, north of the Hole-in
the-Wall country. The Nebraska blood
hounds are expected to reach the scene
soon and the speedy capture of the rob
bers is predicted.
The San Francisco police arrested
eight boys about 12 years old belong.
ing to a gang . who call themselves
"The Forty Thieves. These young van
dais and thieves had stripped of all
their furnishings fourteen passenger
coaches of the Southern Pacific Com
pany standing on a siding and had sold
their plunder to a junk dealer. The
damage to the cars amounts to $1500,
but the boys say the junk dealer gave
tnem only $7 for it.
The Fresno Republican says: "Th
nickel-in-the-slot machines are no
more in Sacramento, and the first con
viction has been obtained in Los An
geles under the new prohibitory ordi
nance. Thus the good work goes on,
But it has not even commenced in
Fresno." "While the lamps of life,
etc. The great forces known to be in
reserve in the raisin valley must come
to the rescue and range Fresno on the
same side with her more fortunate
neighbors.
A Washington dispatch says that the
President has not yet come to a deter
mination about his long-talked-of
western trip. He said to a senator
that he could not now say when he
would start west or how far he would
go. The Pacific coast people continue
to flood the President with invitations
and from every western state there, is
the keenest desire to see the President
It is now said a grand review of Phil
ippine troops would have been held at
San Francisco had the President not
promised to do this at St Paul.
The San Francisco Examiner tells of
two policemen of that city who went
on a vacation and found a rattle
snake's egg in the brush. The police
men put the egg in a box of lime to
hatch it. In the morning they found
the mother rattler at the box, she
having traced her egg fully two miles
by its scent. This is a case of mental
strabismus and can be accounted for
only as a result of the late earthquake.
It is an unquestioned fact, as solid as
the trend of the magnetic needle, that
the breath of a San Francisco police
man will not only charm a rattler, but
replenish its stock of deadly venom as
well, and this explains how the moth
er snake smelled her way to the egg.
Not even the torrid sun of Lake coun
ty can feaze such a breath.
Jose Barrillas and Kate Kinsey, the
one a relative of Gen. Barrillas of
Guatemala, and the other the daugh
ter of a well-to-do merchant In San
Francisco, determined to marry. Being
under age they thought it the right
thing to have a tugboat marriage. They
had the tugboat marriage. This was
two years ago. Almost from the day
of the marriage to the present the
young people have been separated
and the bride disowned by her hus
band's people. After two years, and
when he became of age, the young
man, loyal and loving and true,
claimed his bride. They are happy,
etc., but the heartache and mental tor
ture of the two years will have its ef
fect on the bride's life, and raises the
question of the wisdom of runaway
marriages.
HER LATEST GIFT.
San Francisco Before leaving for
Europe Mrs. Jane Stanford prepared
two deeds, which were placed on rec
ord conveying valuable real estate to
Stanford University. The property
consists of 1700 acres in Lassen county
and 160 acres in Tehama county. All
of this land was recently purchased by
Mrs. Stanford to seenre valuable
water rights and grazing land for big
flocks of sheep owned by her and
which are to be transferred to the Vina
ranch, now owned by the University.
All this is in addition to the recent en
dowment of over $11,000,000.
By this latest gift, Mrs. Stanford has
transferred all her realty to the Uni
versity savea house and lot in Sacra
mento, the residence of the Senator
and his family in early days and par
ticularly at the outset of his career as
a railway magnate. She will eventu
ally give that property also.
Mrs. Stanford is now on her way to
Europe for a three months' tour. While
away, it is said, she contemplates in
vesting $1,000,000 in rare bric-a-brae
for the University museum.
PERKINS WANTED THE CORONER
TO BURY HIM.
Fresno Fred Perkins, a young man
about 24 years of age, died at the
county hospital last week from what
is supposed to be a case of looking up
on too much wine when it is red.
Perkins had been on a protracted
spree for the past two weeks, and last
Thursday he called upon Coroner Long
and requested the Coroner to bury him
Upon being told that he must have a
death certificate to show that he was
dead, Perkins called upon numerous
doctors about town requesting them to
fill out a blank death certificate that he
had obtained.
The young man had been employed
as porter at the Hughes hotel up till
about two weeks ago.
Perkins claimed to be a cousin of
Lieutenant Perkins of the U. S. S,
Philadelphia.
The inquest will be held late this af
ternoon.
HE SAW A BOY'S FALL IN THE
LENS OF A KODAK.
Spokane, Wash. Douglas Martin,
11 years old, son of Lewis I. Martin
fell into the Spokane river at the big
whirlpool and his body is still missing.
The lad was sitting on a cofferdam, his
feet hanging over the whirlpool. He
was missed and workmen thought he
had gone home, but a Kodak enthusi
ast, who was taking a snapshot at that
portion of the river, including the cof
ferdam, while focusing his instrument
saw the boy's body pass across the pic
ture on the sighting lens. He was the
only eye-witness to the tragedy.
FROM FOREIGN LANDS.
A London cablegram 6ays the
Church Missionary Society confirms
the reports of the trouble at Kieng-King-Fu,
adding that two native mis
sionaries were killed.
NEW YORK The survey for the
submarine cable which will connect
Germany with the United States by the
way of the Azores was practically com
pleted when the cable-laying steamer
Britannic came into port. The line,
when completed, will cost nearly $5,
000,000. The longest stretch of the ca
ble between the Azores and New York
City will measure 2279 miles.
niNES AND MINING.
A MINE CURIOSITY.
A. J. Shotwell, of Gila Bend, Ariz.,
with Mark Chartrand, A. F. Hoffer,
James R. Kineally, William H. Hof
meister, Prof. A. W. Waldauer and
Robert Stockton of St Louis, have in
corporated under the laws of Arizona,
the Arizona United Copper Mining
company with a capital stock of $10,
000,000. Mr. Mark R. Chartrand, one of
the incorporators, says the company
owns claims covering five acres in Pi
ma county, Ariz., fifty miles south of
Gila Bend. One claim is a hill 225
feet high, which by actual measure
ment shows 3,500,000 cubic yards of
copper, gold and silver ores, or about
8,000,000 tons. It is the intention,
Chartrand says, to erect one of the
largest milling plants in the country
on the property, and Shotwell has gone
to Denver to buy the first installment
of machinery.
THE BLACK WARRIOR MINES.
The Globe, Ariz., Silver Belt say3
that a careful survey and measure
ment of 10 per cent, copper ore now
opened up on two of the twenty-five
claims owned by the Black Warrior
Copper Company shows 20,000 tons of
metallic copper, worth, at Globe, at
present values, $300 per ton, which
would give a total gross value of $6,-
000,000, or $4,000,000 net profit after al
lowing $2,000,000 for expenses. It is
expected that the new smelting and
leaching plant will be ready for work
about July 15 next.
RICH STRIKE IN GRAVEL.
The San Francisco Post reports that'
rich gravel has been struck by the
Dutch Flat Blue Lead Mining Com
pany close to the town of Dutch Flat,
in Placer county. The statement is
made that 'about seventy feet of the
"lead" will produce about $10 to the
ton, and about four hundred feet will
go from $2.50 to $5 per ton, the depth
of the gravel being from twenty to
thirty feet. As a result of the strike
the company has ordered a ten-stamp
mill for the mine.
RICH ORE.
One of the richest discoveries re
corded in the northern part of the
state is the property of F. C. Cullers,
near Arastraville. The vein averages
one foot in thickness and mills $50 to
the ton in free gold. The ore is being
crushed in a Sweepstake mill, capacity
of which is four tons daily. One hun
dred tons have been put through this
mill and its returns were in excess of
$5000.
MINING NOTES.
The Tucson, Ariz., Citizen, has news
of a rich lead strike about two miles
from Helvetia camp, Pima county,
Ariz.
The discovery of an extensive cinna
bar deposit two miles northwest of
Oak Bar, Siskiyou county, Cal., is re
ported. Development work in the Delhi mine
near Columbia Hill is progressing most
satisfactorily and the force of men has
been increased.
A 125-light dynamo is being placed
at the Providence mine. With it the
dwellings, boarding houses, office, etc.,
will be illuminated.' The Providence
sawmill, situated about four miles
from tbe mine, is in full operation.
Receiver Paulv, in his eighteenth re
port of the Golden Cross mines, San
Diego county, Cal., gives the clean-up
for last April at $13,117.11. The pay
roll for the month was $5800 and the
balance in the company's hands $18,
924.19. At the Gerrymander mine sinking is
still going on in. the shafu A crew of
six men is employed and additions will
be made as the work continues. The
prospects for this property are excel
lent and it will no doubt develop into a
paying mine.
A new copper deposit has lately been
found west and close to the old Har
rison ranch, above Whiskytown. A
man by the name of Wade Hampton is
one of the lucky discoverers. The ore
looks well, and doubtless carries both
silver and gold.
The metal output of Utah during the
year 1898 was $14,654,235, of which
$2.372,442 was gold, $6,494.275 silver,
$524,542 copper, and lead $3,162,375. So
far as known, - no placer gold was
mined in that state last year, but prep
arations are in progress to open placer
mines near Bingham.
Three experts of Marcus Daly, one
of the most prominent figures in the
copper combine, are at Vancouver se
curing options on all the leading cop
per properties in the province. The
work was done before a shrewd min
ing engineer discovered they were
working for Daly, suspicion being
aroused owing to their ability to
write big checks and make gigantlo
propositions.

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