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The St. Johns herald. (St. Johns, Apache County, Arizona Territory [Ariz.]) 1885-1903, June 11, 1885, Image 1

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PRESS COMMENTS
On the Recent Outbreak of the
Apache Indians.
The Inefficiency of the Regular
Army to Subdue Them.
Tombstone Record : Gen. Crook
is eorelv srieved over President
Cleveland's last order, wherein he
demands the suppression of this
Indian outbreak and the extermi
nation of the renegades, as it pre
vents :i treaty wilh the darlings;
and if there is one thing Crook
knows less about than another, it
is treating with Geronimo and his
pals, as proven by past experience.
The people of the frontier have had
enough of Crook's soft-shelled In
dian treaties.
Albuquerque Journal : This is
the fourth time that Geronimo has
escaped from the reservation where
he is fed, clothed and cared for by
the United States government.
Each time he has gone forth on an
. crran i of blood. It has been the
same story every time men mur
dered, women outraged, little chil
dren hacked to pieces, houses burn
ed cattle stolen, the future for
prominent settlements thrown
back for years. Three times the
troops of the United States have
pursued, captured and brought him
back.
Alta California : When the hos
tile Apaches approached the town
of Doming volunteers were called
for among the citizens, but, as the
telegraph explains, "o wince to the
lack of arms, ammunition, saddleF,
etc.. only a" posse of ten men could
be gotten together. In a sparsely
settled country like this it is almost
impossible to arm and equip a par
ty of men on short notice." We
had lip idea that arms and ammu
nitjim were so scarce in a New
lexico town. Down there, where
every live mining camp has a man
for breakfast, and where "bad men"
sire as plenty as blackberries, such
a scarcity of weapons just at.a crit
ical moment could not have been
anticipated. It is a pity that this
untoward circumstance prevented
the exterminating of the Apaches.
The Tombstone : When the War
Department issued Crook an order
the other day to call for all the
troops he wanted, he telegraphed
tmck that he had all he wanted.
We say that he has not Let him
imt in soldiers here by the thou
sands and surround these Indians
and exterminate them all men,
women and children. We call upon
the press of Arizona and New
Mexico to stand by us in this fight
.agauisi the Apaches and against
this Christ of the frontier, and if
he goes down in the Sierra Madres
and makes terms with these red
handed savages, and attempts to
return to the reservation with them,
to call upon the people to exter
minate them before they reach
there, and to exterminate Gen.
Crook or any one who dares say
nay.
Prescott Journal: A dispatch
from Silver City, New Mexico says
although the Indians have appar
ently left the immedhite vicinity of
this eity, many fresh trails h&ve
been seen in the country about
here. Trails are mostly small,
indicating that the bands are
broken up and wantfering through
out the country, doubtless seeking
a way out. The people are thor
oughly aroused and it seems im
possible for the Indians, to get
back to the reservation. If the
fail to escape to Mexico, it is prob
able that the campaign will last
sixty to ninety days, with the kill
ing of isolated prospectors and
ranchers wherever the Indians
can come upon them. Military
inefficiency to cope with the In
dians on the warpath is demon
strated fully,and much indignation
is expressed by the people. Cap
tain Overton is severely condemned
ST. dSNS,
i for his failure to engage the hos-
tiles near Alma at good oppor
tunity. Most of the women and
children die believed to have gone
south, while the bands of bucks
keep the attention of the troops
elsewhere;
Tucson Citizen : Tcswin, the
production from which the present
Indian raid is said to have arisen,
is as much an article of mystery
to the general reader as the ingre
dients of boarding house hash. As
made by the Indians it is a crude
and weak fermentation, producing
intoxication only by imbibing
large quantities after a prolonged
fast. They remove the hulls of a
quantity of corn by the use of
lime and ashes, then s.oak the
grains for several days and grind
to a coarse meal. This is placed
in an olla and allowed to attain a
state of brisk fermentation, when
the ingredients are briskly stirred
and the meal drank with the li
quor. The Indians usually ab
stain from food for several days be
fore a tcswin spree, in order to get
the intoxicating effect, butpvhen
the result is obtained itis the cra
ziest of all drunks. It is often
made in a much better manner, by
even some Mexicans in this city.
It is usual for them to add flavor
ings that gives it a more pleasant
and agreeable taste.
Silver City (N. M.) Sentinel
The direct responsibility for every
murder committed by these In
dians is upon Gen. Crook. Forty
eight hours before Geronimo left
the reservation the Lieutenant in
immediate charge of them tele
graphed to Crook that the' were
preparing to leave, and asking for
authority to put them under ar
rest. This was peremptorily re
fused. Then six hours before the
left, the Lieutenant again tele
graphed for such authority, stating
that the Indians were on the point
of Qparture, and immediate ac
tion was necessary. To this, after
a long and unnecessary delay,
came the reply authorizing forci
ble detention. As might have been
expected, the authority came too
late. Geronimo had been gone
just three hours. Aside from this
direct responsibility, there is this :
Crook recently reported to Wash
ington that these Indians were
quiet and satisfied on the reserva
tion, and wore disposed to engage
in agriculture and pastorial pur
suits. The result shows that in
this, Crook misrepresented, for the
signs of restlessness and dissatis
faction which the Chiricahuas even
then gave were unmistakable, and
must have been within the Gener
al's knowledge, as they were un
doubtedly within the knowledge of
his subordinates. Furthermore,
when Crook brought Geronimo and
his band from the Sierra Mad res,
he became their sponser, and guar
anteed their future good conduct.
Look at the matter from any stand
point, and the responsibility rests
upon Crook ; and in nine years of
newspaper work on the frontier
this is the first occasion on which
we have really felt that his acts
called for condemnation. We now
say : D n Crook and his policy,
of which we are reaping the re
sults. Globe Democrat: Geronimo
(lier-ron-i-mo) is the head chief
of the Apaches, the most untrust
worthy Indians in the west, and
the leaders in nearly all tho out
breaks that have made bloody his
tory in Arizona and New Mexico
for years. Formerly the Apaches
were powerful and controlled the
country in which they have latterly
been but little better than prison
ers by virtue of their reputation
for fighting and craft. The Chey
ennes to the north were their ene
mies, not always victorious nor
greatly fearod. Since the settle
ment of their territory has begun
to grow large the Apaches have
grown cunning rather than daring, I
APACKE COTJtfTYj ARIZONA
and have only gone upon raids
with murderous intent when some
special circumstance roused them.
Tucson Tailings : It is reported
from Deming that the soldiers have
captured thirty marauding Indians
and are on the way to Fort Apache
with their captives. That is, thirty
red murderers, finding themselves
in a tight place have surrendered
to the troops, to be taken back to
the reservation until thev feel like
breaking out again.
It is just two years ago this month
since General Crook brought the
"subdued Apaches" back from the
Sierra Madres. For God's sake,doi.'t
subdue and bring them back any
more. Southwestern Stockman.
Clifton Clarion : For the death
of every citizen who has been num
bered with those who have swelled
the roll of the unfortunates since
the late Indian outbreak, Brigadier
General Crook is indirectly respon
sible. His temporizing policy has
encouraged the savages to renew
and repeat the diabolical acts
characteristic of the blood-thirsty
Apaches. Only a few weeks since
we cordially greeted friends from
the Blue, and their coming was
ever pleasing and pleasantly re
membered. Some of those who
were welcome visitors in the sanc
tum of the Clarion have made
their last call. . The pets of the
military commander" have sum
moned them from time to eternity.
General Crook has pampered and
encouraged the fiends, and his pe
culiar pet, Geronimo, who captur
ed him in the mountains of Mexi
co, is now bidding defiance to mili
tary authority, and with his ma
rauding band marks his trail with
blood. How long shall such be
the case? Awake, arise or be for
ever fallen ! Proclaim the fact that
Crook is a failure, and let the peo
ple of Arizona realize that their
safety depends upon their own j
strong arms.
RAILROAD NEWS.
Messrs. Wilson and Hamilton,
eastern railroad men, who propose
to build our branch railroad, arriv
ed in Prescott last evening. In
coming from the Atlantic & Pacific
to Prescott, they were driven over
the proposed route of the road and
on arrival here expressed them
selves well pleased with what they
had seen. They say they are pre
pared to commence work at once
on the road if they find the other
representations, which have been
made to them, as fully verified as
has been what they have already
seen. A aisuatcii was also received
from Mr. Bullock last night saying
that he is also prepared to build
the road. Prescott Journal.
THE ASSESSOR'S BLANKS.
Ye honest ranchman wears a
puzzled look now-.i-days. The fact
is, that visit from the assessor who
left a big blank to be filled out bv
each of them has a good deal to do
with it, and thus the rancher rumi
nates : "Lemme see, thars the two-year-olds,
thirteen of them, guess
I'll ring 'em in with the yearlings;
thars them old cows I brung from
Missoury four years ago, theni'll go
in with the two's ; an' them heifers
which war yearlings for two years
past, guess they'll go fur two's again
an' dang my buttons, them little
runts of cuyuses will have to stand
the yearling racket, too ; Lord ! sum
on them is mor'n thirteen-year old,
fuz I know; an' mus'ntforgit them
pigs, twenty-seven on 'em, guess.
I'll forgit 'em ; lemme me see, that?
a hundred an' seventy-two head,
not counting the old woman an'
the kids, that'll make 'em pesky
taxes seven dollar' an' six bitF.
Mighty hard fur a man to live
nowadays, somehow. Eagle Eock
(Idaho) Register.
The legislature of Tennessee
have passed a law prohibiting the
preaching of polygamy in that
state. -
TERRITORY? THURSDAY
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
Tflr L. VAN HOBN.
ATTOENE Y-AT-LA W ,
HOLBROOK, A, T.
JjJ M.SANFORD,
ATTOENEY-AT-LAW,
rRESCOTT, A. T.
JJARRIS BALDWIN, .
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ST. JOHNS. A. T.
Land business a specialty. Office in Court House.
JJR.D. J. BRANNEN,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
FLAGSTAFF, A. T.
4-Office and Drug Store Opposite R. R. Depot.
Will give prompt attention to calls from any
point on the line of the A & P. R. R,
ALFRED RUIZ,
CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT;
RECORDER APACHE COUNTY,
AND IT. S. COMMISSIONER.
Special atrention given to the examination
and transfer of titles to Real Estate in the county.
Office in Court House, St. Johns, Arizona.
jyj V. HOWARD,
" ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ST. JOHNS, A. T.
Office at Court noues.
r S. BUNCH,
ATTO RNE Y-AT-L A W,
ST. JOHNS, A. T.
? Office in Court Ilouse.
Q L. GUTTERSON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ST. JOHNS, A. T.
j-Office in Court Ilouse.
ELLS HENDERSHOTT,
ATTORNE Y-A T-L A W,
ALBUQUERQUE. N. M.
c,
BliCKER,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
SPRINGERVILLE. A. T.-
M.ZUCK,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
HOLBROOK, A. T.
r-G. NORR1S,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
FLAGSTAFF. A. T.
J. C. II EKNDON. J. J. 1I.UVKISS.
JJERNDON & HAWKINS,
ATTORNE YS-AT-LAW,
PRESCOTT, A. T.
WH1 . practice in the District Court of
Apuchu County.
J W.SPAFFORD,
DEALER AND BROKER IN REAL
ESTATE, MIXING AND COL
LECTING AGENT.
flagstaff, a. t.
TSFropprtics visited examined and report
ed on. for purties living at n distance, in Yav
apai. Mohave and Apache counties. 1'arlicu
lar attention liii to Government claims.
HOUSE.
F. M. ZUCK, Proprietor
HOLBROOK, A. T.
JR3""This house is neatly furnished and 'has
large, airy room?, and its tables are supplied with
ill the market af'ords. Stage leaves the house
laity for Ft. Apache.
J. F. HAWKS,
RESTAURANT,
Everything New, Neat and
Clean. Jleals at all Reasonable
Hours and Trices. Nothing Fi
ner in the Territory. Fresh fish
and oysters in their season.
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZ.
RAILROAD AVE.." OPPO. DEPOT.
HOLBROOK LIVERY, FEED
AND-
, SALE STABLE,
NATHAN BARTH - PROPRIETOR.
Splendid outfits for parties go-ng-to
the Petrified Forest
Saddle animals, buggy teams
on call.
2a?" Stock kept by day, week or
ionger time at reasonable rates.
Hay and grain, for sale in large
or small quantities.
UJ?' Freight and express teams on
hort notiee.
- . .i B. I. TERRILL, SIANAGER.
JUNE lh 1885.
LOWENTHAX & METERS,.
Successors to Santiago Haca .
Wholesale -
LIQUOR DEALER,
Albtlquerque N. M.
IMPORTER OF FOREIGN WINES AND LIQUORS;
THE
Largest and Most Complete Stock in New Mexico.- '
FULL STOCK BAR GOODS;
SOLS AGENT FOR THB CELEBRATED VAL BUTZ'S BOTTLED BEER-
The Ayer Lumber Company.
OF FLAGSTAFF ....
Have for the accommodation of the people of Holbt'&ok and vicinity -on
or near the line of the Atlantic fc Pacific road established a depot
for the sale of LUMBER in all varieties produced at the Great Mill
in the San Francisco Mountains. DRESSED LUMBER of all qual
ities PLAIN LUMBER of all kinds and dimensions.-
DOORS, SASHES, BLINDS,- LATH, SHINGlES, BATTENS
AND MOULDINGS. :
The prices for all kinds of stock will bo the same' as' if
delivered at the mill with freight added.- Office arid
yard Central Avenue, West End;
O. P. CHAFFEE, Agent,
iiropean Hotel.
C. E. BONSALL
BEST ROOMS IN THE-GITY. MEALS SERVED
IN ALL PARTS OF THE HOUSE.
CLUB & BILLIARD ROOMS.
Opposite Union Depot.
Albuquerque - - - - - Mew Mexico
Albuquerque National Bank,-
Albuquerque - - - - New Mexico
A General Banking Business Transacted,
Louis Hl-xixg,
Joseph Bell,
W. K.P -Wilson,.
Louis Huning
JnsErii Bell Associate Justice Supreme Court New Mexico.
W. K. P. Wilson
w! A. Dp.akb
Edmckd H. Smith
Stkickland Auhkigut
Geo. F. Chalandeh
20,0005000 ACRES OF LAUD FOR
Sale in New Mexico and Arizona,
THE ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY',
The Land Grant of this Company, in alternate
sections extends entirely across the Territories of
New Mexico arid Arizona, between the 34th and
36th degrees of north latitude. It is 650 miles long
and 80 miles wide and includes some of the 5est
grazinc lands of both Territories. In the valleys
are many desirable tracts ofr.zricuhural land, sus
ceptible of irrigation. A sufficiency of water has
been found wherever cattle and sheep have been
grazed, and large herds have been grazed in the
country ever since the coming of the Mexicans
Wells have been sunk and good water has been
obtained.
A stream of limning water, the San Jos-, rises
near the summit of the SSierre Madre, and runs 75
miles eastward to the Rio Puerco, and the compa
nj's road follows the whole length of us valley.
1 here are numerous fine valleys opening into the
valley of the San Jose, flanked bv grassy and woo
ded hills, upon which there is an open growth of
small cedar and pinon. 1 here is ane nsivebelt
of good pine timber on the mountains, near the
railroad, and good springs are found on both slopes
oftheSierre Madre. 'lhere is a large coal field
west of Fort Wingate which has been fully ex
plored, and which will afford labor for a large pop
ulation, there are also coal deposits on the eastern
slope of the Sierra Madre. Many varietiesof buil
ding stone are found in great abundance along the
line of the road.
In Arizona the grazing areas are supplied wtih
good water, and the United States Surveyors, who
made thettfficial surveys of the country, say they
are as cood, if not better, than those of Wyomins
and Montana. The Navajo Indians grow corn
without irrigation, in the valreys of the Puerco of
the West, on the Company's lands, and in the val
ley of the Little Colorado, also on the line of the
road, good crops of corn, sorghum, oats, barley,
and garden vegetables are grown by irrigation-,
the finest of potatoes, oats, wheat, barley and gar
den vegetables of larce size and fine quality have
been successfully grown without irrigation on
WATCHES AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
LIST OF WALT HAM AND ELGIN WATCHES IN 3-oz SILVER CASES NAMED :
5 I hKLlNii, 7 Jewels,
WILLIAM KLLKRY, ix Jewels,
P, S. BAR'l LE'l T improved! is Jp.wels,
APPLETON TRACY & CO., improved
pat. hair surinsr. adiusted.
E. W. RAVMONl'J. 15 Jewels, pat. reg.
ALL STEM WINDERS.
3 The same movements in heavier cases, whh Gold joints, from S3 to 5 extra. Howard; Hamp
den, Rockford or any other movement in Gold or Silver cases at similar prices. Remember that
every watch is examined and regulated by myself and a writterrguarantee given.
Noteaddress: ARTHUR EVERITY, '
Practical v atchmaker.
P. S. Any watch sent C, O. D. with priv
ilee of examination.
NUMBER XXII.
Proprietor,
OFFICERS.
President.
Virp-Presidcmv
Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
. . .of L. & II. Iluning, Los Lunas, N. M.-
formerly Cashier Central Bank.-
Chief Engineer A. &P. R. R.-
Clerk U. S. District Court.-
Physician.-
Asst. Supt. A. & P. R. R.
the slopes of the San Francisco mountains!
On these mountains there is an extpnsive timber
belt, diversified by beautiful valleys and parks',
with good water and wonderful canons throuhg
which the road passes. In fact, the whole of the
country traversed by the road is very picturesque
and beautiful, and many towns are being- built
along its route.
The Valley of the Rio Grande, at Albuquerqe
is 5,000 feet above the sea, and the passes-of the
Sierra Madre and the San Francisco mountains, in
Arizona, have elevations of 7,300, witha depres
sion at Winslow. on the Little Colorado, where
the altitude is 5.000 feet ; the climate is mild and
saiubrous. Cattle and sheep graze throughout
the year and do not need to be sheltered of grai 1
fed during the winter. The nights are cool' during
the summer.
The Company is now prepared to make sales
of its grazing lands in quantities of 50,000 acres
or more, at prices ranging from one dollar (or
even less for larger quantities.) to one dollar and
a half an acre, upon payment of one-fourth the
purchase value at date of contract of sale the
remainder in payments as may beagreed upon,
bearing six per cent interest ; and irrigable agri
cultural lands in tracts of forty acres or more.
The belt of the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad
Land Grant includes the only available grazing
land in the country south of the Missouri River
that can be purchased in large areas ; and the
section of country through whieh this road passes
will become the best beef producing region of
the United States.
Maps of the Land Grant will be forwarded on
application and properly acredited persons desire
ing to inspect grazing lands, with a view to pur
chase and extablish stc ck ranches, will be gvien
facilities for that purpose.
J. A. WILLIAMSON.
THOS. S. SEDGWICK;. Commissioner
Land Agent 87 Milk St., Boston, Mass
Albuquerque, N. M.
5ie.oo.
7.60.
patent reg.
15 Jewels, t
25,00.
42,00V
'47.60.
pat. reg.
adjusted,
Railroad Avenue,
: 4-
0
Albuquerque, N. M.
Mm
Fin;

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