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The St. Johns herald. (St. Johns, Apache County, Arizona Territory [Ariz.]) 1885-1903, June 18, 1885, Image 1

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VOLUME I.
ST. JOHNS, APACHE COUNTY, ARIZONA TERRITORYTHURSDAT, JUNE 18, 1885.
NUMBER XXIII.
MORE MORtvIONS.
-Another consignment of Mor
mon converts arrived Tuesday.
They were brought down from Og
den on a special, consis$ing of
five coaches and a baggage car.
They were met at the depot and
hugged by the relatives who had
preceded them. A Tribune rep
resentative also met them, but no
hugging ensued from the meeting.
There were about 200 of them,
mostly subjects of the Queen, who
ought to be thankful that they are
inUtah instead of Merrie Eng
land. They are of about the same
average quality as those who have
preceded them, and will make
good material for a Tabernacle
congregation.
Many incidents occurred that
"were rather amusing to a casual
spectator. For instance, Sullivan,
the Cliff House representative, was
wandering around among them
looking for relatives, A little tow
headed Johnny Bull one of a
brood of seven attracted his at
tention, and in a fit of generositj
he pulled forth his last nickle and
gave it to the child. The seven
youngsters immediately swarmed
around him, shouting at the top of
their voices : "Here's grandfather."
They clung to his coat tails, grab- j
bed his cane, and made sundry
dives at his watch chain, while a
crowd gathered around and eng
joyed the spectacle. When the
Tribune man left, Sullivan was
still trying to convince them he
was not their grandparent.
"Brother Cannon is in prison
now," sorrowfully remarked a
brother to one of the emigrants.
"Well, if had two wives he
ought to be in prison," was the
emphatic response. That emi
grant needs counsel, and he will
probably get it.
The most of the emigrants were
taken to the tithing yard where
they spent the night. One hun
dred will be sent south and the
rest will be utilized as building
material for the center Stake.
THE "THIEVING THIRTEENTH."
It is said that the grand Jury in
session at the present term of the
District Court, will, before its ad
journment, investigate certain
charges of official corruption
against several members of the
last Legislature, and endeavor to
ascertain which members received
the benefit of $1,300 levied as tri
bute on the citizens of Pxescott
for permitting the Capitol to re
main here. The parties who sub
scribed to the fund are all known
as is also the names of the parties
who represented that it was abso
lutely necessary to pay it to pre
vent the Capitol being located elsewhere-
The open and notorious
bribery used both in favor and
against the attempted creation of
the proposed County of Sierra
Bonita, will it is also said, be in
vestigated, while certain members
of the legislative corps who re
ceived a pecuniary consideration
for throwing their vote and in
fluence in favor of the drainage of
mines bill are in great jeopardy of
being called on to offer legal ex
planation of their conduct in the
premises. Should the grand jury
really embark in an attempt to fur
nish a salutary example for future
legislatures, by punishing the rot
tenness of the last, the result will
be a sensation that will exceed in
interest any event that has taken
place in Arizona for many a day.
The presence of Dr. Ainsworlh,
the President of the Council; A.
E. Fay, its Secretary ; Morris Gold
water, ex-Chief Clerk of the house,
his assistant, Harry Carpenter, and
many prominent lobbyistSj at
present in Prescott, renders the
work of the grand jury in the
premises more easy than at first
appears. Prescott Miner.
A FEW POINTS ON MORMONISM.
Pioche Record : Bishop Lee says
that the sacred institution of po
lygamy will survive the Govern
ment of the United States. Apro
pos of this sacred institution, I
wish to state that in 1883 I had a
revelation that the polygamous
craft, with its President, Apostles
and High Counselors, would sink
into the deep water of oblivion in
the year of our Lord 1888. A little
over two rears of the specified time
has passed, but in the three to come
the prophecy will surely be fulfilled
and I want the Bishop and his
counselors to make a note of the
fact, as my reputation as a revela
tor is at stake.
Portland Oregonian : The Mor
mon heresy finds its best recruting
ground in densely ignorant coun
tries in the old world and in por
tions of the South. The Mormon
missionaries have won astonishing
success among the "white trash" of
the South. In Tennessee the Leg
islature passed at its last session
a bill prohibiting the preaching of
polygamy in the State. Three Mor
mon elders were arrested a short
time ago for breaking this statue,
and there is a prospect of a hard
fight in the courts. To make it a
misdemeanor to "advocate" any
doctrine is not strictly in the line
of our legislation, and the consti
tutionality of the act will be stoutly
disputed.
Butte Inter-Mountain : The Mor
mon church priests in Utah are
now taking more interest in the
sanitary condition and manage
ment of its penitentiary than ever
before. The3r charge that the old
prisoners are in the habit of prac
ticing all kinds of immorality, and
have a regular organized society
for hazing new convicts by tossing
them up in blankets, making thom
put on the gloves, etc. It is simple
blasphemy thus to saddle indigni
ties on the polygamous martyrs.
But pretty soon, under the benefi
cent rulings of Judge Zanc, the
Mormon prisoners will be in the
majority, the tortures will be re
versed, and the old convicts will
then be hazed on the Mountain
Meadows plan, unless the warden
shall interfere.
San Francisco Chronicle: A
prominent Mormon of Salt Lake
named Aurclfus Miner, after five
months of hiding from the officers
of the law, returned to his home
recently and was promptly arrested.
He declared that he had grown
tired of roaming about the East and
traveling on what the Saints call
"the Underground," and contem
plated giving himself up when the
Sheriff saved him the trouble. The
seriousness of his present position
is beginning to come home to the
polygamist. He is forced to sup
port several wives and their chil
dren while he has not even the sat
isfaction of living with a single one
of them or of devoting himself to
his usual business. If he comes
home and risks arrest, conviction
follows his prosecution as surely as
night follows day, and he finds
himself fined and imprisoned for
six months or a vear. No wonder
the pent up feelings of Mormondom
found vent in the recent pathetic
appeal. It differed strangely from
their previous defiant utterances,
and is a fair indication of the col
lapse of a power which depended
largelv for its success on ignorance
and isolation.
Great Falls Tribune ; . The cour
age displayed by the Salt Lake
Tribune in its unrelenting war
against the Mormons is commend
able. Day after day for years it
has poured grape, cannister and
chain-shot against the Mormon
bulwarks and is now about to be
rewarded by seeing the enemv
hoist the white flag. The Tribune's
fight has been a faithful one.
The polygamists must go !
INDIGNATION MEETING.
At a special meeting of the So
ciety of Arizona pioneers, held at
their Hall in Tucson, June 3d, the
following resolutions were adopted :
Whereas, Disastrous troubles
have again fallen upon the Terri
tory by reason of the recent out
break of the Apache Indians, who
have left the White Mountain
reservation and are making their
way across the line into the repub
lic of Mexico, leaving the trail be
hind tliem strewn with the vic
tims of murder and rapine, to say
nothing of the evidence of des
truction of property, and
Whereas, The Military station
ed in the Territory have been pow
erless to prevent the terrible out
rages committed by these Indians,
and to afford the people the pro
tection that under the law and in
accordance with the principles of
justic and humanity, they are
entitled; therefore
Be it resolved by the Society
of Arizona Pioneers, that the citi
zens of the Territory be requested
to meet in general mass meetings
at an early day, to deliberate upon
the questions involved in the cri
sis, and to take such steps as in the
judgment of the people will be
calculated to furnish the general
government with a clear and truth
ful statement of our unfortunate
condition, to the end, that the gov
ernment may consider our dilemma
and adopt such a course as will eng
sure us speedy and adequate re
lief from our sufferings.
Resolved, That- the citizens of
all the counties in the" -Territory be
and they are hereby invited to take
action in the premises.
Resolved, That it is the sense of
the Society of Arizona Pioneers
that all hostile Indians should be
removed from the Territory at the
earliest practical opportunity.
And at an adjourned meeting
thereof held the following evening
the following additional resolu
tions were adopted :
Whereas, We are again visited
with the periodical massacre of our
citizens and their families by the
savage Apaches, our property des
troyed and our progress retarded.
Now therefore be it
Resolved, That we demand of
the Government that protection
which we are guaranteed by the
Constitution of. the United States
the protection that we have been
repeatedly promised and the prom
ises as often broken.
Resolved, That a member of
this Society be sent to Washington
at the earliest opportunity, to pre-,
sent to the President the true sit
uation of Indian affairs in this
Territory, and to convey our appeal
to the powers that be, for relief
from the curse that has been al
lowed to rest upon us so long by
previous administrations
Resolved, That the President
and Secretary be instructed to
notify and request the members of
this Society residing in the several
counties of the Tcrritoiy to use
their best endeavors to call the
people of their respective locali
ties together in mass meeting, to
the end, that united action may be
taken on the question of Indian
outrages in this Territory, and
that a free expression of the peo
ple may be had, and that the sev
eral members bo notified of the
action of the Society' relative
thereto.
Resolved, That the President
be requested to cause circulars to
be printed and sent to members of
the Society, citizens and press of
the territory, requesting their co
operation in the subject matter of
the foregoing resolutions.
The Chiricahua Apaches must
be removed from Arizona or kiiled.
The Latter method is the cheapest
and best method of getting rid of
them. Santa Fe Review '
The AjDaches must go I
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
-fflm L. VAN HOBN.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
HOLBROOK, A, T.
g M.SANFORD,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
PRESCOTT, A. T.
JJARRIS BALDWIN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
ST.-JOHNS, A, T.
Land business a specialty. Office in Court House,
JJR.D.d. BRANNEN,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
FLAGSTAFF, A. T.
Sr Office and Drug Store Opposite R. R. Depot.
Will give prompt attention to calls from any
point oh the line of the A & P. R. R,
LFRED RUIZ,
CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT ;
RECORDER APACHE COUNTY,
AND U. S. COMMISSIONER.
CSr Special atrention given to the examination
and transfer of titles to Real Estate in the county.
Ollice in Court House, St. Johns, Arizona.
jyj5 V. HOWARD,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ST. JOHNS, A. T.
X?-Oince at Court Houcs.
rj S. BUNCH,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ST. JOHNS, A. T.
Office in Court House
Q L.GUTTERSON,
ATTO R NE Y-AT-L AW,
ST. JOHNS, A. T.
XP-Ofiicc in Court nouse.
"yELLS HENDERSHOTT,
ATTO RNE Y-AT-L A W,
ALBUQUERQUE. N. M.
Q-BECKER,
? NOTARY PUBLIC,
SPRINGERVILLE, A, T.
jji M.ZUCK,
' NOTARY PUBLIC,
' HOLBROOK, A. T.
r G. NORRIS,
" ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
FLAGSTAFF, A. T.
J. C. HERXDON.
J. J. HAWKINS.
JJERNDON &. HAWKINS,'
ATTO RNE YS-AT-L AW,
PRESCOTT, A. T.
JEP-Will practice in the District Court of
Apache County.
J W.SPAFFORD,
DEALER AND BROKER IN REAL
ESTATE, MINING AND COL
LECTING AGENT.
flagstaff, a. t.
-Propcrties visited examined and report
ed on, for parties living at a distance, in Yav
apai, Mohayo and Apache counties. Particu
lar attention paid to Government claims.
HOUSE.
F. M. ZUCK, Proprietor
HOLBROOK, A.T.
This house is neatly furnished and has
large, airy rooms, and its tables are supplied with
all the market afords. Stage leaves the house
daily for Ft, Apache.
J. F. HAWKS,
RESTAURANT,
: Everything New, Neat and :
: Clean. Meals at all Seasonable :
: Hours and Prices. Nothing Fi- :
: ner in the Territory. Eresh fish :
and oysters in their season. :
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZ.
RAILROAD AVE., OPPO. DEPOT.
HOLBROOK LIVERY, FEED
AND--
SALE STABLE,
NATHAN BARTH - PROPRIETOR.
fjggW Splendid outfits for parties go
ng to the Petrified Forest
0F Saddle animals, buggy teams
on call.
Stock kept by day, week or
longer time at reasonable rates.
Hay and grain for sale in large
or small quantities.
Z? Freight and express teams on
hort notice
B M. TERRILT, MANAGER r
LOWENTHAL & MEYERS
Successors to Santiago Baca
, "Wholesale
LIQUOR DEALER,
A IViii nil prn n p Tsl TVT
IMPORTER OF FOREIGN WINES AND LIQUORS;
THE
Largest and Most Complete Stock in New Mexico:
FULL STOCK BAR GOODS;
SOLS AGSNT FOR THE CELEBRATED YAL BLATZ'S BOTTLED BEBR- ,
The Ayer Lumber Company
077 T7T A H-QT AT7T7
Have for the accommodation of the people of Holbrook and vicinity
on or near the line of the Atlantic & Pacific road established a depot
for the sale of LUMBER in all varieties produced at the Great Mill
in the San Francisco Mountains. DRESSED LUMBER of all qual
ities PLAIN LUMBER of all kinds and dimensions.
DOORS, SASHES, BLINDS, LATH, SHINGLES, BATTENS
AND MOULDINGS. '
The prices for all kinds of stock will be the sanie as if
delivered at the mill with freight added. Office and
yard Central Avenue, "West End.
O. P. CHAFFEE, Agent,
European Hotel
BONSALL, - - - -
BEST ROOMS IN THE GITY. MEALS SERVED
IN ALL PARTS OF THE HOUSE,
GLU
B & BILLIARD ROOMS,
Opposite Union Depot.-
esj-mw Albuquerque
- -
Albuquerque
- -
A General Banking Business Transacted,
OFFICERS.
Louis Huning, ...President.
Joseph Bell, Vice-President.
W. K. P. Wilson, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
Louis Huning. of L. & II. Huning, Los Lunas, N. M.
Joseph Bell Associate Justice Supreme Court New Mexico;
W. K. P. "Wilson formerly Cashier Central Bank".
W. A. Dkake Chief Engineer A. & P. R.R.
Edmund II. Smith . Clerk U. S. District Court.
Strickland Auijrigiit .PhysicianV
Geo. F. Chalander Asst. Supt. A. & P. R. R.
Sale in New Mexico and Arizona.-
THE ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY.
The Land Grant of this Company, in alternate
sections extends entirely across the Territories of
New Mexico and Arizona, between the 34th and
36th degrees of north latitude. It is 650 miles long
and 80 miles wide and includes some of the best
grazing lands of both Territories. In the valleys
are many desirable tracts of agricultural land, sus
ceptible of irrigation. A sufficiency of water has
been found wherever cattle and sheep have been
grazed, and large herds have been grazed in the
country ever since the coming of the Mexicans.
Wells have been sunk and good water has been
obtained.
A stream of iunning water, the San Jose, rises
near the summit of the Sierre Madre, and runs 75
miles eastward to the Rio Puerco, and the compa
ny's road follows the whole length of its valley.
There are numerous fine valleys opening into the
valley of the San Jose, flanked bv grassy and woo
ded hills, upon which there is an open growth of
small cedar and pinon. There is an et?nsive belt
of good pine timber on the mountains, near the
railroad, and good springs are found on both slopes
oftheSierrc Madre. There is a large coal field
west of Fort Wingate which has been fully ex
plored, and which will afford labor fora large pop
ulation, there are also coal deposits op the eastern
slope of the Sierra Madre. Many varieties of buil
ding stone are found in great abundance along the
line of the road.
In Arizona the grazing areas are supplied wtih
good water, and the "United States Surveyors, who
made the official surveys of the country, say they
are as good, if not better, than those of Wyoming
and Montana. The Navajo Indians grow corn
without irrigation, in the valrcys of the Puerco of
the West, on the Company's lands, and in the val
ley of the Little Colorado, also on the line of the
road, good crops of corn, sorghum, oats, barley,
and garden vegetables are grown by irrigation,
the finest of potatoes, oats, wheat, barley and gar
den vegetables of large size and fine quality have
been successfully grown without irrigation on
WATCHES AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES,
LIST OF WALTHAM AND ELGIN WATCHES IN 3-oz SILVER CASES -NAMED:
STERLING, 7 Tewcls, S15.00.
WILLIAM ELLERY, ii Jewels, 17.60.
P, S. BARTLETT improved 15 Jewels, patent reg; 25,00;
APPLETON TRACY & CO., improved 15 Jewels.pat. reg;
pat.-hair spring, adjusted, . T -42,00.
B; V RAYMOND, 15 Jewels, pat. reg. adjusted- 47;6o.
ALL STEM WINDERS.
K3 THo same movements in heavier cases, with Gold joints, from $3 to $5 extra. Howard; Hamp
den, Rockford or any other movement in Gold or Silver cases at similar prices. Remember that
every watch is examined and regulated by myself and a written guarantee given.
Note address: ARTHUR EVER ITT,
Practical Watchmaker;
P. S; Any watch sent C, O; D. with priv- Railroad Avenue",
ilegs of examination! AlbuquerquckN. M;
Proprietory
- - - Wew Mexico
National Bank,
- - New RSexicOrf
the slopes of the San. Francisco' mountains.
On these mountains there is an extensive timber
belt, diversified by beautiful valleys and parks,
with good water and wonderful canons, throuhg
which the road passes. In fact, the whole of the
country traversed by the road is very picturesque
and beautiful, and many towns arc tbeing built
along its route,
The Valley of the Rio Grande, at Albuquerqe
is 5,000 feet above the sea, and jthc passes of the
Sierra Madre and the San Francisco mountains, in
Arizona, have elevations of 7,300, witha depres
sion at Winslow, on the Little Colorado, where
the altitude is 5,000 feet ; the climate is mild and
saiubrous. Cattle and sheep graze throughout
the year and do not need to be sheltered or grain
fed during the winter. The nights are cool during
the summer.
The Company is now prepared to make sales
of its grazing lands in quantities of 50,000 acres"
or more, at prices ranging from one dollar (or
even less for larger quantities,) to one dollar and
a half an acre, upon payment of one-fourth the
purchase value at date of contract of sale, the
remainder in payments as may be agreed upon,
bearing six per cent interest ; and irrigable agri
cultural lands in tracts of forty acres or more.
The belt of the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad
Land Grant includes the only available grazing
land in the country south of the Missouri River
that can be purchased in large "areas; and the
section of country through whieh this road passes
will become the best beef producing region of
the United States.
Maps of the Land Grant will be forwarded on
application and properly acredited persons desire
ing to inspect grazing lands, with a view to pur
chase and cxtablish stock ranches, will be gvicn
facilities for that purpose.
J. A. WILLIAMSON.
THOS. S. SEDGWICK. Land Commissioner
Land Agent, 87 Milk St., Boston Mass
Albuquerque, N. M.

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