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The St. Johns herald. (St. Johns, Apache County, Arizona Territory [Ariz.]) 1885-1903, September 09, 1886, Image 1

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ST. JOHNS, APACHE COUNTY, ARIZONA TERRITORY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1886.
WHOLE NUMBER 87
VOIATME II.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
-Tn. WM-T. DALBY,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Mt. JvkB, Arizexa Territory
COUNTY PHYSICIAN,
J. A. Rush. E. W, Wells, SomsebIIowaed.
RUSH, WEULS 8c HOWARD,
ATT0RK8YS & COUNSELORS AT LAW,
Prgctt, Yavapai County, Arizona.
r-TUl it end promptly to all business eng
lruitd to them In the Courts of Keconl of the
Territory.
JJ M. SAN FORD.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
PRESCOTT. A.T.
JJARRIS BALDWIN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
ST. JOHNS. A, T.
L4 fcuineM a specialty. Office in Court House,
J)R.D. J. BRANNZN,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
FLAGSTAFF, A. T.
JWOSceand Drufi Store Opposite R. R. Depot.
Will ive prompt attention to caUs from any
psiat on the line ot the A & P. R. R
JLFRED RUIZ,
CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT ;
RECORDER APACHE COUNTY,
AND U. S. COMMISSIONER.
JW Special atrention given to the examination
d transfer of titles to Real Estate in the county.
Oflcfll Court House, St. Johnu, Arizona.
rp S. BUNCH,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
H0LBRO0K, A. T.
Qfiee in Court House.
1 L. GUTTERSON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ST. JOHNS, A.T.
Oflce in Court House.
"Vy ELLS H E N D E RS H OTT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
ALB UQUERQUE, N. M.
t BECKER,
NOTARY PUBLIC, '
SPRINGERVILLE. A, T.
M.ZUCK,,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
HOLBROOi:. A T.
rp G.NORRIS,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
FLAGSTAFF. A. T.
jLAHK CHURCHILL,
Attorney General of Arizona.
Attornev and Counselor at Law.
, - OrneK Over the Bank, of Arizona,
Prescott, Arizona.
R.SGGERS,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
(District Attorney of Yavapai County.)
PRESCOTT, - - ARIZONA.
3. CXERtfOOX. J. J. HAWKINS.
H1
"ERNDON & HAWKINS,
ATTO RNE YS-AT-L AW,
PRESCOTT, A.T.
Will praetice in tbe District Court of
Jlpachft conty.
LEWIS LYSTCH
DEALER IN
Groceries and General
MERCHANDISE.
Navajo Station, A. & P. R. R.
Haigrain and stabling for ac
commodation of travelers
Stage leaves the house
daily (except Sunday) 6
p. m. for St. Johns and
Spri b gerville.
WIRE FENCING
FOR SA1B.
HISSING'S AKB COOJLEY
Have for sale at their ranches at
or near Show Low, barbed and plain
FENCE WIRE, at the low prire of
FIVE CE'TS PER POlflSIV-
MT" Applications may be made
in person or by letter.
JffF Purchasers will be required
remove the wire from the fence
jjosts at their own expense.
JpP This is a rare opportunity
to obtain wire tencing at half its
vilue.
HUNING'S &COOLEY,
-24tf. Show Low, Ariz.
STANDARD WORKS
OF REFERENCE
FOR I3VI3RY LIBRARY.
WORCESTER'S
Quarto Dictionary
Of the English Language. NewEdition.
With Supplement. Unabridged and
Profusely Illustrated. The standard,
and in all respects best, Dictionary
published. Library sheep, marble
edges. $10.00.
LIPPINCOTT'S
Biographical Dictionary.
A New, Thoroughly Revised, and Great
ly Enlarged Edition. A Universal
Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography
and Mythology. Containing complete
and concise Biographical Sketches of
the Eminent Persons oi all Ages and
Countries. By J. Thomas. M. D., LL.
D. Imperial 8vo. 2550 pages. Sheep.
$12.00.
LIPPINCOTT'S
Pronouncing Gazetteer of the
World.
A complete Geographical Dictionary.
New Edition. Thoroughly revised and
greatly enlarged. Containing Supple
mentary Tables with the most recent
Census Returns. . Royal 8vo. Sheep.
$12.00.
CHAMBER'S
Encyclopaedia.
American Revised Edition. The best in
every way. A Dictionary of Universal
Knowledge. Profusely Illustrated
with Maps, Plates and Wood-Cuts. 10
.vols. Royal 8vo. Several editions,
at various prices.
READER'S
Reference Library.
Containing "The Reader's Handbook,"
"Dictionary of Phrase and Fable,"
"Dictionary of Miracles," "Words,
Facts, and Phrases," "Ancient and
Modern Familiar Quotations," "Wor
cester's Comprehensive Dictionary,"
"Roget's Thesaurus," and "Soule's
English Synonymes." 8 vols. Bound
, in half morocco, gilt top. Per set, in
pasteboard box, $20.00. Any volume
.sold separately.
POPULAR
Family Atlas of the World.
Containing Twenty-four Maps, neatly
colored, and with all the recent dis
coveries and changes. Size, 10 x 12
inches. Quarto. Stiff paper covers.
Sent by mail, postpaid, for 30 cents.
NOW OFFERED AT GREATLY
REDUCED PRICES.
Encyclopaedia of Chemistry.
Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical,
as Applied to the Arts and Manufac
tures. By Writers of Eminence. Pro
fusely and Handsomely Illustrated.
In Two Volumes. Each containing 25
Steel-Plato Engravings and Numerous
Wood-Cuts. Imperial 8vo. Price per
set: Extra Cloth, $15.00. Library
sheep, $18.00. Half morocco, $20.00.
. For sale by all Booksellers, or will
be sent, free of expense, on receipt of
the price by
J. B. LIPP1NC0TT CQ.
PUBLISHERS,
715 AND 717 MARKET ST., PHILADELPHIA.
DIONICIO BACA
DEALER IN
GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
ALSO
WINES, LIQUORS,
-AND-
dfiX C3r jEt&
BUYS AND SELLS
WOOL. HIDES, PELTS, GRAIN.
2priMgervilIe,
Arizona..
It is estimated that the westward
elope of Colorado will furnish the
markets this fall 10.0)0 head of
beef steers, and that the average
weight of. the four-year-old will be
close to 1,200 pounds. Stock
Grower.
There are large numbers of Texas
cattle at Hugo and at Coolidge yet
unsold. Buyers are scarce and
those few are not eager to catch on.
The cattle are reported improving
in flesh since the late rains have
started the grass afresh. S c c!c
Grower,
The new Maricopa and Phoenix
railroad project is a dead sure
thing. Word has been received
here, and authoritatively at that
which assures the people that ar
rangements have already been per
fected for the institution of opera
tions, and agreeable terms made as
to tariff rates with the Southern
Pacific Compan This is really
cheering news. Gazette.
An exchange says beef cattle
grass cattle some twenty-five or
more years ago were considered
boss cattle when at maturity they
averaged a weight of 800 pounds.
Now, a beef steer at the age of four
years old won't weigh 1,200 pounds
is no steer at all. Blood will tell
every time. The ordinary scrub
steer, the progeny of the scrub bull,
ot course was not counted upon in
the light of weight ; it was point
of numbers in olden times, not
weight. Times have changed;
stockmen begin to learn that it is
blood that tells, not numbers.
9 -am
A Little Rock, Arkansas, special
says that last Saturday two partit s
of cowboys who were driving cat
tle out of the Chickasaw nation un
der the proclamation recently is
sued by the Chickasaw authorities,
and had been quarreling some til e
halted at a spring near Mud Creek,
and as Ben Taylor was leaning
down to drink he was shot in the
neck by Franklin Scales who start
ed to run away, when he was shot
by one Adams. Firing then became
general and the fight ended in one
gang of the cowboys driving the
others from the field. Taylor and
Scales are said to be mortally
wounded.
It is a noticeable fact that Ari
zona is this year singled out from
all the states and territories as the
only one for which no appropria
;i n has been made by Congress for
' expenses of the Surveyor General's
i office. This remarkable step, so
contrary to the usual custom,
forces the conclusion that the only
r iason can be a desire on the part
of interested persons to so cripple
Mr. Hise that he will be unable to
pursue his investigations of fraud
ulent land grants. The design of
these men is known and will be de
feated, out it will be well forthe
public to note what desperate ef
forts are being made by the land
grabbers to retain their ill-gotten
plunder. Tombstone Epitaph.
9 m
A gentleman who came here re
cently from Tombstone, and with
his partner bought the Stinebaugh
ranch, attempted suicide Wednes
dav night. He first took a dose of
laudanum, but it did not work
quick enough to suit him, and he
helped it along wTith strychnine.
The laudanum counteracted the
strychnine and his friends discov
ering his condition, administered
an emetic, which caused him to
throw up the bulk of the poison.
When sufficiently recovered to
sneak he remarked, "You have
brought me out this time, but you'll
not catch me next time." His part
ner and he own about 8,000 head of
cattle in the Huachucas, and they
are dying in large numbers for the
want of feed. This is supposed to
be the cause of his act. Enter
prise. Enterprise.
C. P. Stanton was brought to
Phoenix, by a posse this morning
and lodged in the county jail,
charged with being an accessory to
the massacre of the Martin family
at Nigger Wells. Stanton and
Barney Martin wjre neighbors at
Antelope Springs, and have been
enemies for several years past.
From the first Stanton was suspect-!
ed of being implicated in th mur
der, or having directed it, but we
have learned that the evidence
against him is simply of a circum
stantial nature. This makes three
persons who are now in our jail in
connection wilh the fiendish crime
mentioned, and officers are search
ing for several more, known to be
closely connected with the murder.
Undoubtedly a gang of Mexicans
committed the crime, and it is to
be hoped that the entire matter will
be probed until the truth is reached.
Gazette.
Captain Jack Crawford, formerly
chief of scouts in the Sioux and
Apache campaigns, was bitten on
the back of the right hand by a
rattlesnake while eng route from his
mines in South Oscura Mountains
to his home at Fort Craig. He had
just killed one monster snake with
his whipstock, and while returning
to his wagon, a few yards distant,
struck another with his foot, when
it sprang up and fastened its fangs
in his hand. He seized the reptile
with his left hand and tore it loose
and stamped it to death, and at
once sucked the wound, extracting
the poison, which undoubtedly
saved his life. He then drove to
the post, a distance of thirty miles,
suffering the most intense pain.
His hand and arm are frightfully
swollen and he is a very sick man.
Pioche Record.
The Tucson Citizen says the pas
senger train going east yesteiday
was several hours behind its sched-
ule timGj and it was quitc dark
when Wilcox station was left. The
train went dashing along towards
Bowie at its usual speed, when the
engineer caught s ght of a man on
the track waving, his coat at the ap
proaching train, and taking it for a
signal the train stopped. It proved
to be a tramp who was journeying
westward, and he stopped the train
to warn the engineer of a danger
ous washout just ahead, into wThich
the train would probably have
pitched headlong but for his
thoughtfulness. The train backed
down to the nearest section house,
and implements were brought and
repairs made so the train could
pass in safety over the break, and
it went on its journey m one di
rection while the tramp plodded on
his weary way in another.
Wm 9 m
On Monday evening la&t as the
Wickenberg stage was wending its
way north toward the Vulture from
this place it was stopped by a man,
in the road above Seymour. The
driver, Mr. Smith, Mr. E. O. Grant
of Wickenburg, and another gen
tleman were all armed and instant
ly drew their revoivers and covered
him in the half moonlight that pre
vailed, while Mr. Smith asked him
what he wanted. Jnst then the
fellow discovered the situation and
dropped his hand in which he held
a presented revolver, and said He
wanted to get on the stage. He,
however, made no move to get on
and seemed to remain in the road
as if awaiting the co-operation of
some one else. While the men in
the stage kept him covered with
their guns the driver drove past and
left him standing in the road. His
confederates probably did not come
to time. Phcanix Herald.
mm 9 '1
Senator Hearst is one of the de
fendants in the suit that Attorney
General Garland, at Lamar's direc
tion, has brought against Haggin,
Carr, et al., for the cancellation of
patents to lakes Kern and Buena
Vista in California, as "swamp and
overflow." The drainage of Kern
river on to Haggin and Carr's des
ert, had the correlative object of
drying up these lakes, and convert
ing them into alfalfa pastures. La
mar holds tl.at these lakes are nav
igable waters, and has instituted
legal prosecution for the recovery
of them from Haggin, Carr, Hearst
& Co. These gentlemen having
been defeated in the supreme court
of this state by Miller & Lux, find
that their gigantic schemes are not
only obstructed by Secretary Lamar
but are made impossible by the de
cision of the supreme court of Cal
ifornia. A Washington dispatch of Aug.
24th says that Governor Zulick, of
A -izona, in an interview with Sec
retary Lamar, called his attention
to a subject which effects hugely
the interests of the territorp, name
ly, the survey of the lands along
the completed portions of the At
lantic & Pacific railroad, so that
they can be taxed Only about
one-third of the land has been sur
veyed, and under the law passed
by the last Congress, the surveyed
lands can be taxed without being
patented. The Secretary referred
the Governor to the general land
office, where he was told that the
surveys would be advanced as rap
idly as possible, although, owing
to the reduced appropriations, pro
bably only a portion of the land
could be surveyed. The new law
authorizing the taxation of sur
veyed lands before patents are is
sued affects large tracts of land in
nearly all the states and terri o:ies
of the west, and as soon as the de
partment issues the necessary cir
culars of instructions, the tax will
be imposed.
m 9 m
For the past year or more says
the Yuma Sentinel, a gang of Mex
ican desperadoes and horse thieves,
under the leadership of a ft How
named Gonzales, have had their
headquarters near Clip, this coun
ty. From time to time they have
committed depredations of almost
every character with impunity, un
til some few months since when
they stole a band of thirty horses
from J. R. Frink, of Yavapai coun
ty, who followed them up and re
gained some of his horses, but fail
ed to get the thieves, although it
was ascertained that the gang at
Clip were the thieves, and they had
gone to to lora. Ihe chase was
given up for the time being, but the
officers kept a good lookout for the
gang. About the 26th of Jura
word was received by t ie officers
that they had returned to Clip and
by their actions had terrorized the
whole community. An officer was
immediately dispatched to Clip who
remained there some time, but was
unable to find the parties. Officer
Smith also spent two weeks at Clip
last month, in a fruitless endeavor
to unearth them, but their many
friends and countrymen kept them
posted as to the movements of the
officers. Nothing more was heard
of the gang until last Thursday,
when news was received here from
Clip .that Trinidad Gonzales and
Louis Mendoza had kidnapped
Miss Inez Martinez, and with oth
ers, who had a band of stolen
horses, had started, it was sup
posed, for Lower California, Under
Sheriff Werninger immediately or
ganized a party and went to inter
cept them, but without success, and
at this time nothing has been heard
from them. The large scope of un
inhabited c( untry that they have to
roam over, the few inhabitants of
which are their countrymen will
protect them, and the limited means
of transportation and communica
tion, makes their capture a difficult
and costly undertaking. But the
county should spare no expense to
capture these outlaws.
a
It has become plain to every stu
dent of statistics that no class of
meat producing animals except pos
sibly the hog, says the Kansas City
Record, can be increased with a
rapidity sufficient to meet the in
creasing demand for it- There is
not only the increase of popula
tion to be met but thre is an as
tonishing increase of meat con
sumption in all the countries of the
world. In this country in 1850
there were S14 cattle to the 1,000
population. Now there are only
772 to the 1,000 population. This
decrease has certainly occurred dur
ing the period of greatest prosper
ity in cattle-raising on a large scale
when the free grass on the pub
lic lands, the vast sums of willing
capital, and the skill and energy of
the ranchmen and feeders all fav
ored to the highest degree a rate of
production above the average of
any other peri d The total popu
lation of the United States doubles
every twenty-five years, but ast of
the Mississippi the increase of cat
tle has been less than one-third as
great. The annual increase of the
population of the country is to the
annual increase of the stock as of
to 14- per cent or an excess of in
crease of population over increase
of stock of over 55 per cent.
It is easy to see from the above
data that our own requirements are
more than a match for our own
production under even the most
fayorable conditions. We can not
hasten breeding operations to any
appreciable degree, but must con
tent with about a slow 50 ppr cent
annual increase or a calf for every
two cattle in the land. But our
home demand is not the sole ab
sorber of our products. The Brit
ish population is increasing at the
rate of 1,000 per day, which, at the
present rate of consumption, would
require an increase of meat supply
of 40,000,000 pounds per annum.
The demand for our meat pro
ducts is not only increasing but
this increase is a growing and per
manent one. Can it be met? Pro
bably not. Already we lack in
numbers of productive stock and
from the west the great source of
supply for the last two years has
come to us, the complaint of over
stocking. At first this was received
as the cry of some alarmist who
was seeking to frighten some timid
people into withdrawing from the
cattle business and to deter others
from entering upon it, but now, af
ter two consecutive winters and one
summer of heavy losses it begins
to be seen that really many ol the
ranches are overstocked. There
can be no expansion therefore, in
that direction. But an increase can
be made in the producing areas by
utilizing some of our mountain re
gions, in dividing some of the large
herds and grazing the subdivisions
on areas neglected to the present
on account of their smallness, and
an increase and possibly the largest
increase in our beef feeding capac
ity, can be made in the farm dis
tnci of the country. Our farms are
not producing 50 per cent of the
cattle food that they should and the
combination of loss probably leave
not over 50 per cent of the entire
products to be acluilly utilized for
conversion into meat, but of these
cattlemen will take advantage but
slowly because in the first the mat
ter will be considered as a utiliza
tion of waste places, and the sec
ond involves a new and im r ie I
system of agriculture and enlarged
knowledge of the science of feed
ing that will require time to meV
while production halts at obstacles
and speculates as to the probabili
ties the pace of demand is neither
turned or retarded. It is inexora
ble and meat must be forthcoming
cheaply as possible, but be the price
what it may meat must come. Bar
ring war prices meat is higher now
than eyer, except possibly during
some short period when they have
been unwarrantably "boomed," and
are sure to continue on their up
ward tendency. The cattlemen have
as bright a day before them as any
one. They may no$ realize during
the next "six months oF even the
next twelve, though it is not im
possible that they should at once,
but let them stay with their herds, ,
the good time cannot fail him. -
'"4
w?'-. .-v -:
4. i
I
I Si'

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