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Arizona weekly enterprise. (Florence, Pinal County, Arizona Territory) 1881-1893, December 17, 1881, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94052364/1881-12-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME I.
FLORENCE, PINAL COUNTY, ARIZONA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 47, 1884Y
NUMBER 38.
PROFESSIONAL
fXRVf O. HOWARD. MARCUS F. HATJtE.
HOWARD & HAYNE,
Attobxiys akd counselors at law, corner
With ami Frsmotit streets. Tombstone, A. T.
A. H. PARKER,
MlNJSO M0IKKE1 AMD 0. . DEPCTT MINERAL
Su-Tyor. Oftioa ill Sun Francisco Jewelry
SHore, No. 430 Allen street, south aide, between
fourth and Fifth str , Tomtmtone, A. T.
VUt U. MILLER. J. LCCAa.
LUCAS & MILLER,
Attornbt and counselor at law, orncr,
mom B and T Uird building, corner of Fremont
and Fourth, Totnlwtone. A. T.
LJTW K. DAVIS CEO. R. WILLIAMS.
WILLIAMS & DAVIS,
ATTORKEVA AT LAW. OIRD'S NEW Rl'ILTlNO,
orotn- of Fourth and Frement U., Tombstone,
A. T.
WELLS SPICER,
ATTORWET AND COUNSELOR AT LAW, !1S FTPTH
etreet, Tombstone, Cachiss Co., A. T. Alo
Mots l'ublw; U. B. Comjulxiooer of D.ede
fee California.
J. S. PARKE,
Cm l INOLNEXS AND 0. i MINERAL at'RVEYOR
Vn reyinK done In all its branches. Office, tiM
Tr nont street, Tombstooe, Arizona.
0. T. HENDERSON,
PVTSICLAV AND SBROION. Cmcl, 60 ME
mont strevt, Tooibstone, Ariaona,
A. 0. WALLACE,
Joanus or the feacr. fourth street,
three doom below Fremont, Tombstone, A. T.
JOHN M. MURPHY
ArroRxrr at law, room 28, brown's hotel
Tesnbetooe, Ariaona.
I. F. BLACKBURN,
D TT SJIERIFF AND AND COLLECTOR. OJTICt
with A. T. Joins, orlioe Huacbua Lumber Co.,
Fourth street, below Fremont. All official
V inees promptly attendsd to. Collections a
ayeo-lty.'
J. f. HUTTON,
Attorney at law. omc on nrrH strkkt,
between Fremont and Allen, Tuenbstone, Ari-
0. E. G00DFE LLOW, M. D.
Orrica in viokibh' rildino, mxMoirr
:, luBumorte, A. I.
P. T. COLBY,
Attorns at law. will fractice in all
the oourU of the Territory. , Otfice in Gird's
boUdtng. rooms 11 aud 13, oomer of Fourth
and Fremont streets. T"niht.on, A. T.
Oajtso Hatmond, A. M. Walker,
tsiasnwnl i City. Tombstone.
WALKER A HAYMOND,
Attorneys at law. i-roh-ft attention Giv
es, to all business intrusted to thetn. L'oUec
tia mads a speoi-lty. A. M. Walker Cum-
.b-ioner of lioeds for the Stat of Nevada.
A. J. FELTER,
JVDTITI OF THE FEACE. NOTARY PI BLIC AND
Haul Xstato Aran. Once on r reruent street,
fourth and fmn, 1 emtxiona, a. i.
DR. R. H. MATTHEWS,
FMTalCIAN AND SURCRON, TOMBSTONE, ARIUZO
M. Ot&os with W. Street, Fourth street, near
AW
a. 'MEiTEJIIT.. O. O. TK.IJ.TWM.
(CMELVENY A TRANTUM,
AT ORNETS AT LAW. ROOMS 3 ASU 4 OIRD's
haAdrng, oorn er FuurtU and Fremont streets,
Tmbrtone, A. T.
8. M. ASHENFELTER,
Attorney at law, clifton, a. t. prompt
aeteution given to any business entrusted to uir
MILTON B. CLAPP,
KOTAKT rUBLIC, CO NVEYANCER
AND FIRE INSURANCE AGENTS.
Offloe at Safford, Hudson &. Co.'s Bank,
Tetnbstoae, A. T.
Thomu Wallace),
MlNINO BROKER, REAL F.HTATF. AOKNT AND
CionTeyanoer. Allen strset, Tonilietnne.
Rodman M. Price), Jr.,
CtTIL INOINEFR AND C. S. 1EPUTT MINERAL
Hnreyor. Otfioe Voiaard building, Allen street,
Tombstone, A. T.
in. Q. jward,
(lte of I oi Aiikl-W. )
Attorn ft at law. at prmfnt at the of
Ewe of J. W. Stump. Tombstone, A. T.
W. A. Har ood.
Notary prBLio, corner fourth and pre
soot streets. Tombstone, A. T.
T. J. Drum,
Attorney at law. orricE in tickers
building, 431 Fremont street. Tombstone, A. T.
E. P. Voisard,
A SKATER AND NOTARY PUBLIC, ALLEN STREET,
Tombstone, A. T.
Charle Ackley,
OlTILINOINrKR AND DF.Pfc'TT 't'. 8. MINERAL
Br yoc, Tombstone, A. T. Office on Fro-
aont street, between sixth aud Seventh.
J. V. Vickers),
RtAL 1ST ATI AO EXT, AUCTIONEER, CONVCT-
anoer and Mining Operator. Fremont street.
near Fifth, 1 mUtone, A. 1.
A. O. Lowejry,
AtTORNET AT LAW. FREMONT STREET. BETWEEN
Fourth and Fifth, Tombstone, A. T. Will
practice in all courts. Agent for mining prop
erty. C'onreyanciiiK and collecting promptly
atfucte! to. rvIerfnces given.
F. M. SMITH. W. EARL. O. W. BFAULDINd
EarL Smith & Spaulding,;
Attorneys and counselors at law. office
In Vnkr s.bliwk on Fenuington street, Tucson,
Arizona i gmwrr.
. John Roman,
ArTORNET AT LAW, TCCSON, ARIZONA.
Webb Street.
Attorney at law, 113 focrth street, tom
stone, Arisona.
J. W. Stump,
Attobnfy and corNsri.oR at law, noons 2
and 4, bpitRph Building, Fremont street.
Tombstone, A. T. Will viractice in all the
courts of the Territory, anil attend to business
before the J eprtmeiit at Washington,!). C
Hyncial attention given to IT. M. patent and
Dr. GilTngham,
!. (liu.monAM (i.atf. or viroiXia titt) is
now awcuttei, in- tlie pr.vtico of Aletlicina
and 8nnrr, with Tr. (lihlcrslocve. Office.
bpitapn umiMing, i imitnlie, A. I .
Dr. T. Heller.
SUROEON AND PHYSICIAN. OFFICE ox HIT
, kIotr AlT.-ti, T'linlwt-ini-, A T.
O. BUCKALEW.
BUCKALEW &
Florence, Pinal County, A T.
Silver King, Piml County, A. T. Casa Grande, Pinal County, A, V,
Globe, Gila County, A, r.
AF ull Stock of Dry Goods
BOOTS, AND SHOES, JJATS AND CAPS, CLOTHING, FANCY GOODS, HOISERY, AND MINING SUPPLIES.
HARDWARE, GROCERIES, LIQUORS, TOBACCO AND CIGARS. ALSO FLOUR, GRAIN,
LUMBER, AGENTS FOR FALK'S MILWAUKEE EXPORT BEER. ETC.,
SILVER
TJ 'SJ W
iiHKeV mm
Groceries, Liquors, Cigars
. GRAIN, FLOUR, MINING SUPPLIES, Etc.
The GLOBE STORE
&f:. V. ViJIJL' A JU. . J- i-LaW, J HJ i,: :f.:x 9 r5: : , ,fi-fi H,: if
I-Iats, Caps, Hardware, AVagon Material,
Mining Supplies, Groceries of Every Description,
FLOUR AND GRAIN, IN FACT TO SUFPLY THE WANTS OF THEPE0PLE IS0UR GREATEST AIM
AT CASA GRANDE WE ARE DOING A
Groceries, Provisions, Grain, Flour,
Prompt Attention
WE
ITOZR. DELrTEBY
Mark Goods "Care of B. & O. Casa
GENERAL
-WILL ALWAYS BE rOLUD-
KING
KEEPS CONSTANTLY OK HAXD A FTLL LINE OF
ST
V; JW
BOOTS. SHOES, HATS,
XEVEB FAILS TO HAVE A OOOD STOCK OF
S XST 'Mr- VSV - si" O' O
BEING ALWAYS SUPPUED WITH
Furnishing Coods,
Given to Goods Consigned to our Care
ARE ALWAYS PREPARED TO CONTRACT
OIF" Irfi-CttTlsrJZttSr
TO ANY POINT IN THE TERRITORY.
J0SEM.0CH0A.
OCHOA,
STORE
r..:j & ZJ$
CAPS,
and Tobacco,
Produce, Gent's
Etc.
OR JJSTT FREIGHT
Grande, A. T.
TUB NAME VX&VNQ.
4 Sing ye," she said the lyric muse
' Of human hopes and fears,
Of human amtles and tear a."
Id all the tones that singers use
They tang through all the years.
" You sing brare songs. of war," she said;
"You sing the hopes of youth;
You sing the might of truth;
You sing of stars, of roses red.
And maids that love, in sooth.
" You sing me well of Joy," she said,
And better yet of pain
Of hearts that loved in vain.
Of lovers lost or cod or dead.
Of hopes like b'asted grain."
She said, u Yea, even of things divine
Full loftily you sing ;
And but one gracious thing
Have you forgot, Oh ! singers mine.
To tune on pipe or string."
" Of love that taught to woo or wed.
Of love that died for othora,
Or knitted friends like brothers,
You sing full well ; and jet,' she said,
" W ho names the love of mother V
They bent the knee and bared the head-
Young poetB of to-day,
Old hards of ages gray !
We cannot sing of her," they said;
Spare that oue name, we pray.
I.et art cla'm all the rest," they cried ;
That Dime is nature's own."
They spoke with graver tone:
u Queen, thine be every name beside.
But mother ours aloae.',
-LippiHcotV Magazine,
THE FIIiT Ol I'ENSK.
In the " cheerful dining-room of my
bachelor friend Stevenson a select party
wii8 assembled to celebrate his birthday.
A very animated discussion had been
carried on for some time as to whether
the first deviation from integrity should
be treated with severity or leniency
Various were the opinions aud numerous
the arguments brought forth to support
them. The majority appeared to lean
to the side of " crush all offenses in the
bud," when a warm-hearted gentleman
exclaimed :
" Depend upon it, more young people
are lost to society fron a first offense
being, treated with injudicious severity
than from the contrary extreme. Not
that I would pass over even the slightest
deviation from integrity either in word
or deed that would certainly be mis
taken kindness. But, ou the other
hand, neither would I punish with se
verity an offense committed, perhaps,
under the influence of temptation, too,
that we ourselves may have thoughtless
ly placed in the way, in such a manner
as to render it irresistible. For in-
stance, a lady requires a servant : the
girl has liitherto borne a good character,
but it is her first place ; her honesty has
never yet been put to the test. Her
mistress, w ithout thinking of the temp
tations to which she is exposing a fellow-creature,
is in the habit of leaving
small sums of money, generally in cop
pers, lying about in her sitting-room.
After a while she begins to think that
these sums are not always found exactly
cs she left them. Suspicion falls on the
girl, whose duty it is to clean the room
every morning. Her mistress, however,
thinks she will be quite convinced be
fore she brings forward her accu
sation. She counts the money care
fully at night, and the next morn
ing some is missing. No oue has
been in the room but the girl ; her
guilt is evident. Well, what does her
mistress do? Why, she turns the girl
out cf the house at an hour's notice;
cannot, in conscience, give her a charac
ter; tells all her friends how dreadfully
distressed she is; declares there is noth
ing but ingratitude to meet with among
servants; laments over the depravity of
human nature, and never dreams of
blaming herself for her wicked yes, it is
wicked thoughtlessness In thus con
stantly exposing to temptation a youDg,
ignorant girl; one, most likely, whose
mind, if not enveloped in total darkness,
has only an imperfect twilight knowl
edge, whereby to distinguish right from
wrong. At whose door, I ask," contin
ued he, growing warmer, " will the sin
lie if that girl sink into the lowest depths
of sin and miserj'? Why, at the door of
her who, after placing temptation in her
very path, turned her into the pitiless
world, deprived of that which constitut
ed her only means of obtaining her hon
est hvelihood her character; and u (
without one effort to reclaim her; with
out affording a single opportunity of re
trieving the past, and regaining, by fu
ture good conduct, the confidence of
her employer."
" There is, I fear, too much truth in
what you say," remarked our benevolent
host, who had hitherto taken no part in
the conversation; " and it reminds me
of a circumstance that occurred- in the
earlier part of my life, which, as it may
serve to illustrate the subject you have
been discussing, I will relate."
There was a general movement of at
tention, for it was a well-known fact thai
no manufacturer in the town was sur
rounded with so many old and faithful
servants as our friend Stevenson.
" In the outset of my business career,"
said he, " I took into my employment a
young man to fill the situation of under
clerk; and, according to a rule which I
had laid down, whenever a stranger en
tered my service his duties were of
nature to involve as little responsibilitv
as possible, until a sufficient time hail
elapsed to form a correct estimate of his
character. This young man, whom I
shall call Smith, was of a respectabh
family. He had lost his father, and had
a mother and sisters in some way de
pendent upon him. After he had been
a short time in my employment it hap
pened that my confidential cleik, whos
duty it was to receive the money froD
the bank for the payment of wages, be
ing prevented by an unforeseen circum
stance from attending at the propei
time, sent the sum required by Smith
My confidence was so great in my head
clerk, who had been long known to me.
that I was not in the habit of recularlv
counting the money when brought to
me; but, as on -this occasion it had
parsed through other hands, I thought
it right to do so. Therefore, calling
Smith back as he was leaving my cojant-ing-house,
I desired him to wait a few
minutes, and proceeded to ascertain
whether it was quite correct. Great was
my surprise and concern on finding that
there was a considerable deficiency.
'"From whom,' said I, 'did you re
ceive this money ?'
" He replied, ' From ?Ir. , nam
ing my confidential clerk.
" It is strange,' said I, looking stead
ily at him. ' But this money is incorrect,
Land it is the first time I have found it so.'
He changed countenance, and his eye
fell before mine : Imt he answered with
tolerable composure, ' that it was as he
had received it.'
".'It is vain,'. I replied, 'to attempt
to impose upon me, or to endeavor to
cast suspicion upon one whose character
f r the strictest honestv and undeviating
integrity is so well established. Now, I
am perfectly convinced that you have
taken this mony and at this moment it
is in your possession ; aud I think the
evidence against you would bs thought
sufficient to justify me in dismissing you
immediately from my service. But you
ire a very young man ; your conduct has,
I believe, been hitherto perfectly cor
rect, and I am willing to afford you an
opportunity of redeeming the past. All
knowledge of this matter rests between
ourselves. Candidly confess, therefore.
the error of which you have been guilty;
restore what you have so dishonestly
taken ; endeavor by your future good
conduct to deserve my confidence and
respect, and this circumstance shall
never transpire to injure you.'
" The pojr fellow was deeply affected, i
In a voice almost in uticu'ate with emo
tion ho acknowledged his guilt, and said
that, having frequently seen seen me
receive the money without counting it,
on being trusted with it himself the
idea Lad flashed across his mind that
he might easily abstract some without
incurring susjpeion, or, at all eventa,
without there being sufficient evidence
to justify it ; that, being in distress, the
temptation had proved stronger than
the power of resistance, and he had
yielded.
" ' I cannot now,' ha continued,
' prove how deeply your forbearance has
touched m : time alone "ui "how that
it has not been misplaced.' "He left ni
to resume his duties.
"Days, weeks and months passed
away, during wtucn 1 scrutinized ni
conduct with the greatest anxiety, while .
at the same time I carefully guarded
against any appearance of suspicious
watchfulness, and with delight I ob
served that so far my experiment had
succeeded. The greatest regularity and
attention, the utmost devotion to my in
terests, marked his business habits, and
this without display, for his quiet and
humble deportment was from that time
remarkable.
'At length, finding his conduct invar
iably marked by the utmost openness
and plain dealing, my confidence in him
was so far restored that, on a vacancy
occurring in a situation of greater trust
and emolument than the one he had
hitherto filled, I placed him in it, and
never had I the slightest reason to re
lent of the part I had acted toward him.
Not only had I the pleasure of reflecting
that I had, in all probability, saved a
fellow-creature from a continued course
if vice, and consequent misery, and af
forded him the opportunity of becoming
respectable man and a useful member
jf society, but I had gained for myself
in indefatigable servant a faithful and
constant friend. For years he served
me with the greatest fidelity and devo
tion. His character for rigid, nay, even
scrupulous honesty, was so well known
that ' as honest as Smith ' became a
proverb among his acquaintances. One
aoming I missed him from hi accus-"
:omed place, and, upon inquiry, learned
that he was detained at home by indis
position. Several days elapsed, and
itill he was absent ; aud, upon calling at
Uis house to inquire after him, I found
he family in great distress on his ac
count. His complaint had proved ty
phus fever of a malignant kind. From
almost the commencement of his attaek
tie had, as his wife (for he had been
wme time married)informed me, lain in
state of total unconsciousness, from
srhiah he had roused only to the ravings
of delirium, and that the physician gave
little hope of his recovery For some
days he continueu in the same state ; at
length a message was brought me, say
ing that Mr. Smith wished to see me,
the messenger adding that Mrs. Smith
hoped I would come as soon as possible,
for she feared her husband was dying.
I immediately obeyed the summons.
"On entering his chamber I found
the whole of his family assembled to
take farewell of him they so tenderly
loved. As soon as he perceived m? he
motioned for me to approach near to
him, and, taking my hand in both of his,
he turned toward me his dying counte
nance, full of gratitude and affection,
and said, 'My dear master, my best
earthly friend, I have sent for you that
I may give you the thanks and blessing
of a dying man for all your goodness to
me. To your generosity and mercy I
owe it that I have lived useful and re
spected, that I die lamented and happy.
To you 2 owe it that I leave my chil
dren a name unsullied by crime, that in
after years the blush of shame shall never
tinge their cheeks at the memory of their
father. Oh, God !' he continued, 'Thou
who hast meted to others, do Thou mete
unto him. Then, turning to his family,
he said :
'"My beloved wife and children, I
intrust you to the care of that Heavenly
Tnient who has said, "Leave the father
less children unto Me, and I will pre
serve them alive, and let thy widows
trust in rhe," and you, my dear master,
will, I know, be to them as you have
been to me a guide, protector and
friend.'
" That' continued the kind old man,,
looking on us with glistening eyes,
"though mixed with sorrow, was one
of the happiest moments of my life. As
f s'tood by the bedside of the dying man
and looked around upon- his children
growing up virtuous, intelligent and up
right, respecting and honoring, Ss much
as they loved, their father : when I eraw
his wife, though overcome with grief for
the loss of a teTid-r and beloved hus
band, yet sorrowing not as one without
hope, but, even in the moment of agony,
deriving comfort in the belief that she
should meet him again in that world
where "adieus and farewells are sounds
unknown ;". when I listened to his fer
vent expressions of gratitude and saw
him calrnlv, awaiting ' the inevitable
stroke, trusting in the mercy of God
and at peace with his fellow-men ; and
when I thought what the reverse of all
this might have been crime, misery, a
disgraceful and dishonored life, and,
perhaps, a shameful and violent death,
had I yielded to the first impulse of in
dignation, I felt a happiness which no
words can express. We are told
that there is more joy among
the angels of God over one sin
ner that repenteth than over ninety
and nine just persons that need no re
pentance. With such a joy as we may
imagine theirs did I rejoice over poor
Smith, as I closed his eyes, and heard
the attendant minister in fervent tones
exclaim : ' Blessed are the dead that
die in the Lord ; yea, saith the spirit,
for they rest from their labors and their
works do follow them.'
" My friends, I am an old man. Dur
ing a long and eventful career in busi
ness, I have had intercourse with almost
every variety of temper and disposition,
ind with many degrees of talent, but
have Dever found reason to swerve from
the principle with which I set out in
life, to temper 'justice with mercy.'"
Such was the story of our friend.
And I believe there was not one in that
company but returned home more dis
posed to judge leniently of the failings
of his fellow-creatures, and, as far as
lay in h's power, to extend to all who
might fall into temptation that mercy
which, under similar circumstances, ho
would wish shown to himself, feeling
" that it is more blessed to save than to
destroy."
THE TREATMENT OF WOMEN.
It fell in the way of Malthua in his
celebrated work on population to search
in the accounts of travelers for those
causes which operate, in different coun
tries of the world, to check the progress
and to limit the numbers of mankind.
Foremost among these is vice, and fore
most among the vices is that most un
natural one, of the cruel treatment of
women. " In every part of the world,"
sayB Mai thus, " one of the most general
characteristics of the savage is to de
spise and degrade the female sex.
Among moat of the tribes in America
their condition is bo peculiarly grievous
that servitude is a name too mild to de
scribe their wretched state. A wife is
no better than a beast of burden. VVhile
the man passes his days in idleness and
amusement, the woman is condemned to
incessant toil. Tasks are imposed upon
her without mercy, and services are re
ceived without complacence or grati
tude. There are some districts in Amer
ica where this state of degradation has
been so severely felt that mothers have
destroyed their female infants, to de
Liver them at once from a life in which
they were doomed to such a miserable
slavery." It is impossible to find for
this most vicious tendency any place
among the unities of nature. There is
nothing like it among the beasts. With
them the equality of the sexes, as re
gards a!lthe enjoyments as well as all
the work of life, is the universal rule.
And among those of them in which
social instincts have been specially im
planted, and whos9 systems of polity
are like the most civilized polities of
men, the females ot the race are treated
with a strange mixture of love, of loyal
ty, and of devotion. If, indeed, we con
sider the necessary and inevitable re
sults of the habit prevalent among sav
age men to maltreat and degrade their
women its ejects upon the constitu
tion, and character, and endurance of
children we cannot fail to see how
grossly unnatural it is, how it must tend
to the" greater and greater degradation
of the race, and how recovery from this
downward path must become more and
more difficult or impossible. But, vi
cious, destructive, unnatural as this
habit is, it is not the only one o r the
worst of similar character which prevail
among savage men, A horrid catalogue
comes to our remembrance when we
think of them polyandry, infanticide,
cannibalism, deliberate cruelty, syste
matic slaughter connected with warlike
passions or with religious customs.
Nor are these vices, or the evils result
ing from them, peculiar to the savage
state. Some of them, indeed, more or
less changed and modified in form, at
tain a rank luxuriance in civilized com
munities, corrupt the very btmes and
marrow ef society, and have brought
powerful nations to decay and death.
Duke of Argyll, in Contemporary He
view. Xhet wcie ou lueir weauing tonr,
ind she said : " Darling, why did you
cnoose roer "i bsw you sweeping
the library one day." "Then you
chose me because I did not disdain t ae
broom ?" " No, but because vou could
not handle it well."
PJLEASAJmtlES.
Xxk CDOTH3 of great men all remind ua
it is easy to lie.
Thebb is a "tied" in the affairs of
men that leads on to baby carriages.-
As a rule the flower of the family does
Hothing toward providing the daily
bread.-
Westebn Bettler (overwhelmed by
spring freshet) " House gone 1 StocK
gone ! Barn gone ! Guess I kin- stand
it, though ; old woman gone, too."
"It is harder to get ahead in this-
World," said Ciorinda's young man- as
her father assisted him out of the door
with his boot," than it is to get a foot."
A LiTTiiB girl, being asked on the first
day of school how she liked her new
teacher, replied : . "I don't like her;
she is just as saucy to me as my mother."
"And 'now, Lord,-what shall I say V"
were the words of the minister at the
close of a lour M?r- "Say Anieu,"
said softly a Luud cacixxO of the coiigro
gatioiu- "
" Brilliant' and impulsive people,"
said a lecturer on phj sioguomy, " have
black eyes ; orj if they don't have 'em,,
they're apt to get 'em if they're too im
pulsive." Mother reading : "And every morn--ing
and evening Elijidi was fed by the
ravns, who brought him bread to eau"
Lucy, aged four : "And was the"brd
buttered, mother?"
Said Fogg, smarting under the hands
of the barber, "I wish you were where -your
razor is." "Where is that?"
asked the tonsorial artist "Under
ground," replied Fogg, with a snap.
Hb wears a penny flower in bis cost,
Lsdida,
And m penny paper oollar round his throat,-
. lid.da;
In his hands s penny stick,
In his tooth a penny pick,
Hot a penny in his pocket,
Ladida.-
" Mabel, why, you dear little girl,"
exclaimed her grandpa, seeing Inn utile
granddaughter with her head tied up,
" have you got the headache ?" " No,"
she answered, sweetly, " Ise dot a spit
turl"
The cool-headed fellow is the bald
headed fellow. He is modest, too, fur
he never puts on hairs. He is a brilliant
man, too, for he always shows a shilling
front. His genius will live after liini
for there is no dyeing there.
A poet chimes, " I do' not dread an
altered heart. There s where most
people will differ with him. To have
one's heart altered a piece chipped olf
here, and another there, so that it will
be altered in form in the shape of- a" tri
angle -is a very painful operation, and
it is to be dreaded every time, -
Little Bertha, who lives in- Cam
bridge, visited her aunt, who resides in
Roxbury. Upon her return she was
asked if she said her prayers when the
was at auntie's. With wide-eyed as
tonishment at such a question the jittiu
one replied: "Why, mumiiia, Duddou't
live iu Roxbury."
An intelligent witness was on the
stand in a Deadwood lawsuit, and the
lawyer asked him: "Do yoa know Jen
nie Drysaale ?" "Yes, Bir." Wnat's
her reputation for truth and veraoity ?"
" Well, her reputation for truth is good,
but I can't say as much for htr reputa
tion for veracity. I am afraid it isu't '
first class."
Two Galveston gentlemen were talk
ing about a certain applicant for Fed
eral patronage, now iu Washington city.
" How is it that he never got an office?"
"Bom incapacity is the reason."
"WTiew! So that's it Born iu Ca
pacity, was he ? I never heard of the
town, but I reokon it is not in Ohio."
Galveston Neivs..
That was a witty man who, being de
tained in a snow blockade, penned a
dispatch which ran thus : " My dear
sir, I have every motive for visiting yd?-?' " "
except a locomotive." So was the 3il
who, under similar circumstances, t "
graphed to his firm in New York :
shall not be in the ollice today, !,,
have not got home yesterday."
ford Post. aepr,,
ne ir.i up.
Even the poor inebriate has a logic of
.is own. When he returned to his dom
cile in the early hours of the morniug
the words which greeted him were not
those of tender solicitude, hoping that
he had enjoyed hire self with his friends,
but rather words of somewhat severe
personal criticism. She looked at him
for a moment, as he attempted to ex
plain that the minister's meeting did no
adjourn as early as he had hoped, and
then said, with withering scorn, "John,
you are intoxicated." Seeing that ho
was, discovered, he threw off all disguise
and replied, " Well, Maria, I did the
best I could ; and, if you had taken as
much wine as I did, you would be r-
good deal more intoxicated than I am.'f
CAKLYLE'S KIKD KEABT.
Carlyle walked a great deal in ordeit,
to make his dyspeptio stomach a little
reasonable. Bat sometimes when th
"great, homely and grizzly old man wan
walking, with his big eyebrows almost
showing from under the brim of his
slouch hat, and his long, old-fashioned
coat was almost sweeping the sidewalk,
he would stop and pick up a bit of cast
off bread from the street and place it on
the curbstone, so that some poor man
who came along might find it
. This canary had begun to twitter a
little after moulting, but was unable to
sing his entire tuue. The little 4-year-old,
after listening to one of the bud's
vain attempts to master his tune, said,
very composedly, "Mamma, birdie only
fang half verse."

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