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Arizona weekly enterprise. (Florence, Pinal County, Arizona Territory) 1881-1893, December 31, 1881, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn94052364/1881-12-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME I.
FLORENCE, PINAL COUNTY, ARIZONA TERRITORY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1881,
NUMBER 40.
PROFESSIONAL.
Kiivvf a. howakd. marcts p. hatke.
HOWARD & HAYNE,
Attorneys and counselors at law, cornkr
Sixth and Fremont streets. Tombstone, A. T.
A. H. PARKER,
MlNJJia INGINEKR AND V. 8. DEPl'TY M1KKRAL
Surveyor. Oilir in San Francisco Jewelry
Store, No. 4.S0 Allen streot, south niile, bt tweeu
l'tmrth anil Fifth stn 9 , Tomlwtone, A. T.
JOUX U. Mil LAP. J. H. LUCAS.
LUCAS & MILLER,
ArrORXITS A1C1I COUNSELORS AT LAW, OPTIC,
rooms 5 and 7 Gird building, corner of 1" runout
and Fonrth, Tomb-tour. A. T.
Unf H. DAVIS. GEO. B. WILLIAMS.
WILLIAMS A DAVIS,
AtTOU-NIYH AT LAW. GIRD'S Nrw Bl'ILMMO,
oernsr of Fourth and Fremont sta. , Tombstone,
A. T.
WELLS SPICER,
ATTORKKT AND ConNsILOB AT LAW, 113 riFTH
rtmt, Tombstone, C'achise Co., A. T. Aim
Kotary Iublic; t;. S. C'onuuiii"H,r of Ie4a
lor California.
J. G. PARKE,
ClTTL SSrilNMR AND 0. S. MINERAL M'RVEYOR
Purveying done in all iU branches. Office,
Tremoot (treat, TombsUsis, Arizona.
6. T. HENDERSON,
Physician and bubo eon. ottick, 60 nue
haoit straet. Tombstone, Arizona.
A. 0. WALLACE,
Jnsrtca or the peace, fourth street,
tar dvor below Fremont, Tombstone, A. T.
K)HN M. MURPHY
Attorney at law, aoou 28, brown's hotel
Tombetoas, Arizona.
L F. BLACKBURN,
DtrvTT aiiFRirr and avd collector. ornc
with A. T. Jones, ofrioe lluaclma Lumber Co..
Fourth street, below Fremont. All official
business promptly attended to. Collections a
specialty.
J. r. HUTTON,
Attornet at law. omc ox nrru street,
baeweeu Fremont and Allen, Tombstone, Ari
asna. G. C G00DFELL0W, M. D.
Omci in tickers svildi.no, frxmont
street. Tombstone, A. T.
P. T. COLBY,
Attorney at law. will practice in all
ta oourts of the Territory. Ottioe in Gird's
bofldrnK, itims 11 and 12, ooruer of Fourth
and r remont streets, 'I"mhtne, A. 1.
(VUBD HaYMOND,
W.-iaiuouto City.
A. M. Walker,
lolilbstoue.
WALKER & HAYMOND,
Attorneys at law. promt attention 6iv
a to all business iutnwted to them. C'-olUo-
ttons made a sperinlty. A. M. n Hiker Com'
sniawutr or ieei Tor ir.e rta oi .-sevaim.
A. J. FELTER,
JPHTlCK OP THE PEACF, SoTaRT Pl'BLlC AND
Saal Estate Aireut. trtlios on rrvtuont street,
between Fourth aad Filth, TojulxW", A. T.
PR. R. H. MATTHEWS,
FHTAICIAS AND BURlKOW, TOMBSTONE, AIUKZO
M. Otfioe with W. Street, Fourth street, near
Aflen.
a O'slBLTINKT. O. 0. TOASTUM.
O'MELVENY k TRANTUM,
Attorneys at law. rooms 3 and 4 gird's
boflding, corner Fourth and Fremont streets,
Tarobstone, A. T.
S. M. ASHENFELTER,
Attorney at law, clipton, a. t. prompt
Mention (riven to any business entrusted to mv
MILTON B. CLAPP,-
notab y public, co n v e y a n c e r
AND PIKE INSURANCE AGENTS.
OfSoe at Saflorrl, Hudson & Co. 'a Bank,
Tombstone, A. T.
Thomu Wallace,
Mt.lINO broker, real estate agent and
CooTeraneer. Allen street, Toniltstone.
Bodman SI. Price, Jr..
Cmt ENGINEER AND IT. R. DEPUTY MINERAL
Surveyor. Otfioe Voisard building-, Allen street.
Tombstone, A. T.
Java. G. .H rward,
(Late of 1 ot Angeles.)
Attohnet at law. at prkkent at the op-
torn of J. W. Httunp. Tombstone, A. 1 .
W. A. Ilaj-wood,
Notary pcblic, cohner pophth and pre
saont streets. Tombstone, A. T.
T. J. Drum,
Attorney at law. oppicb in ticker's
building, 431 Fremont street, Tombstone, A. T.
E. P, Voisard,
AMAYPK AND NOTARY PUBLIC, ALLEN STREET,
Tombstone, A. T.
Charles) Ackley,
OmLENSINEER AND DEPUTY 1!. 8. MINERAL
Surreyor, Tombstone. A. T. Office on r"re
mont street, between sixth and Seventh.
J. V. Vicker,
REAL ESTATE AGENT, AUCTIONEER, CONTEY-
arvl M inintt Uiwrator. r remout street.
Fifth, Tombstone, A. T.
A. G. Lowery,
ATTomiEY AT LAW, PKEMONT STREET, BETWEEN
lourth and Fifth, Tombstone, A. T. Will
practioe in all courts. Agent or mining prop
arty. Conveyancing and collecting promptly
attended to. Keft;rnees yiven.
r. U. aMITlL
0. W. BFAULDINO.
Eavrl, Smith & Spaulding,
ATTORNETB AND COl'NKELORS AT LAW. OPriCE
la Drake's block on Pennington street, Tucsou,
Ariuma Territory.
John Roman,
ATTORJCET AT LAW, TPCSON, ARIZONA.
Webb Street,
Attorney at law, 113 fourth stritet, tom-
, Arizona.
J. W. Stump,
Attorney and cocnhei.or at law, roouh ?
and 4, Kpitupli' Building, Fremont street,
Tembstone, A. T. Will practice in all tlie
oourta of the Territory, and attend to business
before the Department at Washington, D. C.
Bpedol attenUon given to U. S. patent and
pensltm business.
Dr. GilUngbjun,
Dr. ciLi.moHAM (late op tikginia oty) is
now associated, in the jirnctice of Medicine
and Surgery, with Dr. liildersleeve. UlKce,
Epitaph buildiiiK, Tombstone, A T.
Dr. P. HeUer,
r!(TR0R)V AND PIITMKTIAN. OI TICF ON PIPT
tree, below Allen, Tombstone. A. T.
O.'BUCKALEW.
BUCKALEW &
Florence ; Pinal Gaunty, At T,
Silver King, Pinal County A T, Cssa Grande, Pinal County, A, r.
Globe, Gila County, A. 2
A Full Stock of Dry Goods
BOOTS, AND SHOES, HATS AXD CAPS, CLOTHING, FANCY GOODS, EOISERY, AND MIXING SUPPLIES,
HARDWARE, GROCERIES, LIQUORS, TOBACCO AND CIGARS. ALSO FLOUR, GRAIN, .
LUMBER, AGENTS FOR FALK'S MILWAUKEE EXPORT BEER. ETC.,
SILVER
.5 v -
BOOTS. SHOES, HATS, CAPS,
Groceries, Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco,
orXin, FLOUR, MINING SUPPLIES, Etc.
The GLOBE-STORE
Plats, Caps,
Mining Supplies,
FLOUR AND GRAIN, IN FACT
AT CASA GRANDE WE ARE DOING A
Groceries, Provisions, Grain, Flour, Produce, Genfs
Furnishing Coods, Etc.1
Prompt Attention Given to Goods Consigned to our Care
WE
FOB ID H! ZLHrVTE -RZ-
Mark Goods "Care of B. & O. Casa
GENERAL
-WHX ALWAYS BB POt'KD
KING
KEEPS CONSTANTLY OJH IIAXD A TVLL LIKE OF
KETER TAIIJ! TO HAVE A OOOD STOCK OF
Hardware, "Wagon Material, '
Groceries of Every Description,
TO SUPPLY TIIE WANTS OF THEPE0PLE IS0UR GREATEST AIM
Nr r--v- $Jr "V ' V 0
TJ W ir 'V' & OT"
BEING ALWAYS SUPPLIED WITH
AHE always prepared to contra gt
OF MACHIlTEEir OIR JTSr FEEIO-HT
TO ANY POINT IN THE TERRITORY.
JOSEM.OCHOA.
OCHOA,
smw ,fw -T4 rfli
-J V-ssil y-y m$
STORE
S 3
Grande, A. T.
THE OLD BBOW.Y SCHOOL 1T0USE.
BI TTJK BEV. D WIGHT WILLI AME.
In mfruory'B hall hsnss the pictnas.
And yearu of pad care are between ;
It haiigB witli a beautiful gilding,
And well do t love it, I ween. "'
It stood on a bleak conntry comer.
But boyhood's youiiR heart made it warm ;
It plowed m the sunshine of summer;
Twaa cheerful in winter and storm.
0, pay were the sports of the noontide.
When winter winds frolicked with snow;
Ve laughed at the freaks cf the storm-king
And shouled him on, all aglow.
We dashed at his beaut iiul sculpture,
Rc Bardies of all its ari-ay;
We plunged in tlie feathery snow-drift,
And aborted the winter away.
We at on the nld-faph toned benches,
Beguiled with our pencil and slate;
We thoufihtof the opening future.
And dreamed of our manhood's estate.
O, days of my boyhood, 1 blews ye,
While looking from 1 te's buy prime;
The treasures are lingLrirg with me
I gathered in life's eai iy time.
O, still to that b'eak country corner
Turns my heart, in wcarineps yet,
Where, leading my gentle young 'slaters.
With youthful companions I met.
1 cast a fond glance o'er the me&dow ;
The hi! Is just behind it I see;
Away lit the charm i f the distant?
Old fcehoo;hoU5et a bleeding on thoo I
Ohe Debt's Payment.
It was the dusk of evening, and night's
shadows were quickly gathering in the
little German vulage through whose
outskirts two lovors fctrolleJ.
They had loft behind them the cot
tages, and had. wandered off among the
green fields and under the shade of the
trees, behind vhich the sun had al
most sunk to rest.
It was an old story, the story of their
loving. They had been betrothed since
the girl was 1-4. It was well-nih five
years now, and on her 19Lh birthday
they were to be married.
She was an orphan, and her snug
dowry, lying eo. safely nestled away in
the village bank, she had accumulated
by the labor of her own hands. But a
shade was on her lover's face .to-night,
and even in the shadow her quick eye
discerned it.
" Sing to me, Hans," she whispered,
knowing that in song Hans Werter for
got all else.
After a moment's silence, he obeyed
her, and tlie sleepy birds woke in their
Bests and almost indignantly drew their
heads from beneath the soft shelter of
their wing, to listen to this strange, won
derful rival to the sweetness of their
notes. The air was tilled with the ex
quisite melody. It rang full and clear
and sweet. It sank down to the violets,
as they stirred in the listening wind,
then soared to the stars.
Poor little Marguerite ! Hans' music
always brought the moisture to her blue
eyes, bnt to-night it seemed filled with
something she had never heard before,
and her little hands were tigbuy inter
laced, and her red lips parted in a sort
of painful ecstasy.
But at the close she was all unpre
pared to pee him end the last note in a
dry sob, theu fling himself down on the
swum and bury his face in bis hands.
"Hans, what is it?" she cried, sink
ing herself down beside him, and trying
to raise his head upon her breast.
Was he weeping ? She had never ii
a!! these vears seen him thus mt.ved
His powerful frame eeemed shaken to iti
innermost center by the torrent of emo
tion that Bwept over it.
Almost rndely, in his unconsciousness
to all but his own suffering, he repulsed
her, only the next moment to be filled
with remorse.
Conquering himself by a mighty ef
fort, he drew her to him with gentle
for;e.
"Forgive me, dear," he said, softly,
" but never ask me to sing again, Mar
guerite. It only teaches me what I
might have been, and hat I am. Think
what it would be if I had the money to
reach Italy ! I could have the world at
my feet, Marguerite I could be great,
and famous. I know it I feel it. Bat
I am chained here, tending my herds
and feeding my cattle, powerless to
break the chains. I need so much
money so much aud I have so little.
Though I sold all I have in the world, it
would not bring me to my journey's end.
No, no 1 I muRt give it all up ; but
never never aitk me to sing again."
The girl answered him nothing, as
6he stroked the hot brow with the little,
cool hand, which, all browned aud hard
ened as it was, fell very softly, very lov
incrly. In her eyes he was a King, this shep
herd lad. Instinctively she kuew that
silence is oftentimes more healing than
npeech ; and, beside, a wonderful, daz
zling thought had crept into her own
busy brain, and driven all lighter thought
away.
Still silently they rose, and walked
silently home. At the door of her little
cottage, he stooped and kissed her on
the brow, as they stood beneath the
stars.
In two more months he was to share
her cottage the home left her by her
dead parents so they both had thought
scarce an hour agone. To-night, Mar
guerite knew difft rently.
How much would it bring, the sale of
this humble little she ter ?
It was this problem which banished
slumber through the long night hours.
It was solved three days later, when the
sum for its possession by strangers lay
in her hands, and, added to it tho nest
egg from the bank, made in the child's
eyes a fortune.
What mattered it that she was beg
gared ? It was for Hans' sake ! It was
now her turn to be silent, as, hand-in-hand,
they walked beneath the gold
studded sky.
She felt, for the fir t time, timid, al
most afraid, in his presence. That she
had performed an act of almost heroism,
she never dreamed. He was a hero ;
she was but a little, humble maiden,
whose proudest duty was to serve him.
" Hans," she said at last, very softly,
" I have been thinking, dear, since the
other night, and and, Hans, we won't
be married yet awhile. A wife would
only pull you down, instead of helping
you soar to the birds, where you belong.
I don't want you to think of me. I
want you to go away and study to bo a
great singer"
In the gloom, the man could see the
pallor on the speaker's face, as it grew
reflected on his own.
"Are you mad. Marguerite?" he ques
tioned, at last. "I've crushed the dream,
child! Don't float it again before my
fancy."
" You couldn't crush it, Hans, for it is
no dream, but a very part of yourself,
and that is the highest, noblest part !
Nor is it madness, Hans. See here !"
and she unloosed the f-trinsr of a l.ttle
bag she held tightly clutched in her
trembling bauds, and showed to his daz
zled eyes the glittering gold pieces lying
on a snug little pile of notes. "It's
enough, Hans !" she sa'd, in answer to
his gaze of utter bewilderment. " It's
more than what I heard you once say
would let yon be tua;ht for a whole
yar.- And it's yours, Han? all yours."
And, as she spoke, she strove to thrust
the bag within his grasp.
" Marguerite !" she shrank from the
sternness of his tomi "how did you
get the gold?"
" Houestly 1" she answered, proudly.
" The gold was to have been my dowry ;
the notes I I sold the cottage for
those."
" You did this for me, and yon think
so meanly of me aa that I would accept
such a sacrifice ?"
His voice quivered as he spoke, f
"Hans, I was to have been your wife,"
she whispered. " Who had the right,
if not I ? Oh, I shall be so proud so
proud, some day, when you come back
for your little Marguerite and I shall be
tue wife of the great singer 1 The will
point at me and say, ' Yes, he married
this little nobody, this little Marguer
ite, but they say he loves her,' and they
will think it strange that you should
love me from your great height. But
you won't forget to do that, Hans ever,
ever will you, my love ?"
"Never, until my voice forgets its
music. I would pray God to still it for
ever, could my heart prove so false.
Something within me, Marguerite, con
quers myself. It is hope springing
within my breast. - I will take your
money, little one, a sacred debt. Wait
for me two years, fraulein. Then I will
return to give you richest payment. I
swear it, and I seal it with this kiss."
Hans had gone, and Marguerite was
left alone. She lived now in one little
room, high up many stairs up which
she toiled wearily mjthe evening's gloom.
There were no more restful walks under
the 'stars now. She might have had
lovers, like other girls ; but no Hans
must find her without reproach on his
return. All day she had to labor from
early dawn, even for the humble shelter
now hers. ' Sometimes 6he was hungry,
sometimes cold, but all mattered not to
her. It was for Hans sake.
The winter's icy breath but hastened
the spring's blosaoms, and their first
fragrance would herald the incoming
summer, which would make the year
complete since Hans had left, and then
there would only be another year to wait.
At long distances apart, letters came.
Oh, how eagerly Marguerite spelled
them out I She slept with them under
her pillow by night, and they sank and
fell with every pulsation of her heart by
day. Labor grew light. She even for
got her loneliness, for they told her that
step by step Hans was nearing his goal.
Then there were weeks aye, months
when she heard nothing, and the
child's figure grew thin and her cheeks
pale, while every night she would run
breathlessly up to her room, only to
find the table vacant and that the poBt-
man had had no errand lor her.
But one evening, when she had al
most given np hope when the great
dread lest Hans should be ill, ovine or
dead remorselessly shadowed her path
way the silent messenger smiled her a
welcome. She burst into a passion cf
tears ere she broke the soaL It seemed
as though the joy must kill her.
But at last she unfolded the sheet,
when southing white and fluttering
fell to the ground. She stooped to pick
it up. '
What did it mean? It was a little
slip, with some figures in one corner.
They represented the exact amount she
had given Hans. Bewildered, she turned
to the letter. Its hrst words explained :
I pay oq my debt. Think, my little love,
ht it cost us, yet I earned it earned it,
Margui rite, on tiie very night of my dflnd. I
have song, and people have listened.' I looked
about among alt the faces on all the young
and beautiful women, with their eyes fixed
upon me but nothing inspired me. Then I
thought of yon, and, looking straight into
space. I forget them all. darling. There was
nr sweet, pale face floating in the air, your
bine eyes looking, not as theirs looked, but
down iuto my soul, and I sang to yon, darling
to yon. The flowers rained at my feet.
Great ladies tore the roses from their breasts ;
but I would have given them all, darling, for
one little tiij blo-som your hand had plucked.
They say I will be ri 'b and famous. I eannot
toil the world is fickle. The village banker
will aamIi vour order. But von ned not buv
b ck the little home. I am coming for yon
-ooo, to bring you to a cage better worthy my
mountain-bird.
Again and again Marguerite read and
reread the precious words. What cared
s e for the money? It had made Hans
great.
" Going back to your native village
vou. who have the world at your feet !
lighed one of Florence's most famous
beauties, as she looked into the. young
singer's eyes.
Six mouths had passed since he had
paid his debt to Marguerite, and still he
lingered. He had spent thrice the
amount since then on. a trinket to clasp
some fair lady's arm. Did he, in hold
ing it so lightly, forget that once it had
lieen a girl's all? Why, then, did the
-uh the lady uttered find a response in
his own breast ?
" It is duty which calls me."
"Duty 1" she murmured. " Are you
mre it is not mistaken duty? Ail vour
life has changed, Herr Werter. H, in
its early time, you pledged it to some
rustic maiden, think could she fill its
measure now ?
The beauty's voice trembled. The
cool softness of her flesh pressed lightly
against Iris burning palm.
"And if I give her up," he said,
" what then ? You will be mine ? "
But the "Yes" she uttered was
hushed by the madness of his ki-ses.
And Marguerite watched and waited.
He was coming, therefore he did not
write.
" He is great now. Marguerite ; he
has forgotten you, tue gossips said,
vhile she turned her back upon them.
in the hottest wrath her gentle spirit had
river known, that they dared thus ma
lion him.
It was the second anniversary of the
day whi'.'h was to have celebrated her
wedding, when they burst into her
ro m.
" Ha, ha ! " they said, " did we not
ell you so? pointing, as they spoke,
to the paragraph in the paper, which
.-..nuonnced tho betrothal of Herr Werter
and the greatest beauty in all Florence.
" Leave me," she said at last, when
they looked to see what she would do.
" I wish to be alone."
But one of kinder heart, after some
hours had passed, stole back into the
darkened room.
The child lay tossing in d3lirious fe
ver, and the physician, when called,
shook his head.
Tlie strain h"wi been too grett, he said.
She must die !
On the third day after, as the watchers
sat about the bed, a step sounded on the
.stairs. A man, stained with the dust of
travel, burst impetuously into the room.
" Marguerite !" he exclaimed "Mar
guerite !" Then he stopped and gath
ered the import of the scene before him.
" I did but falter," he cried, falling on
his knees beside her bedside. " I cume
back, my wild German daisy, to tell you
so. Oh ! Marguerite, is it thus I pay my
debt?
Then, as though that voice must pene
trate even the ni.Vs of fever, tLe blue
eyea opened, a wonderful ecstatic light
in their depths.
"Hans, she whispered "iiansl
Forgive me for the doubt which killed
e!"
And with the words a dagger-thrust
in his own remorsrf ul heart the spark
of life flickered and went out.
Marguerite was dead. She who had
lived for him died for him. They found
the paper he had sent her among his
letters.
Thus had he redeemed his debt ! An
empty slip of paper, worthless to all, to
return to him, but bearing' the interest
of a broken heart.
Girl Life in India.
On the day of her marriage she is put
into a palanquin, shut up tight, and car
ried to her husband's house. Hitherto
she has been the spoiled pet of her
mother; now she is to be the little slave
of her mother-in-law, npon whom she is
to wait, whose commands she is implicitly
to obey, and who teaches her what she
is to do to please her husband f what
dishes he likes best and how ok
them. If "j" mother-iii-law is le
will let the "url go home occasionally to
visit her mother.
Of her husband she sees little or noth
ing, bhe is of no more account to him
than a little cat or dog would be. There
is seldom or never any love between
them, and, no matter how cruelly she
may be treated, she can never complain
to her husband of anything his mother
may do, for he would never take his
wife's part. Her husband sends to her
daily the portion of food that is to be
cooked for her, himself and the chil
dren. When it is prepared she places
it all on one large brass platter, and it is
sent to her husband's room. He eais
what he wishes, and then the plat
ter is sent back, with what is left, for
her and the children. They sit together
on the ground and eat the remainder,
having neither knives, forks nor spoons.
Wlale she is young sue is never allowed
to go anywhere.
The lit tie girls are married even as
young as 3 years of age, and, should
the boy to whom such a child is mar
ried die the next day, she is called a
widow, and is from henceforth doomed
to perpetual widowhood ; she can never
marry again. As a widow she must
never wear any jewelry, never dress her
hair, never sleep on a bed, nothing bnt
a piece of matting spread on the hard
orick floor, aud sometimes, in fact, not
even that bttwten her and the cold
oricks, and, no matier how cold the
night may be, she mtut have no other
covering than the thin garment she has
worn in the day.
She must eat but one meal of food a
day, and that of the coarsest kind, and
once in two weeks she must fast for
4,4'enty-four hours. Then not a bit of
ood, not a drop of water or medicine
must pass her lips, not even if she were
dying. She must never sit down or
speak in the presence of her mother-in-,aw,
unless they command her to do so.
Her food must be cooked and eaten apart
Irom the other women's. Sue is a dis
graced, a degraded woman. She may
ever even look on at any of the mar
riage ceremonies or festivals. It would
oe an evil omen for her to do so. She
may have bet n a high caste Brahminic
'Usui ; but, on her becoming a widow,
any, even the lowest servant, may order
uer to do what they do not like to do.
No woman in the house must ever speak
one word of love or pity to her, for it is
supposed that if a woman shows the
slightest commiseration to a widow she
will immediately become one herself.
I saw an account a short time ago in
an English paper that they had beeu
trying to take the census of the popula
tion lately in India, and, as fur as ttiey
ii ad gone, they found that there were
' 80,U00 widows under 6 years of age !"
Can you imagine the amount of suffer
ing that little sentence tells of and fore
tells? Congregativnalist.
Jenny LIud.
"Where is Jenny Lind now?" inquired
a reporter of P. T. Barnum.
"Jenny Lind, or Mrs. Goldschmidt,
is living in London, near the Buckingh m
Palace, at a place called Pindico. Wi 6j
I was last in London I met her daugl te.
at a photographer's the royal photogra
pher'sand she insisted upon my seeing
her mother. So I went to see her, and
had a very pleasant visit Her marrii ge
was rather romantic. Goldschmidt is a
Jew. They studied music together.
When she came to America she sent inr
him to come as a pianist, and he used
play at her concerts.
"It was her own arrangement, and
she paid his salary herself. She thought
he was a grand musician, and used al
ways to get into one of the private boxes
and applaud his pieces. Though she
was older than . he, she loved him, auu
was bound to marry him. He renounced
his religion in order to be her husband.
I guess he thought it was a comfortable
place. She must be worth $1,1)00,000.
There was a joke about it at the time.
The question was, 'Why did he niai'ry
Jeuny Lind?' and the it ply, 'Because
he was gold sruit.' " -
Tlie Pentateuch.
Pentateuch is the collective name of
tho first five books of the Old Testa
ment. For centuries the Pentateuch
was generally received, in the church,
as written by Moses. Differences in
style and apparent repetitions to lj
found in different parts of Genesis and
the first chapters of Exodus led emi
nent critics to suppose that, in tlie com
pilation of the book, written documents
of an earlier date had been made use of.
The Mosaic authorship of the Penta
teuch is defended by many theologians,
who hold that any other supposition is
inconsistent with the plenary inspiration
of the Bible. But some of these writers
admit that, beside the account of the
death and burial of Moses, some words
and sentences may have been interpo
lated at a later period. Other theologi
ans hold that the documentary theory
is inconsistent with the divine authority
and inspiration of the writings attrib
uted to Moses.
Briglit'8 Disease and Ice AYatcr.
The idea has been advanced that
Bright's disease is attributable to the
immoderate use of ice water and cold
drinks, tho fact being cited that tlie
people of this country use 90 per cent,
more ice in drinks than the people of
any other country the inhabitants of
Greenland not excepted and that we
have 75 per ceut. more of Blight's dis
ease. The wine-drinking countries of
Europe are said to be comparatively free
from the cinlndy. while in America the
progress of tiie disease, it is asserted,
has kept pace with the increased con
sumption of ice.
"I don't so much mind," said Mr
HeDpeck, "I don't so much mind a
woman's having a mind of her own, 'ex
cent tltut in EHli a nn. 1 1
i . t ----- w-.... - ' ut'inmv
; takes charg- of li-r husband's also.'" "
PITH A5U P0IXT.
Tsk miser's little joke Don't give it
away.
A soft answer--What will yoti'have'
for breakfast? Mush,
The hardest road to travel' for a Eus-"
sian Czar is the shell road.
"What a beautiful thing, my dear, is'
a rosy cheek." "Yes,- husband, but
how great the contrast when the blush'
settles on the nose 1"
"Are yon mate of this ship?" said a'
newly-arrived passenger' to the cook.
"No, sir ; lam the man that' Cooks the'
mate I said the Hibernian.'
" Marie 1 what's that strange noise at"
the gate?" "Cats, sir." "Cats! Well,
when I was young cats didut wear stove-'
pipe hats and smoke cigars." " Times'
are changed, sir."
A cHciibH deacon at Tarry town, If. Y.,- -snored
so loudly that the sermon had to'
stop until he could be awakened. When'
aroused he jumped upandsaid : "I vote'
aye ! " The ayes had it,-
" How 18 your wife, Vr. Sruith ?" Saya1
S?uith, jiointiu-' to whore his wite sat in
the neit room 'it .ork upca his ooat.
" She's sew-Bew." Mr.-. Jones. "Oh, I,
see ; she is mending, sure enough 1"
Lotus A. Godkv, of Cocfc.yV Lady's
Book, left an estate inventoried at
8221,854. As a distmguiohed French-'
man said, " Jjet me publish the fashion
of a nation, and I care not who losca
money by publishing its classics."
It is well known that certain fowls fi'l'
their digestive apparatus with gravel and
pebbles, which act as niiii.-ttones to grind
up their food. Human beings should act
ou this suggestion, and before dining at
a Western reHtuurant swallow a sausage'
cutter. Philacli Iphid Neiett.
" Where would we be without worn''
en?" asks an Ottuinwa man. It is hard
to determine just which Way the majori
ty would drift, but some men we know,
of would be out of debt and Out of
trouble, and a good many more oui at
the seat of their breeches.
That jolly old' sea-dog, the Secretary
of the Navv, rushed into Congress one
day with a demand for an appropriation'
for sinking artesian wells on ship-board.
He explained that it was about lime our
navy was supplied with pure, fresh water
at all times. He was removed by force.
San Francisco Post
A QtjAKEit maiden of 60 accepted an'
offer from a Presbyterian elder, and,
being remonstrated with by a delegation
of friends appointed to wait upon her
for marrying out of the meeting,' she re
plied : " Look here 1 I've been waitings
just sixty years for tlie meeting to marry
me ; and, if the meeting don't want me
to marry out of it, why don't the meet-"
ing bring along its young men ?'' The:
delegation depaited in silence.
"I cannot pay you this morning,"
said the customer to the milkman,'
" you'll have to chalk it down." " Chalk
it down?" stammered the milkman.
" Yes, chalk it down. Why, you look
as if you didn't know what a'pieee of
chalk was." The milkman blushed,'
and, picking up his cans, sadly took his
whey from the door, pondering on the
uncertainty of humanity. SoineniUe
Journal. .--v-;.
- M Hast thou no ffte'ing . ' - -
To si-e me kneeing," J '-lv-3tty
love rove&Liug . : - - u
Xfaj alter aaj 7" Cj a
SUE.' ' -. f;-V
"Yes, I havefee'ing
j o see you sues lug,
Yonr ba'.d head revealing.' f
TaKeitswsy."
THE was a bright yonngter nauted Jack
Im his dssr mother chitr plac-Ail a tsck ;
Khs arose with s u Yip I '
Then KrabUid the youij; ch!p
An4 warnted him down una. r his back."
Derrick.
A man from one of the mral districts'
went to Washington to see the sights.
A member of the House, whose con
stituent he wus.'said, " Come up to-morrow,
aud I will give you a seat on the
floor of the House." " No, yon don't,"
answered Jonathan ; " I always manage
to have a cheer to sit cu at home, and I
don't coiae to Washington to sit on the
floor !"
A Galveston school- teacher asked a
new boy: "If a carpenter wants t,
cover a roof fifteen feet wide by thirty
broad with shingles five feet broad by
twelve long, how many bhingles will his
need T' The boy took up his hat anil
slid for the door. " Where are you go.
ing?" asked the teacher. "To find a
carpenter. He ought to know that bet-"
ter than any of we fellows."
A nice-looking old lady, with a snowy
circle of lace about her head, sat in "a
Wabosh-avenue car, and drew up her
skirts nervously, lefct the cataract of to-'
baceo-juice that was pouring from th.v
mouths of two loafers next her should'
deluge them. " Conductor," she asked,;
timidly, when he came iu, "isn't is
against the rules to spit on the' floor .of
the car?" "No, ma'am," replied tho n
gallant conductor, " spit wherever voii
like." Cliimnn Tntr Cit-mn
The Summit.
Johnny Boonspiller goes to school
and he loves eggs ; but, during the re -ei.t
gg famine, when the price was at mh-j
point that one would have to m0rtU).3
his house to buy a straw oiit of a heu'.-i
uest, Johnny had to give up his favoiiUi
teed. About this time the class of wliUh
ae was a brilliant member was called' in
vrive definitions. Said the teacher :'
"Tommy Tompkins, name something
very high."
" The big trees of California," sV.id
Tommy.
" And you, Jimmy Jackson."
" The Himalaya mountains, " ans it crt-d
Jimmy.
"And yon, Billie Jones."
"The clouds in the far-away ky,"
triumphantly replied Bilhe.
" And you, Johnny Boonspiller."
"Eggs," senteutiously remarked thr-t
young man, and, as strange as it nwy
seem, the teacher told him to jjo up
ahead. Steubenville Herald.
A Sly Cat,"
On the plains of Nevada a nti'c frina
any house, a gentleman noticed h cat,
huge one. It lay on its back, its le t
uppermost, and was apparently dead.
Around it, feeding mjf,uspectiiil, ;is
i flock of small birds. Just as lie vm
thinking how much easier it wouid lv,
lor the animal to feign death ami i-at ;
a bird by deceiving it than by aiipj.-iiig
up to it, he was astonished to bee tin.
cut suddenly roll over and grab .ue
the feathered tribe that was very m-;ir.
Tho other birds flew away a hliuurtd
yards or so, aud alighted. The -.it iu:y
made one or two mouthfuls of the g.im ,
and then crept around to wind .vui.l ot
the birds, Jaid himself out a; a n. Aij.j
once more successfully played i:io' uii
dodge.
A man in Alban? '
that he "had a
fourteen base-ball r t. li.e .-s
him asking what "Tie ri!''.. r0 t.-.n-. -
j were for tbo sca-on,

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