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The morning call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1878-1895, December 16, 1890, Image 2

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SPORTING EVENTS.
.he Match Between Corbett and
Slavin Ratified.
-rticles of Agreement Which WUI GoveVn
Ibe Dempsey •Fitur'mmons Match—The
Champion Pool-Player.
The California Athletic Club Directors
met last evening and ratified the recently
proposed match between Slavin and Cor
bett.
Both fighters have agreed that the pro
posal made to them by the club iv the way
nf a purse aud other mutters ia satisfactory,
mid that the contest can be arranged to take
place in the months of April or May next
The inaugural opening of the club, since
fistic exhibitions ceased, will take place in
January with a scientific contest between
Danny Xeedham and au unknown yet to be
pauied. An endeavor will lie made to get
Austin Gibbons, but if the attempt should
prove n failure the club has one or two men
iv its mind's eye, either of whom will not
fail to give a good account when called upon
for duty.
THE SECOND CONTEST.
The second exhibition which will be given
by the club In the new year should be the
most interesting event in tlie line of fistic
sports ever witnessed in tbis city. It will
be a meeting between Kilrain and Godfrey.
The latter has given the old club members
an opportunity ol feeing him at his best,
-und although he failed to reach the goal a
successful competitor, he nevertheless made
a favorable impression on tho best jud yes
of pugilistic art by letiriug from the fray
v lien ho had f. und that his opponent
was bis master. Godfrey met aud
was defeated by the sable pugilist
Peter Jackson, who bas yet to meet his
master, notwithstanding the fact that a
number of people are thoroughly satisfied
that Jackson would not be in it against the
demon, little Patrick Frauds Slavin, who,
since bis victory over the Californian, Joe
McAuliffe, has discovered his "front" name,
thereby giving precedence and title to the
more fashionable co.uoiuen which steps in
between the saint and the pugilist.
petek wii.i. he hi:i:e.
Feter Jackson will soon be here, and the
question now debated by the Directors of
the California Club is, "Whom can we pit
against the colored champion?" John L.
Sullivan's ntime has been mentioned as one
of the few who "might" give a good account
of himself before the Australian phenome
non, but the many obstacles which bave
sprung up withiu ihe past six months, that
would very materially interfere with the
consummation of a bout between these two
shining lights in fistiana, bave set the cluo
to thinking, aud tho general belief Is that
the prospects of a meetiug between John
aud Pete, are very slim at present,
BULL Q| DOUBT.
Although Slavin has cabled his willing
ness ' meet Corbett in this city and the lat
ter Las consented to fight him according to
tne terms proposed, there still lurks in ihe
minds of tbe Directors of the club a present
iment that this match will nut take place.
li« that as it may, should either Corbett or
Slavin find a loophole to crawl out of when
ihe tune has come for final business, Jack
son will be here to accommodate tlie man
who is willing to fight and there is very
little doubt but th.it the purse which has
been offered to Slavin and Corbett will
satisfy I'eter. The choice between the men,
it is safe to say, will scarcely be objected to
by the latter, as he has time and aga n
stated that either Corbett or Slavin couid
have a mate- when be was open for au en
gagement.
liJ-MTsEY AND FITZSIMMONS.
The following is a copy of the articles of
agreement which will govern the fight be
tween Dempsey and Fitzsimmons at New
Orleans on January 14th next, viz:
We, tlie undersigned, John li. Dempsey of
l*oitlHiiU, Oiegon, and Robert -"iiz«iniii>oiis ol
New Ze-iaud. do liereby agree lo engage in a
glove contest to a _ofa_, .naitjuiso( Oueens
berry niles, before Olympic Club of New Or
leans, on the uigbt of January 14,1891 at a
o'clock sharp, for a iiurse ot 'twelve thousand
dollars (SIL'.oOOj, of which lhe winner is lo le
celve e:even thousand dollars (£11,000), aud lhe
loser ll.e sum of one ihousand aoi! us (SIOOO),
li.c ssia contest to be with five-ounce gloves
Official tune-Keeper lo bo selected by the e:ub
Ibe contestants reserving tlie rtgiit of selecting
one nnie-liee. er eacli lo lejiresem tliem.
The tefeiee lo be selected by the club, subject
to tlie approval ot the said John li. JJeuipsey aud
l'ohrrt Hizsininiou?. Duili men to wt-ieli in live
n unites belore the call of time at tlie line side.
"Neithei oue lo welgn-over or above one bundled
aud tidy-lour pounds (154 pounds). To guaiau
lee oui good iaitb iv carrying out tiie above, both
as lo weigiit ami apptamnce at tlie pioper nine
aud place, we eacli h- itby ngiee to post a foilelt
of one thousand dollan (51O00) lv the bauds of
Ihe officers of lhe Olympic Club on or before Nov
ember 30,1880. It is understood thatsliould
either one of us fail to appear In tiie ling or weign
j \ei 1.">4 todiids, tlie oue so doiug shall forleii to
Ibe other the umounl ol his deposii.
Koi'.KKT 111/.SIMMONS,
John 8. Ui-.nrsiiY.
Wttnesse"—James F. Carroll, Charles H.Clute.
As will be seen by the above the size of
the mittens must have been satisfactory to
Dempsey, who will train at a beautiful sea
side resort within ten hours'ride of the place
in which be will dispute tlie question of
listic superiority with his Australian oppo
nent.
Ou the 7th of January a special car, under
the management of little Willie Vice, will
leave this city for New Orleans. Several
members of the California Club have sigui
fii-d their wil ingness to go South in the
above conveyance to see the great middle
weight fight.
A. CHANCE FOB MITCHELL.
A cable fnm London, <iated December
9th, to a New York sporting paper reads:
In reply to the cablegram of the California
.Mhie,ie Club to pui up a purse lor Young
Mitchell of ibe Pacific Slope aud Ted Fritchard
to liulu lor, the Inter says tb.-.t If he beals Alf
Mitchell ol Caiditl, with whom he is matched,
he Is going to light Jack Burke for £500 a side.
Alter he has ni. I liuike, win or lose, he will fight
-oung Mitchell lor £500 a side and a purse la
California.
FIFTEEN-BALL POOL.
J. Malono, the champion fifteen-ball pool
player of ttie world, gave an exhibition be
fore the members of the California Club
lust evening. lie astonished some of the
local expert billiardists by his teally clever
■plays. This evening he will give an exhi
bition at McCleery's billiard-rooms.
John Ready writes that he will fight
I nomas Gillen, who claims the title of
1-0-pound champion pugilist, cither with or
without gloves. Neither of the men are
known to the Directors of bjxing clubs as I
pugilist, of any note.
TOO LATE FOX THE BOAT.
How Belated Paaaen.era Act at the
Ferry-Landing.
A student of human nature cannot find a
better field for observation than the ferry
laniiing at the foot of Marke. street. This
is true of any hour ot the day, but more par
ticnlarly at the time a buat is at out to leave.
Jive minutes before each boat leaves a
warning oell is rung, and intending passen
gerx, who hear it away up Market street,
commence to "get a move on" to Ue in time,
'the moment a boat is timed to leave an
electric bell rings, the ticket-takers slam to
the doors, and thereisalwaysanumber even
then running down the passage-way, just in
tune to be too late.
Tnere are two entrances to the outer
waiting-room, and it is not until a passenger
passea through theui that he can see
•rfaet-ec the inner door li'adiug to the boat
is clo.-ed and the boat gone or not Wheu
the dour is closed, the luu commences. Last
night when the . o'clock boat steamed out
thirteen passengers were left, and all hud
run until they were out of breath. A fat
mau grunted and then sat down and wiped
the perspiration off his forehead. A man
who followed him straightened up as soon
iis be saw the door was closed and walked
nonchalantly and slowly down the room as
much us to say, *'l wasn't going on that boat
anyhow. lie was followed by a man who
came tearing along and looked blankly at
the c:o-ed door and then said, "
." A young laay, who c.ime next, looked
at him npprovingly, as much as to say,
"Ihems my sentiments." The next two
men looked at their watches and assured
everybody thatthe boat had left a minute
and a half ahead of tiiuo. Then all hands
sat down by the siove to wait for the next
bunt, nnd looked at one another with an
expiession that the man doubled up with
tlie cholera morbus in the hospital had
when he glanced al the man writhing with
lullamniatory rheumatism, an expression
that seemed to say, "Thank goodness, you're
left as bad as 1 am." Misery does like
company.
ttu-nr From Java.
Ihe British steamer Eton, Captain New
comb, arrived in port at nine o'clock last
evening from Java, bringing a cargo of
sugar for J. I>. Spreckeis & Bros. On the
way the steamer put into Nagasaki, Japan
for coal, aud sailed from there on Novem
ber 7th.
A Tlll-Tapper Caught.
John Mueller, an old-time thief, was ar
rested yesterday on a charge of stealing,
lie is said to have tapped a till south of
Market street. Mueller has served terms of
iiuprisouif.ent for burglary and larcenies.
rii e» From Mutch pi.
At s:..o'clock last evening an alarm was
turned i_ from Box 216 fur a fire at 2208
Steiner street. It was in the residence of
Edward Stemple. The damage amounted
to 575.
The alarm from Box 132 at 7:12 o'clock
was for a conflagration in the residence of
J. Mahouey at 823 Guerrero street. The
damage amounted to $250. Matches were
tne cause.
WHtEL VERSUS WHEEL.
A Unique Contest Ketween a Bicycler
nnd a Skater.
There was a big crowd of roller-skaters
and bicyclists at tlie Pavilion last night to
witness the race between W. S. Maltby of
Connecticut and A. W. Ridgely of this city.
Maltby can cut more capers on a wheel and
make it go with greater velocity than most
men. He isn't particular as to the manner
in which be uses it Sometimes he spins
around ou tbe big wheel, and sometimes he
amuses himself by getting upon a small
table and whirling around on the little
wheel. Ridgely is a veteran on the rollers,
nnd in the race showed that he was more
than a match for the wheelman.
Tiiey started at 9 :_0 o'clock to cover tbe
eight laps which make a mile in the rink,
lt was Maltby's first race with a skater, and
be made use of all the strength and agility
in his lithe body. For the first four laps he
was ahead of nis competitor, and Ridgely,
seeing that the race was going against him,
began to spirt and at the end of the sixth
lap had placed nine or ten feet between In in
and the bicycler, and this he maintained
until the end. The race was ruu iv four
minutes twenty-eight and one-quarter sec
onds.
THE WAGE-WORKERS.
Puzzling Action of the American
Labor Federation.
Ctftcers Elected by the Striking Iron Molders
acd Core-Makers—Op;osition Slipper Fac
tery—After the "Arbeiter Zzitotg."
A telt gram from Detroit announcing that
the American Federation of Labor bad sus
pended the "Trades and Labor Council of
California" until the subordinate union had
paid its nssessineiit, was read and discussed
at a meeting if lhe Executive Committee of
the Ciuncil of Federated Trades yesterday.
"lhe dispatch could not rightly be inter
preted, as the only body on the Coast that
could he classed cs the Labor Council of
California is the Council of Federated
Trades, v.i.tilt has paid all dues to tbe
American Ft deration up to January 1, 1891.
A telegiam was sent to President (Junipers
asking bim to give an explanation of the
affair.
Stme of the committee thought the dis
patch a mistake owing to tlie confusion of
names, while others believe the national
btdy is trying to compel some local union to
pay its dues by making tlie council here
compel tho union to pay up its assessment.
llin.N-Mdl.lJtlls.
Ten Workmen Sent B_al wn rd Inn lug tlie
Week.
The weekly meetiug of Iroo-molders'
Union, No. 10*9, was held last night, aud tbe
usual weekly donations were received from
the foUowing organizations: Upnolsterers'
Union, Typographical Union, No. 21. Jour
neymen Barbers' League, Tauners and Cur
riers, Car-builders' Union, Journeymen
Coop ers, Wire-Vforkera' Cnion, Carpenters
Union, No. 22, and Carpenters' Union. No.
iSS, of San Fraucisco; Cerman Typograph
ical Union, No. 22, ol Stockton; Carpenters'
Union, No. iMi, oi Haniard; lion-iuolder.'
v nious—No. 2'So, of Kock Island, III.; Nu.
231 of Salt Lake, aud Nu. lay ot Portland,
Oregon.
It was reported that during the week ten
imported molders had been induced to
leave the strut k foundries and were sent
East by Ibe union.
Nominations were made for officers and
the seuii-aiinual election will be held ou
Mt nday night, the 29th inst
J. F. Valentine, who has conducted the
affairs of the union so ably during the long
str.ke, will be re-elected Fresident.
A resolticiou congratulating the sewing
girls on their victory ut Strauss oc Cu.'s fac
tory was adopted.
As to Shipping; Sailors.
At a meeting or the Coast Seamen's Union
last night a committee was appointed to at
tend to the preparation of a new Congres
sional bill for a revision of tlie existing
maritime laws, whicli are alleged to be de
fective in many paiticulars, and do not af
ford sufficient protection to American sea
men. It was reported that some of the
boarding-house masters are now opposed to
the shipping of sailors through the board
ing-house, because tliere is "nothing in il."
Competition has raised the bonus to ship
owners to such a figure tbat tlie business is
no longer profitable, unless control can be
had over a large number of ships. The
smaller boarding-house men are new trying
to induce the boarding-niasters to sign nn
agreement not to ship any inure men, aud
lo compel the signing of coasting crews at
some central office.
Core-in titers' Jtili , s.
The Core-makers' Union elected the fol
lowing officers last night to serve six
months: President, G. 11. Langford; Vice-
President, Alexander Greeul.iigti; Treas
urer, James Thorn; Financial Secretary,
Louis Hubs; Recording Secretary, William
Goddard; Inductor, J. D. Nolan; Door
keeper, F. Sebnltz: Tiustees, Ai. Lennon,
Michael O'Connell and Johu Schutheas; Ex
ecutive Committee, F. Sclmltz, Gustavus
Hubs and George Webb; Auditing Com
mittee, P. Lunnpy, M. Keenan and J. D.
Nolau; Delegates to the Council of Feder
ated Trades, George Webb and G. H. Lang
ford.
—■
In Opposition to the (blu-ae.
An important meeting of the Executive
Committee of the Root and Shoe Makers'
White Labor League was held last night nt
which it was stated that a slipper factory
would soon be started in this city in oppo
sition to the Chinese manufacturers. The
new industry will turn out the same class
of goods as made by the Mongcls as well as
those of a finer grade. The factory will ap
ply to the Leather Federation for a white
labor stamp, as there would be no sale for
the goods without it. The league has made
arrangements to hold its second anniver
sary tali on Saturday night at R'uai B'rith
Hall.
Triple I.e. ■!.-, 1-r Committee.
The Legislative Committee of the Coun
cil of Federated Trades will meet commit
tees from the Slate Grange and tbe Farmers'
Alliance next Saturday at 3GB Jessie street.
Apian of campaign to induce members of
tho Legislature to pass a bill providing for
the adoption of the Australian ballot si stem
will be mapped out. A committee will also
be appointed to watch tlie progress of the
bill. Every precaution will be taken to
prevent the failure of the measure or Its
amendment so as to render it inoperative.
The ll.n ir-Mitit-r..
The Journeymen Horse-shoers' Union
met last uight and decided to increase the
initiation fee after Janusry 1. 1891, from
S2 50 to SIO. The boycott on T. Doyle's shop
is still prosecuted. A committee was ap
pointed to look after a noc-uuiou r.an em
ployed tliere who claims to be a member of
the union. Michael McDonnell was elected
a delegate to the Council of Federated
Trades.
Itetall Shoe Clerka.
The retail shoe clerks have granted a stay
of proceedings in the early closing crusade
until after tbe holiday season. At a meet
ing ol the association last night seventeen
more clerks signed the roll, and six more
applications for membership were received.
Arrangements are being made for an anni
.versary ball to be held some time next
month iv Odd Fellaws' Hall.
""'■li"-' J'rolecflTe Union.
The Butchers' Protective Union has
elected tbe following officers: President,
Georgo A. Ranbe; Vice-Pre-ident, Frederick
Zeither; Secretary, J. L. MeKee; Treas
urer, Joseph Rultgenbach; Sergeant-at-
Arms, J. Bunder. Board of Directors-
John Ott, «. J. Conolly, Lewis Rosenberg,
A. Chiesa, F. Zeither and Jacob Render.
The llin.i.-Mili.i,.
Four candidates were Initiated at a meet
ing of.tlie Harness-makers' Union last night
It was reported that a member had died
during the week aud had been buried by
the union. Owing to the winter season
business is only fair, but nearly all the mem
bers of tlie organization are employed.
After th* Arbiter Zt.lt.u_.
At a meeting of Carpenters' and Joiners'
Union, No. 304, last nlgbt, a resolution was
adopted condemning the course of the Ar
biter Zettune in taking sucb a prominent
part in politics during the recent campaign.
The Ooilook Good.
Plasterers' Union No. 1 initiated five can
didates last night at a well-attended meet
ing. It was reported that the outlook is
unusually good lor this season of tha year.
THE MORNING CALL. SAN FRANCISCO, TUESDAY. DECEMBER 16. 1890-EIGHT PAGES.
MINISTERS MEET.
The Central Tabernacle Nearly
a Bankrupt.
Eev. Robert Bentley Gives Soma Goad Advice
to Cepltal—Spend Whisky Hooey
for Missions.
The San Franci-co Presbytery wrestled
hard yesterday with tbe perplexing problem,
what shall be done with the Central Taber
nacle indebtedness?
Rev. Dr. Easton. Chairman of the com
mittee that has had tbe matter in hand
since the previous meeting of the Presbytery,
reported ibat the committee was opposed to
iucreasing the indebtedm ss §3000, as then
suggested, but instead favored selling the
property and moving westward.
The indebtedness of the church is 824.000,
and Dr. Ellis, pastor-elect, expressed the
firm conviction tbat it would never be paid
unless some benevolent citizen will donate
it. ne feared that moving westward would
work an injustice to Westminster Church.
A union with Central Church he thought
practicable, and he was surprised that the
committee did not suggest it. lie did not
wish to be understood that any cue church
could take all of his congregation, but apart
of tbe church he regarded as the natural
ally of Westminster Church.
To sell the property now under such a
pressure would be to sacrifice 25 per cent of
its real value. The bank holding the pres.
ent lien had consented to an additional
mortgage of $3000, which would carry the
chimb through to June; meanwhile it is
highly probable that a better bargain can be
effected.
In reply to an inquiry as to church assets
Dr. Ellis stated that the building alone was
worth $40,000, including tbe organ. He ex
plained that a canvass among the congre
gation proved that tbe income could not go
beyond $125 a month.
Rev. Dr. Chapman, one of the committee,
explaiut-d that nothing hud been said about
a union, because, as in all oilier marriages,
the consent of two parties was necessary.
No church had come forward with an offer
to assume the liabilities. He was inclined
to favor tbe proposition tbat the Tabernicle
and Westminster unite and build a largo
church in some suitable locality.
Rev. U. H. Rice proposed that the com
mittee's report be adopted and the com
mittee continued. He thoueht it would be
a serious tiluudi-r on the part of the San
Fraucisco Presbytery to let the Tabernacle
property be gradually absorbed by the mort
gage holders.
This seemed to be the general sentiment
of the Presbytery.
The matter was recommitted, and will be
again taken up at the January session.
—I-SIO-SAItY WOIIK.
More Money to Be tilvtn for Missions
end Lent, for Whisky.
The Congregational Club, composed of
the pastors of the Congregational churches
in this city aud vicinity, met yesterday in
T. M. C. A. Hall to discuss the recently held
"simultaneous mission meetings." It ap
peared from the testimony of the reverend
gentlemen, most of wlimii had attended oue
or more of these meetings, that the attend
ance had been rather small, but that a spirit
of fellowship had been boru whieli might be
profitably fo-tered.
Rev. J. Harris introduced a Japanese
named Myoslii. who has been to Eurtipe as
an emissary "f the Mikado, charged with the
task of securiug modifications nf existing
treaties between the European States and
Japan. Mr. Harris interpreted the 9hortad
dress which lie delivered, m which he stated
that he was a member of the Cougregationai
Church, and saw with keen delight the
progress it is making.
Rev. W. W. Scndder of Alameda read a
paper on missionary work, which was fol
lowed by a genera! discussinn. A proposi
tion to change the title, "Simultaneous mis
sion meetings," to "Fellowship meetings,"
had many adherents, but was not voted
upon.
Mr. Scudder contrasted tbe amounts
which are spent by the people of the United
States for missions and whisky, and inti
mated that il would be well to give much
mora to the former and much less to the
latter.
At the next meeting a committee will be
appointed to secure a more commodious
meeting-place.
"LABUK A.MJ SEKVICE."
A Tertlnent Hint to C'epltnl by ■ Sletbo-
dlst Minister.
An interesting essay on "Labor and Ser
vice" was read by Rev. Dr. Robert Bentley,
Presiding Elder of Oakland District, yester
day before the meeting of Methodist Minis
ters at Central M. E. Church.
Tbe doctor first referred to the different
conditions tbat surround human beines and
brutes upon enming into the wnrld. Nature
takes caro of the latter and provides every
thing, while with man' it is different. He
must toil almist from the cradle to the
grave, and It will never do to sit idly down
in the btlief that the world owes every man
a living. Glory is the crown ol industry;
idleness never won a laurel.
Discussing labor differences Dr. Bentley
expressed the belief tnat in all troubles be
tween capital and labor, capital should make
the first concessions. Labor would quickly
follow the good example, and trouble would
soon melt away. Tbe employer und em
ploye ought to get clo>er to" each other.
There never can be a solution of the labor
problems uutil tiie ebasan between master
and man isc!u!'cd. The immigration ques
tion is au important matter that must be
settled before there can be an end to strikes.
The tendency of the American laborer to
drink whisky is in Dr. Bt-ntlev's mind the
principal reason why the fanner demands
foreign labor. The young men of America
should be made to understand this.
The doctor's sentiments were discussed at
leneth and very generally indorsed.
Bishop Fowler spoke on the question of
immigration. He said foreigners were all
right as laborers or equals, but were a rank
failure as superiors. He had never known
a church in this countiy to succeed with a
foreign element iv the ascendancy in its
membership.
It was reported that the property at the
enrner ct \ an Ness and Austin avenues has
been purchased as a site for a new Metho
dist Episcopal Church. Rev. George _.
Beatty bus been appointed pastor of the
new church.
Bipt.st Ministers.
" Conscience; Its Nature and Office," was
the subject discussed at the Baptist minis
ters' weekly meeting yesterday, Rev. S. K.
Dexter of Vallejo reading tho paper.
He believes that a man may be thoroughly
concientious and yet lack good judgment.
The conscience urges one to do that which
the judgment says is right, even though the
judgment may err and be entirely wrong.
Reports from the various churches were
received, and all showed good work re
warded with success.
AKDhiiSOJN HIT,*, BACK.
Hla Absence From His Office la Dae to
Attention to Hininru.
Tlie Superintendent of Schools does not
like it at all that Director Woodward should
accuse bim of being absent from his office
all the time. Mr. Anderson says that he ia
generally in during his usual offlce hours,
and at other times is away, attending to his
duties as Superintendent. He says he is
willing to leave it to any teacher in the de
partment if he has not always been faithful
to the duties ot his offlce.
In tlie position he lias taken as against the
interference of Director Wo.dward, tbe Su
perintendent refers to the case of Barry vs
the School Board, wherein the court says
of the Superintendent:
That officernuud be the execullve head of the
seboet*. He nuisi have the control of tne schools
in tne full sense ol Ills office. -liiohuli him all
reports must come; lo liiru all mailers must be
siilniiited. lii permit teachers to be controlled
tlirouuh any otner channel would suhveii all dis
cipline and leooer tlie body of teachers uncertain
oi ll.elr allegiance and suspicious of all aiieinuts
to coutioi ihem. "No man can serve iwo mast
ers, lhe teachers cannot be asked to obey me
dictates ol the ( omnittiee on Classification and at
the same time be ioy M | tv inelr < xecuuve head
A Carpet-Beat, r Enjoined.
T.,,7,.,, TT 1 ._. .. _
-uoge uoge lias granted the City Carpet
Beating and Renovating Company an in
junction restraining H. L. Jones from carry
ing on a rival business. Jones recently sold
out his business to tho company, agreeing
not to engage In a similar business for ten
years.
Inyo Indiana Agitated.
It Is proposed to ask the Legislature to
authorize the foimation of four military
S"_BS». in Owens Valley, Inyo County,
as the Piute Indians in that vicinity, num
bering lO* warriors, are becoming a^toti
few'ed ™^ Cruze> and *5_5)5
The Charity Concert.
T-» — I -m . . . .
me evening of music and drama given at
2& Us\a? U- 310 Post street, by Professor
-hlelds-Aslaehsen, for the purpose of rais
ing funds toward "an old folk*' Christmas
dinner," includes an interesting programme:
Duo, organ and piano, Mr. Hammond, or
ganist Church of the Advent, Oakland, and
Mrs. Murdock; violin solo, Mozart's sixth
symphony, Mr. Alfred Couid: soprano solo,
aria fiom "Robert le Diable," Mrs. Rnsa
Walker-Watson; "A Day Dream," with
violin obligato, Mr. Harry Hatch; scenes
from "Hamlet" aud "Othello," Mr. C. S.
Rouse: duettino, "Is Vivo c tamo," Mrs.
Rosa Watson and Professor Shields-Atlach
sen; selections by Bree's Mandolin Club,
and other numbers. The tickets can ba had
at Sherman & Clay's.
THREATENING WEATHEB.
Storm Signals Ordered Hoisted on the
-nast of IVnsliln.lnn.
The following special bulletin was issued
last evening by Lieutenant John P. Finley,
U. S. A., in charge of the Signal Service
Offlce In this city •. The cyclone of Saturday
last disappeared to the eastward during Sun
day night, followed by a rapid rise in the
barometer and winds shifting to westerly in
Oregon and Washington. Since this morning
the baioinetf r has again fallen very rapidly
in Weitern Washington and Western Ore
gon, and another cyclone has appeared at
sea, to the westward of Vancouver Island.
The winds have shifted to south and east
in Oregon and Washington, and threaten
ing weather is reported from all parts of the
Jsortn Pacific region. The winds are fresh
to brisk in Western Washington and storm
signals have been ordered for stations along
that coast. The fall in the barometer has
extended southward along the coast to San
Fraucisco, giving rise to heavy cloud for
mation in Northern California and threaten
ing weather on the upper northwest coast
of the State. Rain is predicted for Oregon,
Washington and the extreme northwest por
tion of California.
CHINESE FLOODS.
Consul Bowman's Report of lhe
Inundations.
Hundreds of Mile* of Cultivated Land Under
Water and Crops Destroyed-Appeal for
Aid to Relieve Saffsricg.
Special to The Cali.
Wasiiisoton. Dec. 10, 1890.—United
States Consul William Bowman in a report
to this Government over date of September
4, IMK), from the Consulate at Tien-Tsiu
ami made public to-dtiy, throws some light
upon the disastrous Huods which overtook
the northern part of China during the rainy
season. Tne following is a brief resume:
The drainage of that part of the great
Chinese plain which is situated north of the
Yellow River for the muj,t part centers at
and abnve Tien-Tsiu, and the accumulation
of water is carried to the sea by the Pei-ilo,
or llni-110, between Tien-Tain and Taku.
ln ordinary season this stream is tilled to the
brim by the July rains, but ln seasons of
excessive rainfall, like the present, the
levees give way aud the surrounding coun
try is put under water.
The ralus at Tien-Tsin began July 7th,
winch is tho usual time for the opening of
the rainy season. Ou that day there fell
554 inches. On the lGth, 17th, ISth, 19th,
-Ota and 21st of the mouth there fell 22
inches of rain, viz., 4.20, (i.BO, J.lO, I.GO and
5.7t) inches respectively. Reports from the
ciuiniry north an.l northwest of Tien-Tsin
indicate still heavier rains over the region
drained by this system of rivers.
By tho 23th of July they were aware
that a catastrophe, was imminent, and on
the following day tiie river banks gave way
ou the eastern, anil also ou the western side,
just above tho foreign settlement. On the
eastern side tlio iilain was covered with
water as far as the eye Ct.uld reach. On the
western side part of the French concession
was inundated aud many Chinese houses
swept away. These two breaks did uot re
lieve the pressure, however, fur they were
both below the juiictiou of the rivers. Ou
the 22J the levees of tlie Grand Caual. at a
point distant about seven miles from Tien-
Tsin, nave way, and this saved the city of
Tien-Tata from destruction, but,in doing so
flooded a vast area to the south and west.
At the date of writing the foreign settle
ment aud the uative city of Tien-Tsin were
like an island in tha midst of the waters.
Un the -Sth of July a Beefing of
tlie foreiun residents of Tien-Tsiu was
called to consider what measures of relief
might be taken lo alleviate the sufferings of
the Chinese pour. They intend to purchase
grain for free distribution during the winter
and an appeal to the benevolent in other
countries will be made. A committee was
appointed to collect information, and it re
ported that, taking Tien-Tsiu as the center
of a circle with a radius of about 150 miles,
all the water falling within the northwest
quadrant should hud its way into the l'ei-110
just above the city of Tien-Tsin. The rivers
which drain this sectiou of the couutry, aud
which ull meet just above 1 ieu-Tsin are, be
ginning with the Grand Canal and going
rouiitl wiih the hands of the clock: The
Grnnd Canal, which, from Lin-C.'iing-Chow
to Tien-Tsin, is formed out of the bed of tlie
Wei Kiver; the lisiu-hsi Kiver; tlie Shang
hai Kiver; the Hun or l'ung-tiug Kiver, aud
the Pei-Ho.
This year the rains came late, aud the
year's supply seems to have ialleu in less
tlnm a month. The mountainous districts
to the north and west uf Peking emptied
themselves over the plains, which, in the
vicinity of the sea, have no appreciable fall;
so that nn all sides to the west, north and'
east of Tien-Tsiu there is now a vast lake.
The country round, so far as the sea to the
east, and for a distance of from 40 to 00
miles to the west, north and south, is now or
has lately been under water, and the crops
are lost.
The banks of the Grand Canal burst in
two or tbree places near Uu-Ching-Chow,
and water pouring through the breach on
the left bank was Mowing toward the north
west of Tien-Tsin, and added to the inun
dations in that ouai ter.
The country immediately round Tien-Tsin
was explored on all sides, one party making
a circuit of about thirty miles. The plains
all round were found to be flooded to a
depth varying from four to eight feet. The
observations made show clearly that the
raisud laud on which Tien-Tsin and the sub
urbs stand divides the current of tbe flood
into two streams. Along a line about we*t
of Tien-Tsin the waters part, the greater
portion flowing east across the embank
ments of the Huu-Ho and Pei-110, and tlie
rest south across the embankments of the
Grand Canal.
Another party went to the west past the
Hai-Kwang-Ssu Arsenal, and entered the
Grand Canal through the breach which is
nearest the city of Tien-Tsin. Proceeding
west, th6y came to Yank-Uu-Ching the
town at the elbow where the caual makes a
right-angled turn to the south. Here was
found a large breach, and a few miles fur
ther on still another. Through the breaches
just mentioned the water was rushing on to
the Race-course Plain, the water to the
north of the caual being two or three feet
higher than tha water to tlie south. The
only outlet for the water issuing through
these branches is through the creeks which
fall into the Pei-Ho In its lower sections. It
is not until Pai-tang-knu is reached that
the level of the Peiho is low enough to
allow the Hoods to drain into it. Beyoud
Pai-taug-kou the plain drains iuto the river
wherever there is nn openine, but
tliere is no other outlet to the sea
in any other direction, for between 11a
chanii, on the Grand Canal, and Hsin Cheng
on the Pei-Ho. there runs the Hsiao Chan
Canal, with very substantial banks which
serve lo dam up the river and prevent the
plain drainiug away in a somberly direc
tion, as it used to do before this Hsiao Chan
was constructed. On the other hand, this
canal is taking off a large quantity of water
from the Grand Canal and leading it by a
safe channel to the Pei-110 at Hsin Cheue*.
One gentleman explored this Hsiao Chan
Canal by following the Grand C.mal as far
as Ala-chaug and then going through with a
strotig current to the i'ei-Ho at Hsin Cheng
In thi.ci.nal the water-level was higher than
in the plain to the north, and the country to
the south, being protected by the crock em
bankments, had escaped the general inun
dation, and its flourishing crops are the one
bit of bright color in this sad picture.
.x.An°y>.%1 Isentleman followed the course of
the Pei-Ho upward as far as Pei-tsang, and
at intervals beyond Hsi-ku found breaches
in the raise-l Peking road aud in both banks
of the Pei-Ho. through wniob the pent-up
waters of the west were flowing in an east
erly direction.
As regards the number of persons who
will he in want it was impossible to form
an estimate, but this Is but a specimen of
what exists for quite 100 miles in some di
rections. The destitute in the villages of
which fien-Tsln forms the headquarters
are being attended to by the officials and
the native benevolent societies. At one
t me there were 30,000 refugees in and about
the city, principally women and children;
but the officials, fearing disease, took steps
to send them back to their homes.
.„T. h2 seneral imtression ot the Chinese Is
that during the winter and spring there will
be acute aud widespread misery.
-» _
A West Eud, London, boot-maker has had
au order from an American patroness for
several pairs of boots and slippers to be en
crusted with precious stones.
GOLDEN GATE
COMMANDERY.
Installation of Officers and a
Banquet.
A private installation of the newly elected
officers of Golden Gate Conimandery, No.
16, Knights Templar, took place at their
lodge-rooms, 131 Post street, last evening,
and the rooms were exquisitely decorated
for the occasion. The asylum in particular
presented a beautiful appearance, there be
ing, besides a profusion of flowers, a gor
geous array of silver banners presented by
tbe various State commanderies at the time
of the conclave, which was held in this
city.
The banquet hall also was gayly dressed
forth, and the three long tables at which the
guests were seated were laden with flowers.
This work was superintended by Mrs. Colo
nel Edwards, assisted by Mesdames Firth,
Clark, Sumner. Booth, Hatch, Young,
French and Miss McKee.
At the installation, which was strictly
private, tbe following officers were in
stalled: Colonel W. Edwards, Commander;
Dr. A. B. Yon Waffelsburg, Generalissimo;
J. N. Firth, Captain General; C. L. Field,
Senior Warden: G. D. Clark, Junior
Warden ; H. ii. Hunt, Standard Bearer; D.
A. Baum. Sword Bearer; W. G. Dodd, War
den; S. D. Mayer, Musical Director; N. B.
Noble, Herald; A. W. Baldwin, W. H.
Crini and J. G. Spaulding, Guards.
After the installation a banquet was
served in the dining-room, and toasts were
responded to in the following order: "The
Grand Captain of the Encampment of the
United States," Reuben 11. Lloyd; "The
Grand Commundery of the State of Califor
nia," Thomas H. Caswell; "Golden Gate
Conimandery, No. IG," A. G. Booth: "Tem
plar Choir of the Graud CumiuauJery," S.|D.
Mayer; "California fommanderv, No. 1,"
Joseph Lilchtietd; "Oakland Conimandery,"
George D. Metcalf; "Drill Corps of tho
Grand Commandeiy," F. W. Sumner; "Tha
Government of the United States," John T.
Cutting; "Denver Club, No. 92," William
O. Gould; "Templar Choir of Golden Gate
Conimandery," Joseph G. Barton; poem,
by C. S. Benedict; "The Ladies," William
J. French ; "The Lawyers," Arthur Rogers ;
"The Doctors," R. Beverly Cole.
At the close of the banqupt a handsomely
engraved watch was presented to Carlos
Young, the retiring Commander, to which
be responded iv an appropriate manner.
EXIiMFT FIKi.MEN.
Annual Mier Hon of Officer*—A Healthy
Financial Condition.
The Exempt Fire Company held its an
nual election last night, and selected the
following officers to serve for the ensuing
year: Henry D. Hudson, Fresident; Will
iam Larkin, Vice-President; J. J. Guil
foyle, Secretary ; George T. Rohen, Treas
urer; Executive Committee—R. H. Buck
man, H. A. Chase, J. E. Connelly, D. A.
Finn, Godfrey Fisher, A. J. Jessup, James
Kentzel, J. J. Mahoney, C. B. McFarlan,
Sam Stryker; Board of Directors—A. Mas
sey (President 1, Joseph Figel (Secretary and
Ireasurer), William Ryckmun, Joseph Mar
shall and E. T. Antliouy.
Mr. Figel, Treasuierof the Board of Di
rectors, made tlio following financial report
fur the year about to close; Sick benefits
paid, .3252; paid to orphans, $645; paid to
widows, $785; paid fur funerals, S280; ex
pense of keeping up tlio Exempt Firemen's
lot in Laurel Hill, $au); repairing same,
$175. 'lhe total assets of the company,
alter paying all liahilities, are S-.xj.CS5 02.
Out of the boo members that originally
composed tlie company, 142 are left There
were six deatlts during the lust year.
The company has decided to give a ban
quet on the third Monday in January, at
which time tbe newly elected officers will
be installed. The committee appointed to
make anangenients is: George T. Bowen,
J. L. Durkee and Henry A. Chase.
Overruled the Demurrer.
Judge Huut has overruled the demurrer
to the cimilaint in the suit of Charlotte
Lee again>t Jobu Lee, her father-in-law, to
recover $2.''i,000 damages for having, as she
alleged, alienated the affections of her bus
bi tui, the defendant's son.
Jud_e Gibuttii's Itesl.iißtltin.
Judge James 11. Gibson, Commissioner of
the Supreme Court, handed in his resigna
tion yesterday, to take effect January Ist.
He announced it his intention to engage in
the practice of the law at Sau Diego, with
Iltdi. J. D. Works.
The Difficulty 5,,1v.-,1, j
T~ .......... . . . . 1
i o mauy of our readers Just wha; to gire to their
friends as a Christmas gilt v a matter or no little
difficulty to solve. To such we would advise a visit
to the coiiimudluus and banilsoiuely stocked ware
rooms ot tuelndlsiiapolts Furniture Company. 750
Mission street, where the long rows of richly and
artistically upholstered parlor iumiture at once at
tract and pit ate the eye. On every hand one's eyes
are met with every kind aud variety or household
furniture, such as book-cases, ladies' desks, chliTo
nlcrs, upholstered rockers, with plush seats, etc.,
etc., all of the latest anil most fashionable designs,
making tbem both useful and desirable gifts.
A New I'onimandar.
Captain John Weatherson, formerly mas
ter of the bark Almy, was yesterday ap
pointed to the command of the sealer C. H.
White. The White is now fitting up and
will leave on a cruise about February Ist.
As A Rule
Your own feelings will tell
you, when you are in need
of a tonic or Blood purifier.
A lack of energy, a tired
feeling, depressed spirits are
good indications that the
blood is sluggish and your
system is out of order.
"I HAVE U EO S. S. S. FOR DE
BILITY RESULTING FROM
CHILLS AND FEVER, ANO HAVE
FOUND IT TO BE THE BEST
TONIC AND APPE HZER 1 HAT I
EVERTOOK. iT ALSO PREVENT
ED THE RETURN OF THE
CH.LLS." A. J. ANYLIN.
EUREKA, SPRINGS. ARK.
Books on Blood and Skin -linsancn free,
ihe swift sr-eciric co, atlamta, a_
an 14 ly TnThSa
WAGONS
AT THK
GOLDENAGE
BAZAAR!
ON JANCARV IST WE MUST OIVE UP
our Wagon Warerooms, aud in conse
quence we are obliged to close out all of our
reserveatockof Toy Wagons, Carts. Barrows,
Doll Carriages, Velocipedes and Tricycles
before that time, and we have marked them
so low that tbey certainly will go. Don't
uilss a chance at them. Remember, those
goods are all new and direct from tlie facto,
rles. As this Is our first year ln business we
have no chestnuts. Come to-day and make
your selections and have tbem delivered De
cember -4th. You know it may rain a little
later.
TOYS!
We have oue whole floor devoted to Toys
and there Is nothing lv the world's market
not here represented, at loner prices than
ever before prevailed lv San Francisco. Come
to-day before tbe assortment Is broken.
PLUSH GOODS!
We hare positively the largest and best as
sortment ot Plush Goods lv tbls city and lust
so positively our prices are tha lowest. __.
limine them and you will find this to be true.
Tbe same may bo suld of our Albums, Jew
elry. Silverware, Clocks, Bronzes. Bisque Fig
ures, Vases, Cutlery, Fans, Xmas Cards,
Frames, Perfumery, Canes, Umbrellas and
Smokers' Articles, and »he assortment does
not stop here. OCR VARIETY IS KNDLESS.
Come iv and Inspect the store; make your
selves at home and price our goods. No ooe
win aak you to buy or make you feel uncom
fortable, whether purchasing or not.
ALL ABI WKI.COHE.
soziisT&co.
421 Kearny Street,
Nl'-AK AI.irOBMA.
NOTE-Ooods delivered free to Sausalito.
Blitbedale. Mill Valley. Tiburon, Antlocn,
San Rafael, Stockton, Haywards, Valleio
Napa, San Lorenzo, Melrose. Sau Leandro,
Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley,
Thla Week We> C'.ee at 11 P. M.
no DO SuTu lm
■L-a________k_MM_M—
TO WEAK MEN
Bu-erlng tract the effecteof yoathfu anon, early
decay, wasting weakness, lost manhood, etc., I win
aend a valnahle treatise (sealed) containing (Ull
particulars (or home cure. FREE of charge. A
splendid medical work: should be read by every
man who la nermns and debilitated. Addresa,
I*rof. V. C. FOWIKB, -flood-e.Conn.
dally
MISCELLANEOUS.
Causes
Of Scrofula.
First or all, Scrofula la Inbeiited. Tbe large major
ity of people suffer more or leas from impure blood
given tbem by tbeir parents.
Second, Scrofula maybe acquired by trying to live
on insufficient and poorly-cooked food, which falls
to supply tbe blood wltb enougb ot tbe elements of
life and health.
Third, confinement ln poorly ventilated rooms,
wort-sbops or factories, or living Id damp, un
bealtby localities, will poison tbe blood and de
velop scrofula.
For All Cases
or Scrofula, whether Inherited or acquired, and la
whatever form, Hood's Sarsaparilla Is tbe most suc
cessful medicine known. It thoroughly expela
every trace ot Impurity, gives tbe blood those ele
ments of bealtb and vitality wnlch lt craves, and
helps tbe liver and kidneys, tbe great sewers of the
system, to perform their natural duties.
Hood's
Sarsaparilla
Sold by all druggists, s1: six for (5. Prepared only
by C. L HOOD ft CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mass.
100 Doses One Dollar
mrl S cod
S. GORDAN,
Successor to
GORDAN
BROS.
Merchant Tailors
13 KEARNY STREET,
SAN FRANCISCO,
Have received a large shipment of
Imported Woolen Goods
For tlie Winter Season.
THEY WILL MAKE SUITS TO ORDER AT
REDUCED PEICES
In order to dispose of same before stock
taking-.
deU SuTuTb
No book for the young people equals AN
ADIKONDACK CABIN, by Margaret
Sidney, in beauty of illustration or make
up. Its charm of style and intense interest
shows the author of Five Little Toppers at
_er very best. Quarto $1.75.
THE L.ION CITY OP AFRICA, by
Willis Boyd Allen, is a book the boys go
crazy over, yet it is based on fact, and pre
sents the wonders of Central Africa in the
most realistic way. Quarto 52.25.
The two gift books for adults that excel all
others in value of matter and beauty of illus
tration areOUK _;.... l_ phebidexts,
THKIU WIVES AND CHILDREN, by
Harriett Taylor Upton 'Sl.OOi and THE
POET'S _EAR, by Oscar Fay Adams
(.15.00).
Ask 3*onr Bookseller to show you these, or
send price to D. LOTHROP CO., Boston,
and you will receive them carriage free.
Send postal for catalogue of one thousaud
other charmine Holiday B.oks. it
THE MAN
«."HO HAS NOl KKAI) THK BOOK ON THK
" payment of the U. S. ltonled Oelit
WITHOUT INTEREST
lteceutly Isaued by tba "Cal. Banker . Magazine "
LOSES
Tha beat Idea or American finance ever printed.
I rice, _f> ceuts, to be bad of all booksellers.
Trade BvppUi d l.y a. K. News Company.
delß It lp *
GKEAT COLLECTION FOX THE HOLIDAYS
-ABLER, I'EASE and other pianos.
MATTHIAS GRAY COMPT,
200 ANdP7jJ?.g?rb.,?ST ST
FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS
GROWN UP,
SEQUEL TO
FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS MIDWAY
Will run as a serial through WIDE
AWAKE next year.
de! 6 lt
PALACEJIOTEL.
THE PALACE HOTEL OCCI'PIE- AN EVTIII.
block In the center ot Saa Franclsoa It la uu
Biodel hotel of tlie world. Fire and earthquaza
crooj*. Has nine eleTators. Evary room ta larta
light and airy. The veniiUt lou 1* per loot A mm
and closet adjoin erery ma Ail rooms are easy
cf acceaa irom broad, light corridors, The ceatral
conrt, Ulumlnatnd by eiectrlo light, Ita immense
llaaaroof, broad balconies, carriage-way and tropi
cal planta, are featurel hitnerto unknown in Amort,
can hotels, .vests entertained on either me Amer
ica- o,,Europeau plan. The restaurant Lj tha dasi;
In thecity. becure rooms In advance by tele^rana
«»,„ THE I*AL*H/i: llUl'ilL,
«"* 7g suu •rij.uctsuo. <j«o.
JAPANESE GOODS!
Japan Curio Trading Co.
126 Kearny St., Upstairs, Room 6.
SCREENS, SILKS, rORCELAIN, LACQUER,
HOLIDAY GOODS, ETC.
di-5 14t -p
THE CALIFORNIA.
Strictly Europj>„n I'lan, Absolutely Fireproof.
OPENED OH KM 151 It 1, 1890.
ROOMS HAVE SUNLKiHT ENTIRE DAY. THE
only stnctl> flrst-class hotel ln Sun Francisco.
Blagiiiltceiii appointments. Unparalleled ln beauty
and brilliancy. Unqnestlnnably the most beantirnl
aud luxuriously lumlsbad botal In America. Kooma
en suite with baths ot latest exposed sanitary
plumbing. Electric lights throughout. Erery con
venience fnr comfort of guests. Most centrally
located, being In mldstof amusements,art naileries,
sbops and other places of interest. Its cuisine Is ot
a peculiar excellence. Restaurant and service per
fect. Halt portions served. Itooms $1 per day aad
upward. iioicii ,\ KINZLEK, Manaaera.
, delo tf
4s*jjjoGty
fir ftw^ n**Pj|-f£
PRINCIPAL OFFICK,
439 CALIFORNIA STREET,
' Ban I*i an cisco, CaL
niy. . rSuTu tf
*TCr_.___-_ ______»* ~~
SUKFERINII fllllM THE EFFKCTSO. YOUTH
fuI errors, early decay, wasting weakness, lost
manhood, etc., should use DVHIANA HIT
TEKS, the great Mexican remedy; gives health.
aaa strength to the sexual orgaus. uo7 tl cod
a-ISCEL-AKEOUS!
■ BE
AT THE
CHUN. BOLE
BAZAAR!
THE BEST
DOLLS.
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
GAMES,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
TOYS,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
WATCHES,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
CLOCKS,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES,
THE BEST
JEWELRY,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
PLATEDWARE,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
UMBRELLAS,
R AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
CANES,
AT THE LOWEST PRICE 3.
THE BEST
CHATELAINE BAGS
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE B>?ST
PURSES,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
LAMPS,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
BRONZES,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
CHRISTMAS CARDS
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
OPERA GLASSES,
BAT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
ALBUMS,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
BRIC-A-BRAC,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST
SMOKERS' TABLES,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
S THE BEST
CUPS and SAUCERS
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
japanesiTgoods,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
THE BEST X
OF EVERYTHING,
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
santaTclaus
Will receive callers in the morn
ing only during this week.
NOTICE.-During this week
our stores will remain open
daily until IQ:3Q o'clock P. M.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE
to Sausalito, illltneilale. Mill Valley, Tibu
ron, Antloch, San Rafael. Stockton. Hay
wards, Vallejo, Napa, San Lorenzo. Melrose,
fan Leandro, Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley.
NOTE.—We have arranged so tnat pur
/ chasers wishing to lay goods aside can Ue
accommodated and the goods lie delivered
at any time they direct.
NEW iLLI'SIUATED C ITALOOUF
Jnst out. Mailed lree on application to any
address.
DA.VIS BROTHERS,
718 Market St and 1234 Mar.et SL
nolo SuTuTti
I. SltilS' 111 SUE.
IRVING HALL.
....COMMENCING....
MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 15TH,
...AND TO 8E....
CONTINUED EVERY EVENING
Until Entire Collection is Disposed of.
Over 100 Highly Finished
PAINTINGS!
Still Life, Figurp and Laodtcape, by ths Well-
Known Artiif,
STRAUS,
Who hit devoted the last six yean of study
to this collection.
troy * SONS.
Real Estate and General Auctioneers.
doi* tt age Market st.
317-319 Kearny Street, bet. Bush and Fine.
SCIENCE HAS CONQUERED I OUR SYSTEM
KOK TESTING ANI) ADJUSTING to correct
any error ot retraction Is nsed on this Coast ONLY
HY CS. and la indorsed by tbe leadln. authorities
throughout the United States as THK KKSTKNOWN
TO SCIENCE. A per'ect lit guaranteed, kxami-
NATION 1 Kl-.K. Our manuiactory and racilltles
are the best In tbe United States, opera. Field aud
Marine Glasses. All kinds of Optical goods repaired.
se3o TuTnSa tt
THE CELEBRATED
FRENCH CAPSULES
MATHEY-CAYLUS
A teat of 30 YEARS bas proved the great merit ot
ttls popular remedy, by tbe rapid Increase ta faror
with leading .hyslclana ererywnere. It is superior to
all others for the safe, prompt and complete care ot
long standing or recent case*. Not ouly is it the best,
buttne cheapest, as ALL DRUGGISTS sell lt for7_,
JMBtapar botUa ol li. capsuiea. CLIN i CO., .___)_
mr-Tutt
AMUSEMENTS.
ODD FELLOWS' HALL
«FOUR GRAND CHOPIN CONCERTS!»
Three Evenings mnd One Matinee.
DECEMBER 15th, 16th, SOth auil •'d.
Matinee December 30th,
VLADIMIR DE PACHMANN
The Greatest Cbopin-Player of the Century.
HIS ONLY APPEARANCE IN THIS CITY.
Box sheet open Thursday, December nth. at tbe
Piano Warerooms of .. w. SPENCER _ CO.. 723
Market street. Second tloor.
jtarChlekering Piano used exclusively, mm
Oil tl ' ■**
■■■—■■____■___————■_——■■—a——_■
AMUSEMENTS.
BALDWffI THEATER. -
Mr. Al Hatma-C „., Lessee and Proprietor
Ma. A-.ki-dßodvieb Manager
LAST WEEK OFTHE OPERA
«EHHA ABBOTT SINGS EVERY NIGHT*
And SATURDAY MATINEE.
BRILLIANT SUCCESS OF THE EMMA
[AlfßOTf!
t_so«»«><»>j \tmma nwwmmmw wnwwb
GRAND ENGLISH OPERA CO.
To-tVl_ht, GRAND REVIVAL IN ENGLISH, with
«;.MMA ABBOTT as Norma
LIZZIE ANNAN DALE as Adalirlsa
WM. BKOIJEItICK as Orovcso **
MARTIN PACHE as Polllo
In Vincenzo Bellini's Famous Opera,
NORMA NORMA
Wednesday Night (Hy request),
_____■*-__?:__:__. MARTHA
ABBOTT'S " Last Rose of Summer."
Thuiiaday. The Oreat Su cess.
EH-NANI -_.__3ST_>lNI
ABBOTT and Entire Company iv the Ciist.
Friday, Gounod's Famous Love Lyric,
ROMEO AND JTJTjIET
EMMA ABBOTT as Juliet
Saturd.iy Matinee. AXNB BOLEYN.
Saturday Ni-ht. J arewell Perforiu-nce,
BOHEMIAN OIRLi
ABBOTT and fentlre Company in tbe Cast.
Mond:iy, Uec. -2d—Holiday Attraction,
THE PJtIVATE SECRETARY.
With Oreat Special Cast of Comedians.
HEW CAUFOSSIA THEATER,
Hanitsoincst Theater ln the World.
MR. AL. HAYSIAN Lessee and Proprietor
WH. jiAKjil* MANN ...Manager
LAST WEEK
LAST MATINEE SATURDAY.
And His Bi^ Comedy Company, In
NEXT WEEK
Boston Howard Athnm Specialty Co X
SEATS ON SALE THCRSUAY.
KIU.I.IN ■ jilt.js. I'ronrietorj aud __,ua;reri
Wednesday Evening. December 17th,
FIKST TIME Of
THE ;
GORGEO-9 THE
SPECTACI'LAR I
Blß^2 LE j WONDERFUL i
scemc LAMP.
SPLENDOR. :
Popular Prices—2sc and SOc.
ORPHEOM OPERA HOUSE.
G csta v Walt kk. Sole _*roprletor and M..: : :> ■*._
Engagement of PAULINE L'ALLEBIAND,
....WITH THT_
This (lv. -.!.,. Kv.-nin.. I),-.■.•:..., IGth,
LUCIA Dl LAMMERMOOR
L'ALLEMAMJ, WILKIE. MERTENS and
HAMILTON In the Cast.
Wednesday Evening
IL TROVATORE.
OCTHRIE, MEVEKS, MKKTK.SS, HAMILTON
BndSIGNOR ALBERT OIiILLE.
I'llnr* lay. Erlday and Sunday LUCIA
Sunday IL TROVATOIIK ,
{AnmssiOK 25c
It, i-h mi, Sb;at» 50c and 75c />
Box Beats >1 tnj**~ J
GRAHD opera house.
COMMENCING HONOAI DEC. 33d
THE GREAT MILITARY DRAMA,
={THE VOLUNTEER!}-
Introducing the
EMINENT ACTHDR AND ACTOR,
={GEO. T. ULMElt!}=z
And a Great Company of Players!
REALISTIC SITUATIONS !
APPOIXTMENTM, ETC.
100 PEOPLE ON* THE STAGE \Q()
BOX OFFICE OPENS THURSDAY.
. delß 7t«
POWELL-STREET THEATER. "
Powell Street. Opposite Baldwin Hotel.
SCHWARTZ BKOS Sole Proprietors
JOHN _.(___ Manager
OUAND OPENING, DKCKMBEIt 15, 181#0.
T _»-__ IC_r__T
BAGGESEN HIGH-CLASS VAUDEVILLES!
Secured trom Europe, and America's best attrac
tions.
BAOr.ESEN, the Human Cot-screw.
MAZL's _• ABACI. O. the Arab Wonders.
THE ''MEAT L iBLO.V, Mlinte.
MR. _ MRS. JOHN PENDY. Character Sketch Ar
tists.
SIIEhtEN - BLAKELEY, Refined Negro Delinea
tors.
VIDELLA _ DUNHAM.
BELLAC 4 AOUDA, Wonder-Workers.
UILLEN A DOYLE, Burlesque Comedians.
3—MORLEYS—3, Europe's i.reat Comic Grotesquea
MISS KOSIE LEE, Operatic Vocalist.
THK ONLY UI'ESEI.LE.
Admiaslon. 35e; Keser-rod Sents. 50c
t. rand Sunday Matinee at _ P. M. *•■.
*_■ SEATS NOW ON SALE. .«r
*A .i.i KMioD _ MiKKwti.u I_ssi»es and -ilanarsrs
Tliis "Week..
ONLY MATINEE SATI.KDAY.
WALLENROD _ STOCKWELL'S COMPANY
In the late Dflon Boucicauit's Drama.
TJBHD
ASTRAY!
Nl XT IVKKR-IJIU III.*: BILL,
T-T*£__sr__D _■_•
AND
B-Oxjc>_r r.i-_._-OisTDg.
NEW BUM THEATER.
R. L. KNAPP ilste or Carieton Opera Co.) Manager
HERMAN EHRENT Stage Director
____! o_=»__!_V*__l>
SCNDAY DKC'KtIMKK 14, 1890,
With the Ureat German Success,
THREE PAIRS SHOES
A MUSICAL COMEDY
With a I'i'iiiii.u,. and Three Acta,
Adapted by 11. EHRENT.
HANDSOME SOL'VENIRs
Or the Company will be I>i»tributed the
OPENINR NIGHT.
Popular rrlees—-ne. 50c nnd 75e.
a*_TSeats now on >„ie..-a
de 9 tf
mtHBIH CLUB
Ml t HANK S' PAVILION.
6000 PAIRS of tlie LATEST ROLLER SKATES.
60,000 SQUARE FEET MAPLE SURFACE.
NEXT FBIDAY NIGHT.
AMATEUR BACK ONE MILE.
NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT,
GREAT TWO-MILE OPEX-FOR-ALL RACE.
Valuabt. Trophies to the Winners.
SECOND GRAND FKTE NIGHT
Tueaday, Ueceinber .3d.
AT CHR STMAS NIGHT.JBV
Flrat Grand Calico anil Necktie Party.
!5* f* ,u * Vs*^.V _f Leasee aud Proprietor
MX J.J. -OTTLOU Mia»_er
NEXT SATUItDAY EVENING.
•"-3K_"N'.Dlrtl»
JOHN T.KELLY) U UUUI.
Seata on »al- To-morrow Morning.
M _^?'?, Mi tS* WKEWS' DANCINB AUAU- «_
i»a amy, 71 New Moatgoraerr st—Now ar- Sr *
rangemeuts; tuition reduced; <ianclng loarnod P% *
at little cost: -eats excluslroly (beslnn»r<> L_k
S.^__ S«_!___ ]Uu,,'» iWlno-rs) IW
XSimSSST^ *,Kr,"'totu'll*'»»,>''iugs;pri»*.«

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