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The morning call. [volume] (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1878-1895, July 31, 1891, Image 3

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TO-DAY! TO-DAY! TO-DAY!
Gr_R.E_.A-T
- — OP •
REMNANTS AND DRESS LENGTHS!
OF
-A-T
His]] HALF [this!
DAY I PRICE lit
_-_-_-H_a_HM^tdtC--MH-_IJI _~BMM-MB-HaH-a_
.- • ■
fff/S^^ MURPHY BUILDING, /
Mi/ Met Street, corner oi Jones, /
s-a_.pa FRANCISOO.
STOCKING'S PIANO.
An Important Decision on In-
stallment Sales.
"This Is one of the most Important de- J
cisions ever rendered by this court if it ,
stand?," said Justice of the Peace Cook I
yesterday afternoon, referring to his de
cision in the case of Mathias Gray & Co.
against 11. Windel and Julius Liebes, in
which all buyers and sellers of goods on the
installment plau are interested.
The action was brought to recover the
possession of a piano valued at $200. The
right to the money was based upon a con
ditional sale of the instrument made by the
plaintiff to C. F. Stocking, who agreed to
jay a certain amount for it monthly until he
had paid $150, when the piano should be
come his property. In the meantime he was
to have possession of the instrument, and iv
case he tailed to pay his Installments the
company had the right to seize the piano
and Stocking was to forfeit all he had paid-
Stocking kept the piano several months,
and at the time the action was brought had
]• id $133 57 for it in installments, leaving
$10 43 dm- the company. Before the action
was brought Stocking placed the piano,
with other articles of furniture, with Win
del and Liebes on storage, borrowing 8250
from them on all the property stored. Win
del & Liebes were sued by the piano com
pany, and set up as their defense that they
loaned money on the piano in good faith,
believing that Stocking owned it.
The company claimed that whether the
defendants acted in good faith or not they
were not entitled to the property because it
belouged to Stocking, nnd the doctrine of
purchase by innocent third parties did not
apply to the case. The Court found in the
defendants' i.ivor to the intense surprise of
the plaintiffs' attorneys, holding that in this
case the plaintiff allowed Stocking to assume
the apparent ownership of the piano, and
that he pledged it to the defendant Windel
as apparent owner to secure the payment of
$230 loaned him by Windel in (rood faith,
and that tins sum, with interest, is due and
unpaid. By the same reasoning the Court
foiflid that Stocking had a right to contract
for the safe keeping of the piano, so as to
hind the same for storage, an 1 that Windel
has, or the defendants liave, a lien on tho
piano for its storage or safe keeping.
THE SIGHT-SEEKS.
A Marin County Tramp In Which the
Public. Are Invited to Join.
Next Sunday the Sight-seers' Club will
hold another of their enjoyable outings ar
ranged for this season, in which all ladies
and gentlemen Interested in the healthful
exercise of walking are invited to partici
pate. The party will leave this city on the
8 o'clock boat in the morning for Sausaiito,
where the train will be taken for Tamalpais
Station. From that point a picturesque
route will he walked over to Laurel Grove,
near San Kafael, and thence back to Alto
Station, formerly known as Blithedale. Ex
cursion tickets to San Kafael should be pro
cured. The club has been holding outings
every other Sunday all spring and summer
and the public interest is constantly increas
ing, new people participating in each event
On the last walk, which was over iuto Se
quoia Canyon on the 18th Inst., forty-six
persona took part, many of them ladies, lt
is customary for each participant to carry a
light lunch, so that no one will be burdened
wiih carrying a heavier package than ls ab
solutely necessary.
MAYNARD OX TRIAL.
Ills Stepdaughter Gave II lm 824,000
Worth of Bonds.
John 11. Maynard was given his prelimi
nary examination before Judge Wallace yes
terday. He Is charged with having em
bezzled 89000 worth of tho bonds of the
Contra Costa Water Company and the
accusation is male by his stepdaughter,
Mr-. Ellen Keed, who 'testified that she
gave him $24,000 worth of bonds as her
agent and that when she called for them
he refused to return them. She stated that
some, time ago, when Maynard was ar
reted, lie gave her S4OOO. Corroborative
testimony was given for the prosecution
and the fuitlier hearing was postponed until
Monday.
Side Lights on Frauds.
James Mack, lately of the customs service
in China, lias thrown some light on the
Shanghai certificate case, which promises
to throw Consul Leonard out of position.
He says the "intendente" at Shanghai is
■°* * Chinaman, but an Englishman named
l_ E. Bredon, who is a sub-officer and petty
judge, lhe consular fee for a certificate is
to, yet Chinese arrive muiitlilv who declare
they have paid from SoO to 8800 for oue.
The Testimony Sufficed.
The Supreme Court yesterday afirmed the
judgment of the Superior Court of Monterey
County In the case of Marcos Ccsena. .who
was sentenced one year ago to six years'
Imprisonment in San Quentiu for criminally
assaulting 11 little girl. His appeal was on
the ground that the evidence against him
was insufficient.
Divorces Granted.
Judge Lawler yesterday granted a divorce
to Georgia from James Heumaun, on ac
count of his willful desertion; also to Mar
garet from K. F. Gates, on account of fail
ure to provide. Judge Finn divorced Mary
from Andrew Duncan for willlul neglect.
A DANGEROUS HABIT.
Placing Money in the Mouth a
Source of Disease.
"I can tell yon," said a prominent physi
cian to a representative of The Call yes
terday, "what is a fruitful source of dis
ease."
"And what is it?"
"In ridine in the street-cars you have no
doubt seen passengers, particularly women,
take a piece of coin from a pocket-book and
place ii between the lips while waiting fur
the conductor to come alonjr. lt is a habit
formed by many and a most dangerous oue."
"Why? 0
. "Did you ever for a moment think," con
tinued the physician, "whero a piece of
coin may have been before It conies into
your possession, to what use it may have
been put, or where its place of lodgment
was? I have known of many instances in
which coin has been used to close the eyes
of leprous Chinamen. Then again there
is a certain class of women who are super-
Btituous and believe that if they will place
in their stocking the first pteco of coin
they receive in the day luck will follow
them all day long, aud how many are there
who carry money in their boots or shoes
and draw it from there as necessity de
mand.? Just think of money that has
been used in the manner I havo described
being placed between the lips of auy one
man or woman. Money carries with it
many a blessing, but it also carries many a
curse, fur blight as it is it carries upon its
face the germ of many a disease, which is
communicated to the people in the niiiuuur
I have described."
PEOPLE TALKED ABOUT.
George Vf. Cable is of the opinion that the
world's greatest novel is yet to be written.
Mrs. U. S. Grant will visit Saratoga this
month for the first lime since tbe General's
death.
The Crown Prince of man in has aban
doned his proposed marriage to Mile.
Vac.iresco.
Mrs. Kendal gave a reception to Marshall
P. Wilder the other day which was attended
by 500 persons.
Laura Holioway Langford, who has with
drawn in a large measure from newspaper
work for the last few years, is returning to
it.
Paul dv Chaillu, who is an original Amer
ican and noted as the discoverer of the go
rilla, is preparing a novel on the "Laud of
the Midnight Sun."
Senator Calvin S. Brice and Mrs. Brice
are at the Savoy Hotel, London, where
they were met by theirdaughter, Miss Helen
Brice, who has been for a year ut a convent
in Paris. iIZ_B
Captain Henry C. Hathaway of New
Bedford, Mass., was the American ship
master who rescued John Boyle O'Keilly in
the Indian Ocean, after he had escaped
from the Australian penal colony.
The late Leslie F. Morgan of London,
England, left $.'50,000 to be distributed in
four equal shares among the poor or any
deserving charities of Philadelphia, St.
Louis, Chicago and Sau Francisco.
C. de Cedercranz, the new Chief Justice
of Samoa, who lias held ofiice six months,
has su far done absolutely nothing except to
draw his salary of £500 a mouth, which is
paid to hiui under the treaty of Berlin.
Lady Constance Campbell has been mar
ried to Thomas Etniuott, the Lancashire
ccttou-spiuner. As the daughter of the
Duke of Argrle she will maintain her title
and be Lady Constance Etninott to the end
of the chapter. ■
Henry Labouchere, the famous free-lance
London editor and Member of Parliament
is a little, fat man, whom a correspondent
who recently saw him, describes as sitting
in a leather chair, twiddling a grizzled
heard. He is a millionaire, a radical and an
Insufferable wag, *
Sir William Gordon-Citmniing's relatives
and friends are being socially ostracized for
their loyalty to him. Lord and Lady Mid
dleton, the latter his sister, who chaperonel
Miss Garner when she became Lady Gordon-
Cumming, were left out at the Marlborough
House garden party. *
Philip George d'Epinois is, perhaps, the
most remarkable Waterloo survivor. Ho
was born in 1791, and still discharges the
•duties of burgomaster in his native village
of Eplnois les Biuche. The Chevalier
d'Epinois was one of the civic guards
who weic.med Leopold 1 to Belgium sixty
years ago.
Lord Charles Beresford Is one of the
most useful men in the British service, He
divides his time between Parliament and
the sea, and having a practical knowledgo
of the navy and its wants is prepared to
push intelligent, reforms without regard to
the bigwigs and red tapo mandates of the
Admiralty Department
The late Calmann Levy, tlie Paris pub
lisher, was acquainted with nearly, all the
famous French writers of the last half cen
tury, and his house enjoyed almost a mo
nopoly of the dramatists. He was the last
of four brothers, who wero associated in the
book trade, and lie inherited a fortune of
$8,000,000 from his brother Michel, the
originator of the firm. . .
The Queen of China is really to be pitied.
At least, so say tho Chinese correspondents.
As the very young wife of her boy husband
she is entitled to a very large slice of royal
good limes. But the Empress-Dowager is a
strong-minded lady and rules with an lion
hand. She is a woman of powerful physique,
strikingly handsome aud of so firm and strong
a disposition that ull other wills must bend
to hers. ~
THE MORNING CALL, SAN FRANCISCO. FRIDAY. JULY , 31. T691-EIGHT PAGES.
■ __■ I ______■ __■■ ■■___■ || ■___________■■ 11 Mil | I 1 _■_—-_________■_______ , _
THE WOMAN'S COLUMN
Women Who Are Securing Homes
\ _W_W_Wf w ßt* ma W*^GlF^BS&'*. '--
in Washington.
Patriotic Ideas That Were Suggested by the
Actions of Our Forefathers— A So
noma County Celebration.
Some women's faces are, ln their brightness, a
prophecy; aud some, lv their sadness, a history.
. \ * Dickens.
I.OGIC AND PATRIOTISM.
Reasons for Not Answering a Question.
A Celebration Described.
Editor Woman's Column, Morning Call:
"A Woman" set out to criticize some of my
statements; in this column recently and in
vited mo to enlighten her on certain sub
jects. That she expressed a desire for en
lightenment is commendable. That she
needs it is patent. -
Her signing herself "A Woman" was not
necessary, as I fancy ho would be a funny
man that would tangle himself so confusedly
with sex lines and the barbarous ages, the
animal kingdom and my common-sense re
marks all at (.lice and many times over.
However much 1 would like to attempt to
enlighten that confessedly benighted woman,
as she desires me to do, I cannot, since she
has debarred from me the possibility— not
to say desire— of so doing by her closing ex
pression, namely: That one would like to
see me produce some logical defense of the
stand I have taken, and that, perhaps, I
will do so. I have only to say to that If she
judges that the stand I have taken is not
founded on logical grounds, it seems strange
thnt she should look for me to advance a logi
cal defense of it.
I am exceedingly glad that I do not live
in Gilroy. lam impelled to make that dec
laration because of reading S. b.'s account
of the celebration held there on tho recent
anniversary of- our national independence
nnd the contrast afforded by placing side by
side her description of the Gilroy affair and
my impressions of the celebration held by
the residents of this and several adjoining
communities on the same glorious day.
6. S.s MODEL CELERRATIOX
Was doubtless a necessity iv Gilroy if the
day was to be observed there at all. As in
dicated by S. S.s article the men of her lit
tle city had not the patriotism to get un a
good Fourth of July celebration. No won
der that such a stale of affairs created a re
action that brought S. S. and some kindred
earnest spirits to the fore to rescue the situa
tion. It certainly is a reproach to the male
citizens of Gilroy that they had to wait for a
proper celebration of the glorious Fourth till
their women folks got it up. asked them to
attend aud showed them bow.
However. I may say here that if men are
defective citizens women need not fancy that
they could turn in and rescue government if
given the opportunity universally. The in
difference or depravity of individual human
character amongst us is the root and base of
all the evils which beset us, as individuals
as well as a nation. The application of tho
law of the land may repress manifestations
of evil doing to an extent, but how rarely is
a lesson taken home from it to reform the
heart of the miscreant. Moreover, women
nre no better, no worse one way and another
than men the world over.
Hut let me describe the Independence day
celebration in this vicinity, thai I think con
trasts strongly with that held in Gilroy. It
was gotten up, officered and managed
throughout by men— the bright. Intelligent
young men who constitute tiie local parlor
of Native Suns. They are mostly the sons
of well-circumstanced farmers, and tho ma
jority of tliem are total abstainers from the
use of liquor and tobacco. The President
of the parlor presided, the Declaration of
Independence was read by one of the mem
bers, who is a teacher in the village school,
and the oration was delivered by a young
lawyer from the county seat, also a Native
Son. An excellent band was in attendance,
and headed the long procession from the
•village to the grove where the picnic was
held. There were
MANY HUNDRED PEOPLE PRESENT,
Including the families and relatives of tho
Sons who were the entertainers, and every
body was happy and enthusiastic.
At lunch time the "boys" might be seen
carrying lunch baskets about tor mother or
Sister, letch. ng refreshing drinks, waiting
on everybody, introducing people to one an
other and making themselves useful and
agreeable 'generally. Besides the literary
programme, there were some athletic games
lor young men and boys that created a
great ileal of fun for all, and dancing went
on all afternoon on the big, shaded platform.
The grizzled old gentlemen looked on with
pride and satisfaction at their sons and their
neighbors' sons showing such hearty enthu
siasm over the day and its significance, the
old ladies were happy to see the boys mani
festing sucl: a kind and social spirit, their
mothers were particularly triumphant, and
produced luncheons well calculated to reveal
the secret of what attracts a boy or a man to
his home and mother. The fair-young ladies
were treated by the gallant sons as the
flower of the assemblage, while the sturdy
little embryo citizens In knickerbockers
scampered about the grounds, hurrahing
over their fire-crackers and aching to be
grown up like their big brothers that they
might carry iho Hags and make stirring
speeches and wear brilliant regalia across
their breasts and march in martial array.
They were not given to see that if they would
be men they must take after their mothers.
The babies were welcome and too happy
to cry.
The picnic was a grand success, as was
also the ball given in the evening, aDd I
will venture to say that the thought did not
occur to a solitary person who participated
in the delightful affair that it was time tbe
women came to the front "to bolster up the
men's faltering patriotism und show them
how to conduct a celebration and themselves
on the Fourth of July. There certainly is a
great difference in communities. :
I think that the celebration I have just
described is nearer the standard than the one
gotten up and carried out with women as the
. lending spirits. >-. jj. _.. T.
English Hill, July 13, ISOI.
FATIIIOTIC THOCCnTS.
Suggested hy the Actions of Those Who
Itebelli ,1 Against King George.
Editor Woman* Column, Morning Call:
Liberty is a growth and in no nation has
she yet attained her full stature. great
event which the Fourth of July commemo
rates is but the sotting of the fruit bud, the
petals nre opening one by one, but the full
fruition is yet to come. February 8, 177,,,
the joint Houses of Parliament, hoping to
awe the restive colonies, presented an ad
dress to the King, declaring that rebellion
existed in Massachusetts and pledging
tlieir lives and fortunes for its suppression.
Months later the news reached a backwoeds
county of North Carolina, afterward
known as the "Hornets' Nest." Her citi
zens assembled and. Isolated as they were,
surrounded by bears, wildcats aud Tories,
they Issued tho Mechlenberg Declaration,
resolved, that "we, citizens of Mechlenberg
County, do dissolve the political bands that
unite us to England." It was as if Mount
Brewer should secede from California.
Thus in Nazareth, as is usual with great
ideas, was cradled our Magna Charta. The
North Carolina members of the Continental
Congress indorsed the sentiment of their
constituents, but as that Congress thought
itself loyal, they simply agitated. Within a
year most of the colonies expressed similar
principles and June 7, 1770, Kichard Ilenry
Lee moved in the Second Continental Con
gress that these y - :
UNITED COLONIES
Are, and of right ought to 'be, free and
independent Slates. Four days later the
resolution p .ased, and a committee was ap
pointed to draft reasons for separation and
to formulate the principles of the new na
tion, the result of which is the Declaration
of Independence. Imagine fifty men seated
around a lone table, at the bead President
of Congress John Hancock, dressed in ruf
fles aud elegant attire, about him- cavaliers
in long stockings and tho hair in eel-skin
queues, Puritans with cropped hair and
home-spun dress. There were men in
Quaker garb, and others, like Parson
Witherspoon, in full wig and short clothes;
there were Catholics like Charles Carroll,
Independents like Adams, Friends, Presby
terians and Episcopalians; there were Sons
of Liberty, representing the labor clement;
there were landed proprietors, with ducal
possessions; there were men like Hancock,
whose sails whitened every sea, and all
knew that war meant privateers ou their
commerce, maurauders on their homos, death
on the battle-field. Tho army in Canada
had just been routed by bad management
and small-pox; Parker and Clinton had
been driven from Charleston and were ex
pected to besiege Kew York; the rich, the
great, official.', those who had something to
lose, were, a3 a rule, loyalists, and in their
midst sat honored men like Dickinson, who
counseled expediency, the unwisdom of
PRECIPITATING WAB,
Yet, though with locked doors and pledge of
secrecy, they deliberately voted for the
resolution, and, on. the evening of July 4,
1770, they adopted tho Declaration of Inde
pendence, putting a price upon their own
heads, loosing cutthroats upon their best
beloved by defying the. "Mistress of the
Seas.' Thomas Jeffeison was inspired to
write that document; he absorbed the best
thought of all and locused it in the Heclara
tion of Independence; he enunciated the
abstract principles of right and justice as j
tho only foundation of just government; he
elaborated the goldeu rule as our national
foundation, not yet comprehended, but
our pole star cutting the sinews, of ex
pediency, reorganizing the divine source of
power and the duty of trusting the perfect
right. Nothing could be more unpromising
than their outlook, yet by that sign the
fathers conquered. And why obsjrve July
4th? May '20, 1775, was heard the birth-cry
of liberty way down in Carolina; June lltli
was passed Lee's famous resolution of
independence, severing all allegiance to
England, yet the fathers fixed upon the ac
ceptance of the Declaration as our national
epoch, and why? Because tho assertion of
rights is less important than the recogni
tion of human rights. The discovery that
" all men are born free and equal, with an
inalienable right to life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness," is the greatest
POLITICAL DISCOVERY
Ever made, worthy to mark an era. July
4th this treasure trove of humanity was
formally given to the wnrld. For 115 yoars
have we been unfolding its hidden stores,
ana the end is not yet. Why did the fathers
rebel? They had full control of local af
fairs; each province had its colonial legisla
ture in which they could checkmate tho
representatives of the King by withholding
supplies, and also prevent legislation hostile
to themselves ; they fixel their own renditions
of voting; they were more nearly free than
any other people on earth— far more so than
the same class in England ; not often were
they carried across the sea to be tried by
jurors not their peers; they themselves
helped to foment the wars for fighting which
they were paid in British gold. Why reb.l?
They fought for a principle. Liberty means
entire freedom to do as one pleases until he
pleases to injure another, then for the com
mon good should freedom be curbed. The
only function of government is to protect
good, restrain evil aud promote general
welfare.
CLASS LEGISLATION',
"Taxation without representation," is odi
ous. Tha fathers saw this and asserted
''AU just Governments derive their power
from the consent of the governed," made
that the corner-stone of the new nation,
and fought to. hold it. Yet they reasoned
belter than they practiced, for they disfran
chised all whom they dared— poor men, for
eigners, negroes and "tho angels of the lire
side." Tliey simply budded justice and
equality, the blossom is gradually opening,
but in only oue State has tho fruit yet
ripened. Wyoming's perfect constitution
says: "No one shall be disfranchised for
race, color or sex, only for incompetence
(idiocy or lunacy) or unworthincss (crimi
nality)." She fixes no impassable barriers;
-the diseased brain may recover, the dwarfed
intellect expand, the criminal reform. Only
while unworthy or incompetent are any dis
franchised In Wyoming, which, like Miner
va, sprang into Statehood full (frown, full
armed, and she alone is the typical republic
founded by the falters. a. s.
Ullioy. July. ISOI.
PLUCKY WOMEN.
They Are Securing Homes for Them
selves in Washington.
There are some plucky women in the new
State of Washington, says the Portland Ore
ccniaii. Vf. 11. 11. Grant, who has been
prospecting with a party in the mountains
back of Port Angeles, found on the extreme
limits of civilization, nine miles from the
city, a widow named Muiiroc. who, with
two children, 10 and 12 years old, had taken
up a fine ranch, and was industriously mak
ing a clearing. She now has about au acre
nml a half cleared and planted in vegetables.
Near Mrs. Munroe .Miss Reshter, a baud
some young lady of 14, and her mother have
a ranch, seven acres cleared and planted in
a garden. She also has a large variety of
Howers in bloom that she has set out and
carefully attended. It was a great surprise
to the prospecting party to emerge from a
dense forest and come upon these ladies
busily making a home, in so isolated a spot.
These two families were out of food, ex
cept potatoes and salt, and the gallant pros
pectors gave them what extra provisions
they bad. Ono need not wonder at the
rapid development of the Northwest when
women will venture Into unknown wilds
and make themselves homes. .
COYOTE SCALPS.
Hart Reverses His Opinion on the New
Bounty Law.
The Legislature recently passed a bill
providing for the payment of £5 for every
coyote killed In the State on presentation of
the scalp. Forthwith a. new. industry
sprang up in California, and slopped over
Into Arizona and Mexico, where coyotes arc
plentiful. In one county alone 810,000
worth of scalps have been raised since the
law was passed, and tho State Board of Ex
aminers and tho Controller began to be
alarmed lest the commonwealth should be
bankrupted by coyote-hunters.
Emotional journalists in the southern
part if the State began to clamor for a spe
cial session of the Legislature tn wipe out
tho new law, demonstrating that scalps
were being imported from Arizona aud
Mexico, and that societies far the propaga
tion and encouragement of coyotes were
being started in many places.
The Attorney-General was asked to give
an npluion as to the constitutionality of the
law, and he cave it. lie hold that the State
had a right to pass a law for tho extermina
tion of animal vests, and that tho coyote
law would stand. When seen by a Call
reporter yesterday the State's attorney said
he thought he would have to reverse his de
cision and declare the law unconstitutional
on the grouud that while It provides for an
appropriation no mention of an appropria
tion is made in the title.
" HE HEAP FOOLEE ME."
Battle Between Bfonfola Armed With a
Hatchet ami Pole.
Two ferocious and greasy- conted Mongols
engaged in a novel duel on Onei.la place
yesterday, but their murderous work was
checked by Sergeant Spilnine nnd posse.
The combatants were Wong Gwoon, who
was armed with a hatchet, and Wall Lee,
who defended himself with a long pole. Be
lore the officers arrived they were In the
center of a circle of highbinders.who viewed
the encounter with exclamations of delight.
Gwoon hacked Lee over the right arm and
in return received a severe drubbing on the
head and shoulders. The lighters wero
locked up nt the City Prison on charges of
assault with a deadly weapon. They re
fused to tell the reason for the combat,
though each said of the other, " lie heap
foolee me." . -•*•. ••*•".
CROOK'S ESTATE.
Appraisers Ketnrn th« Value of thr Same
at *<;:u.ooo.
The appraisers cl the estate of the lato
K. F. Crook, P. J. Sullivan, C, S. Gushing
and Michael Flood, filed their report yester
day. They find that the property, which
embraces numerous lots and buildings in
Chinatown, the Polreto and the Mission,
besides real estate In San Mateo. Marin and
Alameda counties, is worth Sii34,oUi). One
eighteenth of the property is bequeathed to
an incompetent son of the deceased on the
dentil of his mother. It is said that he was
recently married without the consent of the
court, and that the marriage will have to be
annulled.
Started Too Soon.
Minna W. Koto, wife of Max Kohn, sig
naled an Omnibus carat the enrner of Ninth
and Howard streets on June 21st. The con
ductor stopped the car. but before she had
securely boarded it started it again. She
alleges that she was seriously injured by
being thrown to the ground when the car
was started, and yesterday brought suit
against the company for 810,000 damages.
Clarke's Dally Suit.
Alfred Clarke, who seldom allows a day
to pass without bringing a suit against
Ilchrend Joost, yesterday commenced an
other suit against his ancient enemy for
811,000 damages, for cutting one of his water
pipes on Falcon road. lie calls Joost "a
European emigrant," and says that the
water which Joost let out of his- pipe was
worth 10 cents per gallon.
Bar-Tender Dutton'-* Exploit*.
LewU Dutton lias been held in $2000 bail
for trial on a charge of an assault with a
deadly weapon. The accused Is the
bar-keeper who was . discharged by E.
A. Fischer on Saturday night, and when
refused his salary because of his alleged
stealings, drew a revolver and threatened
to bore a bole through Fischer's body. . v ?
_ y Her Mother la Dying.'
Cliief Crowley received a Tetter from F.
W. Kenncsse of 427 Seventh street, NW.,
Washington, D. C, who is anxious to learn
the whereabouts of his sister, Lizzio Jordan,
who lived two years ago at 232 Fourth street
In this city. The writer's mother is dying,
and he is anxious to impart the sad news to
his sister. - .■ -• </::*--
Three Liens More.
Kellctt& McMurray added to the liens
that have been filed against the Towell
street Theater a claim for $953, for labor and
materials furnished. The Pacific Door Com
pany has sued the theater lor SlOoO for
labor and materials, and Matthew Harris
has brought a similar claim for $492.
The Start Was Too Sudden.
Jane Quigley, ; who alleges that she was
seriously Injured on May 29th by the sud
den starting of a Howard-street car from
which she was about to alight, has sued the
company for $10,000 damages.
RESTING ON ARMS.
The Rival Railroad People Hold
ing Their Own.
No Further Trouble Anticipated -The Omni
bus Company Has the Inside Track Be
fore the Supervisors.
The reign of force is over on Stanyan
street, the touch of medievialism has
flickered out, . and the rival railroad com
panies have settled down to nineteenth cen
tury methods, and will adjust tlieir differ
ences by an amicable compromise, or by
leaving the issue to the decision of tho
courts.
At least that is suggested as the most
probable solution of the trouble. On the
steps to bo taken in the latere every one is
discreetly reticent, and the two companies
are, for the present, contenting themselves
with holding their own on the scene of
operations. The process of holding their
own has been the modus operandi ever
since active hostilities on Wednesday morn
ing.
And their own consists for the Omnibus
Railroad Company In completing the build
ing of the forty yards o r so of rail which it
has already laid from- llalght street south,
and for the Market-street Company in
maintaining its rails which run the rest of
the block and actively pushing forward the
extension of the line along Waller street.
TUE WATCnERS WERE FEW.
There were but few watching the men at
work yesterday compared with those who
bad been present on Tuesday. Knotsof curi
osity seekers hung about the spot all day.
Visitors to tho park and tho ball grounds
loitered for a few ininutcs.tbut passed on,
with their curosity sated, when they found
that nothing was to be seen but ordinary
road-laying work.
There was, perhaps, an overlarge force at
work nt both sides, and the men engaged at
the junction of the two tracks had seemingly
little to do but to smoke an occasional pipe
of peace and wait upon events. Looking
down Stanyan street, too, the track already
laid preseuts au odd appearance.
The Market-Street section has evidently
beeu laid In a hurry, and presents a zig-zag
course that only an intoxicated car and
dummy could travel In safety. It is of a
wider grade, too, than the shorter section,
and there is an abrupt break at the junction
of the two systems. A further appearance
of want of symmetry is produced by th§
southern track beiug at least two inches
higher thau the Omnibus road track.
KO FURTHER TROUBLE ANTICIPATED.
No further trouble is said to be antici
pated. On Tuesday night Sergeant W.
Lutiiian and four officers were ou duty to
prevent a collision between the rival forces.
Sergeant Flanders relieved him at 8 o'clock
in the morning, aud ho aud his men had an
equally easy time, and at 3 o'clock in the
alternoon .Sergeant Birdsall was ablo lo
telephone to headquarters that all was quiet.
A fresh shift of men in the employ ot the
companies went out at 7 o'clock in the
morning, but for tho higher officials it lias
been a busy time. Superintendent Barron
of the Market-street Company was ou the
ground all day. Superintendent Anderson
ot the Omnibus Company saw that, no
march was stoleu upon the Omnibus people
till the middle of the afternoon, and En
gineer Fnlrcbild of the same company lias
only left the spot for a few hours since tho
beginning of the trouble.
.So further light could be obtained on the
rights of the quarrel. The Omnibus road
officials claim that their original franchise
entitles theui to extend their road as far as
Waller street. They had further preserved
the right by running a horse-car from
Haight to Waller at occasional intervals,
lt is claimed on behalf of the Market-street
road, that the bio. -k had only been used by
the opposition company by sufferance.
Their own franchise allowed them to run
along Stanyan to Waller aud out. Waller in
-ihe direction of the ocean.
OMNIBUS ON TOP.
A Bitter Wall From the Market-Street
Company.
The quarrel before the Street Committee
of the Hoard of Supervisors took a most
unsatisfactory turn as far as the Market
street system is concerned.
J.J. Haley, representing that system,
asked the committee to postpone considera
tion on both applications for a franchise on
Stanyan street tc Frederick. His petition,
he said, notwithstanding that it was filed
first, had been referred to the. committee,
while the petition of the Omnibus Company
had been passed to print and then referred,
thus giving it a month or more advantage.
Supervisor Burling told him he was mis
taken; his petition had not been filed
first
Haley did not offer to dispute tho matte r,
but wailed because the Omnibus Company
Is enjoying such a very large percentage of
the base-ball patronage, lt wan the special
desire of the Market-street Company, ho
said, to monopolize that travel. It owned
the grounds and had spent many thousand
dollars improving them with the sole aim of
benefiting by the traffic. Now comes the
Omnibus Company and controls turee
tourths of It
The property-owners objected to having
a loop constructed on Carl and Frederic.:
streets by any company, because it would
shut off any possible improvement by other
lines. Others objected to giving any mora
privileges to the Market-street system un
til It would consent tj transfer from tbo
Mission tothe park.
The committee finally agreed to recom
mend both franchises, which, in plain En
glish, means that the Omnibus Company's
franchise may be finally granted on Monday
night, while the Markot street's application
can ouly pass to print at most and must
then wait lor final passage ono mouth, till
the board's vacation is over.
If the proverbial " pull " of the Market
street Company should not havo the usual
effect in this case the desired franchise on
Stanyan street to the very door of the ball
grounds will be granted to too Omnibus
Company and there will end that part of the
controversy, ns it is not likely (list the Mar
ket-street system will undertake to run over
the same strip of road.
REAL ESTATE.
List of Property Sold by Auction Yes-
terday.
O. F. yon Klieiu & Co. yesterday sold the
following property by auction: Lot 28x99.
routing on Market and Fell streets, with L
29x27:0, fronting Polk, for SHI, 000; lot
27:0x110, southeast corner California and
Broderick streets, for 50750; double flats,
32 Kuss street, for 86000; flat at 925 Mission
street for 57500; two residences, 1420 and
1428 Twenty-sixth street, for 53100; resi
dence. 410 Bartlett street, for S2SOO; four
lots on Erie street, near Mission, for §7300;
also a number of outside lots.
THE CUTICLES
OF
LITTLE BOYS AM GIRLS
Are often spotted with cutaneous eruptions
contracted at school. The way to eradicate
these annoying complaints is to wash their
little bodies with
GLENN'S
SULPHUR SOAP.
0C24 tf FrTu , '■■■--•
OSSCNESS & KEAD NOISES CURED
t,»ll 1,« IVii'.lu.-J-l. _u-._i.ir l.„ * :,..,.:... *u,,a
™"" "■ lirar.l. Sui-vs*.fnltvl_--._ii llrem*_.!e*tail. **u!jrai-e
Wily by F.llUtfox, tt«9 il'way.N.Y. Write ..:.;.■ T -1-.C
_eI2U -'.. ■ r : ;\
- ■ * . *...:v- - -' •
CONRAD ! CONRAD! CONRAD
A CARD TO THE PUBLIC.
While it is true I have been chosen the President of the Louis-
y_BßHg— W<MgMKP_^__Blßj___-)Wt^Bß___|_-________B__P-W---PS
iana State Lottery Company, vice M. A. DAUPHIN, deceased, I still
retain the Presidency of the Gulf Coast Ice and Manufacturing
Company, so all proposals for supplies, machinery, etc., as well as
all other business communications should be addressed to me here
as heretofore. PAUL CONRAD,
PAUL CONRAD,
Lock Box 1358. New Orleans, La.
apB tt cod
i^—^mmw— www— s^— n_imi-
MISCELLANEOUS.
I HEADACHE
Proceeds from a Torpid Liver and im-
purities of the Stomach, and can be lo- ,
variably cured If you will only
Let all who suffer remember that
SICK AND NERVOUS HEADACHES
Can be prevented as soon as their symp-
toms Indicate the coming of an attack.
I use Simmons Liver Regulator when troubled
seriously with Headaches caused by Constipation.
It produces a favorable result without hindering my
regular pursuits in busiuess."— W. Vf. Witmeb,
DcsMoiues, lowa. - **-*-*-'..'
■- ocl WeFrMo SOw ' ■
*" ' v -j v/A V^P
Chances to double your
money is to invest a few
dollars in Sunn}' Side.
646— MARKET STREET— 646
- Jy3l FrSu 2t
jg_^^^B_W_.
£ \
DOCTOR SWEANY,
MEDICAL S SURGICAL OFFICER
737 Market Street,
""Examiner" Office, S. v.,
FOR THE HtOMl'T CURS OK ALL CHRONIC
nnd l'rivnte ■.«-..■-., IHseuses of Man-
hood, Diseases of Women, etc Sexunl ami
Seminal Weakness and Nervous Affections of
lon? standing which may have resisted all other
treatment, cured quickly by scientific and modera
treatment.
Those living away rrom the city should write as
once,
Beware of any person who may spoak to yon
on the streets and ask yon to go to any other doctor,
lor they are hired by disreputable doctors to en*
cnare you in their dens.
Kead my large advertisement In Sunday's Cali.
ani 4 tf exSu
CARBOLIC SIL¥Es
ufUlDULlti ««La.£_
Tlie most Powerful Healing
Ointment ever Discovered.
Henry's Carbolic Salve cures
Sores.
Henry's Carbolic Salve allays
Burns.
Henry's Carbolic Salve heals
Pimples.
Henry's Carbolic Salve cures
Piles-
Henry's Carbolic Salvo heals .
Cuts. . ,;- . ■: ,/-■■■
Ask for Henry's— Take Mo Other*
K2T-EETYAEE OF COUNTERFEITS.
Price 25 cts., mail prepaid 30 eta.
' JOHN R HSNEY & CO., New
ByWrito for Illuminated Book. __y y
noM 3y s ■•
-__i_^S&k
Z : 'l' 427 KEARNY ST.
IF YOU HAVE DEFECTIVE VISION, IT WILL
be well to remember that I make a specialty of
examining and measuring nil imperfections ot the
eye where glasses are require J, and grinding such If
necessary. No other establishment can Ret the same
superior facilities as are found here, for the Instru-
ments and methods used are my own discoveries and
inventions and are far In the lead or any now in use.
Satisfaction guaranteed. >y .v . •* . ->-
427-DO NOT FORGET THE NUMBER-427
5 tf cod
f »*~ B^ v ■ t-1 dd f «
_/*. iw* mm^ib r^ __T •
A\ J&^' trrfia^n, 5 - 0 .
gsy B? 3■■ i I §3
_4ffiEaEB-W&i- -I_Z "
ji'2'l »m We FrSu V j
— — , — . — _.. .
palace_hoteL
THE PALACE HOTEL OCCUPIES AN EN'TIRB
block In tlie center or Sao Frauclico. It Is m.
model hotel of tbo world. Klre and earthquake
proof. Has nine elevators. Every room is larze,
light and airy. The v. notation Is perfect. A bath
and ili. set adjoin every room. • All rooms are easy
of access from broad, light corridors. The central
court. Illuminated by electric light. Its Immense
glass root, broad balconies, carriage-way and tropi-
cal plants, are features hitherto unknown In Ameri-
can hotels, tl uc entertained ou either the Ameri-
can or European plan. The restaurant Is the finest
In the city, Secure rooms ia advance by telegraph*
•iaf. , : IHK P*LACK HOIEI.
"' v Sau Franciaco. Cal.
WHY HAVE DIRTY WALL PAPER,
FKJBSCO TINTING, • •
HEN YOU CAN HAVE-IT CLEANED AND
" made equal to new. NATIONAL CLEANING
COMPANY, 517 Jones street. •*.'_• ■ jy-28 tf
MISCfLLAXEODS.
MOTHERS!
Dollars al tae
ARE TWO VERY GOOD
THINGS TO HAVE, AND
THOSE THAT MAKE USE
OF THE LATTER GENER-
ALLY MANAGE TO GET *
THEIR SHARE OF THE
FORMER.
Your Pleasant Duty
IS TO STUDY ECONOMY,
v BUY AT THE MOST RE-
LIABLE HOUSE; THE ONE
THAT WILL GIVE YOU
THE BEST VALUES FOR
THE LEAST MONEY.
LOOKfOYER!
BOYS^SUITS,
yUC UPWARD
mmm mmm,
0.0 O WOOL
SEE OORTiSPLAY!
Bargains in Every Deisartni't.
LEADING CLOTHIERS
AND FURNISHERS.
27-37 Kearny Street
3>'3l 2t
Naber, Alfs & Brune
WHOI.KSAI.K I.ililOi: DEAI-EU3,
323 AND 325 MARKET STREET,
>^-fes5OLE AGENTS r" 0 r^
raMf 1* OLD
MlPbourbok
The purest and best Whiskey In the market
lor Medicinal and Family use. Sold by all
first-class dealers. Ask for it.
pod eo*l it .
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY.
TIIK COMPANY'S bH-AUSilll'-i WILL *w_»
sail , -^gogf
FOR new TOIIK via Panama.
Steamship COLIMA, Monday, Anjust 8, 1891.
at 12 noon, taking passengers and fret^nt direct tor
Mazatlnu, AcapolCO, ticos. (.tiaraperlco, San Joso Ue
Guatemala, Ac.iintia, La Llbertad, Coriuto, l'uuta
Arenas and l'anunia.
l'«»i. HOMi-KOXO VI > YOKOHAMA.
CITY OF PEKING (via llouo'.uln)
Tneeaay, August 11, 1881, at-FX
CITY 01. KIO UE JANEIRO ,
, Tnursday, Septembers, lS'll. as 3 m.
CHina Saturday, September 2D, lain, at 3 t-t
I :.*:.:. ' trip tickets to lu&oaa:ua and return at ra-
dnced rates.
lor Ircight or passage apply at the offlca, corner
first and llrannan streeta
branch office— 2U'l Front street.
7tli xx ALEXAMiEIt CENTER, General Agent
OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
- a ron
JAPAN AND CHINA.
Note Change In Hour of Sailing.
STEAMERS LEAVE WHARF. COR- _ar^_
iJ ncr l'lrst and iiraaaau streets, at 3^_'»i^f%
P. H., Tor -^aa.4Hitaf,
YOKOHAMA AND HONCKONC.
Conm ctlns at Yokohama with steamer for Shanghai
OCEANIC Saturday. Juno 13, 1891
GAELIC Tuesday, July 7. IS3I
Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Kates.
Cabin Plana on exhibition uid Passage Tickets for
Bale at S. I". Company's General omce*), room 71,
corner Fourth ami Townsend its., San Fraucisco.
For freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the
Pacific Mall Ste-mshlp Company's Wharf, San
Fraucisco. T. H. GOODMAN,
General Passenger Agent
GEOKUK n. RICE. Traffic Manager. Jy3 lm
OCCIDENTAL ANO ORIENTAL S.S. CO
FIT. IKK THK CAPTAIN NOB THE CUARTEK-
-L\ er» wilt lie tesponslblo for any wor* doaa oa
hoard of these sioum-ijiju. or lor bills or debts con*
tracted by the officers or crews, unless specially
ordered from this offioe. LKLANO STANFORD.
President, Koom 7, li. li. Bu.idlns. corner Fourth
and lownseud sis. . jel tf
GCEANIC STEAMSHiP COMPANY.
TnE SPLENDID 3000-TON STEAMEKS «kj__
ol this line,, carrying United States, j_.___S£
Haw. and Colonial mails, sail from Folsom-st,
Wliitrl as under.
FOR HONOI.Cr.II. ONLY.
P. P. AUSTRALIA AUGUST Ilth. 2 P. M.
S. S. ZEALASDIA AUGUST '25th, 2 P. M.
FOR HONOLULU, AUCKLAND AND SYDNEY
DIIIEL-l.
S.S. ALAMEDA AUGUST SOttl. 3 P. M,
For Irelght and passage apply at omce. 327 MarKet
street, J. V. SI'KECKELS £ BROS.,
26 tt ■_■ ' General Agent..
ANCHOR LINE.
Steamers Leave New York Every Saturday,
For Clasgow via Londonderry.
Kates for Saloon Passage * v -..'".- „.* ,**■--".
I'.Y S.S. CITY OP HOME, SCO AND UPWARD,
according to aceoramodatlon and location of room.
Other Steamers or the line «50 and upward.
Second Cabin »30._ Steerage i'J.
Ptsscngers booked at through rates to or rrom any
city In Great liritaiu or ou the Continent,
Drafts on London Sold at Lowest Rate..
8001, ot information, tours and sailing lis.s fur,
nlshed on application to agents.
HENDERSON BROTHERS, 7 Bowling Green, V. V.-
-or to GEORGE W. CUE it. HIS Market SC: or
to T. 1). McKAY, '32 Montgomery street; or to
.i. F. FUGAZI & CO., 6 Montgomery avenue: or
GEORGE li. SEAMAN. 1073 Broadway. Oakland.
lvlt>3ru
COMPAGNIE GENERALE
IKAN SATLAMIQU E
" French Linn to Havre.
COMPANY'S PIER (NEW), 42 NORTH _fi»a
River, loot of Morton St. Travelers !)V __S6m_!
this line avoid both transit by English railway .in",!
the UlacomlorC of crossing the channel iv a small
boat.
LA GASCOGNE, Santeili..
Saturday, August Sth, 7:01) a. __.
LA TOUKAINE
- Saturday, August 16th, l:0u P. st
LA BOUKIiOGNE, Frangeul
...Saturday, August Md, 7:00 a. x.
LA CHAMPAGNE, Traub
Saturday. August V9UI, at 1:00 r. _.
Ma' For Irelght or passage apply to
A. FORGET. Aient,
. -*™ * I'°-31 '°- 3 Bowling Green, New York.
J. F. FUGAZI « CO.. Agents, i Montgomery ava_,
En Francisco. . ? .
tog oihce, 19 Montgomery street. inr2o tt
WHITE STAR LINE
United States and Kojal Mall Steamers
BETWECM
Now York, Queenstown A Liverpool,
■'. SAILING KVKIIY WEEK, ".
CABIN *60 AND UPWARD, ACCORD- 'A«a_,
ing to steamer aud accommodations se- ____«
lected; second cabin, $ 35 : Majestic aud Teutonic,
140 and 1 15. Steerage tickets from England, Ire-
land, Scotland, Sweden, Norway aud Denmark,
through to San Francisco at lowest rates. Tickets,
sailing dates and cabin pia_;s may be procured rrom
W. 11. AVERY, Pacific Mall Dock, or at the General
OOice of the Company, 613 Market st., under Grand
Hotel. U. W. FLETCHER,
ap2B TuWeFrSn tt Gen. Agt. for PacUc Coast.
ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO.
STEAMERS LEAVE ASPINWALL '
il fortnightly for the West In, lies and TOMB
Southampton, calling en route at Cher- •*■■^^*
bourg, France, and Plymouth to land passengers.
Through Bills of Lading, in connection with the
raclfic Mall S. S. Co., Issued for freightand treasure
to direct poits In England and Germany.
Through tickets from Sau Francisco to Plymouth,
Cherbourg, Southampton. First class, $195; third
class. 5-07 50. Fur further particulars apply to
jelO tf PARROTT & CO., Agents, 90S L'AilloruU a.
." OCEAN STEAMSHIPS.
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO.
DISPATCH STEAMERS FROM SAH M*a_
Francisco for ports In Alaska May 39. ■ <t^ijg l
June 4, 14, 19, 29, Jnlv 5, 14, 19, 29, August 3, 13.
18. 2-s. September 12. 27. oa. it *
For British Columbia and Puget Sound porta, Mar
25, SO, June l. 9, 14. 19.24, 29, .Inly 6. 9. 14, ID.
•24. 29. Au.nst 3,8. 13. ix. •_:. OT . 9 A. m.
J>r Eureka, Humboldt Bay, Wednesdays. UK
. For » nt a Ana. Los Angeles audail way ports every
lonrtb day, 8 a. m.
For Sau Diego, stopping on'y at Los Angeles.Stata
JSarl ana Sau Luis Obispo, every lourtli day ai It
For ports In Mexico. 25th or each month.
.ticket omce— Palace Ilotel, 4 New Montgomery it
GOODALL, PERKINS * CO.. General Agents.
1 "If 10 Market st. Saa Franclso-
FOR PORTLAND & ASTORIA. OREGON.
THE CNIOX PACIFIC RAILWAi'- ___-« '
ocean Division— anil I'ACIKIC COAST *<T__iaP
STEAMSHIP COMPANY will dispatch froinsS_>
. licet Wharr, at 10 a. - , for the above ports oas of
their Al iron steamship., vis:
BTATE OF CALIFORNIA— May 31, June 12, 21.
Juiv ... 18, 30, Annul 11, 23. ■
COLUMBIA— May 27, Juno >. 10. '28, July 10, 2J,
Aiii.ii-; 3. 1.., 'Jf.
OKEGON-May •-':: .Inn" **. 20. •
Connecting via .Portland with Northern P.vsUj
Eallroad, Oregon Short Line and other diverging
lines lor all points in Oregon, Washington, Brill. a -
Columbia, Alaska, Idaho. Montana. Dakota, UtiX
Wyoming, Yellowstone Park, and all points East aal
couth ami to Europe.
Fare to Portland— 916; steerage. *8: roual
trip, cabin. $„._.
'ticket unices— l Montgomery st. and Palace ll»-
-lei, 4 New Montgomery st.
goodall. PERKINS & CO.. Supt. Ocean Lina
Ist tl It) Market at.. San Frauclsaa.-
RAILROAD TBAVEK
SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPAN/.
(PACIFIC SYSTEM)
Trains Leave and Are I)u«i to Arrive at
■ SAN FICAX«'I3CO. - ", • /
ieavb— -rKuAI JUNE 20. :«.l ARBtra
""7:00a Be. .tela and Sacramento.. ..*,.. 777 10-15**
7:SUa Haywards, Mies anil San Jose •1-Is_>
7:30 a Ma rtiui'i. San Rninon. Oallnoat
Xl Verano and Santa Kosa H:4s_.
S:00a Sacramento A Keddiug, vlaDivis 7:li»
8:0Ua Second-class for ogden aud East.
and first-class locally S:4Ja
8-Eoa Kllea, San Jose. Stockton, lone. '
Sacramento. Marysvlile,Ororiils
audited Bluff 4:U_.
f X'Ca Li.» Angeles Expresf, Fresno. II *-
, kersfield. Santa Barbara aad Los *
' - Angelas ll:»v
i?* 0 ?" Haywards. Niles and Livermore.. 7:lJp
•1:001. Sacramouto River Steamers *9:l)Je
».00P Haywards, NlleS aud San Jose . .. 9:l}-,
8 Sunset Route, Atlantic F;xpres»,
■ Santa Barbara, Los Angeles,
Demiag, El Paso, _sew uncus
and East 8-43*
8:00p Middle Koute Atlantic Es press
forMujaveaud East.; 11:15 a
4 00r Benicia and Sacrameuto 10:15*
«:o"i' Woodland an. l oroville 10:15*
4 :Sor Martinez ana Stockton ;.. . 945*
4:io_- Vallejo, Calistoga. El Verano and
Santa Rosa 9'4ii
•4-501' Nllesand Livermore ... «d 45*
6K)Oi- Haywards. Niles and San Jose 7:»i»
...... Niles and Sau Jose to;ls_.
7 :00f Central Atlantic Eapress, Ogdoa
_ and East 12:15*
"7:COp Vallejo tSUJr
V W)r Shasta Route Express.' Saerw
inento. Marrarllle, Reddlaf.
, Poitlaud. Pilgct Sound aud En; 8:15*
; SANTA chjdz DivTSxos.
17:45 a "Sunday Excursion" Train tv
Newark, San Jose, Los Oatoi,
Boulder Creek and Saata Crux.. if.Osw
U:1Ba Newark. Cent— San Jose,
Felton, Boulder Creek and Saata
Crux _ Q-.'llr
•2 :45p Centerville, San Jose, Almiden.
Felton, Boulder Creek aud sauta
,„. Crua •mm
4:-15 l* Ceutervliie. >.i, Jose, l^is Uatos,
Saturday and Sunday to Santa
Cruz, Saturday to Bohider Creek 9:50*
COAST DIVI.S'X-Tlilril mii i Tmvnsea.l Sts.
7:20 a San Joae, Almaden and Way Sta-
tions .- 2:30r
17:50 a Monterey and Santa Cruz Sunday
Excursion 18:25*
8:30 a San Jose, 'iilroy, Tres Pinos. Pa-
]aro, Santa Cruz, Monterey,
Pacific Grove, salluas, San Mig-
uel, Paso Robes and Santa
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) and
Principal Wav Stations 6:12P
10:30 a San Jose and Way stations 6:15r
l'-':lsr Cemetery, Menlo Park aud Way
Station. 4:00»
•2:301- Menlo Park, Sail Jose, Ollroy,
Pajaro, Castrovllle, Monterey
and Pacific Grove ouly (Del
Monte Limited) »11:15 a
•3:30p san Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz,
Salinas, Monterey, Paciflc Grove
and Principal Way Stations •10:00 a
*4:20p Menlo Park and Way Stations.... "8:01*
6:20p San Joseand Way stations 9-.U3*
6:30p Menlo Park and Way Stations 0:35*
f11:46_. Menlo Park and Principal Way
Stations : t7:3or
a for Morning. _• for Afternoon,
•Sundays excepted Saturdays
:Su:n!.-«ys only.
SATJSALITO-SAN RAFAEL- SAN O.UEHTIH
NORTH PACiFIFcP^T RAILWAY
TIME TABLE.
Commencing Similar, April B, 1801, anil
until further notice, boats and trains will run as
follows:
From SAN FRANCISCO Tor SAUSALITO, ROSS
VALLEY and SAN RAFAEL (week days)— 7:3s.
9:30, 11:00 a. U. : 1:15. 3:25. 4:55. 0:10 p. St.
(Sundays)— B:o*), 9:00. 10:00, 11:30 a. St.; 12:39.
1:: 0. 2:50. 4:20, 5:30. 6:30 p. m. Extra trips oa
Sundays to SAUSALITO at 11:10 a. m.
From SAN CISCO for MILL VALLEY (week
days;-7:35, 0:30, 11:00 a. _.; 3:25, 4:55. ti:li»
tr. M.
(fcund'=ys)-8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00 A. St.: 12:30.
1:30. 2:50. 4:20, 5:30 p. it Extra '.rip on Satur-
days at 1:45 p. .i. r ... - .'-.
From SAN FkXncisCO lor FAIRFAX (weekdays)
—9:30 a. M. : 1:45. -.55 P. M.
(Sundays)-8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:30 a. »_.; 12:31
p. m. ■- ■-.■.■>..-. ----- -■- . *
From SAN RAFAEL for SAN FRANCISCO (weet
<lays)-U:2S, 7:15, 9:30. 11:15 a. m.: 2:00, 3:331
4:55 p. St.
(Sundays)-B:0O. 9:50. 10:55 A. St.; 12:00, tt: 1:15.
2:45, 3:50, 5:00, 0:05, 7:00 P. St. Extra trip oa
Saturdays at 0:25 p. — . Fare, 60 cents, ronal
trip. ■»
From FAIRFAX Tor SAN FRANCISCO (weet
<lays)-7:3U. 11:19 a. _.: 4:25 p. M. .
(Sundays)— ':4s, 3:55, 0:05 i: sl. Fare. 50 cents;
round trip.
From. HILLY ALLEY >or SAS FRANCISCO
davs)-6:40, 8:03, 9:40, 1 A. it: 3:33, 5:0 I»
p. v.
(Su'udays)-8:12, 9:20. 10:10. 11:15 A. St.- 12:20, '
1:40, 3:00, 4:10, 5:15, 6:30 P. _. Fare, 50 ceut*,
round trip.
From SAUSALITO for - SAN FRANCISCO (weet -
days)— 7:oo, 8:15, 10:05 a. M. ; 12:05, 2:10, 4:oa,
6 :30 P. M.
(Sundays)-8:15. 9:45, 10:40, 11:10 A. if.; 12:45.
1:35, 3:30. 4:35, 5:45. 6:30. 7:45 P. St. Extra
trip on Saturdays at 7:03 p. St. Fare, 25 coats.
round trip.
THROUmi TRAINS.
LEAVE ABRITB
aart kbancisco. OESTIS'ATIOJT. . SAN v-ianc-sco.
"Week Days. Week Days.
n-™ .i_ Cam P Taylor. To- R .,- :
I*-45p__: caloma. Point tSMif^ "
sssss isijr w «» 'si*!--
-4:65 p. it stations. B:oi)p.it .
■ ■■ " ' ■■ '■'-■ —_______—— . 'm
Tomales, How- -:.-■
ards, Duncan
1:45 P.K. Mill, ('.uiJ.-rM 12:33 r.ic
and Way ata- -
tions.
Sundays. Saaaays.
" Camp Taylor, To- '"
-■'*.- a-tia ast ''■ caloma, Point . o,l* m „
8 .UoA.it Keyes and Way 8:15 p. it
Stations.
■■■ ■ ■ — 1 — — — — -— — — ■ ■
Tomales, How- ■,'<-'
ar d s, Duncan
Biooa.il Mill, Caiadero 8:15 P. «. ~\ C
„,-., and Way bta-
tlons. -
EXCURSION RATES: " "
Thirty-Day Excursion— Round-trip Tickets, to aa&
from all stations, at 25 per cent reduction fr»ja
eliiftle tariff rate.
Friday to .--mday Excursion— Ronnd-Trip Tickets
sold on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, good ta
return following Monday: Camp Taylor, tls>:
Tocaloma and Point Reyes, 9175: Tomales, *- J*;
Howards. $3 60: Cazadero. «1 00.
Sunday Excursion— Round-Trip Tickets good om •
day sold only: Camp Taylor, >1 25: Tocalotna
and Point Reyes, $1 5Uj Tomato, $2 00; ___j»-
>rds,»2 50: Duncan MIII and Cmi Hro. »3 03.
STAGE CONNECTIONS.
Stages leave Cazadero daily (except Mondays) fer
Stewart's Point, uualala. Point Arena. Caffeya
Cove, Navarro, Meudocloo City, and all points aa
the North Coast. . _^
JNO. W." COLKMAN. F. B. LATHAM.
General Manager. Gen. Pass. £ Tkt. Aft.
General Offices. 21 .8«B«<_S-«.-__tc»__t_-
SAN FRANCISCO ANO N. P. RAILWAY;
'The Donahue Itroail-Ciauce Kouto."
COMMENCING Bl'Nl> A V. APRIL li IJJL
"L* and nntil further notice boats and trains will
leave from anil arrive at the i.an Francisco i'aii-a-
Depot, Market-street Wharf, «. follows:
From San Francisco for Point Tlburoa . Belvedere
an.l hail Kalael— Weekdays: 7:40 A. a.. 9:20 __.___,
11:20 *. » IM) V. M.. 3:30 P. M. BO.", P. st, 6:__ rl\£.
Sundays: 8:00 A. M. 9:30 A.X, 11:00 LI. 1 :*._■.-__.
3::*OP.M.."»:00 V. M.. CHOP. M.
From San Kataol for San Francisco -Waalr lays: -
li:'.'.*.--* :<n A. M, 9:30 A. Ji. lilt ' a.m., IK P.W,
3:40?. M.. 6:<'sP.-I. Saturdays only, an extra aa
MM Sundays: 8:10 A.tl. 8:40 A... 11:10 A.M.
1:40 P.M. K:4OP. *.. 6*lO P. M.. U.-25P. M.
From Point Tiburon for San Francisco— Week 4ar— I
6:60 A.M. 8:20 A.M.. 0:55 A.K.1!1).',P.11. -:0a P.M.
4.05 i*. -* „ 6:3.', P. m. Saturdays only, an extra trip al
7:0 OP. M. Sundays: A.M. 10:05 A. M. 11:35 A.-L.
8:05 P.M., 4:05 P. It, b:M P.M„U:SOP. M. -
Leave' IDSSTTHA-I - Arrive In
San Francisco. I tion. i Sau P-Huc'sen,
\V_tl_l_ i SUM- 1 j BUS. I Wkik. '
Days. I bays. I I i>at». I Pats.
7:40 A. M -HI A.M I Petaluma | 10:40 A. M 8:50j-,lt
8:30 p. si 9— Oa.m and <i:O5 I'M 10:3l)».M
605 P. M 5:00 P.M I Sta Kosa. -7:25 P.M Ulop 3
!l Fulton I
Windsor, 1
H-nOAM 'IraUlstf* 7 .~. _ -- 10:30 *.«
B-OOA.M LittonSps «-*° " " O.IOP. 5
rdalo I - . - .
A Way Sts I
I Hopland
7:40 A. If 8:00 A. M..and 7:23 P. M S:I0r.«
I Ukiah.
7:40 a. m 1 8:00A.M I Uuernvle I 7:M p. 51 1 10.30 a. >c
8:30 P.M I I I I 0:10 P..<
7:40 A. M 18 A.M I Sonoma I 10:40 A.M I 8:50 A. it
6*5 P. M ! 5:00P.M ' GlenEll'n I 6:05 PAI 10:10 P. st
7:40 a. M l£:00 a." ! S'eHstopT I 10:4O"a.m I IC:3oa.ic
8:30 P.M IsVoOr.M I ! «:05P.M I 6:10 P._j
Stases connect at Santa Hon* for Mark West Springs-
at Oeyserville for Skagqs' Springs: at Cloverdale foe
the Geysers; at Hopland for Highland Springs, Kel.
soy ville, s_*,.i Ilay, Lakeport and Bartlett Springs, a(
Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Bin*
Lakes, Upper Lake, Lakeport, miii;., Cahto, Mendo-
cino City, Fort Bragg, V.estport, Usal, HydesrUie and
EXCURSION TICKETS, from Saturdays to Has. '
days-To Petaluma. II 60; to Santa Rosa »2 25; •■•»
ealdsboro. »3 40: to C.overdale, M BO: to Hoplauil.
$5 70: to Lklah, SO *5; to Sebastopol. ,2 TO.toGuerne.
srUle. «3 75; to Sonoma, 60; to Glen El'.oo. »180u
EXCURSION TICKJBTB. good for Sunday* only ~tm
Petaluma. II; to Bauta Rosa. II SO; to Ksaldsty-.c.
•2 25; to Cloverdale, *3; ta Ukiah, It 50; to HoplanX
•3 80;toSeba.topol, J 1 80; to Uuer£arule. (i 80; te
Bonoma. II; to Glen Ellen. »l jl. --...-
„ a.C. WHITINO, Goneral Manager.
PETER J. MOGLVN.V. Ueu. Pas,. i'ftcEt A»t.
Ticket odlces at Ferry, 3d Montgomery su**t ail
lgew Montgomery itreet.
ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD.
lUM FM ROUTE. \
TRAINS I,ftA*fc AND ARRIVE AT SAM A*-
cUeo {Market-street Ferry)!
"sToo-p.-tast vlTMoJar*..: 11:1»»
SsOO a. .Atlantic Express vULos Angeles..
Ofll««-ti6U Market street; c^°l^_\^^^
ma. a 1* W. A. iJi3i_.uiA
\jtt*| j_ym_iT- it*****/***- »-■*»*-
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