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Estancia news-herald. [volume] (Estancia, Torrance County, N.M.) 1912-19??, January 08, 1920, Image 1

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ESTANCIA NEWS-HERALD
Sl.w. BstablUhadtMH
Har.ld KiMblUhedlH
Estancia, Torrance County, New Mexico, Thursday, January 8, 1920
Volume XVI No. 12
HEY! II
FARMERS
(From New Mexico Farm Courier.)
So far as any reliable information
that we have been able to obtain is
concerned, the banner, for the lar
gest yield of beans ever grown in
New Mexico, is to be given to P. A.
Shope and William Haas of Luna
county, who during the 1919 season,
made an average yield of 2,212.6
pounds per acre on eight acres.
There is no secret about the suc
cess of this remarkable yield. The
meinocis employed by the growers
are everywhere recognized as scien
tifically correct principles of farm
ing. The only difference between
Shope and Haas and the average
farmer is that these two men be
lieved in these principles with a
vengeance and the results show that
they were correct.
The four contributing factors to
this remarkable yield are:
1. A determination on the part
of the growers to produce 2,000
pounds per acre.
2. Thorough tillage.
3. Careful preparation of seed.
4. Strenuous effort to obtain a
100 per cent stand.
Some people may ask, "What has
determination got to do with pro
ducing a certain yield per acre?"
We reply, "That it has Everything
to do with it." Last year Mr. Shope
grew 1,500 pounds of beans per
acre. He learned something in grow
ing that crop and said to himself,
"I can grow 2,000 pounds per acre
next year." His will to do this
thing compelled him to take advan
tage of every possible resource, both
natural and artificial. Without this
determination the result could not
have been obtained.
Second. His method of tillage
was thorough. Six acres of this
ground was new, being leveled dur
ing the winter and spring. After
leveling the following order of op
erations was pursued: Plowing toa
depth of from eight to nine inches,
listing, irrigating, harrowing,( plant
ing in the furrow, harrowing again,
and cultivating four times and part
of the crop six times. The crop
was irrigated twice after planting
by pump irrigation and once by a
torrential rain. As soon as one cul
tivation was finished, the growers
immediately began at the beginning
and cultivated their entire acreage
again whether the crop appeared o
need the cultivation or .not. The
writer was on the place several
times during the season and at no
time could he see a single weed.
Third. The preparation of the
seed was the best. After the beans
. were recleaned with a first-class
cleaning machine, the growers spent
36 hours in hand picking 300 pounds.
Only plump and fully matured
beans were selected and these were
then inoculated with nitrogen-fix-ing
bacteria. This assured an even
and vigorous germination and even
ripening.
Fourth. Using the utmost care
in the preparation of seed, the
fourth factor, a 100 per cent stand
was pretty well guaranteed. However
"a torrential rain and flood on July
13 killed about all of the plants on
two acres of their first planting and
this land had to' be replanted. Also
the same rain fell immediately after
the planting of the last two acres
and the ground became so crusted
that a perfect stand was not ob
tained and on these last two acres
the yield was only 1,250 pounds per
acre.
If we should leave these last two
acres out of the reckoning, the six
remaining acres yielded 2,608
pounds to the acre.
The irrigation was done by pump
ing the water from a well. This is
the most expensive method of irri
gation: and on this farm, because
the entire acreage tilled was small,
comnared with the investment in
the pumping machinery, it made the
cost per acre run much higher than
the average pumping plant charge
per acre if the county.
A summary of the detailed cost
charges are as follows:
I. Overhead Charge'
1. Land and land improve
ment per acre $10.10
2. Irrigation, pumping plant
. rhnrce Der acre 16.25
3. Farm implement charge,
per acre 2-07
i Building charge per acre.. .78
5. Miscellaneous charge per
01
COUNTY PRIZE WINNERS
IN CLUB WORK FOR 1919
Below are the names of those
who won county prizes during the
past year:
Cooking Club Donnie Addington
I Lucy District.
Sewing Club Rosa Davis, Estan
cia District.
Pig Club Major Dean, Estancia
District.
Bean Club Claude Brown, Fair
view District.
Corn Club Maurine Rogers,
Round Mound District.
Poultry Club Lawrence Bledsoe,
Willard District.
I Gardening and Canning Club
Byron Hodgson, Mestinito District.
Rabbit Club Fields Walpole, Es
tancia District.
The prize winners in the first
five clubs will be given a free trip
of one week to the State College
and will be given 1 tome special
training in their line of work.
This Club Encampment is sched
uled for January 12-17.
Nellie Williams, a county prize
winner in both Cooking and Sewing
for 1918, will also attend the encampment.
In ' determining these prizes it
must be understood that these mem
bers were not granted the County
Championship on their exhibit or
yield only, but there were three
other items considered.
ESTANCIA SCHOOL NEWS
Those on the Honor Roll in the
third and fourth grades this month
are as follows: Ocariz Schubert,
Laurence Manker, Vern Piggott,
Imagene McGee. There were many
absences on account of sickness this
month.
Miss Morgan has started the dumb
bell and physical culture work in
the third, fourth,1 fifth and sixth
grades.
We wish to thank the people who
so kindly contributed to our collec
tion of records for the Brunswick.
Those who brought records are as
follows: Kenneth Lane, Faye Lane,
Evelyn Croft, Daisy Jim Daugherty,
Corinne Williams, Milton Howe, Ed
gar and Ernest Ayers, Kenneth
Green.
Miss Weddige has been ill with
the mumps. A number of others in
the high school have been absent
on account of illness.
Gilford Guest is back again with
plenty of "pep."
Myrtle Chandler is teaching this
week.
Everybody is busy cramming, sigh
ing and losing hope, for semester
exams, begin, Wednesday. But we
have one consolation and that is in
the box supper Friday night,
The show given by Mr. Stubble-
field for the school children last
Friday night was eertalnly good.
The pupils of Estancia schools wish
to thank Mr. Stubblefield for his
kindness and interest.
Tbe new furnace is in at last and
the radiators are all in use. Steam
heat certainly feels good these frosty
mornings.
The students of Estancia high
school have at last gotten their pen
nant up. It is gold and black and
we think it is splendid.
The Seniors have ordered their
class pins and expect them in soon.
THE SPECIAL
SESSION
, The Red Cross Executive Commit
tee has accepted the resignation of
Mrs. Jameson as Home Service Sec
retary, and appointed Dr. A. M. Par
rett to fill the place.
acre
Total overhead, per acre. .$28. 21
II. Direct ChargM.
1. Labor, 526 man hours at 44
cents per hour and 720
horse hours "at 8 cents per
hour, per acre $36.80
, Material charge, including
seed, inoculation material,
sacks, fuel and lubrication
for pumping, per acre 10.37
, Cash charge, including use
of cleaning machinery and
selling, per acre 5.16
Why should a special session of
the legislature be held?" asks the
Taxpayers' Association of New Mex
ico. The answer to this question
will depend upon the point of view
of the individual to whom the ques
tion is addressed. Among the an
swers thus far suggested are the
following:
1. ' To ratify the Federal Amend
ment granting women the right to
vote. '
z. io enact, legislation giving
the executive power in certain
emergencies similar to those arising
in connection with the recent coal
strike.
3. To provide means for investi
gation of and control over prices
charged the consumer for the nec
essities of life.
4. To grant state aid in the
matter of soldiers settlement.
5. To provide for traveling ex
penses for county assessors.
6. To provide for a minimum of
$1200 per annum for teachers' sal
aries.
7. To fix a county tax levy for
health and sanitation and for a paid
county sanitary officer.
8. To issue bonds or certificates
of indebtedness to build an addition
to the capĂ­tol building.
Appeals from state institutions
and various departments of the state
government have been presented for
ncreased appropriations. Each in
dividual and official, of course, feels
that the work in which he is inter
ested is the one important need.
That the needs exist are beyond ar
gument, but the relative importance
of needs are subject to considera
tion. It is well that the date for
calling the special session has been
postponed as the taxpayers general
ly will have time in which to learn
of the purposes of the session and
to discuss their urgency.
As to the expenses of the session,
the traveling expenses of members
will amount to about $3500 and the
additional expenses will average ap
proximately $600 daily. A three
day session would therefore cost
approximately $5000; a ten day ses
sion would cost nearly $10,000; and
a thirty day session would cost
about $21,000.
. Reviewing the measures above
mentioned, it will be noted that
greater expenditure are involved in
many of them requiring increases
in tax levies which for state and
county levies of 1919 are in excess
of 1918 levies by an average of 42
percent ranging from 15 per cent
to 84 per cent. The taxpayer is
now paying between three and four
per cent - upon his assessed value.
One mill upon the dollar of valua
tion is a small matter, but adding
mill to mill multiplies the rate as
our present extraordinary increase
clearly indicates. Hence it is to the
taxpayer's interest to give consid
eration to the demands made for
DIED
' The many friends of little Doris
Belle . Campbell were shocked at
noon New Year's day to hear that
the little, girl was no more.
She had her lunch bucket ready
to go to school but her mother de
cided she did not look well, and
told her to remain at home. She
loved to attend school and began to
cry to go with the other children.
In her mouth she held a tin whistle
and this was sucked into her wind
pipe. As she seemed to suffer no
inconvenience from the accident it
was decided that the toy had passed
into her stomach. Her mother and
grandmother gave the child some
home remedy and she seemed to be
all right. After about two hours
she suddenly became very sick, suf
fering for want of breath, and
though she threw up a quantity of
blood, failed to dislodge the toy.
All was done for her that loving
hands could do, but after an hour's
excruciating paih she passed away
before they could get in touch with
doctor,
Her death was such a shock to
her parents and brothers and sisters
it seemed that it was more than hu
man hearts could stand.
Her relatives were telegraphed at
once and though her little body lay
at her Grandfather Campbell's till
Sunday he was not able to get there
intime for the funeral, having gone
to Texas on a similar mission. G.
Campbell and wife, D. A. Camp
bell and wife arrived in time, but
missed the telegram and were igno
rant of the sad accident till in
formed by friends in Estancia.
This death, following so closely
the death of her aunt in Seattle
makes the burden harder to bear.-
We will all miss little "John
Henry" as we loved to call the lit
tle bright-eyed darling.
Funeral services were conducted
at the residence of G. W. Campbell
by W. H. Ligon, assisted by W. S.
Buckner, after which the body was
taken to Estancia where it was laid
to rest.
Doris Belle is the second daugh
ter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Campbell
of Cedar Grove.
The many friends of the family
extend sympathy.
BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday school at 10:00 A. M.,
Prof. Trentman, Superintendent.
Preaching Sunday 11:00 A. M.
and 7:15 P. M.
B. Y. P. U. 6:00 P. M.
Ladies' Aid Monday 2.30 P. M.
Conference Saturday 11:00 A. M.
Important business.
Come to all these services.
W. C. GRANT, Pastor.
various purposes and to weigh care
fully their relative importance. A
special session is justified only by
some emergency and it is pertinent
to inquire what one, or more pur
poses, of those mentioned, demands
a special session for their realiza
tion. Some of these needs and pur
poses are apparently not so pressing
that they would have been urged at
this time except for the need or
needs that constitute the emergency
to be met by a special session.
Total direct charge $52.33
This made a total . overhead and
direct charge per acre of $81.54.
On a yield of 2,112.2 per acre, this
is 3.9 cents per pound for the cost
of production.
The cost per acre in growing this
crop is exceedingly nign ana naa
the growers not obtained more
than the average yield, estimated at
900 pounds per acre, the cost per
pound would be 9.6 cents per pound
and the crop would be a losing
proposition.
The difference, however, between
growing ,112.0 pounas per acre
and only 900 pounds per acre is
the difference between practicing
scientifically correct principles of
farming or practicing these princl
plea half-heartedly.
A. C. HEXMAN.
(If any New Mexico farmer has
raised a larger yield of beans than
the one cited above, we should be
glad to have him write us the de
tails in regard to it. Editor.)
STANDING ORDER TO THE EDITOR OF "NEWS
HERALD"
Increase this space to keep pace with our growth.
666 J. N. BURTON, Cashier. .
A Small
' Investment
Does not necessarily mean just interest, when wisely placed.
Crops fail for many reasons. Harvest comes but once" in
twelve months.
A GOOD COW brings a WEEKLY dividend. If you have part
of the money to buy a good DAIRY cow, or. a pure bred pig, we
will furnish the BALANCE. Such an investment wjll pay you as
much and possibly more than 100 per cent annually, arid means
a weekly income and compound interest fifty-two times a year.
It also means that you are on the road to financial success, and
that, you have helped us to install a permanent and very profit
able industry in this valley, that will mean a competence to our
.people when all else fails. THINK THIS OVER.
Our first duty is to serve this community and help you and
your neighbor to success. Your success means a huge success for
us. -
FARMERS AND STOCKMENS BANK0' nda
We are proving all the name implies.
NEW MEXICO WOMEN
IN PUBLIC LIFE
In view of the fact that the ex
pected session of the state legisla
ture will probably ratify the Federal
Suffrage Amendment and that the
women of the state may have com
plete political equality with men by
the time of the November elections,
it is interesting to note that New
Mexico women have already made
1 it 1
piates ior inemseivcs and tneir in
terests in the public life of the state.
Mrs. Josie Lockhard is a member of
the State Board of Education, Mrs:
Hallett Reynolds is a Regent of the
Normal University and Mrs. Adelina
Otero-Warren is Chairman of the
State Board of Health, while there
are five women members of the
State Child Welfare Board and five
on the Girl's Welfare Board. The
State Librarian and the State Di
rector of Industrial Education are
women, and all the Governors for
the last decade and more have re
lied upon the expert assistance of
Miss Clara Olsen who has been the
Governor's private secretary for
many years. Naturally the women
are especially interested in educa
tional matters, and ten counties have
recognized the work of women by
making them county superintendents
of schools, while twenty-two others
are serving on county boards of edu
cation. One hundred and thirteen
women are members of school dis
trict boards and many others are
acting as rural supervisors, home
economics directors and assistants to
county agents.
The legislative work done by New
Mexico women extends over a space
of only a few years, but consider
able has been accomplished in that
short time. The record should be
gin with the work of Mrs. W. E.
Lindsey who induced members of
the Constitutional Convention to in
clude the clause giving women suff
rage in school elections. Mrs. Lind
sey, Mrs. A. A. Kellam and Mrs.
Otero-Warren served in turn as
chairman of the legislative depart
ment of the State Federation of
Women's Clubs, and aided by the in
terested women of the state, have
succeeded in securing some excellent
legislation. The laws secured large
ly by the work of women include
the raising of the age of consent,
the repeal of the act which permit
ted the husband to dispose of com
munity real estate without the con
sent of the wife, the creation of
Juvenile Courts, the act providing
for the care of dependent and neg
lected children, the creation of Child
Welfare and Girl's Welfare Boards;
while the Prohibition Amendment
and the State Department of Health
owe their existence largely to the
interest and efforts of women.
Those men who have worried as
to the effect of the vote and office-
holding of women in the public life
of the state may relieve their minds
by glancing over this summary of
what has been accomplished by them
in the past. The home, the school,
civic housekeeping, the conditions
surrounding women and children-
these will continue to occupy the
attention of wives and mothers, and
they will find in the suffrage, not
a new and uncharted sea of respon
sibility, but a tool which will make
their public work easer of accom
plishment, whether it be in the com
munity, the state or the nation.
ENTERING THE NEW YEAR WITH RESOURCES
OF OVER $200,000.00, WITH OUR DIVIDEND
NO. 24 OF 5 PER CENT, AND IN ADDITION
.THERETO THE SETTING ASIDE FOR HJTURE INTER
EST ITEMS AND THE PAYMENT OF ALL TAXES IN
EXCESSS OF $1,200 HAVING BEEN RESERVED; AND
WITH DEPOSITS ON THE INCREASE AS THEY HAVE
BEEN FOR THE PAST THREE MONTHS, MAKES THE
OUTLOOK FOR 1920 ONE OF THE BEST OF OUR
TWELVE YEARS OF SUCCESS. WE WANT YOU TO
BE WITH US TO HELP YOU MAKE THE NEW YEAR
ONE OF THE BIGGEST AND BEST OF THE MANY
YEARS THAT HAVE GONE BEFORE.
5
B A S K
KNAB A BANK
That offers their experience and strength for years past,
and establish your banking relations with us a bank
that can and will take care of conservative and progres
sive customers. Come to us, and if you are from Mis
souri, come in and we will show you.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF WILLARD, N. M.
H. B. Jones, Pres.
P1
ED. DICKEY, Cashier
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
MEETS
The newly elected executive com
mittee of the Estancia Chamber of
Commerce met January 6th, 1020,
at the office of the secretary. Pres
ent, Elgin, Sherwood, Wills, Lud
wick, Williams and Corbin.
Chair called for an election of
officers, resulting in the following:
B. G. Wills, President; Willie Elgin,
Vice President; H. C. Williams,
Treasurer, and Ira L. Ludwick,
Secretary.
Treasurer reported funds in bank
as follows: Farmers and Stock
men's Bank, $106.44; Estancia Sav
ings Bank, $166.77. Total, $273.21.
Then came the discussion of the
proposed organization of the Tor
rance County Taxpayer's League.
John Corbin was appointed chair
man of hc committee to investi
gate this and report at next meet
ing. Motion made and carried that
the Chamber express itself as fav
orable to the $2,000,000 bond issue
for roads, providing that the High-
Way Committee will make a com
! prehensive report as to the roads to
I be improved, methods of construc
tion and maintenance and give an
!idea of the overhead charges on
same.
Secretary reported total unpaid
'subscriptions $420.50.
I Shenvood offered a motion that
jthe chair appoint a Boy Scout Com
jmitteo to assist in the organization
tion carried. Chair appointed Lud
wick, Elgin, and Wasson on this
committee.
! Ou motion the first and third
j Tuesday nights of each month were
I set as the regular meeting nights
for the Chamber.
j All business men are invited to
be present at any time and enter
i in the various discussions.
Dr. Parrett has been appointed
census enumerator for this precinct
outside of Estancia, and Mrs. Mason
for Estancia. Dr. Parrett has ap
pointed J. A. Brittain to do the
work for him.
ESHI
Ladies' Coats
These coats are not just manufactured, but
artistically created, and they are priced
right. An unusually fine assortment, from
$24.50 to $69,50.
UP-TO-THE-MINUTE STYLES
Another shipment of shoes unpacked shoes for the
stylishly dressed lady, for the well dressed young man,
for Dad, big Sis, and shoes the kiddies like best.
Estancia Lumber Co.

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