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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, March 01, 1912, Image 1

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QBE LAKELAND EfEMNG TELEGRAM
Published in the Best Town in the Best Part of the Best State.
:
LAXZLA5D, FLORIDA, TODAY, HABCH 1, 1912.
No. 102
T0L1
NTIIUSIASM FOR
GOOD ROADS
W MEETING AT HALLAM CLUB
HOUSE YESTERDAY WAS
LARGELY ATTENDED.
i .,ki enthusiastic meeting of the
Llar.d Highlands Good Roads As-
L.:,.mii was held yesterday atter-
L at the new Lakeland Highlands
untrv t-lub house, which is now
Lt roinuleted and ready for oc-
pancy. The meeting waa called
nrjt.r bv the President, Mr. J. u
tCWland. at 2:30. The Secretary,
rs. L. L. Knudsen, read the minutes
the last few meetings which were
Icpttd. Mr. W. F. Hauam reaa
L report of the committee appoint-
to meet the Board of County Com-
bners for tne purpose oi iirereunuB
tltion asking the help of the
lard in the establishment and main
land of certain roada specified in
t petition and covering the Lake
id Highlands District. Mr. Hai
ti reported that the Board decided
anede to the prayer of the petl-
Lners, asking them to go ahead and
V the funds they had collected In
Iking the roads passable as far as
bible and that the Board would
e ttum over and complete and
intain th m as soon as funds were
band from the current year's
Mr Holtirook, personally, and on
till of the Board of Commission-
expressed his hearty approval of
It work and plans of the Associa-
ar. suggested sbme practical
!'.hrs of procedure In order to gain
Y !o-op. ration of the Board.
IM -rs r P. lirnsh anil If. T.
ri nhili, who had volunteered to
the t v. sary engineering work,
' '.::.ii.!tiinii.sly elected the official
rs (if tlie Assoriation, and Mr.
:J- j.Iiiill vmlertook to have the
Vi in ."Lane to nrivertlso fnr tikis
J:'ir-h l". and, on motion of Mr.
J I r i" ' ,it was decided to request
' ';"y ((immissiotiers, at their
to advertise for bids
' 'fing and grading of the
d in the petition and as
i hy tho Hoard. The members
''inmitt.-e who met with the
pr- v ionsly werc re-appointed
-'ru t, ,i t0 prcsent the matted
1 ' r' i't shape, reporting to the
amount of money now on
' :- -fiine a substantial sum
:i! 'hi meeting.
ttion all present, not now
Weft elpetol t n moment.
'.nested to hand in their
th.-. Secretary.
IT- Hon, of Bartow, express
ly approval of the work
iation and would cladlv
' rihuted but that the stat
r the .State made it a penal of.
' 3 (andidataln ihnn Ma In.
N i a financial war durine the
'andidary.
' ' tur Lewis, who waa
rom attending the meet
expression of his en
' the work of the Asso
n:ising his cooperation
'-:Me way.
ting was adjourned shortly
k to meet on Thursday,
at the residence of Mr.
v an '
'B r.ti
tice lunch was served at
; th meeting, consisting
res .cake and rnffoo- icn
some fine strawberries
English's farm, not
however, in the menu.
- J :st S much n1nr.t
tlub hou8 splendid
y v Jn ta th city and will, no
- icuuezrnni Af
f (ve . v.
viSItor who cornea here. It
lEe rreatest crAu wr
i j. ork ot t conatrnctioa lit
11 thoroughly qnlp.ex-
cept for the furniture for the Bleep
ing apartments and when this is
reclved, as it will be in a few days,
it will please the taste of the most
fastidious.
Mr. Ward Pender, the photogra
pher, took several group pictures of
those present, a reprint of one of
which will be produced in a later is
sue. Great credit is due to the Presi
dent, Mr. J. L. McClelland, to Mes
srs. Pollock, Gwinn, English and oth
ers for their zealous activity in the
important work of the Association
which is to construct and maintain a
system of good roads in the triange
between Lakeland, Bartow and Mul
berry, and from the enthusiasm man
ifested at yesterday's meeting we ex
pect very boo nto see several miles of
new and good roada around this dis
trict In the very near future.
The road now accepted by the
Commissioners for immediate work
during the coming year begins in the
Holllngsworth district, runs sjouth
one-quarter mile into section 32,
thence east one-half mile to the
(Continued on page 4.)
P0ST0FFICE AND STOUE
BURNED TCItlHSTINA
Christina, March 1. Tuesday
night while the postmaster was ab
sent exchanging pouches with the
mail agent on the northbound train
about 9 o'clock, lt is supposed a
lamp exploded, setting fire to the
store occupied by English Bros., in
which the post-office was kept and
both store and office were consumed.
It was only partly insured. Their
loss will be heavy.
GREAT LOSS CAUSED
BY RIOTINGSOLDIERS
(By Associated Press.)
Peking, March I. Rioting by re
volting soldiers was continued all
day, although tho danger to foreign
ers is not so great as yesterday. Tho
less as the result of fires started by
rioters, is fifteen million dollars.
The loss of life is unknown.
DIVISION OF CANADA
PREDICTED BY MOTLEY
Winnipeg, Canada, March 1. In
the Manitoba legislature last night
William Molley declared that the
ateion of Eastern Canada in defeat
ing American reciprocity showed a
hostility towards Western Canada
which would eventually lead to the
separation of Western from Eastern
Canada.
REFORM OF BILLS
OF LADING PRACTICES
(By Associated Press.)
New Orleans, March 1. The Cot
ton Exchange telegraphed Senator
Clapp, chairman ot the Interstate
Commerce, asking an early enact
ment of the Stevens bill for the re
form of bills of lading practices of
railroads. ' The message said that
the logical solution was in finding
the shippers, but to compel the car
riers to assume responsibility of de
termining if there be no fraud.
NO INTERVENTION
IN MEXICAN AFFAIRS
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, March 1. Chairman
Sulzer, of the House Foreign Affairs
Committee, said, after a talk with
the President, that he was opposed
to any intervention in Mexico.
Settlement or
STRIKE PROBABLE
MILL OWNERS OFFER A FIVE
PER CENT. INCREASE OF
WAGES.
(By Associated Press.)
Lawrence, Mass., March 1. Post
ing notices in Arlington Cotton
Mills announcing a wage increase
of at least 5 per cent., beginning
Monday, Is regarded as a step to
ward a speedy settlement of the tex
tile strike, which has been involving
20,000 operatives. It is thought
other mills will follow.
AMERICAN WOOLEN COMPANY
ALSO GRANTS A RAISE
(By Associated Press.)
Boston, March 1. The American
Woolen Company has notified its
agents in all its thirty-three mills
to announce a five per cent, increase
in wages. This company is largely
Interested in the Lawrence, Mast.,
mills agajnst which the strike has
been In force for some time. The
end of the strike la now In sight.
The executive committee of the
Industrial workers voters to recom
mend that the strikers refuse tol
aoVanre five per cent, on their wag
es. They had asked fifteen per cent
FINALS OF SENIOR
CLASS TONIGHT
Interesting Program Prepared to
Which Invitation Ii Extended
To Public.
Tho Seniors of the Lakeland High
School will deliver their finals this
evening at the Lakeland High
School. The purpose of assigning
the students essays to deliver at this
time Is to enable them to get more
accustomed to speaking in public,
which is a very commendable move
upon the part of their teachers. Tho
Senior Class have tfeken great paiiu
in decorating tho stage, and the
whool auditorium will present a
splendid appearance this evening
vhen the program Is opened. All
parents and friends of the school arc
Invited to att"nd the exercises, which
are free, and which will be as fol
lows: "Old Folks at Home" Chorus.
"The Stony Way" Irma L. Trani
mell. "Robert E. Lee John Patterson.
"In Medias Res" Georgia Strain.
"Echo" Gerald Mitchell.
Piano solo Beulah Hooks.
"Seven Wonders of the World"
1 nomas Jackson. .
Debate: "Resolved, That we are
following In the footsteps of Rome."
Affirmative, Herman Flanagan; neg
ative, Boyd Edminston.
Chorus, "Florida, My Florida."
"Is it Worth While?" Rosa Lee
Swindel. j
"It Might Have Been" Suella
Groover.
"These are My Jewels" Lela
Norton.
Piano solo Suella Groover.
Niagara Falls Laura Southard.
"Representative Women" Miriam
Ross.
"The p Sunny South" Beulan
Hooks.
Quartette, "Silver Threads Among
the Gold."
RE THAN A
MILLION IDLE
ENGLAND FACES A COLOSSAL
STRIKE WHICH MUST RE
STILT IN DISTRESS.
(By Associated Press.)
London. March 1. With the ex
ception of a few small collieries In
isolated districts all the coal mines
of the country are idle. One mill
ion and fifty thousand men are out
'as the result of a refusal of employ
ers to come to terms over wages.
No violence s expected. Railway
service is curtailed, and many steam
ers are tied up for want of coal, but
the big New York liners have enough
cn hand to do some time. A ray of
hope is seen In the government's
announced intention of passing a
minimum wage bill, which would
takj the matter out of the hands of
the mine owners and end the strike.
CITY TAX NOTICE. ,
The city tax books will close April
1, 1912, after which date costs will
be added. Better pay today.
H. L. SWATTS,
City Tax Collector.
Twelve tons of Spanish mackerel
at one catch was the luck of a Mi
ami fish' company recently.
MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF
GAINESVILLE PHYSICIAN
Doctor H. C. Spencer's Body Found
In Clump of Buihei Neat
the Roadside, '
ENTHUSIASTIC FISHERMAN
ENJOYING LAKELAND'S LAKES
Mr. Doyle, of Chicago, who with
his wife have rooms at the Fleming
bungalow on South Kentucky ave
nue, Is one of the most enthusiastic
fisherman It has been our pleasure
to meet. Mr. Doyle Is here for the
winter, and every day he takes his
rod and reel and goes to some nearby
lake, having had splendid luck in
Holllngsworth, Parker, Bonny and
Bonnet. Yesterday he spent the day
on the water and last night he very
kindly remembered the editor's fam
ily with three shining bass, each one
a large speckled beauty.
Mr. and Mrs. Doyle left their
home In Chicago last September, go
ing first to Europe, visiting England,
Ireland, France and Germany, and
upon reaching New York they camo
immediately to Lakeland. Mrs. DoylJ
is becoming anxious to return to her
Chicago home, but Mr. Doyle says
he is going to remain until May, as
he is greatly in love with Lakeland
and especially with the fine fishing.
TAfT TALKS
ABOUT TAIUf E
DISCUSSES "COMMON SENSE VS.
HAPHAZARD METHODS" OF
HANDLING PROBLEM. '
NEAR BEER DEALERS
DENIED CITIZENSHIP
(By Associated Press.)
Savannah, Ga., March 1. Fe'deral
Judge Speer turned down several ap
plications for citizenship because the
applicants were "near beer" deal
era.
Fred S. Mayes, a resident of La
Belle, was drowned yesterday in
water scarcely a foot In depth. The
body was brought to Fort Myers and
will be sent to his former homo at
Waterloo, la., for burial.
Gainesville, March 1. This city is
wildly agitated over the murder of
Dr. H. C. Spencer, one of the leading
physicians of the city, who was call'
cd away from his home Monday nigiu
about 11 o'clock, presumably to sea
a negfo patient, and who was not
heard from again until his body was
found in a clump of bushes late yes
terday afternoon with his head blown
off.
Several negroes have been arrested
and placed In jail, but it is thought
that white people are at the bottom
of the affair, although Dr. Spencer
was not known to have had an
enemy.
According to Mrs. Spencer, sho and
her (husband were awakened Monday
night at about 11 o clock by some
one calling, and upon investigation
they ascertained that a colored man
desired the doctor to go to Galncy's
still to see his (the negro's) wife,
whom he said was quite 111. The
night was fair, the moon was shining
ard Dr. Spencer, who had been in
good health recently, decided he
would go. The negro, Mrs. Spencer
says, gave his name, but she can not
remember it, since it was a strange
name to her and she does not remem
ber ever hearing it before.
Dr. Spencer asked the man how
the roads were and he replied by
saying they were all right, where
upon the physician left his premises
in his Hudson automobile.
Last Sen of Doctor.
Before leaving bis residence Dr.
Spencer handed his wife $20 In mon
ey, and so far as she knows he had
only a small amount of change in
his pockets when he left. The negro
left In company with the doctor, .nd
so far as ascertained that was the
last seen of him.'
Mrs. Spencer is prostrated with
grief over the terrible affair.
WATSON WOULDN'T
DINE WITH SIIUSTER
(By Associated Press.)
New York, March 1. To those
who wondered why William Watson,
the English poet, was not present at
the dinner of tho Economic Society
last night, after he had been an
nounced as the guest of honor, it
was explained that the name of W.
Morgan Shunter had scared him
away. He Haiti he was too loyal an
Englishman to listen quietly to an
attack on British policy, such as lie
filt Sinister would make if he re
ft rred to Persian affairs.
CORPORATIONS WIN
MISSOURI SUITS
(By Associated Press.)
Jefferson City, Mo., March 1.
The Missouri Supreme. Court has de
nied the writ of ouster asked by the
Stato against the Missouri Pacific,
Iron Mountain and Wabash Rail
roads, the Pacific Express Company
and the American Refrigerator
Transit Company.
Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Mendenhall
will move into their home on East
Orange street tomorrow. During the
past few months they have had their
nome leased and have had apart
ments at Mrs. Nleawenkamp's.
NOTED WOMAN AUTHOR
DIES IN KENTUCKY
(By Associated Press.)
Lexington, Ky., March 1. Mrs.
Eugenia Dunlap Potts, author of
several books, and prominent in the
affairs of the Daughters of the Con
federacy, died yesterday, as the re
suit of a broken hip. Her husband
was Surgeon Major Richard Potts,
C. S. A.
(By Associated Press.)
New York, March 1. President
Taft has given an authorized inter
view on tariff-making. It is entitled,
"Common Sense vs. Haphazard Meth
ods," and appears in the current is
sue of The Outlook. It was secured
by a special representative of The
Outlook .and Is in part as follows:
"Not that 1 wish to see the tariff
question made the mere tootball of
politics," President Taft explained;
"we have had too much of that al
ready. But I should like to have the
people of the United States pass their
deliberate judgment on the issue as
it baa been made up within the last
year the difference between the
common sense way and the haphaz
ard way of making a tariff law. As
you know, 1 am a believer in tha
Republican policy of protection. I
want to see it continued; but 1 also
want to see our party strengthen it
iby giving it an underpinning which
can not be swept away by the first
passing flood of popular sentiment."
"And this purpose could be accom
plished how?" I asked.
"First, by fixing the rates at fig
ures not dictated by a group of do
mestic producers for their own en
richment, and granted in exchange
for party support, but based on the
difference betwen the cost of produc
tion here and the cost of production
abroad, ascertained by means which
preclude all doubt of the substantial
accuracy of the calculation.
"Second, by establishing on a per
manent foundation the machinery
for collecting the data of cost, so
that it can be In continuous opera
tion and its work ever more and
ciore easily done. This machinery,
I need not tell you, should be in
charge of a Tariff ConiiniKslon or
Loard, corresponding In a general
way with this non-partisan Tariff
Hoard wo now have.
"A good many persons evidently
think that the whole purpose of a
Tariff Board Is to collect material
lor a single tariff bill or scries of
bills; and, not unnaturally, thoso
who wish to see tho government eco
nomically administered question tho
wltidom of spending so much money
and employing so many experts for
the preparation of the tariff legisla
tion of 1912, in View of the possi
bility that all this work may be torn
up and done over as Boon as a new
set of hands take charge of our pub
lic affairs. Now, It is just such a
contingency that the Tariff Board U
designed to avoid. The collection ot
data to guide this year's legislation
is only a first step. From now on,
if Congress consents to prolong Its
existence, the Board will continue
collecting data through the channels
It Las already opened, and with tha
aid of men trained in their duties."
MILK BOTTLES IN THE AIR.
SOUTHERN HAS 1YRECK
NEAR ANNIST0N, ALA.
(By Associated Press.)
Anniston, Ala., March 1. One
man was killed, and three hurt, in a
wreck on Southern passenger local
train No. 35, near here this morning.
There was a lively scrap in front
of the Lake Pharmacy about S
o'clock yesterday afternoon, whett
Mr. Brannen. who formerly drove
the wagon for Swindel's Dairy, and
Joe Kennedy, the present driver,
mixed It up, milk bottles being the
principal weapons of warfare. Bran
nen is now in the dairy business on
his own account, and it seems that
he claimed Kennedy had some ot
his milk bottles. In the resulting
argument both men were pretty
roughly handled. They were sep
arated before serious damage waa
done, though there was cona!dr&hu
blood drawn. Both cherfully paid
ones in ue police court thU mora
le. .
1
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