OCR Interpretation


The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, August 19, 1916, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Florida

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1916-08-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

MlLakeland
Evening Telegram
ED 1N THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BEST STAT
BOOST REMEMBER THAT SATAN STAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWN
LAKELAND. FLORIDA, SATURDAY, AUG. 19, 1916
No. 137
SON ISSUES STATEMENT
MUG HIS PROPOSALS
FOR AVERTING R. R. STRIKE
ME
RIGHI lU
EXPECT THE
E
OF SAME
VtmME RAILROAD PRES-
b CONTINUE TO DELEB-
h AND MAY SEE THE
llDENT AGAIN ON MON-
RUSSIAN TACTICS IN SAfTLE
ARE UNPRECEDENTED
i By Associated Press.)
ington, Aug. 19. After an
conference with President
thirty-three railroad presi
today left the White House
giving any indication that
id abandoned their stand for
ion. which their spokesman,
pt Holden, of the Burlington,
t President was a greater
e than the question of hours
km involved.
while the President gave out
bent outlining his proposals
concessions of an eight hour
for a special commission to
ate the demands for extra
overtime by the Brother-
ind contingent proposals by
The president said "This
thoroughly practical and
fair program and I think
lie has the right to expect
ptance." The railroad heads
final answer today and will
p to deliberate, and see the
ft again, probably on Mbn-
the majority of railroad
ts are understood to be un
to their attitude, a .predom-
fport was that some did not
hold out to the point of a
Wilson's statement said an
pur day now has the sanction
!'y and should be adopted as
basis even where the actual
n not be done in eight
He said the railroads, which
Fdy adopted it do not seem
f serious disadvantage. He
ft if necessary after a fair
his proposition, the matter
p threshed out again .
(By Associated Press.)
Vienna, Aug. 19. The Russian
offensive against the Austro-Hun-garian
troops is being conducted, ac
cording to Austrian officers returned
from the front, with tactics that
hardly have a precedent in the his
tory of the wars of the world.
These tactics are, briefly, to an
nihilate the Austrians by forcing
Russian soldiers to advance in their
own' artillery fire, drawing the Aus
trians from their bomb and shell
proof shelters into hand-to-hand
combat, and then mowing down both
Austrians and Russians by a wither
ing drumfire. Great Russian losses,
it is claimed, are due to this method
of warfare.
The Russian method of attack in
the Bukowina and Wolhynia, the
Austrians say, consists of artillery
preparation lasting from 24 to 48
hours. Then come the first Rus
flan infantry troops, in from six to
fourteen rows, driven forward by
Russian machine guns and by Cos
sacks armed with the dreaded "na
waikas" or lead-tipped whips.
As they advance the Russian ar
tillery fire abates somewhat, but be
tween it and Austrian fire from 40
to 50 per cent of the first troops
sometimes reach the trenches. Their
arrival, naturally forces the Aus
trins to abandon their shelters, and
as soon as they do so the Russian
drumfire begins again.
in hnth the Bukowina and the
Wolhynia offensives it is estimated
that the Russians used up about two
million shells every twenty-four
hours shells of Russian. Japanese
and American make, and thrown
from every calibre of gun. Including
naval pieces apparently dismounted
from warships.
BELIEVED
FUNSTO
RECOMMENDED THE
i
WITHDRAWAL OF
PERSHING S MEN
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Aug.. 19. Although
there si no official confirmation or
denial there are indications today
that General Funston has recom
mended the withdrawal of Persh
ing's expedition on the ground that
their continued nreHencA in mvIka
is serving no useful purpose.
FRENCH TAKE
REMINDER OF
FLEURY AFTER
T
HID
nun
KFGROES LEAVE PALATKA
FOR NORTHERN CAMPS
IT,
ALIAN
SHIP
PL
fflfi
BETWEEN
Palatka, Aug. 19. More than
twenty-five negroes left Palatka this
week for northern construction
camps. Who induced them to- go,
is still a puzzle. No one was present
who seemed to have direction of the
exodus .
Palatka is not unlike other cities
in the State, where the labor mar
ket is being stripped to its very hide
by these northern recruiting agents.
They are a wary lot, these agents.
They know their business is getting
on the nerves of employers of labr
all over Florida, and that license
laws which amount to practical
prohibition have been enalcted by
most of the cities. To escape the
penalty of the law on their occupa
tion is their only ambition.
There are two reasons why Palat
ka should protect itself against these
men. The labor i sneeded here, and
the men who are being enticed
away need the protection of the law.
They have the right to go, and no
one would think of placing any ob
stacles to the freedom of their move
ment. But they ought to know that
In going into a new country they are
going to run against a prejudice that
will make them wish they were
back home." The north is a cold
country in winter and always cold
hearted individually toward the ne
gro, although it warms to him as a
race when he is at a distance. These
negroes need protection.
At the council meeting last Tues
day night an ordinance was p.u
through and signed by the mayor
which imposes a license of $1,000 on
the business of enticing labor from
Palatka. Now, catch your man.
He works in the dark.
BULGARS AND SERBIANS ARE
(BATTLING IN THE BALKANS;
GERMANS CLAIM TO HAVE RE
SISTED STUPENDOUS DRIVE OF
FRENCH
CORPUS CI
KALE OF COTTON STALKS
bhia Inventor Says Com
r With Sin rtnnnnn rum-
U Has Bought Site for
1 Mill J- ur:..:: ;
" iU i'ussissippi
felphia, Aug. 19. The
f" that the manufacture of
f'P from cotton stalks Is pos
i that a $10,000,000 cor-
ha been formed and a site
M foT its first .factory at
H. Miss., was made todav
! w- Marsden of this city,
'"feiy among paper men as
Center with cotton and to
1,ks as raw material for pa-
He is
vice president of
fiomic Power and Develop-
fflPany that was chartered
f laare laws last year. Mr.
ys three carloads of ma
usei in his experiments is
aclis at Greenwood awalt
itruction of the mill. Pro
at the rate of fifty tons a
a?r ulp will be started in
he says.
lrsden has been experiment
ation Stalka Rtnr 1903.
big first .)..( j ion-.
Itnd and final patent on the
secured In June, 1915.
Partialis th of
hich includes . running
I5 talks through steam,
Mechanical treatments for
lun of the long and short
" "e "PTtrof!- . .l
al 'ncldentally, produces
80 by-products, all of
N. Y. AND ITALY
SUNK; ALL ON
JOARD LOST
(By Associated Press.)
London. Aug. 19. -The Italian
passenger steamer Stampalia, plyins
between New York and Italian
ports, has been sunk, according to
a dispatch to Lloyds. The Stam
palia usually carried two small de
fensive guns. It was 476 feet long,
displaced nine thousand tons and
had a crew of 170. There were ac
commodations for 1,700 passengers,
but it is thought comparatively few
were aboard. It is thought possi
ble that a submarine sank the Stam
palia. BAR HOOT NOW THE .STYLE
FOR GERMAN BOYS
(By Associated Press.)
. ,o TThe barefoot
Berlin, Aug. 19.
boy is coming back into his own
Result of the war and its ncre -
ta" tTof the emoTaVof
norts have come of me
potions gainst
barefooted, and the cty council o
Munich has now rented the ban
against shoeless youngster in tn
against , eql est-
stitt. cars. The puhi
a make room for Darel
ed to mane .
dren inside tne
ble, so that ! Jtform .
'on while stanume
Weather Report
For Tampa M: 0'
nlght; Sunday P , g'9.
Local temperatures. Maxim
minimum 74.
(By Associated Press.)
London, Aug. 19. TheFrench. an
nounce after a violent all-night bat
tle they they have captured the
remainder of the ruins on
the edge of the village of Fleury and
also repulsed violent German coun
ter attacks on the Somme front.
Italy says the Italian batteries
checked Austro-Hungarian attacks
on the Oarso plateau.
Russia announces they have brok
en through the Austro-German lines
and made considerable advance forty
miles northeast of Kovel in Volhy
nia. The Bulgars and Serbs, each aided
by their allies, are again battling in
the Balkans in what may prove a
serious offensive. Serbia today an
nounces the repulse with enormous
losses ofthe Bulgarians who attack
ed the allied positions along the Ser
bian frontier and admits the Bul
garians captured Florine, 15 miles
southeast of Monastir. Bulgaria an
nounces the repulse of Serbian at
tacks with heavy losses. The artil
lery is also playing a part and both
sides claim successful aeroplane
raids.
Gorman y announces having vic
toriously resisted the stupendous
French attacks on the Somme front
yesterday but the Germans shortened
their line somewhat between Guil-lem-eont
and Maurepas.'
tlSTI. TEH
SWEPT BY STORM
BUT NO LIVES
REPORTED LOST
(By Associated Press.)
San Antonio, Aug. 19. There is
heavy damage from the hurricane at
Corpus Christi but little or no loss
of life along the coast,, according to
reports received at Sinton to which
telephone communication was re-established
today.
The hurricane blew down half of
the army tents around Brownsville
and damaged houses at summer re
sorts along the coast.
FIVE NEGROES
KILLED TODAY
AT NEWBERRY
IN
BATTLE
II
BEGGING FOR PENNIES
Man When Arrested Found to Have
Big Bank Balance
FULL LRESS ABOLISHED
FOR ECONOMY'S SAKE
(By Associated Press.)
Kiel, Aug. 19. The cry of econ
omy has now reached the German
navy, as indicated by an order Just
issued by the Kaiser which abolishes
the full-dress uniform of officers
Henceforth, accordingly, Cerman na
val officers will make a much less
"stunning" impression rn gala occasion-.
The gold embioitifry on
the collar and down the legs of the
trowsers is a thing of the past, and
with it goes two-pointed hats.
New York, Aug. 49. Detective
Eller of the Central office squad was
strolling up Clinton street near
Rivington last night when he saw a
man begging from storekeepers. He
was told the man said he was starv
ing and wanted a few pennies, and
arrested him.
The man said he was Aaron Tit
ten, sixty-five, of No. 809 East Ninth
street. In his pockets, Slier says,
he found a bank book recording an
account of $2,460 in the People's
Bank in Canal. street. Yesterday $37
had been deposited and deposits had
been made almost daily for the past
two years.
Arthur Karrin, TItten's lawyer,
asked Magistrate Koenig In night
court to parole Titten in his custody,
but the man was held in $300 ball
for a hearing in Essex court today.
Magistrate Koenig said he had no
doubt of TItten's guilt and that he
regarded 'him as a. man of the meati
est type, preying on the sympathies
of his co-religionists.
WITHWHITES
MOB WAS SEEKING FOR B0ISET
LONG, MURDERER OF DEPUTY
SHERIFF WYNNE, WHO ALSO
WOUNDED DR. HARRIS
(By Associated Press.)
Gainesville, Fla., Aug. 19. Five
negroes, three men and two women,'
were reported killed today near New
berry in a fight with whites seeking
Boisey Long, a negro accused of
killing Deputy Sheriff S. G. Wynne,
wounding "Dr. L. G. Harris, who
was trying to arrest the negro for
stealing hogs. Scores of automo
bile loads of 'men are seeking Lng.
Another negro was reported kilted
yesterday near Jonesville. No whites
are reported hurt.
TURKISH WOMEN MAKE
EXHIBITION OF PAINT 'SSS
(By Associated Press.)
Constantinople, Aug. 19. As an
evidence of the constant increase of
Occidental influences in Turkey, a
considerable number of young Turk
ish women were permitted to exhibit
their paintings at an exhibition,
just concluded, of the work of the
r-upils of the Imperial Lyceum Club.
Some 200 paintings in all, many
of them by women, and all of them
by Turkish painters, were placed on
view. Critics familiar with Occiden
tal painting and judging the work
exhibited by Occidental ideals, com
mented very favorably on many of
them .
The Jury of award was headed by
the Grand Vizier, himself a painter,
lie has been empowerede to have
struck off medallions to be awarded
at the two exhibitions annually that
are contemplated for the future.
INFANT IS FED PICKLES,
FRIED 'TATERS AND BEER
STILL IT LIVES
Topeka, Kan., Aug. 19. ."I can
not understand why my baby Is not
well," announced a robust German
mother who this morning brought
her sick infant to the public health
nursing quarters in the city build
ing, "My baby, she iss well fed."
"Maybe she is not properly fed?"
queried the nurse.
"No, no," asserted the mother, "we
lff her eferything."
' Horror-stricken, the nurse asked
for a sample diet arranged forthe
baby, 18 months old.
Here is what the last meal in
cluded: Fried potatoes, pickles, a
piece of banana, beer and wine.
Reasons for the infant's illness were
explained to the mother.
DEPUTY SHERIFF
'DIES IN JACKSONVILLE
FROM BULLET WOUNDS
ARMY MOTOR TRUCKS IN A HOLLOW SQUARE
l T K -t' ' m, 1 ii I w I ;
jcas; .r v.i -
Jacksonville, Aug. 19. S. G.
Wftrnne, a deputy sheriff at Newber
ry, Alachua county, died at the Rog
ers Sanitarium yesterday afternoon
as a result of being shot flv3 times
by. an unknown negro who hf Irled
to arrest at an early hour yesterday
in a shack on the outskirts of New
berry, eighty-four miles from here.
Deputy Wynne was brought here
immediately after the shooting in an
attempt to save his life but attending
physicians held out no hope for his
recovery, his wounds holnj of a ta
tal nature. Three btrllets pasted
through his liver, one through the
lungs and one through thj "T.omaeh,
According to information frou
Newberry this morning, a posse of
citizens led by the sheriff of Alachua
county, is in pursuit of two negroes
who are said to have shot Deputy
Wynne as he was about' to enter a
house In which they were concealed.
It is believed the negroes will be
caught before the end of the day.
The unfortunate deputy left
Jacksonville Thursday night with a
negro by the name of Mills Dennis
n custody, who had been arrested
near Mayport by Sheriff w. M.
Dowling Wednesday night on the
charge of hog stealing. After Dennis
had been placed In the Newberry
Jail, the deputy was notified that two
other members of the gang of negro
thieves were In a vacant shack on
the outskirts of the town. It was
while Deputy Wynne was attempt
ing to enter the place that he was
met by pistol fire at close range. Ev
ery shot from the pistol In the dark
took effect. The negroes left the
scene while a companion of Mr.
Wynne placed him in a carriage and
returned with him to the city.
The injured man bore the repu
tation of being one of the most fear
less officers In Alachua county and
during his time In office has had
many serious encounters with ne
groes.
.,m of lU- automobile trucks that curry supplier lru,.i Columbus. N.
vnlre formation to rertst a ponihl attack.
11., to General I'erhliing's expedition In
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Aug. 19. Approxi
mately 172,000,000,000 postage
stamps have been issued by the Unit
ed States since they were first placed
on sale at New York July 1, 1847.
Issuance passed the billlon-a-year
mark in 1882, the two-bllllon mark
in IfciO, the three-billion mark in
1896, the four billion mark In 1901.
the five billion mark in 1902, the
six, seven, eight, nine and ten bil
lion marks in 1906, 1907, 1909.
1910. 1911- respectively, and the
eleven billion mark in 1914. Last
year the exact number of ordinary
postage stamps issued by the Unit
ed States was 11,226,386.415.
"imped envelopes and wrappers is
fled numbered 1,793.764,296.
singly taiuable.
t

xml | txt