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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, November 20, 1916, Image 1

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The Lakeland Evening Telegram
CRUSHED IN THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BEST STATE
BOOST REMEMBER THAT 8ATAN STAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWN
"THE VI
LAKELAND. FLORIDA, MONDAY, NOV. 20, 1916
No. 17
5.
i
to
ve
id 1C
m OCCUPY
CAPTURING 620 PRISONERS
AND MUCH
OS)
'.OCT POSITIONS
Xm OF MONASTER
CAPTUSE OF MONASTIC IS
LOOKED ON AS A VICTORY OF
NOTABLE POLITICAL JMPORT-
1 ANCE; ENTENTE VICTORIOUS
ON. ENTIRE FRONT
(By Associated Press.)
London, Nov. 20. After occupy-1
ing Mjonastlr, on the Macedonian
front yesterday the French troops
mored north from the city occi'ipyin?
several Tillages, and capturing 620
u o. .a.6C w ;t0 their nome stations,
materials, Paris announced. The! Included , the wder was the .
statement said the entente au.es
were netorwus along me enure
fmnt at tne River Cerna to I.ake
Precba. ? Berlin announced that the ,
Teutons occupied new positions north
t OT 130naSTirWliinoui pressure iruui
p tb entente and said the Serbian at
tack In Monglenecia were repulsed.
; Tha arriral of fresh German troops
i a tail froot was also announced.
I The caipture of Monastir is looked
if, L. at. i x. .A vtl1tfnir wtftara
.jw.uiu,l. "favorable consideration
rat of notable political Importance.
I TKa nnlntam anneared divided, how-'
I ever, a to whether it wcild he roi
I lowed by sweeping military develon-
tments. ..Some quarters predicted the
I entente "advance towards Prilep and.
from there toward Negotin with the
I object of outflanking the Bulgarians (
! and Opening the passes northwest or ,
Salonlkl .
f . Berlin announced the repulse of
t the Rumanian forces near Camptr
I lung, while Potrograd said that the
? Rumanians in the Jiul valley were
retiring before the invaders. British
atteicks on the Somme front between
Serre and Beaucourt and south of:
MIrauroont failed, according to Ber
lin . The' British are reported to he
driven out of the western part of
ThA Rrltlah nnd French .
said w-thing important had occurred
Mthtifmnt.
1 -TEUTONS ROUTED
V. ,- (By Associated Press.)
' London, Nov. 20. The Teutonic i
retreat from Mbnastir toward Prlep
Mcaime a rout, with the entente
'orces continuing their pursuit and j
Kcupylng villages north of Monastir, j
iccoTdlng to a Rome dispatch to the ;
rireless press. The dispatch said the
Serbians delayed entry Into Monastir
cause cf fires and explosions which i
ad virtually destroyed the" city. jRoy Miller, of Lehigh University, and
I former Senator Thomas Kearns, of
t . (By Associated Press. I jLtah. The charges made in eac'i
s London, Nov. 20. Vice Admiral :caee- General Goethals brands as "er
Wornet, commander allied fleet, has roneous, unwarranted and unfair." It
iformed German. Austro-Hungarian. j la shown ln the rePrt that durinS
ulgartaa and Turkish ministers top"1 of the flscal 'ear 1916 during
reece that they must leave by Wed-jwhich tne canal was opened, 411 ves
jsday, according to the news agency ;8e,s Passed frcm the Atlantic to the
spatch from Athens.
I DOW OF MAN WHO
. LOST LIFE IN LODGE
TO RECOVER $58,000
;; jwas 3,140,046 as against 4,969,792
Montgomery, Ala.. Nov. 16. The the -preceding year, although the wa
tte Supremen Co today upheld j terway was in operatfcn for only
1 decision of the lower court in five months last year. Commenting
urdinc the estate of Donald A. uPn the reduction in coastwise traf-
ony a Judgment of $58,000 because
,nny lost his life while being initia -
the Order of Moose, in Birm-.ships
ham. Tho estate maintained that '
excessive electric shock adminis-,
daring' the initiation caused
anys death. The .suit was brought ,
dnst the Supreme Lodge of
rid. Loyal Order of Moose.
the
. - j earning capacity of a ship the basis
fccanae of the war Switzerland has ( upon which charges should be com
reased its acreage under cultiva-jputed. He points out that $2,399,
i in grains by more than 20 per 830 were collected in tolls during
L.
over the 1914 figures.
j
'yt a blanket of snow
1
Trees warmer than,
"
he e "i r
MR,
WAR MATERIAL
NATIONAL GUARDSMEN TO
GET OUT ONLY "IN INTER
EST OF THE GOVERNMENT"
San Antonio, Texas, Nov. 20.
National guardsmen are mot to be
discharged from the federal service
for any reason other than the "in
terest of the government," according
to the new instructions from Secre
tary of War Baker to Southern De
partment headquarters. It was ad
mitted by officers here tonight that
this ruling practically closes the door
to members of the National Guard
who are desirous et leaving the ser
vice for various reasons.
The information was also given
out that it was impossible for the
war department to say definitely
when the various organizations, or
(any particular organization of the
National Guard, would be returned
planation that the
granting of all
the
numerous applications of busi
and professional men for dis
mess
charge from the. National Guard
wuld di90rganl7e many mlllUa unltg
and seriously impair the efficiency of
the service, and favorable action on
any individual application would be
a manifest discrimination against
many other soldiers similarly circum
stanced, and equally deserving ' of
GOETHALS REPLIES
TO CRITICISMS
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Nov. 20. Sharp
language is employed by Major Gen
eral George W. Goethals, governor of
tho Panama Canal Zone, in replying
to published criticisms cf the big
waterway which he charges have se
riously affected its commercial rat
ing. In his annual report, made
public by the war department, the
governor declares that the earth
movements which have frequently
interrupted traffic through the canal
;fina,,y w, be overcome for all time
i Giner!i Goethals goes into a
; lengthy review
of the geological
problems which
- un, U-tll CllUUil"
j tered, of the steps taken . to over
come such onstaeies ana the meas
ure of success attained. So far as the
jCulebra cut is concerned, he said,
j"the worst is over, the intervals be
tween movements are becomin?
greater ana the quantities rf mater
ial less."
The report replies tr, the .published
statements of Professor Benjamin Le
Pacific and 376 in the other direc
tion. Of all these, only 91 were en
gard In the American coa-st-wise
trade.
The total cargo tonnage handled
(nc shown, however, the report says it
. 'ai due principally to the scarcity of
for foreign trade which drew
American coasting vessels into that
service .
Difficulties of the present system
of levying tolls are recited and Gen-
eral Goethals asain recommends that
legislation be sought making the
1916. Had the so-called Panama
Canal rules applied in measuring the
ships; he adds,' this sum would have
been increased by approximately
1 1400,000.
IRA1R0ACS
T
READY TO GIVE
THEIR SIDE OE
RATE CHARGES
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Nov. 20. .The first
session of the joint congressional
committee investigating the subject
of transportation developed into a
preliminary meeting. Chairman
'Newlands made a statement of the
investigation's purpose. The rail
roads are not ready. The State rail
way commissions said they preferred
to he heard in December.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Nov. 20. .The heads
of four great railway brotherhoods
will confer with President Wilson
late today. They insisted the visit
was merely to "pay their respects." It
was expected the eight-hour-day
fight and probably plans for the co
operation of the Brotherhoods with
the American Federation of Labor in
the fight will be discussed.
PAYS FOR CIDER WITH
CONFEDERATE MONEY
Macon, Mo., Nov. 20. Confeder-j
ate money will still go in some parts
of Missouri . A man stopped at Jake j
Crubb's farm, northeast cf Macon, ;
and asked Grubbs to fill a couple of !you forget?"
bottles with cider. On delivery of the j The stranger apologized, said he
cider the stranger tendered a $10 was a little absent-minded about
bill of the sort that Johnnie Rebs money matters, took th echange and
used in war times. Then the man went on his way. After the bill was
started to run off . ; protested at the (grocery the con-
Grubbs took after him. It was a stable started in Bearch of the circu
lively chase, but Grubbs was finally lator of Jeff Davis currency.
AMERICAN
u
OFF DOVFR;
(By Associated Press.)
Berlin (Wireless), Nov.. 20. The
American steamship Siberia is
stranded on the east Goodwin sand'
near Dover, according to wireless re
ports here, and is asking for help.
Heavy seas made it impossible to
launch life boats, said the report.
ITALY THE FUTURE
GATEWAY TO ORIENT
(By Associated Press.)
Milan, Italy, Nov. 20. The ex
planation of the increasing number
of American firms settling in Italy In
the realization that Italy is the fu
ture gateway to the Orient and to the
Near East, according to Charles F.
Hauss, president of the American
Chamber of Commerce for Italy.
"Because of her Reographlnal i.o
sitin. Joining the north of Rurope
to the Orient," said Mr. Hauss tr ;
crorespondent of the Associated
Press, "Italy today offers better busi
ness opportunities for Americans in
my estimation than South America or
the Far East. She has a fine com
mercial strategic position and her
Government and people are actively
aware of the fact, and intend to push
this advantage of location.
"Wartime Italy is far mure pros
perous than is generally known. The
recent declaration of dividends
showed earnings higher even than in
peace times. It is also not generally
known that Italy bcught mare pro
ducts in the United States during the
past year than In any four other
great countries. She bought over
two hundred millions from us, 83
convpared to eighty millions in Eng-
land, fifty in the Argentine, fifty in
Framce, and fifteen in Switzerland.
She is selling to us something ever
fit : 1 1 ! . . ..LJ.L n - ,
...iy .u.lu . ""'"'ond son of Emnercr William.
ner normal yeany sates 01 oeiore me
war. 1
"There is going to be much more
business between Italy and the Unit-'
ed States as this big fact of her
geographical situation is better ap- j
predated, and when both Italy and
the United States Increase their num-
ber of merchant ships, at presenting freely and eggplants and peppers J
sadly inadequate to handle the car-
goes either way. Italy has provided
and will continue to provide abund- j
ant return cargoes, such aa herVe-
nowned silks, laces, furniture, all-
mentary foods, wines, cheese, her
beautiful marbles, hematite iron,
CATTS MAJORITY,
flOW TABULATED,
8,874; BOURKE
TO BE HIS
PRIVATE SECY
Tallahassee, Fla., Nov. 20. (Special
to the Telegram) With all counties
in, official and complete except La
fayette, tabulated at the secretary cf
State's office, the viote for governor
is as follows: Catts, 38,927; Knott,
30,053; Allen, 10,333; C. C. Allen,
2,460; Mitchell, 191.
J. V. Bourke is here tsday famil
iarizing himself with the. department
end executive offices. It is announced
positively here that he will be pri
vate secretary to Governor Catts, and
1 Bourke
did not deny it when ues-
tkmed by correspondents. Amos, wh.)
i
has resigned as State auditor, will be
. succeeded by Andrew Gray, present
secretary to
ten days.
the governor, in about
winded and cried out:
"Don't you want your change?"
The man stopped, and when ho
saw Grubbs pulling his pocketbook
instead of a revolver, he went back.
"I'll have to charge you 40 cents
for that cider," said Grubbs; "prices
has riz. Here's $9.60 in change. Did
IS CALLING FOR HELP
lead, and zinc ores, as well as cer
tain other manufactures in which she
excels. Before the war Italy was
laying; the ground for a fine national
merchant marine and right now dur
ing the war she is continuing that
policy.
"I have lived in Italy nearly eight
cf the seventeen years I have been
in Europe, and I can say that Italy
has the most liberal government I
have even lived under. Its laws,
though severe, are just, and when
you get to know Italians and their
customs you will realize what great
strides they have made ln science,
industry and commerce during the
last forty years of a United Italy.
Milan, with its more than 600,000
inhabitants, the heart of Industrial
Italy, has a record of growth unique,
in modern European history. Its
population has increased 50 per cent
in the last ten years, duo to the
wealth and hustle of her business
men.
"All of the American firms now in
Italy to my knowledge and belief
are prospering some even more than
.previous to the war."
Lithunia May
Become An
Independent
Kingdom
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Nov. 20. Dispatches from
Switzerland said that Germany was
about t0 dec,ape LUnun,a
an inde
pendent kingdom. The dispatches
said Prince Eitel Friederick, the sec-
will
probably be made king
. '
FLORIIA TRUCK NEWS
(New York Packer.)
Fort Myers. Vegetables are mov
ere being shipped in carlots. Other
crcca look promising,
Arcadia. Cucumbers sold at fancy
prices last week, -the first shipment
frn this section bringing $5 pet
hamper In New York city. Peppers
and squash are also moving freely.
JULY COTTON
FUTURES SOLD
AT 21,1 CENTS
(T'y Associated Press.)
New York, Nov. 2K July ortton
futures sold i t 21." cents. July
reached 2' rents r.t Tew Orleans.
MORE itEGULAH ATTEND
ANCE OF PARLIAMENT! TO BE
SECURED BY BETTER PAY
(By Associated Pre8 )
The Hague, Netherlands, Nov. 17;
To prevent irregular attendance in
the Second Chamber of the Dutch
Parliament the Prime Minister, Mr.
Cort van der Linden, has brought
forward the proposal that members
shall be paid an extra fee of $2 f ir
every sitting they attend. He pro
poses also that the yearly salary of
members shall be raised from $800
to $1,200, with right to pension.
According to the Dutch Constitu
tion, not only is the Chamber de
barred from taking any decision un
less more than half of its members
are present, but it may not even de
liberate. The "absenteeism" has not
only sometimes prevented parliamen
tary sittings opening at the appoint
ed hour, but has even occasionally
entirely Btopped the Chamber from
proceeding with its business.
Brya
n Will Not
Move Voting
Residence To
Asheviile, N.C.
(By Associated Press.)
Lincoln, Nov. 20. Business asso
ciates here of William J . Bryan de
died rumors that ho would move his
voting reisdence to Asheville, N. c.
RUSHING FLORIDA CITRUS
FRUIT TO MARKET
Those Interested in the Deal Anxious
to Ship Available Supplies in
Time to Reach Destination
for Thanksgiving;. Trade
(New York Packer.)
Oranges
Cars
Season's shipments up to last
Saturday , 1,13,;
Shipments week ending Nov.
11th . .,. .", 727
Shipments first three davs
'this week
Grapefruit
Season's shipments u,p to last
Saturday yc2
Shipments week endin? Nov.
'th ,n
Jacksonville, FH., Nov. 20 Citrus
fruit Is being rushed to market at a
rapid pace. The movement last week
was 727 cars cf oranges and 2T,7 cars
of grapefruit, compared witli sno (Orlando, three; Tallahassee, three;
cars of oranges and fis; nrs 01" Bartow, two; Gainesville, one; Jack
grapefrult for the corresvnnding pe-' sonville, one. Fifty-cne ministers in
riod last year. Without doubt the
movement this week and next will
eqv
if not exceed, the movement
for the corresponding period last
year.
Most of the fruit now moving is
of the early bkom variety which wasjthere will be a goodly number. Some
bought on the tree and has proven a
good, profitable deal for the buyer,
as prices have held up remarkably
well in almost every market. The
next two weeks will continue to show
heavy shipments as fruit will be
rushed to market for the Thanks
giving iraae. ion different markets. An attractive
It is enredtd by all parties in the package goes "a long ws.ys towards
citrus fruit deal that the fruit is of petting 2."c or TOc mere per box. ev
exrcptionolly gcod quality this sei- cn if the fruit I nn hotter than boxes
so:;. T".ic :-;-ywd have taken ex-'that are not tastefully put m. There
cell-jut care cr their groves, also giv-jare prndes "f Florida oranges that
en closer attention to the picking, ;re not ? nn handsome but the eat
packing: and shipping. The fruit, jng ouelities are unsurpassed by any
when it reaches its destination, isjfruit erewn, and there is no reason
consequently in better condition and -why these homely but good varieties
far 8u,perkf than the fruit shipped j should not have an extra dress in
from the same grove only a few years the way of fancy clothes,
ago. The Florida grower has also ,
found out that a little fancy paper The steel mast of an Atlantic coast
used in dressing the bos, has much oil barte is used as a smokestack
to do with the selling when displayed from the galley.
RECORD FLIGHT
MADE BETWEEN
CHICAGO AID
NEW YORK
RUTH MADE Tl J TP.TP OF 832
MIIES IN AIT AEHCPLANE IN
NINE HOURS AND 0KE MINUTE
(By Associated Press.)
New York, Nov. 20. Ruthe Law
ended a record-breaking aeroplane
flight at Governors' Island here at
9:40 this morning. He left Chicago
yesterday and stopped a.t Hornell and
Binghampton, New York. The
actual flyin; time f r 832 miles was
nine hours, one minute. He made
152 miles from Binghampton in two
hours and twenty minutes.
T
WHO WILL HAVE TO
MOVE THIS YEAR
Writing of the Methodist preach
ers who will have to move this year,
Rev. D. B. Sweat says:
Interest at an Annual Conference
always centers ln the assignment or
ministers to their new fields of labor,
as they are appointed for only one
year at a time, and a preacher may
be moved at the end of one year, or
he may bo reappointed year after
year for four years. The last item
of business of the Annual Confer
ence Is the reading of the appoint
ments by the bishop.
According to the last conference
minutes, seven pasters and two pre
siding elders have completed the
quaidrcnniuni, and must bo given oth-e-
charges. Tlio presiding elders are:
Rev. O. A. Thrower, of tho Tampa
district, and Rev. F. R. Bridges, of
tho Ocala district. Those ministers
will bo given stations in some part
of tho conference, and other minis
ters chosen to head the work for
those districts. It is rumored that
there will be a change in one or two
other districts, in which case three
new presiding elders will bo appoint
ed . The pastors who halve completed
the four years and must move are:
T. J. Nixon, Tallahassee; II. Du
till, Quincy; J. F. Bell, Bartow; W.
H. Steinmeyer, Dixieland and Myrtle
St. churches, Lakeland; J. B. Roon
ey, Umatilla and Tavares; S. Steen
bock, Winter Garden, and L. D.
Hay-ties, Bunnell.
There are twelve pastors and two
presiding elders who complete their
year at this conference. The elders
are: S. Hardin, of the Orlando Dis
trict, and J.I). Sibert, of the Miami
district. Tho third year pastors by
districts are as follows: Ocala, one;
! tne conference arc completing the
'second year and one hundred and
three are finishing the first year at
their present charges.
With nine or ten changes absolute
ly necessary, it Is a settled fact that
one has estimated that at least five
are involved In making each adjust
ment, and some oae has declared that
jfive times that number have been
Tcnown to be involved in making the
adjustment of a certain appointment.
MINISTERS

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