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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, January 31, 1918, Image 1

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T
he Lakeland Evening Telegram
PUBLISHED IN THE BEST TOWN
BOOST REMEMBER THAT SATAN STAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWN
VOLUME VII
IN THE BEST P4DT rr-
. .... . v,r , n(. Bb8r state
; LAKELAND, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, JAN. 31, 1918 No. 77
HR8JIS" A IN BERLIN: 700,000 NOW
WHEN GERMANS VIOLENTLY Tmi m REPORTED OUT, 58,000
BOMBARDED ARAN J9: OF WHOM ARF VVOMRJ
14 Tons Of Bombs
Dropped On Paris;
20 Killed And
50 Injured
BERLIN REPORTS THIS WAS
DONE AS A REPRISAL; ATTACK
ON AMERICANS OCCURRED
DURING HEAVY FOG
(By Associated Press.)
With the American" Xrmy, France,
Wednesday, Jan. 30. (Delayed)
Au American position in a certain
section on the French front was
raided during a heavy fog at day
light this morning after a violent
aitillery barrage. Two Americans
were killed, four wounded, and one
missing is believed to have been cap
tured. It is now permitted to dis
close all the recent casualties given
out at Washington which occurred
on this sector.
Last night was fairly quiet
throughout the American sector. At
daybreak this morning a fog envel
oping the wthole position became
thicker and at seven o'clock there
were three muffled reports followed
by shell bursts on three sides of the
American listening post, near a sim.
liar post of the enemy. "Then hell
broke loose," said one of the men
there. It is certain the enemy
casualties from American fire equal
or exceed ours.
Germans Bomb Paris
(Bf Associated Press.)
Berlin, Jan. 31. "As a reprisal
we dropped fourteen tons of bombs
on Paris." says an official statement.
... 20 Killed; 50 Injured
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Jan. 31. Twenty persons
were killed and fifty injured in last
right's air raid, it was announced
officially.
DUTIES OF THE
ESPIONAGE SERVICE
(By Associated Press.)
airistiania, Norway, Jan. 31. An
official handbook of German espion
age, one of the most remarkable
dijnents of the war, was produced
as evidence in the course of the
great Bergen spy case, which ha3
jubt been ended in the courts with
the conviction of six of the defend
ants. The handbook was found in the
safe of Herr Paasche. one of the em
ployes of the so-called German In
formation Agency. Its title-pago
bears the inscription, 'Duties of the
Espionage Service," and it contains,
in the words of the court, "the ob
jects and methods of the German In
formation agency in Scandinavia.
The Introduction says that impor
tant Information can be obtained
through the neutral or enemy ships
which come to Scandinavian ports,
resardlng such points a3 mine fields,
mine belts, changes in lightships,
etc. "By suoh information," it ex
plains, "our U-boats can be shown
not only safe routes, but also ob
jects of attack."
CURIOUS HOLIDAY FACTS
There is no national legal holiday
In the United States.
Massachusetts does not observe
New Year's Day as a legal holiday.
Five Christian countries do not ob
serve Christmas as a legal holiday.
New Year's Day Is the only holi
day observed throughout the world.
Eleven different dates are observed
as New Year's Day In different parts
of the world.
Ihternatlonar business will be ln-
BRITISH
LOSSES
FOR
JANUARY
TOTALLED
73,017
(By Associated Press.)
London, Jan. 31. British casual-
tics reported during January tot
alled 73,017. The figures show a
slight falling oc from December
when the total was 79,527.
Sailing Of Five
Passenger Ships
To Spain Cancelled;
Embargo On All
Shipping To
That Country
(By Associated Press.)
Atlantic Port, Jan. 31. Sailings
of five passenger steamships making
ready ihere to go to Spain, weiis.
pended today on orders from Wash
ington, it was announced.
Embargo on to Spain
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. Jan. 31. The war
trade board suspended issuing II
fceenses for exports to Spain. This ef
fectually embargoes all shipments to
that country. It Is believed the
state of exchange a partial cause.
THE "EFFICIENCY" OF
' AMERICAN RAILROADS
Here's What caused Director Gen
e:al McAdoo to chop off traffic on
the Pennsylvania under the most
drastic embargo in the history of
America railroading, says the New
York Tribune:
In the Altoona district loaded cars
have been piling up to get on the
track scales at Tyrone ever since
Nov. 2, until
There are now 7,000 cars in that
one pocket east of the Allegheny
mountains. Some of the cars have
actually been there since Nov. 2.
Seven thousand cars occupy forty
two miles of lineal track.
They hold 350.000 tons of coal.
It will take 140lrains of fifty cars
each to move this accumulation of
coal.
Ylth a clearance of half an hour
on each of two of the Pennsylvania's
four tracks, it will take thirty-fivo
hours to move the jam.
Allow 100 cars to the train and it
would take eighteen foours with the
same interval between trains.
This is "figuring."
The practice would doubtless take
a week.
And there are some other "nests"
like that at Tyrone.
terfered with by holidays or Sun
days on 281 days In 1918, of these
261 days being holidays:
This leaves only 84 days In which
universal banking business Is possi
ble. November, with 26 holidays in dif
ferent parts of the world, leads the
months.
March, with 19, has the fewest
holidays.
Brazil leads the nations of the
world with 84 holidays.
The Unked States comes next with
54.-
(By Associated Press.)
Copenhagen, Jan, 31. A state oi
siege has been declared at Hamburg,
Altona and Wandsbeck, according to
the Hamburg Echo, a Socialist news
paper. Both Altona and Wandsbeck
are in the Hamburg district and are
seats of ImDorta
15 Ships Sunk By
Submarines In The
Past Two Weeks
(By Associated Press.)
London, Wednesday, Jan. 30.-(iDe-
layed) The official summary of
snipping losses issued tonight, re
ports the destruction of nine ships
over sixteen hundred tons and six of
lesser tonnage. This exceeds by
seven the total for the previous two
weeks in both of which six large
ships and two small ones were lost.
NEW OFFICE ANNOUNCED
(By Associated Press.)
London, Jan. 31. Tho somewhat
paradoxical office of director general
of lands for the air ministry is an
nounced. Sir Howard Frank is the
new director general, and. 'as he
holds the same title for the war of.
flea and ministry of munitions, the
whole of the renting management
Total Demands Wage
Increases By Employees
Nearly $500,000,000
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. Jan. 31. The de
mands for wage increases pending
before tho railroad wage commission
are for aggregate average of 40 per
cent, it was disclosed today. The de.
mands represent a total of nearly
$500,000,000 this year, or about half
the railway operating income of last
year.
NEED OF NURSES IS URGENT 1 hince the entrance of the United
FOR AMERICAN ARMY States into the war, the number of
puijlic nurses entering nurses train
Washington, Jan. 31. The Amerl- ing schools has Increased 20 per cent
can Red Cross is in urgent need of ever tho year before,
approximately 40,000 nurses to care ; in order to meet the increasing de
for the American army. The allies mands of the army and navy, the Red
are also depending on the United Cross has modified somewhat its for
States to supplement their nursing nrr requirements for enrollment. The
services. age limit has been lowered to 21
There are between 80,000 and 90,- years and in special cases nurses of
000 registered nurses in the United1 over 40 may be accepted. Smaller
States. They have been enrolling injSCh0ols for nurses have been placed
the nursing department of the Red!on the accredited list and applicants
Cross at the rate of about 1.000 a!xre judged on their merits,
month, hut this will not keep pace( A, Re(, Crosg nurgeg ag8,gned to
with the needs of the army, It is said. 1 duty , military hospitals automatic
About. 16,500 nurses are now enrolled aly ,)0come member8 of the army on
with the Red Cross, of whom the ma-jnavy mn6 corpg and aftep the,r flg.
jority are in active service, ready forisignment tQ duty are nQ ongcr under
mobilization, or prepared for speci-jthe supervlsion or dlrection of the
fied service. iRcd Cross. These nurses, when on
The fact that recruiting of nurses j active duty, are entitled to the same
is not keeping pace with the mill-1 government war risk insurance us
tary needs is because the sudden and army and navy officers and enlisted
heavy demand for nurses has not 'men.
teen thoroughly realized by worn-,
en available for nursing, and does not
indicate that the women of the Uni
ted States are "slackers," according
to Miss Jane Delano, chairman of the
National Committee on Red Cross
The nursing service of the Red
c,nM h airMnv tinned and sent
abroad 1,700 nurses for service with
the army and navy; has provided
about 2.500 nurses for home service
with theVmy and navy In camps
and cantonment hospitals, and has
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. Jan. 31. A fuel
famine is imminent in large sections
of the East unless the ralroad ad
ministration finds a way to speed up
cual movements despite the snow. Ice
and storms. Forecasts gave littlo
basis for Ihope. Snow was promised
in most sections east of the Missis
sippi river.
BRYAN HOPES FOR A
BONEDRY AMERICA
New York, Jan. 31. William Jen.
nings Bryan, speaking Monday be
fovo tho annual union mooting of
tr.o protcstant ministers of New
York city, held under the auspices
of the Anti-Saloon League, declared:
"I expect to see the entire country
saloonlcss before I die."
Mr. Bryan praised tho administra.
(ion at Washington for keeping
liquor out of tho army cantonments
ard tho navy. The making of a
"bono dry" nation, Mr. Bryan assert
ed, was "freeing more slaves," than
thy Emancipation proclamation
signed by Lincoln.
and compensation for theso three
great departments will be under one
control.
about 2,000 nurses organized into
units and practically ready for mob
ilization. In addition to tho nurses serving
with tho army and navy nurse corps,
r6 Rod Cross public health nurses are
on duty in the sanitary zones sur
rounding the cantonments; 89 are
rerving directly under the American
Rod Ciohs in France; 12 In Rumman
ia, 3 in Greece and 1 in Serbia.
THE "BLACK MARIA"
(By Associated Press.)
I Paris. Jan. 31. The "Black Ma-
K ' ln hlch,
I prisoners, have been transferred from
police stations to their places of con
finement, went out ;wlth the oil
I year. New motor vehicles containing
J fourteen compartments each, re.
, placed them .
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Jan. 31. Speaking
to the question of personal privilege
today Senator Stone charged pub
lished reports that Democratic lead
ers sought to dissuade him from re
cent attack on Republicans had been
calculated to break the force of ihls
charge that Roosevelt and other Re
publican leaders have been playing
politics. He denied any Democratic
leaders conferred with him on the
subject.
ATTENTION, SIR KNIGHTS
Lakeland Commandery No. 21,
Knights Templar, will meet tomor
row afternoon (Friday) at 1:30. for
the purpose of conferring degrees
on several candidates. Visiting Sir
Knights cordially Invited to be pres
ent. W. W. CHASE, E. C.
C. E. McMULLEN. Recorder.
(By Associated Press.)
Rome, Jan. 31. Tho Italians now
position west of Frcnzela VaL'ey on
the mountain front improved yester
day. the war office announced today
Tho line advanced slightly northeast
of Col del Rosso.
SIXTY-NINE U. S. VESSELS
SUNK IN YEAR
New, York, Jan. 29. In the twelve
months of unrestricted warfare
launched against American and allied
shipping by Germany one year ago
Friday, there have been sunk by sub
marines, mines and raiders 69 ves
sels totaling 171,061 gross tons, ac
cording to a careful compilation of
records of sinkings which have been
made public during the period.
Offsetting this loss of American
vessels, most of which were sailing
ships, tho United States slnco Febru
ary 1 has added to her merchant ma
rine by tho seizure of former German
and Austrian owned ships, a total of
107 vessels having a gross tonnage of
080,494, loaving on the credit side of
tho American ledger In the account
with tho central powers a net gain of
515,435 gross tons. The loss of life
caused by the sinking of tho 69 Amer
ican ships was more than 300 per
sons, however.
The percentago of sinkings of
American ships compared with the
nmber of vessels which have sailed
through the war zono successfully Is
small. Records of tho department of
commerce" show that for the period
beginning with February 1, 1917, and
ending with December 1, there were
cleared from American ports In the
foreign trade ships aggregating 17.-
738,900 net, or approximately 24,834,
460 gross tons.
Further offsetting the loss in ton
nage occasioned by the submarine
warfare, the United States, through
the shipping board, requisitioned In
American shipyards 420 vessels total
ing more than 2,000,000 gross tons,
and contracts have been awarded for
884 ships, a large number of whlh
are now under way and are being
rushed to completion. In addition,
the shipping board on October 15 last
placed under government requisition
393 American vessels of over 2,500,
000 tons dead weight capacity which
were already afloat and immediately
assigned them to tho task of carrying
supplies for the allies and the Ameri
can forces abroad.
Another difficulty which faced the
United States In the task of putting
to sea vessels to offset the ravages of
the U-boats was the repairing of the
"willful damage" done to the former
German ships by their officers and
crews before the ships were seized.
This cost millions of dollars.
The statement was made today by
ITALIANS
MPROVE
POSITIONS
ASK THAT REICHSTAG
BE CONVENED IN
VIEW ALAR
I
SITUATION SO CRITICAL AS TO
BE ALARMING TO MILITARISTS
(By Associated Press.)
London, Jan. 31. The German;
strike is growing in magnitude, the
Exchange Telegraph correspondent!
at Copenhagen reports. In Berlin)
700,000 are on a strike, 58,000 be
ing women, iho reports. He adds that
a great number of Socialist leaders
have been arrested In various Get
man towns.
(By Associated Press.)
London, Jan. 31. Socialist part,
leaders In Germany, according to a,
statement to the Berliner Tageblatt
forwarded by tho Amsterdam corre
spondent Central News, have asked
President Kaempf of the Reichstag
to convene that body immediately
in view of tho alarming events ot
the past few days.
UNCLE SAM WANTS
ACCOUNTANTS AT $2400
TO $6,000 A YEAR
Washington, I). C. Jan. 31. The
United States government Is la
need of several hundred expert cost
accountants to fill vacancies In the
accounts section of tho finance de
partment of tho equipment division
of the Signal Corps. War Depart
merit, and in other branches, for
duty in Washington, D. C, or ia the
field, according to an announcement
just issued by the United States Civil
Service Commission. The salaries of
fcred rango from $2,400 to $6,000 a
year. Men only are desired.
1 lie duties of appointees to the'
Signal Corps will consist of the de
tcrniiatlon of production costs ot
airplanes and airplane motors, either
as supervisors in charge at one op
lnoro of the several plants, or as as.
sistants; or appointees may be as
signed to duty in Washington, D. C.
Applicants will not bo assembled
for a written examination, but will
h rated upon the subjects of educa
tion and experience, as shown by
their applications and corroborative
ovldcnce.
The Commission states that on ac
count of the urgent needs of the ser
vice, applications for these positions
will bo received until further notice
and that papers will be rated
promptly and certifications made as
tho needs of tho service require.
Complete information and applica
tion blanks may be obtained by
communicating with the secretary
of tho local board of civll.servlce ex
aminers at the postoffice In any oJ
the larger cities or with the United
States Civil Service Commission,
Washington, D. C.
a prominent official connected with
the shipping board, that every seized
vessels was now completely repaired
and In service. Many of them have
made as high as three and four trips
through the war zone.
Three of the former German ves
sels have been the objectives of suc
cessful attacks by the submarines.
The Actaeon, formerly the Adams
turm, and the Owasco, formerly the
Alemania, were sunk, and the Armen
ia was bit by a torpedo but was saved
after being beached.
The announced sinkings of British,
ships for the year up to and including
the week ending January 23 have
been 1.033 vessels, of which 763 were
over 1,600 tons and 270 were under
that figure. The joint losses ot
France and Italy have averaged three
to four large vessels weekly.
SITUAMI
I

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