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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, February 05, 1918, Image 1

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The Lakeland' Evening Telegram
ISH DIN THE, BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BEST STATE BOOST-REMEMBER THAT SATAN STAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWN
LAKELAND, FLOBIP A nTSDAT. FEB. 5 IMS jfo. 81
OUR FRUSTRATED
H PLANS TO
U UD THEIR TRENCHES
! EARY YESTERDAY MORNING
avy Casualties
Inflicted, Is
Believed
cie
K.
.ISH CARRIED OUT SUCCESS-
tTl. RAIDS; COMPLETE ORDER
I etobed at lams
ICf
- f
lv , 1 1 IPt Associated Pre9B.)
WltS . American Army In France,
Monday, Feb. 4. ( Delayed. )Ger
mftn ijlans to raid the American
Blijirisitai were frustrated early this
moixjng. The American artillery
" jptit tdown a heavy barrage in front
of (11 on the German lines, which,
ii Ai telieved, were filled with officers
i" I xien awaiting the signal for an
'j. It is believed that heavy
cc !iles were inflicted. Ther has
A1K j ft' general increase of artillery
fire 1Jie past few days.
iaii ' v -
J .' i (By Associated Press.)
Lcadon, Feb. 5. Complete order
hat been restored at Lams, north
m:X of Athens, where soldiers of
Wl 'Greet infantry regiments mutinied,
M.121 Non-Combatants
I v Have Found Watery
I '" Graves At Hands Of
on ,
111' ' 1
1 " (By Associated" Press.) ' .
I London, Feb. 5. German U-boats,
-iccCding to Andrew : Bonar Law,
1 1fowtSient leader of the House of
emmon8, have "caused the death of
14.121 non-combatant British men,
women and children.
watV Bonar Law also announced that
CoiOeneral Issimo will not be appointed
as the result of the recent conference
,k at Versailes.
acr FIT! SEAGULLS SAVE STEAMER
lit' i -
London, Feb. 5. How five seagull
.jji-ncre the means of saving a steamer
rarL'om destruction was related by the
I pilot of the steamer on arrival at an
10 English port. He noticed fivi pea-!ar-tuJls
perched on a dark ofrect which
ei;wao bobbing up just ahead of the
a vessel Closer examination revealed
it'Oiat a seagull was gicting on earr
at the five prongs of a floating mii:e
ojii;d there was lust time tD alter the
vessel's course and prevent a disas
ter. '- s y
iot: CITRUS GROVE BRINGS $50,000
r r.
e Bartow, Fla., Feb. 5. The large
i Kitras grove owned by Syd C. Inman
' !fiear Florence Villa sold recently for
Jcr J50.000. Mr. Inman reserved his
Q;;iandsome home and the immediate
rrounds with improvements, only the
""Vrove, which comprises 30 acres, be
)0'ng sold. The purchasers, whose
lames are not given, are from the
lorth. , The Inman grove has long
een considered one of the show
)laces ot the Florence Villa section
ind is In splendid bearing condition.
c -
KORlTAf PLANS TO MAKE MORE
STRINGENT FOOD LAYFS
(By Associated Press.)
0" Chri8tlania, Norway, Feb. 5. A
Dans of the population and an In
ntory of all public and private
jacks' of foodstuffs is being made by
Norwegian government, as a ba-trtii-
for a new and very stringent sys--i
cf food restriction whlch-will be
t m force soon.
according to an Athens dispatch to
the Times. Former Premiers Skoul
oudis and Lambros, and other former
cabinet members under impeachment
have been ordered to consider them
selves under arrest in their own
homes, where they are guarded
closely by police.
British Raids Successful
(By Associated Press.)
London, Feb. 5. The British car
ried out successful raids last night
southwest of Armcntieres and in the
neighborhood of Ypres Steden rail
vay. Many Germans were killed
and prisoners and machine gun cap
tured, an official statement says.
Over 600 Ships
Are To Adopt
Wheatless And
Meatless Days
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 5. Operators of
mure than six hundred steamships
have agreed to adopt wheat and
meat saving menus as proposed by
the food administration for Bhips in
Gulf and Atlantic trade.
German Submarines
RETURN OF U. S. GAS
MASKS FROM BATTLE
FRONT EXPLAINED BY
SECRETARY BAKER
The Secretary of War authorizes
the following:
Various newspapers during the past
ten days have printed a statement
that 200,000 gas masks, made in this
country and shipped to Gen. Pershing
have been returned to the United
States, "being absolutely worthless
for the purpose for which they were
Intended." It is due the parents and
relatives of the men who will use gas
masks that the facts be known.
Our experiments in the United
States for devising a gas mask super
ior to any previously used have been
constant and gratifying. Previous to
January 1, 1918, only 20,000 masks had
been shipped from this country to Eu
rope. Before these masks were Is
sued to our troops in France, very
marked improvements were perfected
here, and Gen. Pershing was cabled
that a superior mask would soon be
manufactured. He was asked to re
turn the mask then on hand, for train
ing purposes here. Gen. Pershing
procured from British sources suffici
ent masks to completely equip his
forces, pending the arrival of the new
ly devised model. t
The perfected masks now being
shipped to Gen. Pershing have not
been commented on by him as yet,
r.or has there been time for an actual
test of these masks In battle. How
ever, after exhaustive tests made in
this country, British experts have tes
tified that the masks give better pro
tection than any now being used by
the allied troops.
The returned masks, which are now
being used solely for training soldiers
in this country, will not withstand the
heavy concentration used in actual
gas attacks In Europe, but they afford
perfect protection against the gas
clouds used in training In this coun
try. Being of the same general type,
however, as those now being sent to
Europe, they serve to familiarize the
men with the use and operation of the
masks with which they will be provid
ed on the firing line.
m
SB PAST
TEN MONTHS
$24,O0O,COO A DAY
(By Associated . Press.)
Washington, Feb. 5. Ten months
of war has cost the United States
about seven billion dollars or at tin
rate of about twenty-four millions
daily. Over four billions of this was
paid as loans to the Allies, the bal
ance being America's outlay tor her
own war expenses.
Winter Haven was visited by a big
fire on January 8th. A city block
was destroyed, including the Snell Na
tional Bank, and a new three-story
structure erected by W. J. Smith.
AMER
WAR
WEN
AVERAGED
Two Ounce Bread Ration
For Hotels and Restaurants
Ordered Today By The
Food Administration
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 5. Two ounce
bread ration was ordered today by
th.i food administration for patrons
of hotels ., restaurants and dining
cars. This allowance is about that
now observed In England. When only
one kind of other than wheat bread
is ordered the portion may consist
ot lour ounces. Rolls may not weigh
over one ounce. - ,
s.c;
T
IS DEAD
(By Associated Press.)
Spartanburg, Feb. 6. Mrs. P. A.
Judd, philanthropist, who has given
ever one hundred thousand to local
Institutions, died , here last night,
aged 92.
U. S. NAVY DEPARTMENT
""NOT IN HABIT OF MAKING
EXHIBITS WILL PARTICIPATE
AT FLORIDA STATE FAIR
State Fair Body Receiving Numerous
Letters of Congratulation
According to A. A. Ormsby, of the
United States Department of Agricul
ture bureau of exhibits, the Navy De
partment has always been averse to
making exhibits, and It Is was ex
tremely fortunate In the Florida
State Fair and Exposition securing
this great $50,000 display of our sea
fighters for exhibition at the State
Fair in Jacksonville from February
26 to March 9.
The big exhibit of the Navy De
partment will be larger than at first
intended, and the display of the De
partment of Agriculture has also
been enlarged, resulting In Prof. F.
Lamson-Scribnef requesting Presi
dent W. F. Coachman to give them
1,000 square feet more of space. In
view of the Florida State Fair and
exposition securing these two big
government exhibits, the officials
have been congratulated on all sides,
and it is believed that on this ac
count, many hundreds of people will
attend the State Fair who otherwise
might have stayed at home.
DISTINCTIVE DECORATION FOR
NAVAL MAN WHO TOOK PRT
IN THE WAR IN 1914
(By Associated Press.)
I-ondon, Feb. 5. A distinctive dec
oration In the form of a bronze star
la to be awarded to all naval officers
and men who took part In the ore
rations in France' and Belgium dur
ing the earlier part of the war In
1914.
SPARTANBURG
WOMAN
PHtLANTHROPIS
mf MANAGERS
ISCRtDlTING
i
L
if
(By Associated Press.)
Vi .i-iii i Fe'' ". .a .He con-
s ' ''-"'i' the fount!"' was
J o . , t.. .; nianattetm io
.i ,,i ihc iioi'i wavie tie"'
. i . w.,o i i met) itie man-
tl 'i ' .e o
, on o" ;v - V hour law anil
. .. :.:overnmeiu opera lion o' ''o
ure.
(By Associated Press.),
Wash ngion, Wo. S.Cbargei that
) ' ' o-il n ipa'M'tvn's .i"c a'lempl-
o (lifvc i i . 1 i'fi sovernmen opo
:it;on o romls ta made b" W. V.
,r-c her.-! ro'lwav 1,-n'nmen. to bv at
inn railway wir e h"nr'ns-. "I hav"
. facts to prove that expeneneeit
NO EMBARGO CONTEMPLATED
ON PERISHABLE CROPS, SAYS
FLORIDA SENATOR
(New York Packer)
Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 5. Rumors
have been current through the state
of Florida in particular and through
the Southeastern states in general,
that embargoes would bev placed on
perishable fruits and Vegetables.
These rumors became so persistent in
their nature that . growers', organiza
tions in the state, becoming dissatis
fied with their effect on the produc
tion of crops, took the matter up with
Senator Fletcher of Florida, who
made an investigation of the situa
tion. Senator Fletcher, In replying to an
inquiry from A. R. Doran, of Gaines
ville, said:
i
"I am pleased to Inform you that I
have discussed the matter with the
Chief of the Bureau of Car Service
of the Interstate Commerce Commis
sion, and with the United States Food
Administrator, and with the Director
General of Railroads, and am advised
by them that there is no reason why
any one should be unduly alarmed re
garding the transportation of any
food and feed products during the
coming season, and that every effort
should be put forward to increase pro
duction. These officials state it Is
their desire and intention to co-operate
in every manner possible with the
farmers and truckers of the country
in order that preferential attention
may be given to the marketing of all
such products.
"The unusual conditions which re
cently prevailed in the North and
Middle West, were due to a general
congestion of freight and express
shipments making it necessary for
the government to take over the op
eration of the railroads, and to one of
the worst blizzards in many years,
which combination of circumstances
made it quite impossible for the
transportation companies to properly
handle such shipments. However, I
ain informed normal conditions will
soon be restored and that there should
be no further cause for complaint un
less another similar condition arises,
which it is thought quite Improbable."
NITRITE SHIP WILL RE
DIVERTED TO JACKSONVILLE
IF DEMAND IS ENOUGH
Washington, Feb. 5. If Secretary
HouFton receives information that
enough Florida farmers will hnv
nitrate to Justify him in doing so. b
will order the ship now enroute from
Chile to put in to some Florida port
probably Jacksonville. He Is await
ing word from the county agents In
Florida.
Lake County growers got together
nd placed an order for over $15,000
worth of nitrate of soda offered by
the Government at $S0 per ton. It is
estimate that a saving of fully 7,500
was thus effected.
GOVLRr
IT
OWNERSHIP
MEATLESS MONDAYS WILL
NOT BE ABANDONED,
IS OUTLOOl DESPITE
FAILURE Or THE PLAN
r.Hi'oad men are not jwni;,-:l :o
i ate as t.-v'xi ns d.. ta'c." Le !
said.
ISK1TIS1I RAILWAYS
UNDER STATE CONTROL
(By Associated Press.)
London, Feb. 5. British railways
which have been under state con
?.roi since the beginning of the war,
I have been operated through an exec
utive committee of general managers
of railways. The working under one
control has resulted in many econo
mies and proved of great advantage
to the state.
Under the original agreement made
with the companies they are guaran
teed the same net receipts as for
1013. Afterward the companies weVe
given allowances in respect of new
capital employed, tfish railways did
not come under State control till
1916.
GERMAN EMPEROR AP-
POINTS A GOVERNOR OF
A REGION LOST BY WAR
(By Associated Press.)
Amsterdam, Feb. 5. The German
Emperor has appointed Privy Coun
cillor Habor to be governor of the
German colony of New Guinea. Tha
Cologne Volk Zeitung explains:
"It may sound curious that a gov
ernor should be appointed to a re
gion which we have lost during the
war, but the fact is thus clearly em
ptasized that Germany has no' inten
tion of renouncing her colonies "
f
Severe Weather Grips
Entire Country; Coal
Shortage Causes
Great Suffering
TO CULTIVATE FLAX
IN IRELAND
(By Associated Press.)
Belfast, Ireland, Feb. 5. The Brit
ish government soon will launch a
.C 10,000,000 scheme for Increasing
the cultivation of flax in Ireland, ow
inp to the importance of flax for tho
manufacture of airplane wings. Es
timates by experts show that the
quantity of flax usually grown In
Ireland would not be sufficient in the
coming year for this and other de
mands. Farmers who own land
suitable for the purpose will be of
fered subsidies, and the govern
ment probably will secure in addi
tion largo areas of land in the mid
lands and south of Ireland. -There
is likely to be a scarcity of seed, and
experiments are to be made with the
use of Canadian seed.
PEOPLE WHO ARE IN CLASS UV
By Associated Press.)
London, Feb. 5. Speaking on Ger
many's war aims and dangers of i
J premature peace. Lord Denbigh de
scribed tho people who are out for
pence at any price and certain others
as in class "Z," separating them as
follows:
"The Z l's are those who are ig
norant of the situation and Co not
know what they are talking fnbou.
"The Z 2's are utter rotters, men
who want the war to end because
they cannot get Inargarine or . be
cause their beer is thin.
"The Z 3's are the enemy agents In
the pay of Germany, trying to lower
'.he morale of the soldiers and the
people."
FAMOUS BELL TO BE fSED
FOR WAR PURPOSES
(By Associated Press.)
Amsterdam, Feb. 5 The great-be'.l
of Cologne Cathedral ('Maria Glorl-
COAL MOVEMENTS
.SLOWER 1HH EVER;
HtATLESS
DAYS
FAILED TO GET
INDICATIONS .NOW ARE THAT
ORIGINAL TEN 1IEATLESS MOX
DAYS WILL BE OBSERVED
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 5. It. is practic
ally certain today after t the confer
ence between McAdoo and Garfield
that heatless Mondays will not be im
mediately abandoned as was hoped.
It is indicated that it might be nec
essary to go through the whole se
ries again.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 5. Most discour
aging reports on the movement of
freight and coal because of the ex
treme cold, threaten to defeat the .
plnns of the abandoned Monday in
dustrial closing order. Aa McAdoo
ant'. Garfield went into a conference
to discuss abandoning of heatless
Monday, reports were received show
Iiir that coal movements east of the
Mississippi had been cut more than
15 per cent in the last two days.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 5. Severe cold
today gripped the country east of tha
Mississippi from the northern border
to the Gulf, adding its share toward
making this one of the most extra
ordinary winters of modern times.
The present cold wave Is not expect
ed to be of long duration. Tempera
tures extend from 35 below in the
St. Lawronce valley to 44 above at
Miami, Fla.
N. Y. Has Only One Day's Coal
Snpply
(By Associated Press.)
New York, Feb. C. Zero weather
continued today to accentuate tho
seriousness of the city's coal short
age. Fuel administrators estimated
the city has only one day's supply of
coal on hand and receipts are far be
low normal.
EFFECT OF AMERICAN
BLACK-LIST ON BUSINESS
HOUSES IN MEXICO
(By Associated Press ) )
Mexico City, Feb. 5. The Amer!
cp.n black-list has had something of
the effect ot a- commercial tornado
on certain business houses in Mex
ico. And, like the Kansas species
of the phenomenon, it has performed
seme queer antics. For instance, a
French business man, with six rela
tives In the trenches, figured on the
frst list. Slips like this, however,
have been rectified readily through
tho various legations at the capital.
osa) was rung for the last time on
Nyy Year's eve, and the metal which
wfighs several tons will be used for
war purposes.
The boll was first rung cn the
bhtbday of William I, on March 22,
1P77, and was cast from French guns
captured In 1870-71.
D
RESULTS

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