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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, February 06, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1918-02-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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he Lakeland Evening Telegram
t . 2LISHED IN THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OF THE BESt1tIt7
;me VII " "
BOOST REMEMBER THAT SATAN S TAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN T6 KNOCK HIS HOME TOWN
LAKELAND, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6, 1918
No; 83
'3
-1 jffiR TO PRESENT FACTS
f. T A SECRET SESSION
; TOMORROW;
$ i POWERS SHOULD
I i GRANTED
M - - t i
vyHas
ranted Great
Service To
The Army
hi - .:
NC .
STATED THAT AMERICAN
i;3TAGE LOSSES HAD BEEN
! K"ilL; QUESTION OF SHIPS TO
j 1'2 DISCUSSED TOMORROW
? (By Associated Press.)
. .Ttshington, Feb. 6. Cross exam-
"TrAca of Secretary Baker on his re
tent statement before the Senate mil
tltrry dmmittee was begun at a pub
jlife L;aring before the committee to-
lAr a number of questions re
garding Baker estimates asfto ton
bags available this year for trans
Import troops to France, the question
arocsaii to whether it would bo prop
er'' tor Baker to answer such ques
tions "la a public session. The secre
utar proposed that he be permitted
to prepare statements showing the
xact' tacts and details as prepared
by experts, and present them to a
lOijcomaitttee and return for cross ex
amination later. Baker said he had
3?r't determined whether the troops
Wi!l lie, kept in southern camps next
t'irzkr. If the summer is as ex-:r-9as
the winter had been, he
pa! J some would have to be moved.
; He stated that American tonnage
lo-: liave been exceedingly light
, in ' that the "service the nary has
II Jrcr-Cared in the protection of the
0r- has been unexampled."
,1,1 5 gave the opinion that new
yon will be desirable which
WouIJ give the President the general
jowers of transfer, and to co-ordi-!wimt
the functions of the various de
' 'partments as conditions arise. The
'question! of ships to transport troops
o France will be presented tc the
1 Committee in secret session tomor-
few. It was indicated the President
jo:nd secretary are taking steps that
1st they hope will satisfy those pressing
tne bill for a director of munitions.
SOMETHING TO BE PROUD
li 1 OF- IS SHOWING MADE BY
ou , THE PHYSICIANS
,e ; Jacksonville, Feb. 6. The response
jes-of doctor' from all sections of the
centate to the colors has been a splen
did one. The records shows that up
'.to date there have been 145 physic
lf jians who: have responded and are now
ecdoing their part in volunteer service
cfor their country.
Jacksonville heads the list with
njthirty-elght physicians, who have vol
nnteered, and jeho have gone. This
' mounts to a little over 26 per cent
of the total number from the state.
Is This is more than from Tampa. Pen
1&acola, Key West, Miami, Ocala and
Tallahassee put together.
H ; It is more than three times as many
8 from Tampa or Pensacola.
More than nine times as many as
Ijlh-om Ocala. Key West 'or, Gainesville,
ijf More than twelve as many as from
Tort Dade, Lakeland or Lake Cky.
More than eighteen as many as
Srom Orlando, St. Augustine, Cler-
ont, Clearwater or Mulberry.
ylThe Duval County Medical Society
ill soon have a service flag with its
-irty-elght stars floating from the
jt frofessional building.
The 'American Berkshire Congress
ill be held in Orlando February 12th
md stock raisers from all portions of
fee United States will be in-attend-
THIS NEW
BE '
PRESIDENT
KIND-HEARTED BURGLARS
DRESS VICTIM'S WOUNDS
San Francisco, Feb. 6. Fred La
ma., a holiday visitor in town, re
turned to his hotel room early in the
morning and was set upon by two
burglars, one of whom smashed him
fiayfully over the head with a shot-H
gun.
Taking pity on their victim, they
bathed and dressed his wounds, gave
him back a fair third of his money
and walked out. Lamar was so as
tonished that he forgot to turn in
the alarm.
VIOLENT ARTILLERY
IT
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Feb. 6. A violent artillery
battle on the Verdun front in the re
gion of the Fosses Wood, east of the
Meuse, is reported in today's official
statement. In the Woevre the
Trench brought back prisoners.
Negotiations At
Brest-Litovsk
Again Are
Broken Oi'f
(By Associated Press.)
London, Feb. 6. Negotiations at
prest-Litovsk have been broken off,
In J- Petrograd correspondent of the
(Exchange Telegraph . says he is in
formed.
Five Buildings Of
Ind. Reformatory
Burn; Inmates
Safely Removed
(By Associated Press.) -Jtffersonville,
Feb. 6. Five of
thirteen buildings comprising the
Indiana State reformatory, burned
today with a loss estimated at a mil
lion dollars. Twelve hundred and
eighty-five prisoners were removed
safely, none trying to escape.
DAYTONA MAN FELL TO
DEATH IN AN AIRPLANE
GERMANS TAMPERED
Daytona, Feb. '6 -Weakened by
th1. injuries resulting in a fall in an
airplane, which collapsed as the re
sult of tampering by German agents
Trederlck E. Sheppard, Davtona's
first soldier victim, died in Toronto,
Can., recently.' Death i eame on the
jve of his departure for Florida,
where he was to have spent his sick
leave.
Sheppard was one of . eight men
who fell as the result of having ma
chine control wires cut by, German
arents. and was the only one to es
cape alive. He was buried with mili
tar honors in Toronto.
The news of his death shattered
many plans for a reunion made by
hW mother, Mrs. Mary A. Sheppard,
52" South Palmetto avenue, and his
fiancee, who is also a local resldenn.
Japan has a population of 54,000,
C00,' spread over an area of 147,655
ksquare miles, a territory Just a trifle
larger than the State of Montana,
hlch has a population of 446,000.
BATTLING
VERDUN
FRON
SPECULATION
IN GREEN COFFEE
BY
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. Speculation
in green coffee by the New York Cof
fee and Sugar Exchange was ordered
discontinued today by Hoover He
forbids dealing in green coffee at
price above 8 1-2 cents per pound
for type No. 7 on spot months.
PARIS INSTITUTES A "MESS"
FOR OFFICERS AT 49 CENTS
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Feb. 6. The military au
thorities at Paris have begun, some
what late, it must be admitted, to
realize that many an army officer on
special duty in Paris, especially a'
lieutenant with his $60 a month, may
ORDERED
STOPPED
HOOVER
Ship Yard Workers
Needed To Speed
Up Construction
(By Assooiated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 6. Responsibil
ity for the success or failure of the
government's ship-building program
was put on labor today by General
Manager Piez of the Emergency Fleet
Corporation, in an appeal for ship
yard workers, and the fact that the
yards are working only one shift six
dr.ys per week he characterized aa
"monstrous."
1
FLORIDA CALLED ON TO
SUPPLY A LARGE NUMBER
OF SHIP CARPENTERS
Jacksonville, Feb. 6. Florida has
been called upon, through the State
Council of Defense, to furnish three
thousand four hundred and thirty
five mechanics who can work upon
the emergency fleet this nation -is
building to overcome the handicap of
the unrestricted submarine warfare
cf the German eitemy. Three eight
hour shifts must be used in everyone
fof the seven hundred and sixteen ship
ways now devoted to government
shipbuilding, and over $1,000,000.
000 has been appropriated for the
work.
Charles Piez, manager of the Emer
gency Fleet Corporation, has sent
our. from the Washington headquar
ters an urgent appeal to every State
Council, every State Food Adminis
trator and every Navy League Chap
ter, to Immediately launch a cam
paign for ship-building volunteers
Manager Piez has issued the follow
int appeal:
' The work of the State Councils of
iDeJense and of the Agent of the
Public Service Reserve in enrolling
two hundred .'. and fifty thousand
skilled workmen for the United States
shipyard volunteers Is of paramount
Importance in the early winning of
tills; war, for Jn earnest labor de
ponds the early construction of our
merchant fleets.
"Within sixty days three huge gov
ernment yards will be completed and
soon thereafter more than sixty thou
sand workmen will be required to
f jvnlsh for them the three eight-hour
shifts necessary if thee yards are to
ti'rn out their ships according to
schedule.
"The Shipping Board now has 715
shlrways. Three hundred and two
are for wooden ships and 14 are for
sioel construction. The yards in
which they are established are only
wrrklng one eight-hour shift per day
days a week. This is monstrous.
If we are to keep ahead of the sub
marines we must run three shifts per
day fifty-two weeks in the year.
"Our program calls for the con
struction in 1918 of eight times the
tonnage delivered in 1916 at a cost
of more than a billion dollars. The
Shipping Board has the necessary
vnrds. the material and the money.
AH that is lacking Is a spirit In the
nation that will send a quarter of a
million American mechanics Into the
J7.rds to give their best and most ef
ficient work.
"We all honor the men In uniform
r
AMERICANS WILL
GET CANNED GOODS
E
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Mb. 6. An agreement has
been reached between the French
and American governments by which
canned fruit and vegetables for
American forces in France, will be
si't plied by France.
be worse off than a workingman with
?3 a day. So consequently it has
been decided to institute a mess for
officers at which they can lunch or
dine economically. The scheme will
offer a meal at 49 cents. The con
tractor will be allowed to buy his
provisions at army prices.
and the same honor must be given
the men who go to work in the yard3.
Just as the navy is the first. line of
the British Empire, and just as Ger
many depends upon her submarines,
ho must America depend upon vic
tory upon the shipbuilders in the
American yards. To the women of
America I say: .'Send your men to
the shipyards, for they will bo doing
there no less a service than In the
army or the navy, and they will be
returned to you safe and well paid
after having performed a duty that
Is a primal necessity of this war."
FOOD PROBLEM WITH
AMERICAN FORCES IN FRANCE
American Aviation Camp, Southern
Italy, Feb. 5. The food problem re
cently attained the dignity of a cris
is here. When the United States
government arranged for the training
of Americans' here, it was agreed
that five lire per day should be paid
for the feeding of each aviation of
ficer in the making, a sum equal to
advanced food prices, considering the
several hundreds of men to be fed. A
contract to feed the men was let to
a local restaurant proprietor but he
became imbued with the idea that
Americans have plenty of money and
are, anxious to spend it. For many
weeks the Americans, absorbed in
their training, accepted the food giv
en them. They merely went down in
their own pockets and patronized the
candy stores of the city, its restau
rants, but particularly the canteen
where the Italian soldiers of the
camp spent their money for drinks,
sandwiches, and omelets.
Gradually the price of canteen pro
ducts rose so high the Italian sol
diers wcre unable to patron iw it and
c.'.mplsiinod to their officers. These
latter investigated jointly with the
American officers, with the result that
canteen prices were reduced 150 per
cent, and the contractor in charge of
the American mess had to beg to be
g.vcn a chance to hold his contract.
This happened just before Christ
mas and as the Americans were being
laid off for the first time in, three
ironths, they persuaded their com
mander to let them all go to Rome
o'.d Naples and gorge themselves
There they engaged in veritable food
oigies. They bought candy and nuts
and cake by five-pound lots, retiring
to their rooms to eat after taking reg
ular restaurant meals. Some of the
nen were reported to have eaten six
.neals a day.
One of the features of the reception
iven at Rome by Thomas Nelson.
Ambassador Page and Mrs. Page at
the Palazzo del Drago to the young
men was a spread of cake and candy
weighing down several tables. Al
though all present ate freely from the
tables, their appetitltes seemed mere
ly to have been whetted, for they
were later found standing out in front
of candy stores eating more cake and
candy. Several started to mass at
St. Peter's but were unable to get
any farther than a restaurant facing
the church.
AGREEMEN
E
REACHED
WHEREBY
FRON
FRANC
Diversion of
Shipping To
The South Is
Again Being
Considered
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 6. Further steps
looking to the diversion of railroad
traffic from the most congested east
ern gateways were taken today by
McAdoo by appointing a traffic inves
tigation committee, headed by B. L.
Winchell, traffic director of the Union
P:.ciflc. T. C. Powell, Cincinnati,
vice president of the southern Rail
way, is a member of the committee.
Many Killed
When Two Trains
Went Together
At Full Speed ....
In Finland
(By Associated Press.) 1
t
London, Feb. 6 A great number
of persons were killed and injured in
i collision between a train loaded
with Red Guards and a governmen:
train sent to intercept the Red Guard
train near Kemi, Finland, according
t- an Exchange Telegrah dispatch
from Copenhagen. The trains came
together at full speed.
Pleasant Stovall
Gets Final Orders
From President
Before Sailing
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 6. Pleasant A.
Stovall, of Savannah, American min
ister to Switzerland, ' called on the
President today for a final conference
before returning to his post.
Bill Providing
Moratorium
For Soldiers
Passed Today
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Feb. 6. The soldiers
ore. sailors' civil rights bill, provid
ing for a Moratorium for men in the
m'litary establishment, was unani
mously passed today by the Senate,
virtually as passed by the Iloijse.
MI ST IM.OAD UUNS
DEPOSITED AT ( LUIS
(By Associate Press.)
London, Feb. 6. Clubs frequented
by military men home on leave have
been troubled by officers carelessly
depositing loaded revolvers in the
( loak rooms, and several of the clubs
now display a noticce reading, "Mem
bers and visitors returning from the
lror.t are requested to unload their
r'tles or pistols before leaving them
with the attendant."
Stockholm, Feb. 6 Some of Chrls
tlanstad's leading citizens do not in-
Jtcnd this year to bare their heads to
winter's biting blasts, regardless of
rules of courtesy. They published in
the city's paper a notice to the effect
that, when meeting acquaintances in
ihe street, they intend, "during the
cold season, merely to make military
salute and not remove the head cov
ering. And reque.it all to respond in
the same manner."
. rf
London, Feb. fi.The appointment
of Lord Hugh Cecil to a seat in the
King's Privy Council brings about the
unique situation of three brothers be
ing members of that honorable body
at the same time, the three being
Lord Robert Cecil, Lcrd Hugh Cecil
end the Marquis of Salisbury.
The 2,000 ton steamer, Capt W. M.
Tupper, built by the Merrill-Stevens
Co., of Jacksonville, was launched
January 1st, and will be put on tho
Tampa-New Orleans run In the fall.
In the meantime she will be in the
trans-Atlantic service.
AMERICANS
KEPT UP A
FIRING ALL
ARE MAKING IT HOT FOR THE
GERMANS; RED GUARD DE
FEATED '((By Associated Press.)
With 'American Army in France,
Tuesday,? Feb. 5. (Delayed) Amer
ican artillery kept up a c6ntinuous
tire on enemy batteries today, the
Germans responding. At the same
time American anti-aircraft guns
prevented German airmen from
crossing the lines.
(By Associated Press.)
, f'iockholmv Feb. 6. General Man
herheim's forces defeated the Red
Guards and Russians at Uleaborg
and captured the city which is the
chief military depot of northern Fin
land. The battle lasted two days and
several hundred were killed In the
fighting.
DESTROYERS? WE'LL
LEAD WORLD SOON
Washington, Feb. 6. In one week
the navy department let contracts for
more destroyers than had been built
for the American government In its
entire previous history.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels in
an interview mentioned this as part
of what ttlfa country was trying to do
in the war on the German submarines.
Secretary Daniels, if he had been
so-minded, could have added these
facts: t.-
At the "conclusion of our building
program we will have more destroy
ers than any nation In the world.
Plans nearly completed make it pos
sible to break a world's record in
turning out destroyers. Hitherto our
best time had been close to two years.
With parts being manufactured in va
rious sections of the country, the final
assembling when one big plant is
completed will take but five months.
Much of this is due to the co-opera
tion between Secretary Daniels and
Charles Schwab of the Bethlehem
Steel Co. This concern has been
turning out vast quantities of guns
and munitions for the allies.
Here is a sample of how Bethlehem
works. The navy department wanted
to let contracts for a big number of
destroyers. There were four or five
firms with plants that could do the
work. But some of them were also
pretty well loaded up with contracts
for submarines, battle cruisers and
other ships for the navy. So Schwab
practically said to Daniels:
"Let all the contracts to the other
fellow that you can, and we will un
dertake to build the balance of your
destroyers."
In order to do this it was not only
necessary to work his Massachusetts
concern, the Fore River Shipbuilding
corporation, to full capacity, as well
as his subsidiaries on the Pacific
(oast, but also to build a new plant.
Fore River has 14 ships in opera
tion, accommodating 36 keels at one
time. 01). the Pacific coast his Rid
son Iron' Works and Union Iron Works
will between them have room for over
40 keels.-' But the new plant will be
the largest, in the country, devoted
exclusively to building destroyers.
PREDICTS NEXT GOVERNOR
WILL BE A WOMAN
One of our delinquent .subscribers
in DeSolo county writes to ask if it
would not be a great thing for A
cadla if Andrew Carter were elected
governor.- Yes. it would; but it
would be mighty hard on Tallahas
see. Tallahassee Record. Don't let
a thing like that worry you, Bro.
Felkel. The next governor will be a
woman.r-Sehring White Way.
Orlando has an ambition to secure
the location of a government hospital
and a committee of citizens will hus
tle to get what is wanted.
CONTINUOUS
DAY
SDA
0

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