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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, May 16, 1918, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1918-05-16/ed-1/seq-8/

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THE EVENING TELEGRAM, LAKELAND, FLA, THURSDAY, MAY 10. 1918 nB&JSSSSi . .... ; "C
( harter So. 9811.
Reserve District A'o. 6
THE NEGRO AND THE WAR
REPOKT OF CONDITION OF THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
At Lukeland, In the State of Florida, at the Close of Business on May 10, 1918
I. Loans and
RESOURCES
discounts $759,270.25
Total loans 759,270.25
2. Overdrafts, unsecured
5. U. S. Bonds (other than Liberty Bonds, but in
cluding U. S. certificates of indebtedness):
U. S. bonds deposited to secure circulation (par
value 100,000.00
U. S. bonds and certificates of Indebtedness
pledged to secure postal savings deposits
(par value) 5,000.00
U. S. bonds and certificates of Indebtedness
owned and unpledged 75,000.00
6. Liberty Loan Bonds:
Liberty Loan Bonds, 3 per cent and 4 per cent,
unpledged 2,650.00
Liberty Loan Bonds, 3 per cent and 4 per cent,
pledged to secure State or other deposits or
bills payable 5,000,00
7. Bonds, Securities, etc. (other than U. S.) :
Bonds other than U. S. bonds pledged to secure
postal savings deposits 2,000.00
Securities other than U. S. bonds (not including
stocks) owned unpledged 8,887.81
9. Stock of Federal Reserve Bank (50 per cent of
subscription)
10. Value of banking house 62,000.00
31. Furniture and fixtures
12. Real estate owned other than banking house....
13. Lawful reserve with Federal Reserve Bank ....
15. Cash in vault and net amounts due from na
tional banks
16. Net amounts due from banks, bankers, and trust
companies other than included in Items 13
and 15
18. Checks on other banks in the same city or town
as reporting bank
Total of Items 15, 16 and 18 154.725.57
19. Checks on banks located outside of city or town
of reporting bank and other cash items....
20. Redemption fund with U. S. treasurer and due
from U. S. treasurer
21. Interest earned but not collected approximate
on notes and bills receivable not past due..
$759,270.25
4,695
180,000.00
7,650.0
10.887.81
4,500.00
62,000.00
24,000.00
11,778.12
49,265.88
140.862.60
11,632.79
2,230.18
2,128.55
5,000.00
733.00
The colored people are rallying to
the call of patriotism all over the
country. They are giving their sons,
their money, and their energies to
the task of mobilizing the Nation for
the cause of democracy. For the
Negro holds his citizenship high.
Friends of the United States are his
friends. Its foes are his foes.
The United States draws no color
line in the Army and Navy. It sum
mons Negroes to arms Just as it does
white. More than 700,000 men o'
color registered, and already 100,000
of these have been called to the train
ing camps to fit themselves for ser
vice. Thirty-six per cent, of all the Ne
groes examined were certified as phy
sically fit for the National Army, a
ratio higher than the whites can
show. In 16 cantonments scattered
throughout the Northern and South
ern States the dusky troops are being
prepared to meet the Hun.
In the old Regular Army of the
pre-war days were four colored reg
imentsthe Twenty-fourth and
Twenty-fifth Infantry and the Ninth
and Tenth Cavalry. These troops
proved their value in Cuba during the
Spanish-American War, just as they
did in the Indian campaigns on the
bolder. They are notably steady
under fire, patient to endure hard
ship, cheerful and good natured at all
times. And they can fight.
The War Department has organized
Do Your Feet Hurt ?
CONDITION of the feet has much to do with Efficiency. Rais.
ston Shoes fit and hold their, shape and give that easy, restful feel
all over. RALSTON comfort and extra wear make for cheeful
ness, efficiency and economy. Unbeatable values in Oxfords at
$5.00 to $7.50, at
The Straw Shoe Store
the Negroes for the Liberty loan and training school for workers at the
UU1CI CUWHrmi'lMVMl.w. - "
the response has been eager and en
thusiastic, an emphatic repudiation
of the German propaganda which has
attempted to stir up the colored part
of our population to sedition.
The organizations in charge of war
recreation work have not forgotten
the colored troops. As much is being
done for them pro rata as for white
soldiers.
The Commission of Training Camp
Activities, which coordinates the
work for the soldier done by the Am
erican Library Association, the Y. M.
C. A., the Knights of Columbus, the
Y. W. C. A., the Jewish Board for
Welfare Work, and other organiza-
a division of colored troops, known as J tjonSi looks 0ut for the colored
the Ninety-second. To lead these : (roops as wen as the white. The "Y"
men 750 colored officers were com- j huts and the Liberty theaters are
missioned after a course of training i0pen to all, and at Fort Funston,
LIABILITIES
24. Capital stock paid in
25. Surplus fund
26. a Undivided profits $ 29,975.74
b Less current expenses, interest, and taxes paid 18,360.89-
27. Interest and discount collected or credited, in
advance of maturity and not earned (ap
proximate) ,0. Circulating notes outstanding
H3. Net amounts due to banks, bankers, and trust
companies
, Item 33 19,157.92
.Demand Deposits (other than hank deposits)
subject to Reserve (deposits payable within
30 days):
04. Individual deposits subject to check
35. Certificates of deposit due in less than 30 days
(other than for money borrowed)
36. Certified checks
37. Cashier's checks outstanding
Total of demand deposits (other than bank
deposits) subject to Reserve, Items 34, 35,
37 and 38 582,802.69
Time Deposits Subject to Reserve (payable after
30 days, or subject to 30 days or more
notice, and postal savings) :
42. Certificates of deposit (other than for money
borrowed)
43. State, county, or other municipal deposits se
cured by pledge of assets of this bank....
44. Postal savings deposits
15. Other time deposits
Total of time deposits subject to Reserve,
Items 42, 43, 44, and 45 401,238.78
$1,271,985.13
$100,000.00
50,000.00
' 11,614.85
7,170.89
100,000.00
19,157.92
529,428.73
46,985.39
856.93
5,531.64
at Fort Dodge, Iowa. Already a
number of Negro chaplains have been
named to serve with these and more
are soon to be appointed. Three reg
iments of Artillery have been formed
and as school for Signal Corps train
ing has been organized. Howard
University, an institution for colored
people in Washington, D. C, will be
kept open this summer to supply tech
nical training to promising men, of
that race. At least 150 Negroes are
engaged in Y. M. C. A. work in the
Army. Some of these are now in
France with the troops serving under
Gen .Pershing.
Back of the actual fighting army is
the army of civilians at home. The
Negroes of the country have joined in
every activity that evinces a spirit of
patriotism. They show a whole
hearted desire to take their full share
of the war load. They support the
principles which President Wilson
where the Ninety-second division . is
stationed, a Liberty theater for col
ored troops alone is soon to be
openedj
One of the most important factors
in gingering up the troops is mass
singing, which has both a recreation
al and a military value. The singing
of a song lifts the weary men over
the last mile of a long hike and un
der the discomforts of camp life
raises the spirits and breeds com
radeship. The colored troops are the
best singers in the camps, They
have a natural gift for expression in
song, and a spontaneous originality
born of the joy they find In it. At
one camp a quartet gave "A Perfect
Day" with responses in gospel-hymn
fashion that brought down the house.
The War Camp Community Service
division, which takes care of the sol
dier in his relations to the adjoining
community, serves the soldier regard-
has defined for us, and they assume iess of color. It establishes hostess
cheerfully the burden" laid upon the homes in the cities adjoining the
camps for the use of Negro troops
75,858.23
5 0M.OO
5,356.58
315,023.97
$1,271,985.13
State of Florida, County of Polk, ss :
I, T. R. Weeks, cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear that
the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
J. R. WEEKS,
Cashier
Correst Attest:
C. M. CLAYTON,
i J. W. BRYANT,
F. A. WHITNEY,
Directors,
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of May, 1918.
LILLIAN KAUFMAN, Notary Public.
My commission expires Nov. 17, 1918.
(By Associated Press.)
Wellington, New eZaland, May 14.
The Prime Minister of New Zea
land, William F. Massey, and the Min
ister for Finance Sir Joseph Ward are
expected to leave the Domlnian for
England within a few weeks to par
ticipate in imperial deliberations in
London concerning the war. tl Is
probable that the New
country as a whole.
The way that the colored citizen
has taken hold of the Liberty loan is
encouraging. Five thousand Negroes
recently attended a patriotic meeting
in a small North Carolina town and
established a record for the quick
purchase of war saving stamps.
"This is good but not at all sur
prising," comments the Charlotte (N.
C.) Observer. "The southern Negro
has long ago proved his intense pa
triotism. In wars of the past he has
shown that his valor is second to
none, and in patriotic undertakings
in civil life he has done his part
when once that part has been made
clear to him."
The Mosaic Temple, with head
quarters in Arkansas, subscribed $25,
000 to the first Liberty loan and later
invested an additional $50,000. Re
cently Secretary McAdoo telegraphed
the Knights of Pythias of Florida, an
other colored order, his appreciation
of their subscription of $25,000 for
bonds. The Provident and Mutual
Insurance Co. of Durham, N. C, put
$5,000 of its spare funds in the loan.
No figures are available to
the total amount of bonds and war
i will travel via Canala or the United saving stamps purchased by the col-
States, ored people. As a rule they have
! bought at the banks where they did
I business, and no record has been
kept or sales made particularly to
them. But to show how extensive
Cash for Old False Teeth. Don't mat-
when off duty. Dinners, dances, and
vaudeville shows are furnished. From
Washington, for instance, each week
amateur or professional entertainers
are sent out to Camp Meade to amuse
the men. Recently the teachers of
the Dunbar High School (colored)
gave a French play and afterwards
repeated the same drama in English.
One of the purposes of the Com
munity Service is to fight the Ger
man propaganda that has been busy
trying to poison the minds of the col
ored people. This took the form of
stories that the Negro troops are to
lie sent to France first and are to be
sacrificed to save the whites. The
whisper ran that many more than the
proportionate number of colored men
had been drawn for service. Lead
ers of the Negro race went out and
answered these charges in meetings,
explaining how baseless they were.
The war council of the Y. W. C. A.
is devoting $200,000 of its $5,000,000
war budget to its work among Negro
women. The money is used to pro
vide maintenance for hostess houses
showfor the families of colored troops, for
emergency housing and recreational
work among colored girls in war in
dustrial centers, for furnishing work
ers where there is no local Y. W. C.
A., and for doing anything possible to
protect colored girls in war time. The
niuncis in Uiese nousfis holn
reation centers for Negro girls have
been opened in Washington, Brook
lyn, and New York.
The colored secretary of the na
tional board of the Y. W. C. A. has
charge of this work. Through her
the Negro women are inspired to rise
to their opportunity, and, as the
white women are likewise doing, to
maintain the wage and labor stand
ards of the men whose places they
are taking. The activity of colored
women in Red Cross and other war
work has been notable. At Washing
ton ,for an example, all Negro troops
coming from Fort Meade are met at
the trains and invited to the hostess
house at 1634 Fourteenth Street,
where food, amusements, reading
matter, entertainment, and beds are
supplied to the boys on furlough.
The war has brought to the Negro
a better chance for national self-ex-l
ression than any event in his his
tory, and he is making the most of
his opportunity. Much of the best
, One of the visitors in Miami duris
the U. D. C. convention reported thj
there are only 126 students enrolls
at the University of Florida. TM
should give about four students to
taient of the race has been absorbed professor. Miami Metropolis.
in meeting the need caused by speej
mg up war industries. Graduatei
colleges and technical schools havi
found a ready field for the use
iL,l 1 1 1 1
uitir niiuwieuge ana trained sktl
jne aemana ror eaucated Negrod
has exceeded the supply.
No such Impetus has ever befor
been given to education for the Ni
gro. It is true that the illiteracy
the race has decreased from 90 pi
cent at the close of the civil war
6 per ceni ioaay, dui tne necessitf
of wiping out ignorance has bee
called sharply to our attention by
demands wnicn tne war is matin
upon our man power. The prop;
training of the Negro Is a problei
which concerns both races. To lea?
one-third of the colored people und
yeloped is failure to utilize the
sources of the Nation.
INDIAN BEACH HOTEL
NOW UNDER MANAGEMENT OF GEORGE LIZOTTE
DRIVE OVER IN YOUR CAR AND ENJOY ONE OF LIZOTTE'S
FAMOUS SHORE DINNERS AND THE FINE 8URF BATHING.
THE PLACE TO SPEND YOUR SUMMER VACATION.
WRITE FOR RESERVATION TO GEO. LIZOTTE, ANONA, FLA.
ter If broken. I pay $2.00 to $15.00 per;thesfi . ' may mpnHnn(1(, women relatives of n i L ...
set also cash for old gold, silver vthat Amo Qf philadelphia ha9vlce and encourage them to take ad
ChrZiSS.'014 t0 date bndS 10 the Va,Ue of-ageofthe unprecedented
and wmlid 7? rJSli-r..u,Mi moo to neEroes of thatr;wnreiin:he indu8tr,ai m
"-""y. i . xiiuijf camps already
Both white and colored speakers i nave hostess houses
er's approval of my price. Mail to L.
Zealanders Mazer, 2007 S. 5th St.. Phila., Pa. .
for colored
have toured the country to enthuse I troops. The one at Camp Upton is a
Long Mileage Repairs
Are Business Builders
YOU KNOW OUR REPUTATION 18 WELL ESTABLISHED WHEN
IT COMES TO GIVING SATISFACTION
IN TIRE REPAIRING,
Our Retreads have made as
high as 10,000 miles: Why?
Because we have only the BEST
equipped plant and experienced workmen.
DON'T THROW AWAY A TIRE THAT STILL HAS MILEAGb III
IT. SEE U8 FIRST
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF GUARANTEED TIRES
AS WELL A3 "SECONDS"
FORD SIZES, $9.00 AND $12.50
OPPOSITE CASINO THEATER
PHONE Sff
StandardTire and Vulcanizing Ctf
I
J
RUTHERFORD'S
Ice Cream: Strawberry, Peach, Vanilla, Pistachio; ChnmUt?
Fresh Pineapple Sherbet, Ice Cooling Drinks
Dainty Lunches, Fine Sandwiches. We Deliver Cream to All Parts of Town
Telephone No. 362 r Th c , n'
I i r" : : :

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