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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, July 02, 1918, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95047222/1918-07-02/ed-1/seq-7/

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HUB EVENING TELEGRAM, 1AKHLAND, FLA., TUESDAY, JULY 2, 191S
Florida Field Notes
G.
TnvArnnaa. A 20-acre melon
raE '.ear Inverness will net the growers
lore than $2,000.
Starke.--The growing of peaches Is
iaPn-ecoming one of the leading indus
ly henries In the southern part of the coun
ty y. The land Is a light sandy loam
tumtjrtth numerous lakes and Inclined to
'He rolling.' Many small groves are be
1 mating developed, and experienced grow
1Ptloa.irs believe the trees will bear for 12
resouseari. ; .
Aro?; Fort Lauderdale. A canning fac
ultantory located at Dania Is turning out
Bnd! 6,000 cans daily of tomato paste,
an he!;ach' can weighing six and one-quar-er
ounces. Farmers are flaring on
E Aoieagjng tomatoes for the factory in
38 Head of the regular markets.
their
patch Mound in nearly every citrus grov In
the state. Trees that are weakened
from overbearing, lack of food,
drought, freezing, or any other cause.
are apt to be attacked. The disease
not only attacks the vegetable por
tions of the tree, but it causes an
thracnose spotting of the fruit. The
fungus which causes withertip fruits
on dead wood; consequently the pres
ence of dead wood in the grove is dangerous.
Cocoa A large percentage of the
lammock groves have Bet fruit and
xe still holding the best crop in sev
nu8t iral yeari. The prospects were never
ts; ot tetter for good returns on fruit next
be a reason..
8. Gainesville. Plan now for the safe
torage of sweet potatoes in some
Hl2iodern storage house, where they
an be kept for winter and spring
tarket, without loss from rotting.
Tweet potato storage houses have
een erected in some parts of the
tate from plans furnished by the Unl
ersity of Florida extension division,
nd they worked successfully. Wher
ver the crop is sufficiently large at
sntTbn should be given to the storage
roblem.
Gainesville. Summer pruning is an
fflclent Vay to conserve the resourc
s of the peach tree, says W. L. Floyd
f the University of Florida College
f Agriculture. Pruning soon after the
I, Fli roductlon of a crop will cause all the
trength to go into the remaining
food and the fruit buds that are de-
eloped on the limbs left on the tree,
"his will make for a few healthy
nds which will give a better crop
ban If the tree is compelled to devel
p buds on all the new wood.
There is little danger of injuring
tie tree by summer pruning if ordln
ry care is used and if pruning is not
severe.
Talnesvllle. Withertip is an enemy
H. E. Stevens of the University of
Florida experiment station, recom
mends pruning as a precautionary
measure against the disease. June and
probably July are the best summer
months In which to do this pruning.
Injury from pruning at this time Is
less likely to occur. Of course, the
best time to prune is what the tree is
most nearly dormant, but if the dis
ease is in the grove the grower can
not afford to wait.
All dead and diseased wood should
be taken out. In bad cases it will be
necessary to prune severely and in
some cases it will be necessary to sec
iflce bearing wood. Trees which
have been pruned severely neer extra
care and it may not be amiss to ap
ply fertilizers to stimulate growth.
No stub should be left where a
branch is cut off. Stubs will not heal
well and will eventually leave dead
tissue open to infection which will
give the fungus a chance to fsuit
again. The cut should be made clean
and parallel with the long axis of the
supporting branch. This will make a
larger wound than If the cut is made
across the branch in pruning, but it
will heal sooner and be less likely to
become diseased. All large wounds
should be painted with a good anti
septic, such as white-lead paint or
carbolineum, to protect the surface
while it is healing.
A group of retail grocers in Van
couver, B. C, recently conducted a
campaign of advertising to educate
the public to the desirability of using
whale meat.
iest
md
rld
3rd
Must Little Homeless
Children Suffer
In Florida?
WE DO NOT BELIEVE that the good people ot
Florida realize that there are right sow tn our State Hub
dreds of little Children in real need seme absolutely
homeless that just must be cared for.
We feel sure that they do net know that there are
hundreds of worthy mothers in Florida who are Just strug
gling to keep their little ones alive and at home.
We cannot believe that with these facta trueand
every orphanage in Florida crowded to the doers that
the people of Florida will let our great work whloh has
eared for 660 of these little ones this year aloae go town
for lack of funda to keep it up. Your immediate hetp Is
greatly needed right now Please sead what you can
today to R. V. Covington, Treasurer of
The Children's Home Society
of Florida
Floritta's Greatest Oharrty
; 8T. JAMES BUILDING JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
WHY NOT RAISE
LEMONS IX FLORIDA
There are probably several reasons
to offer when some one asks, "Why
doesn't Florida raise lemons?" and all
may have been fairly good reasons in
time gone by. Just now there should
be only one excuse accepted as satis
factory, if it can be offered, and that
a positive statement to the effect that
lemons will not grow in Florida. Of
course if the acid fruit that has such
a call upon the public in all the walks
of life cannot be grown in the State
the other excuses, for instance-?, that
citrus lands can be put to better use
growing oranges and grapefruit, and
another, perhaps, that lemons grow
plentifully in Sicily and other places
near by and cost less to import than
to raise, can be overlooked.
As long as we get plenty of lemon3
from foreign ports the public takes
little heed of the fact that this most
popular member of the citrus fruit
family is not a home product. But
there have been times, before the war,
when lemons wre escarce and high
priced in the United States, and now,
since the enemy submarines are op
erating in the Mediterranean it has
happened more frequently. The ships
that come and go are largely em
ployed in carrying what are known
as essentials and while lemons are
used to a greater or less extent in
practically every home in this country
they are not listed as necessities.
It may be that some men have tried
to raise lemons in Florida and have
had bad luck with them. We do not
mean the huge, thick-skinned kinds
that would have to he sold by the ton
and delivered by freight, but refer to
"regular" lemons; the egg-shaped,
thin-skinned ones, full of juice and
health and satisfaction. Some of our
varied soils may not be good for the
lemon tree, but we have many kinds
of lands in the state and our climate
so nearly approaches that of Sicily
in some sections, suggesting that ex
periments could find just the place to
grow real, fine lemons in abundance.
Within a few years past growers of
oranges and grapefruit have some
times looked with dismay upon bum
per crops maturing in their groves,
fearing an overstocked market and
low prices. If they had lemons to
offer there would never be any wor
ry, for the demand is universal and
steady.
At present in the real American
home of citrus fruits, lemons are sell
ing at Ave cents each, and the tiny
shriveled up specimens offered are
hardly worth taking home, being but
a trifle larger than the nickel that is
taken by the dealer. Worst of all
few dealers have any at all, and none
can tell when there will be another
supply received. Everybody uses lem
ons and there are practically none to
be had in this section . Why not raise
them? Times Union.
a
THE "LONDOX TRANSPORT
COLUMN" OF TnE RED CROSS
re
These Are Only Four of the Many Sweetly Simple Styles
Suitable (or Making Gingham Dreasea
Illustrated in THE .FASHION BOOK FOR SUMMER
1 COM
) i. IS nnu 25 cQt 2b wnu
Over 600 of the Newest nd Smartest Designs to Select from
PICTORIAL REVIEW PATTERNS for JUNE now ready
(By Associated Press.)
London, July 2. Shortly before the
arrival of a train of wounded at any
of the London railway stations, morn
ing, afternoon or night, a small group
of men in navy blue uniform may be
seen passing through the gates onto
the platform. They are members of
the "London Transport Column" of
the Red Cross, and they have unload
ed every train of wounded that has
reached London since the war be
gan.
Their duties consist of the transfer
of the wounded men from the trains
to the stretchers and thence to the
ambulances which take them to the
various London and suburban hospi
f tals. Speed and skill are the essen
ttials of the work ot these men, and
they have become experts through
Jong training, assiduous practice and
a thorough knowledge of flrst-aid
principles. Many of the cases brought
to London are what is known as "spe
cial" and have to be handled with
skill and care owing to the nature of
their injuries. In spite of this, trains
containing several hundred cot cases
are unloaded in a half hour or less,
The London Transport Column was
organized in August, 1917, by volun
teers from the staffs of the big Lon
don insurance companies. The Col
umn numbers about 1,000 men, all of
them business men In good positoin
who volunteered to give two days a
week to the work, and to hold them
selves in reserve for a third day each
week. Their work takes them from
one railway station to another, awl
they are often on continuous duty for
twelve to fourteen hours.
AJr raids make no difference. Man;.'
a train has been unloaded during a
beavy barrage. During a recent air
raid on London several trains of
wounded were stopped at a siding in
the suburbs and unloaded in compete
darkness, the wounded being carried
to safety in a tunnel nearby, where
they remained until it was safe to
send the ambulances out for tbem.
The Transport men have been on
special duty in every Zeppelin air
plane raid on London. Every member
'of the corps Is subject to call in an
The Lakeland
Evening Telegram
EVERY I88UE OF THE EVENING TELEGRAM 18 A COMPEN
DIUM OF ALL THE NEW8, BOTH LOCAL AND FOREIGN.
IN A CONCISE AND CONDEN8ED FORM, IT GIVE8 THE
HAPPENING8 OF THE CITY OF LAKELAND AND 8URROUNDING
COUNTRY WHEN IT HAPPENS.
The only paper in Polk
County taking Associated
Press Dispatches or Tele
graph of any kind,
THEREBY GIVING IT8 READERS THE BENEFIT8 OF THE
NEWS OF THE NATION SEVERAL HOURS IN ADVANCEOF ANY
OTHER PAPER IN SOUTH FLORIDA.
The Lakeland News
Lakeland's Oldest Newspaper
THE PAPER THAT FOR A GENERATION HA8 TOLD THE
STORY OF LAKELAND, THAT HA8 CHRONICLED THE
BIRTHS OF CHILDREN, OF WHOM LATER IT TOLD OF
THEIR WEDDINGS; THE PAPER THAT EVER SINCE THERE
WAS A TOWN HA8 BEEN INTERWOVEN IN IT8 HI8TORY.
MORE PEOPLE HAVE BEEN BROUGHT TO LAKELAND
THROUGH READING THE LAKELAND NEW8 PERHAP8 THAN
THROUGH ANY OTHER AGENCY. EVERY WEEK 80ME HUN
DREDS OF COPIES GO OUT OF THE STATE, THE REMAINDER
OF IT8 LARGE CIRCULATION GOING TO THE NEIGHBORING
TOWNS AND VILLAQE8, AND REACING PRACTICALLY EVERY
FARMER AND GROWER IN THE CENTRAL AND NORTHERN
PORTIONS OF POLK COUNTY.
It is a splendid advertising
medium so recognezed by
the big national advertisers
who use it regularly.
IT IS JUST THE THING FOR THE PERSON WHO LIVES AT
A DISTANCEND DESIRES TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH THIS
SECTION'S PROGRESS AND HAPPEnTngs! " '
THE WEEKLY NEWS, ISSUED FROM THE TELEGRAM OF
FICE HAS THE LARGEST SUBSCRIPTION OF ANY PAPER IN
VICINITY, BEING DEVOTED TO THE INTEREST OF THE FARM
ER AND FRUIT GROWER.
Notbetter medium is in reach of the merchant
or business man to get before the public of
Til" a a
Honaa ana many aajomtng states.
11
emergency of this kind.

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