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The Lakeland evening telegram. (Lakeland, Fla.) 1911-1922, October 09, 1918, Image 1

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The Lakeland Evening Telegram
PUBLISHED IN THE BEST TOWN IN THE BEST PART OP THE BEST STAtT
BOOST REMEMBER THAT 8 AT AN 8TAYED IN HEAVEN UNTIL HE BEGAN TO KNOCK HIS HOME TOWM
TOLUHE TIL
LAKELAND, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9, 1918
No. m
GAMBRAI HAS BEEN TAKEN BY BRITISH;
ENEMY EVACUATE ARGONNE FOREST
8.000 PRISONERS TAKEN
YESTERDAY: ENEMY SMOTHERED
WITH DELUGE OF STEEL
AND
HIGH
MIKE
mm
ENEMY IS PUSHED BACK THOUGH
MAKING STERN RESISTANCE ON
CHAMPAGNE FRONT
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Oct. 9. Eight thotibf.nd
Germans were taken prisoners yes
terday by the Allied forces on the va
rious fronts, says Marcel Butin in the
Echo De Paris. The Germans, he
adds, have hurriedly evacuated the
Argonne forest and the battle is con
tinuing. (By Associated Press.)
London.Oct. 9. The city of Cam
brai has een captured by the British
with eight thousand prisoners, it is of
ficially announced. The Anglo-American
attack -was resumed this morning
and rapid progress was being made
last night. Additional progress is
being made east of Pequesral and to
wards Bohian Maretz, south of Cam
era). The British captured Forene
ville and have reached the western
outskirts of Walicoth. Their attack
this morning was on the front of the
Third and Fourth armies and began
at 5:30 o'clock.
Heavy Fighting
(By Associated Press.)'
With Anglo-American Armies Near
St. Quentin, Oct. 9. Heavy fighting
continued throughout the night on the
Cambrai-St. Quentin front and the
British and Americans continued their
progress of Tuesday under heavy pro
tective fire from the British artillery.
They defeated the enemy who was
almost smothered under the great
deluge of steel, and explosives. A
large number of guns have been cap
tured in addition to great batches of
prisoners who continue to arrive at
the cages.
The Americans alone captured two
complete field batteries and a bat
tery of heavy artillery. The Amer'
cans captured their guns Tuesday af
ternoon when they suddenly out
flanked them, on both ends of the val
ley south of Premont, capturing all
cf the German guns there.
Driving the Enemy Back
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Oct. 9. The Ameri
can and French troops are steadily
driving the enemy from the scene of
the desperate struggles for Verdun,
it was reported today In the com
munique for yesterday announcing
the advance of both sides on the
Meuse. They captured more .than
three thousand prisoners during the
mree wousand prisoners during we
r and are also reported to have
captured Coorway against the stub
born fighting in their continued ad
vance in the Argonne forest.
Capture Important Defenses
(By Associated Press.)
Paris. Oct. 9. The French at-
Quentin captured the German de-
! a
"uses oeiween Hariey. iseuvane '
St im..j 3 ... ,v.
-- uiau ana urove pasi iuc
town on the north, it Is officially an
nounced. Americans Go Forward
(By Associated PresO
With the Americans Northwest of
Verdun. Tuesday night. Oct. 8.
The Americans drove forward today
011 the east side of the Meuse an
occupied Charney; In company with
EXPLOSIVES
the French they captured the villages
of Conceilveye, Bradant, Haumont and
Deaumont and drove the enemy well
beyond these towns. They have
pushed him northward in desperaU
fighting in today's operations. More
than three thousand prisoners have
been taken. American unim have
captured four hundred prisoners and
four Austrian field guns.
Enemy Is Counter-Attacking
(By Associated Prut.)
London, Oct. 9. (1:00 p. m.) The
Germans are today counter-attacking
heavily on the Sulppe river. On the
front in Champalgne the French have
not been able to make much progress.
AVIATOR'S MEDALS WILL
BE GIYEN TO HIS TOWN
New Haven, Conn., Oct. 9. Medals
which Major Raoul Lufbery, the no
ted American aviator and ace who
was shot down on the western front
last spring, had received during his
flying career, probably will be given
to Wailingford. Conn., the home of
his parents. This is the indention
expressed by Edward Lufbery, the
aviator's father.
OF
(By Associated Press.)
London, Oct. 9. The Turkish pre
mier, Tala"at Pasha, has resigned, and
has been succeeded by Tewfik Pasha
former premier and ex-ambassador to
London. The dispatches state that
the minister of war, Enver Pasha
also has resigned.
AMERICAN PEOPLE
MISJUDGED IX HOLLAND
Amsterdam, Oct. 9. Hollanders
have been told by their friends in the
United States that American opinion
is undergoing a change adverse tj
Holland. To combat this a Nether
lands society is preparing to 3end a
special mission to America in the
hope of more firmly cementing the
friendship of the two nations.
Friends of Holland in the United
States, according to the Handelsblad,
which is regarded as the leading
newspaper' in the kingdom, have sent,
word to Holland that the feeling in
America is that the people of the
Netherlands seem "indifferent" to the
tremendous issues of the war.
The paper declares that the con
sensus of American opinion U that
the Dutch fail to appreciate the pur
ity of America's motives, that the
Houanaera mm - --- ,
j keep out of the war and enrich t em-,
trnonora think or notning out io
keep out or tne war aim cum." ."
selves and that the loudness 'of their
. i
mteata airainst any inconveniences
they may have suffered as a result
of Entente war measures is not pro-
rortionate to the moderateness of
i their complaints against Germany's
I crimes on land and sea.
I tip nPwsDaner freely admits
thit
( there is good o,md fr reproach
"XfanT nprsons in Holland, it says
i - inoH.w states
"Mudee the war and the leading states
- .,,, neel-
.ati at rnp vanuur v uum.. -.
any Amem-. ... - . i
tious. even cynicai spun
wni' n
calculated to grieve Americans sore
iv America can Justly expect Holland
to believe in the good faith of 1 dec
it entered the wir not
laration that
from egotistical or selfish purposes
but to free the world from the rancer
of militaristic imperialism
TURKISH
PREMIER
AND
WAR
HAVE
RESIGNED
RES
ISTANCE
FROM ENEMY NOf
SO HEAVY TODAY
(By Associated Press.)
London, Oct. 9. (1:15 p. m.)
The British advance along the front
between Cambrai and St. Quentin is
proceeding well today all along the
line. There is not so much enemy
resistance as yesterday In the Amer
ican sector. " On this front the Ger
mans are resisting strongly. Ameri
can losses, however, have not been
heavy.
SHELL SHOCK BRINGS
HAIR TO BALD HEAD
St. Petersburg, Oct. 9. The follow
ing communication has been received
by J. F. Girard, from A. L. Mitchell,
formerly auditor for the Investment
company and the city of Pass-a-Grillu.
Mr. Girard has an extensive bald area
on his head. The card reads:
"I hope the attached may be of in-
ENCOUNTERED
At Present Rate Liberty
Loan Quota Will Not
Be Reached By Oct. 19
(By Associated frees.)
Washington, Oct. 9. "At the pres
ent rate or going with the present
average per capita subscriptions,"
says the treasury loan review today,
"the Fourth Liberty Loan may not
reach the desired goal within the al
lotted time."
AMERICAN AVIATORS
READY ON ARRIVAL FOR
BOMBARDMENT WORK
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Oct. 8. r-Americans who Join
French escadrilles, can from the mo
ment of their arrival take part in
bombarding expeditions, thanks to the
sound training they have received,
say French aviation authorities . Th?
work of a single group, that under
Major Vuillemin, may be taken to il
lustrate this statement.
During the bombardment of a battle-field,
Second Lieutenant Bonnh.
the observation officer having been
killed, his pilot, Second Lieutenant
Halley, an American, although him
self severely wounded in the arm, suc
ceeded in bringing the body of his t
companion back into the French lines.
Halley brought down a German plane
that day.
Second Lieutenant Lloyd Scl aeffer
observation officer, was severely
wounded in a fight, gaining a cita
tion which spoke of him as "an Amer
ican observation officer of the very
first rank, giving fresh proofs of
courage and admirable coolness each
day. In full battle he carried out J
fifteen bombardments at low altl
tude."
Major Vuillemin has cited Harold
Wilson Andrews, Second Lieutenant
observation officer, as "remarkable
for dash, and skill. Always in he
. .. . to morl
breach ' '
offen-
- - - (
jstve. he has taken part In several:
ATifa TTa rotitrnpH frnm nnfl with
flehts. He returned from one wifr.
19 shell splinters In his plane." An
drews was attacked in one instance
by 18 enemy machines but succeeded
in getting away. The next day he
brought down an enemy plane.
"Officer pilot of great courage and
high consclentousness," says a cita
tion of Lieutenant Edward King Mac
Donald, who took part in ten battle
field bombardments daring the fight
ing on the Aisne and in Picard'.e Twc
.,,, ra t him
vsviui icn v .......
Lieutenant
Pilot William Hoeveler,
after several months' work with the
American ambulance, enlisted in the
eviatlon, won a citation for his work
in mine DomDarnmems on me nnuie
field. Having brought down an enemy
in ore fght. he returned with nine
mfHk At TROOPS III FRANCE
raw PLEASED WITH PRESIDENT'S
(By Associated Press.)
Stockholm, Oct. 9. Alexandorla F.
Trepoff, former Russian premier, has
been shot, according to Petrograd ad
vices. Trepoff resigned as premier In Jan
uary, 1917, after serving less than
three months.
terest to you."
Attacked is a newspaper clipping.
It says:
"It the story related by Harry
Vane, who is in France, is to be be
lieved, the crash of cannon, shriek of
high explosive shells and the burst
ing of shrapnel is the best hair restor
er on the market today. Frank Na
than is in receipt of a letter from
Vane, who tells of an American sol
dier who entered the conflict as bald
as an egg. He had been in several
hot fights, and today he has a fine
Crop of hair.
bullets in his machine.
Lieutenant Pilot John Glover Is an
other American cited by Major Vuil
lemin as "always ready to start, and
always volunteering, has given every
day fresh proofs of the wonderful
qualities of his race."
GALA DAY FOR SLAVIC
TROOPS AT CAMP MEADE
v Washington, Oct. 8. To bring the
families of the non-English-speaking
soldiers into closer touch with the
Ufa of their "boys in khaki" In the
camps, and to pay respect to the great
nations fighting with us, the com
manding officer of the Development
Battalions at Camp Meade, Md., has
set aside Sunday, Oct. 13, as the first
of a series of gala days for the vari
ous nationalities represented in our
"foreign legions." It will he an "open
day" In camp, from 2 p. m. on, for
the home-folks of these soldiers, with
no passes necessary for admittance
and with an Intensely Interesting pro
gram. Primarily the celebration is for the
Slavs, with addresses by Ignaco Pad
erewskl, the great Polish musician,
and Dr. Thomas G. Masaryk, leader
of the Czechoslovaks. There will be
a parade of the battalion of the so
called "foreign legions," so that their
own people may see how quickly and
effectively they have been made into
first-class fighting men. Later !n the
afternoon, there will be a coinpeti-
tlve dri11 between the Slavlc com-
panies
The National Bohemian Alliance
and the War Camp Community Serv
ice will contribute a number of In
teresting numbers to the program
Slavic dances by girls in native cos
tume, native songs by various Slavic
singing societies, and famous gym
nastic teams of Czechoslovaks from
Baltimore will Impart a picturesque
note to the events of the day. A
Bohemian cake called "kolach" and
other Slav dishes will be served free
to more than 3,000 civilian guUs.
That the non-English-speaking sol
dier is rapidly becoming a large aw'
powerful factor In our Army is ap
parent, but he needs a "line of com
munication," so to speak, with his
home-folks, while he still remains in
camp. This Slavic gala day ol Oct.
13 is but the first of many similar
opportunities which the army autho'
ities plan to provide for that purpose
Freemen
them.
buy bonds; slaves wea.'
REPLY: WANT
WITH MANS ALLIED SOIL
GERMAN WAR MARRIAGES
PRODUCE MANY DIVORCES
(By Associated Press.)
New York, Oct. 9. Restriction of
war marriages in Germany If de
manded by the New Saxon Church
Paper. The material advantages
which a young woman obtains by the
war marriage are so alluring that
only a few resist the lure, says the
paper, adding: "The war divorces
throw a bad light on the moral con
ditions in our people. They have not
been numerous thus far but we tear
that they will increase after the war "
According to the Cologne Gazette
seven hundred actions for divorce
were begun within a period of four
months before one court In Berlin
JERICHO NOT A
LAND OF PURE DELIGHT
(By Associated Press.)
Jerusalem, Oct. 8. Allied soldiers
In the valley of the Jordan know now
how really unkind were persons who,
In pre-war days, "wlBhed them in
Jericho." To these fighting men, Jer
lcho and its dust-covered environs
mean heat, flies, mosquitoes and
snakes, mildly advertised by the
Turks in this message set up opposite
the British lines: "Don't fear an of
fensive from us; We will come over
later when you are all dead."
This summer, day after day, army
thermometers along the Jordan reg
istered from 105 to 125. Yet with
scarcely a breeze, and these dust-la
den, the Australian and New Zealand
horsemen holding these lines, bring
Ing from a temperate climate a re
serve of health and vigor lacking In
the natives, withstood the ordeal. It
la the second or third summer that
tells.
The files and mosquitoes of the val
ley know no pity. In the early days
of the fighting, when It was Impos
sible to take the necessary sanitary
precautions, they bred In myriads,
but now pools of stagnant water have
been eliminated and large tracts of
scrub burned. As a result, the num
ber of malaria cases has been sur
prlslngly low.
Of the minor evils, the snakes are
the worst, but, due to the precau
tions taken by officers and men
casualties from snake bites have
been comparatively insignificant, de
spite the number of the reptiles and
their venomous species.
One captured Turk had been at
tacked and bitten by a serpent four
feet long, and as he lay on his cot In
a British hospital, he told how he
had strangled the reptile and then
fainted. His nerves were shattered
by the Incident, and medical officers
said It would be years before they
were again normal.
(By Associated Press.)
Dublin, Oct. 9. Construction bv
the government of model homes for
the families of 27,000 Dublin work-
ingmen Is recommended in a report
Just published here by Chief Erpri
neering Inspector Cowan of the Lo
cal Government Board, appointed bv
the government to solve the serious
housing problem.
The proposal Involves an expendi
ture of 9,000,000 pounds and calls for
the erection of 16.000 new buildings,
and the reconstruction of nearly 4.000
old tenements.
The problem of housing the work
ing classes long has been a serlon?
one here, and there has been much
discontent because of poor living con
ditions. Rome twenty thousand families,
cr nearly one-third of the city's pop-
IARRE
BRITISH
ARE
SATISFIED
VITH
E
THE REPLY IS REGARDED AS
CLEVER AND LOGICAL BY DIP
LOMATS (By Associated Press.)
With American Forces in France.
Oct. 9. ThePresident's reply to the
German peace proposal reached the
rear lines of the Americans this
morning. The general tone of the
rank and file cqmment was quiet sat
isfaction in that no armistice shall be
granted while enemy troops are on
Allied soil.
(By Associated Press.)
London, Oct. 9. In diplomatic cir
cles here Wilson's reply to the German
chancellor Is regarded as clever and
logical .
LIGHT TANK MOST
EFFICIENT WEAPON IN
USE BY ALLIES
(By Associated Press.)
With the French Armies, Oct. 9.--The
armored caterpillar motor car or
"tank," which is now In high favor
as an engine of assault against the
enemies' lines, almost fell into dis
credit In France In 1917. The mOBt
successful type has been the new
lighter car with a swinging turret
from which an Inch and a half cali
ber cannon or a machine gun can,
fire in any direction.
While the British were manufactur
ing their immense, heavy "tanks," the
French, without knowing of the work
their allies were doing, experimented
with lighter cars, one type weighing
13 tons and another 23 tons. The 13
ton cars made their appearance in
April, 1917, taking part In the French
offensive between Rheims and the
Aisne, as an experiment.
The losses appeared to be excessive
and the report spread that they
caught fire every time they were hit
by a projectile. The death of Com
mandant Bossut while leading an as
sault with one of the cars created a
profound impression.
Two later operations, however,
modified the military opinion regard
ing them and they proved to be most
effective.
During the winter other experi
ments were made and toward the last
of May,-1918, the light "tanks" mado
their appearance on the battlefield in
greater numbers. They were as
signed to the defense of the forest of
Villers-Cotterets when the Germans
made their rush between Soissons
and Rheims. During the first fifteen
days of June they made more than
twenty counterattacks and kept the
forest clear of the enemy. The med
ium weight cars In the meantime
helped the Americans take Cantlgny.
Their first spectacular feat was in
mobilizing In twelve hours south of
Montdidier to precede the Infantry in
a successful counter-attack that stop
ped the advance of the Germcns on
the Montdidier-Noyon line.
These and subsequent successes
convinced the French military au
thorities that the light "tank" was an
effective and efficient arm.
ulatlon, live in single rooms.
Mr. Cowan's report recommend?
the erection by the government of
IG.000 self-contained homes In the su
burbs near car lines.
ho

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